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The IB Diploma Handbook 2011-2012 (revised)

YCIS Beijing is fully recognized and accredited by:


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Table of Contents 1. A Message from the Co-Principals……………………………………..……………

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2. Philosophy and Objectives………………………………………………..…………… Page 4 3. YCEF Mission Statement and Motto……….…………………………..………….... Page 5 4. IB Mission Statement and Learner Profile ………………………………………....

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6. The Yew Chung International Curriculum ……….…………………………………

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7. Overview of the Diploma Programme…………………………………………..….…. Page 8 8. Recognition of the IB diploma……………………………………………………..…

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9. Assessment Policy…………………………….…………………………………..….. Page 10 10. IB Results…………………………………………………………………………..….. Page 12 11. University Offers and Placements ……………………………………………………Page 13 12. The Curriculum………………………………………………………………..………. Page 14 13. Selecting Subjects……………………………………………………………………. Page 15 14. The three Core Requirements………………………………………….…………… Page 16 15. Diploma Award Information…………………………………..………...…………... Page 17 16. Individual Subjects…………………………………………………………….……… Page 18 17. Grades and descriptors……………………………………………………………… Page 26 18. Authenticity of Student Work…..…….…………………………………………..…. Page 27 19. Conditions for the award of the IB Diploma …..…….…………………………..…. Page 28 20. Contact Information………………………………………………………………….., Page 29

YCIS Beijing Academic Excellence Promoting Leadership Potential Committed to Global Education Caring Community through our Mentoring and Pastoral Support Programmes

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A Message from the Co-Principals 校长致词 Dear Parents, It is our pleasure to welcome you to the 2011/2012 academic year. To our new families, welcome and thank you for choosing YCIS, we hope that your stay with us will be a valuable time. To our returning parents and students, thank you again, and we believe that the firm foundation laid down in previous years will assist you and your child/ren to continue to grow and develop at YCIS. As we enter a new school year the partnership we build together will allow us to work hand in hand to educate your child/ren in a caring and safe learning environment. Together we will offer a strong and dedicated administrative team as we progress into yet another exciting year of growth and development. It is the aim of our highly dedicated office team to meet your every need. The Yew Chung Education Foundation has invested considerable efforts into the resources and facilities of which we believe the quality of education will be enhanced and that both student and teacher will learn in a vibrant and challenging environment. This handbook provides you with detailed information on numerous aspects of the school’s Secondary programmes. Please take the time to read through this handbook and become familiar with all the curriculum requirements and school procedures which allows us to operate in an efficient manner. If you are unsure of any aspect, please do not hesitate contacting our staff for any clarification. Apart from the contents of this handbook we produce a bi-weekly newsletter which provides valuable information on the many activities that occur throughout the school year. We also post the newsletter on our website which is accessible on www.ycis-bj.com. Further information is also provided at various meetings throughout the year. May we highly encourage you to attend these meetings to keep abreast of what is happening in our school, and keep in contact with your son/daughter’s teachers and learning. We hope that this year will be another enjoyable year in the growth and development of your son / daughter’s future at Yew Chung International of Beijing. Best regards,

Wayne Richardson Co-Principal

Christine Xu Co-Principal

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 3 of 30


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Philosophy and Objectives 理念与目标 Yew Chung International School (YCIS) has pioneered a new paradigm in international education. We define an international education by what goes on inside the student. It is about the internal transformation of the child. This is affected by the international school’s culture, which is created by the teaching and learning environment, the administration, the overall content and process which links to the character formation of the child. The international education ethos that Yew Chung reflects can be seen in the content and process of education that leads our students to an inner transformation whereby they are both Eastern and Western. 耀中为国际教育奠立了新的范例。我们创设的教学环境、行政管理和课程内容,让学生在校园的国际文化 氛围中,潜移默化,成就相容东西文化的独立人格。 Yew Chung is committed to educate the whole person from infancy through secondary education. We strive to unite the best elements of Eastern and Western traditions and practices, the growth of the individual and the inquiring mind as well as develop a sense of personal responsibility and social welfare of all. The Yew Chung international curriculum is designed to be developmentally appropriate for each age level, rooted in bilingual education in multicultural environments utilizing instructional and information technology, fusing both Western and Chinese philosophies for character formation. Our holistic approach to education involves cooperation with parents, family, community and world around us. 耀中致力提供从婴幼儿至中学阶段的全人教育。我们努力不懈,撷取东西文化的精粹,将学生培育为勇于 探索、具备责任感和公民意识的社会栋梁。耀中的国际课程,以双语及多元文化教育为经,以揉合中、西 哲理为纬,适应不同年龄段的学习特点,配合现代信息科技及教学策略,培育学生的优良品格。我们的全 人教育,非常重视家长、家庭、小区及周遭社群的通力合作。 Yew Chung’s educational objectives are to: 耀中的教育目标,包括: o o o

o

o

o

o

o

Provide a holistic education that nurtures the whole person 提供培养学生全面发展的全人教育; Promote multiple-intelligence development to allow students to develop their own individual talents 提倡多元智能发展,让学生能发展其各自的才能; Uphold moral and spiritual values based on Christian faith, affirming the worth and dignity of each individual while instilling in each student a caring attitude towards people and the environment 倡导建基于基督信仰的道德及精神价值,在确认个人价值及尊严的同时,教导学生关怀他人及爱护环境; Nurture in each student an open outlook in life, respect for cultural diversity and the beliefs and values of all people, and a sense of commitment and social responsibility 培养学生广阔的胸襟,能够尊重不同的文化、不同的信仰及价值观,并能承担个人的社会责任; Integrate high technology, sciences and the arts to allow students to adjust well in a competitive global society 重视科学、技术与艺术教育,让学生日后面对高度竞争的全球社会时能应付自如; Provide a bilingual program that emphasizes both English and Chinese languages and cultures and leads to st fluency in these two world languages of the 21 century 推行中、英双语及东、西多元文化教育,让学生能通晓这两种廿一世纪极为重要的语言及其相关文化; Provide individualized attention and guidance to meet the needs and to develop the potential of individual students 为学生提供个别辅导,关注学生的个别成长,发展每个学生的独特才能; Incorporate a research-based curriculum that is regularly evaluated by teaching and research professionals to improve the quality and effectiveness of our programs 定期由教师及专业的研究人员,评估课程的质素及成效,并借助研究工作加以改善。

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YCEF Mission Statement 耀中教育机构使命宣言 o to explore new directions in education, 探索教育新方向, o to meet new challenges brought by time, 迎接时代新挑战, o to upgrade the quality of our services, 提升服务的质量, o to seek self-growth and development, 寻求成长与发展, o to contribute to society and 奉献社会以及 o to create a better future. 创造美好的未来。

School Motto 耀中校训 Yew Chung Will Align耀中 o With Science and Technology 与科技结盟 o With Culture and Arts 与文艺结盟 o With Love and Charity 与仁爱结盟

Secondary School Objectives 2011-12: 1. Expansion and implementation of a broad Character Education programme from Year 7 to 13. 2. Implementation of an integrated Humanities programme in Key Stage 3. 3. Formation of a technology based cross-curricular approach to learning in the classroom. 4. Development of a mentoring programme for staff. 5. Evaluation of academic pathways to strengthen vertical and horizontal curriculum links. 6. Expansion of extra-curricular programme to include local and national trips to further develop secondary service programme.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 5 of 30


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IB Mission and strategy The International Baccalaureate aims to develop inquiring, knowledgeable and caring young people who help to create a better and more peaceful world through intercultural understanding and respect. To this end the organization works with schools, governments and international organizations to develop challenging programmes of international education and rigorous assessment. These programmes encourage students across the world to become active, compassionate and lifelong learners who understand that other people, with their differences, can also be right.

IB Learner profile IB learners strive to be: ♦

Inquirers They develop their natural curiosity. They acquire the skills necessary to conduct inquiry and research and show independence in learning. They actively enjoy learning and this love of learning will be sustained throughout their lives.

Knowledgeable They explore concepts, ideas and issues that have local and global significance. In so doing, they acquire in-depth knowledge and develop understanding across a broad and balanced range of disciplines.

Thinkers They exercise initiative in applying thinking skills critically and creatively to recognize and approach complex problems, and make reasoned, ethical decisions.

Communicators They understand and express ideas and information confidently and creatively in more than one language and in a variety of modes of communication. They work effectively and willingly in collaboration with others.

Principled They act with integrity and honesty, with a strong sense of fairness, justice and respect for the dignity of the individual, groups and communities. They take responsibility for their own actions and the consequences that accompany them.

Open-minded They understand and appreciate their own cultures and personal histories, and are open to the perspectives, values and traditions of other individuals and communities. They are accustomed to seeking and evaluating a range of points of view, and are willing to grow from the experience.

Caring They show empathy, compassion and respect towards the needs and feelings of others. They have a personal commitment to service, and act to make a positive difference to the lives of others and to the environment.

Risk-takers They approach unfamiliar situations and uncertainty with courage and forethought, and have the independence of spirit to explore new roles, ideas and strategies. They are brave and articulate in defending their beliefs.

Balanced They understand the importance of intellectual, physical and emotional balance to achieve personal well-being for themselves and others.

Reflective They give thoughtful consideration to their own learning and experience. They are able to assess and understand their strengths and limitations in order to support their learning and personal development.

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The Yew Chung International Curriculum Yew Chung Education Foundation has created a unique vision, known as the philosophy and objectives. This philosophy and the school ethos serve the Foundation well in setting guideposts for education excellence in all YCIS campuses. It is this vision that sets us apart from any other school and the glue that ensures the continuity of the distinctive features from campus to campus. The philosophy is shared openly and proudly with every prospective parent and staff member before they arrive. We consider the choice of YCIS to be based on the desire to obtain the philosophy. Therefore, the curriculum consists of research-based components of major internationally recognized curricula plus the original, distinctive Early Childhood Education programme developed and reviewed by a special ECE task force at Yew Chung Education Foundation. The components are: • An internationalised version of the framework from the National Curriculum for England (Junior Secondary Years 7-9) • Cambridge International General Certificate of Secondary Education (IGCSE) (Upper Secondary Years 10-11) • International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) (Upper Secondary Years 12-13) One of the special features of the YCIS philosophy consists of bilingual and multicultural approaches to learning in English and Chinese, where students are expected over time to acquire a high level of competence in both languages. To achieve this aim we use a system of Co-Principals and CoCoordinators as role models of cooperation and mutual sharing of responsibility. The philosophy also promotes a strong programme of character development in all YCIS students. The YCIS Beijing secondary curriculum has a crucial role to play in enabling the school to raise standards and help all our learners meet the challenges of our fast-changing world. The aim is to develop a coherent curriculum that builds on young people's experiences in the primary phase and that helps all young people to become successful learners, confident individuals and responsible citizens. Senior Secondary programme at YCIS Beijing The aim of the Yew Chung International School of Beijing’s quality international education is to nurture global citizens and lifelong learners, and to provide as many options for further studies as possible. Whilst the IB programme is an internationally based curriculum, they allow for teaching to be placed in a localised context, making it relevant to different regions. The Experiencing China trips in Year 12 to Yangshuo give our students the opportunity to experience the culture of our host country. In addition to the Academic Programme, students in Years 12 to 13 are encouraged to take part in community service through outreach work in the local Migrant School Lo Bo, The Hope School, Yangshuo(Year 12) and the home stay visits with local ethnic groups on the Humanities trip to Guizhou; Performing Arts drama productions and musical recitals; the schools’ Athletics and Sports Programmes and the school participations in the MUN and various Public Speaking events.

“Enjoy IB as much as you can as it is a journey that you will have to go through whether you like it or not anyway. Times could get stressful and even overwhelming as you struggle through trying to fit in all your deadlines and college applications, so don’t be afraid to ask for support from your teachers. Know that what you gain out of the IB program depends on how much you put into it, so make the most out of the experience.” HELEN LEUNG Graduate 2011

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 7 of 30


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Overview of the Diploma Programme The International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme (IBDP) is the most widespread international course of study for secondary students. The IBDP is a two-year course for 16-19 year-olds. It is a well recognised and highly esteemed qualification for entry to most Universities around the world. It is constantly being enriched through ongoing educational research resulting in a strong emphasis on intellectual rigor and high academic standards. The Programme's flexibility allows for adaptation to the diverse needs of students and makes it a suitable study course for pre-university senior secondary students. The IBDP is offered only by those schools that comply with the strict academic requirements regulated by the International Baccalaureate Organization (IBO), based in Geneva, Switzerland. As such, it is an ideal component of the YCIS International Curriculum serving the upper secondary segment, years 12 and 13 of the school. The following points from our philosophy and objectives are wonderfully fulfilled by the IBDP. o Provide a holistic education that nurtures the whole person. o Promote multiple-intelligence development to allow students to develop their own individual talents. o Nurture in each student an open outlook in life, respect for cultural diversity and the beliefs and values of all people, and a sense of commitment and social responsibility. o Integrate high technology, sciences and the arts to allow students to adjust well in a competitive global society. o Provide a bilingual programme that emphasises English and Chinese languages and cultures and leads to fluency in two languages. o Provide individualised attention and guidance to meet the needs and to develop the potential of individual students. o Incorporate a research-based curriculum that is regularly evaluated by teaching and research professionals to improve the quality and effectiveness of our programmes. The two-year senior secondary International Baccalaureate Diploma Programme leads to a qualification that is recognised by universities worldwide. The Diploma Programme prepares students for university by encouraging them to: o o o o o

Gain knowledge and understanding across all the major disciplines ask challenging questions learn how to learn develop a strong sense of their own identity and culture develop their ability to communicate with and understand people from other countries and cultures.

The Extended Essay and Theory of Knowledge components allow students to begin to develop the critical thinking, analytical and research skills necessary for successful tertiary studies. The Creativity, Action and Service component ensures that students develop their creativity, and become involved in an activity and become aware of their role in society. It develops in them a sense of the contribution they can make to their respective communities and the wider world.

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Recognition of the IB Diploma The IBO works closely with universities in all regions of the world to ensure that the IB Diploma is properly recognised. To aid this process, university admissions officers and government officials have direct online access to all syllabuses and recent examinations. To assist IB diploma students in making appropriate choices, the IBO holds a database containing contact details of universities around the world together with up-to-date information about their requirements for admission. Students applying to a particular university may also grant permission for their grades to be accessed directly from the IBO’s secure web site. Presently, universities all over the world accept students with an IB Diploma. It is well recognised throughout North America, Europe, Hong Kong, Korea and Australasia. Many universities offer credit for students who do well in particular subjects. Yew Chung International School Beijing has a University Placement Officer who is familiar with the requirements of specific universities worldwide and assists all senior students with their university applications procedures and placement.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 9 of 30


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YCIS BEIJING SECONDARY SCHOOL ASSESSMENT POLICY Assessment is the gathering and analysis of information about student performance. It identifies what students know, understand, can achieve and experience at different stages in the learning process. Assessment is integral to all teaching and learning. Effective assessment should: Provide feedback for students and teachers to revise/advance performance, learning, and teaching Be formative, summative and demonstrate what students know, understand, and are able to apply Use reflection as an essential and integral part of self, peer, teacher, and parent assessment Show awareness of learning approaches, cultural, gender, linguistic, and racial differences Be anchored in authentic tasks Provide evidence of progress along a continuum of criteria that are clearly known and understood in advance PURPOSES OF ASSESSMENT Assessment is an essential part of the instructional cycle. It provides information about student learning and development, as well as a framework for planning, self-reflection, and collaboration. Students始 learning is promoted through: Assessing prior knowledge and experience Differentiating instruction to meet individual needs Engaging learners in reflection to determine strengths and weaknesses and to set goals Providing feedback for students Expanding student learning opportunities Building a profile of children始s understanding Information about student learning is provided through: Examples of student work or performances. Statistics relating to benchmarks and/or rubrics or test scores. Test results Programme evaluation uses a variety of student assessments to: Assess the levels of students始 current knowledge and experience before embarking on new learning. Assess new learning. Guide teacher planning and presentation. Assess student performance relative to external standards. Focus on closing the achievement gaps amongst students. YCIS Beijing assesses students to verify the students understanding of concepts, their acquisition of knowledge, their mastering of skills, their development of attitudes, and the decision to take responsible action.

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TYPES OF ASSESSMENTS Pre-assessment occurs before embarking on new learning to uncover prior knowledge and experiences. Formative assessment is woven into the daily learning process. It provides teachers and students with information about how the learning is developing. It helps the teacher to plan the next stage of learning. Summative assessment occurs at the end of a teaching and learning cycle. Students are given the opportunity to demonstrate what they have learned by applying their knowledge in new and authentic contexts. Standardised / External Assessment: Checkpoint Yr 9, IGCSE Yrs 10/11 and IB Diploma Yr 13. ASSESSMENT STRATEGIES Observations: All students are observed regularly with a focus on the individual, the group, and/or the whole class. Performance Assessments: Students are presented with a task that represents the kind of challenges that adults face in the world beyond the classroom. Transdisciplinary Skills Assessments (research, thinking, communication, self management and social skills): The focus is on the process and skill application rather than on the product. These skills are regularly observed in real contexts using checklists, narrative notes, and inventories. Open-Ended Assessments: Students are presented with a challenge and asked to provide an original response. Tests/Quizzes: These single-occasion assessments provide a snapshot of students始 specific knowledge. Portfolios: An ongoing, purposeful collection is composed of selected student work and is designed to demonstrate growth, creativity, and reflection. ASSESSMENT TOOLS Rubrics: Rubrics are established sets of criteria used for scoring or rating children始s tests, portfolios, or performances. The descriptors tell the child and the assessor what characteristics or signs to look for in the work and then how to rate that work on a predetermined scale. Rubrics can be developed by children as well as by teachers. Benchmarks/exemplars: These are samples of children始s work that serve as concrete standards against which other samples are judged. Checklists: These are lists of information, data, attributes, or elements that should be present. Anecdotal records: Anecdotal records are brief, written notes based on observations of children. Reporting is a means of giving feedback from assessment. Effective reporting should: involve parents, students, and teachers as partners, be comprehensive, honest, fair, and credible. Parents, students, and teachers are all valued partners in the reporting process and in sharing the responsibility both for learning and for accounting student progress. Pathways for communication need to be open and reciprocal. YCIS Beijing builds into the school calendar two parent-teacher conferences each year. In addition, we provide many opportunities throughout the school year for conferencing. Parents, teachers, and/or students may participate, depending upon the purpose. Written reports are completed at every year level and are sent home four times a year. Transdisciplinary Skills, Student Profile, and Attitudes are reflected in the comments that teachers write on every report card.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 11 of 30


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IB Diploma Results 2011 31 candidates: 22 diploma students and 9 certificate students. o 100 per cent of students who sat the IB Diploma examination achieved their goal. The IB Diploma is a qualification which proves academic excellence and will open the door to top quality international universities. o 45 per cent of students achieved the coveted IB Bilingual Diploma which proves a very high level of competency in two languages. o One YCIS Beijing student scored the maximum points possible (45 out of a possible 45), showing an all-round ability in a range of subjects as well as the Creativity, Action and Service and Extended Essay portions of the course. o The average IB Diploma score for YCIS Beijing students was 38.1. o The average subject score amongst students was 6.08 (out of a possible 7).

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University Offers YCIS Beijing 2011 The YCIS Beijing Class of 2011 received over 115 offers from 64 universities in 8 different countries. Three students were invited to interviews at Cambridge and Oxford Universities and students received offers from many prestigious universities. Twelve students received academic scholarships. This proves that YCIS Beijing students are highly sought after. Our graduating students have chosen to study a variety of subject areas including computer sciences, chemical engineering, aeronautical engineering, media studies, social sciences, law, interior design, economics, commerce, psychology, mathematics, international relationships and several students are undertaking research in the sciences.

CANADA (5)

HONG KONG (7)

Emily Carr University of Arts and Design McGill University University of British Columbia University of Toronto

Hong Kong University of Science and Technology The Chinese University of Hong Kong The University of Hong Kong

KOREA (4)

SINGAPORE (1)

Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology Seoul National University

National University of Singapore

UNITED STATES (45)

California College of the Arts Florida Institute of Technology Hiram College Massachusetts College of Pharmaceutical and Health Sciences Northeastern Pratt Institute SCAD UC Berkeley UC Irvine UC Santa Barbara University of Chicago University of Illinois at Chicago University of Massachusetts Amherst University of Pittsburgh Wentworth Institute of Technology

DePaul University Fordham University Maryland Institute College of Art New York University Parsons San Francisco Art Institute Seattle University UC Davis UC San Diego University of California Los Angeles University of Connecticut University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign University of Massachusetts Boston University of Southern California University of Washington

UNITED KINGDOM (37)

American InterContinental University - London Imperial College London Manchester Metropolitan University Regent's Business School of London University College London (University of London) University of Bristol University of Essex University of Lincoln University of St. Andrews

Durham University King's College London (University of London) Newcastle University UAL London College of Fashion University of Bath University of Edinburgh University of Leeds University of Manchester University of Warwick

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 13 of 30


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The IBDP Curriculum at YCIS Beijing The curriculum contains six subject groups together with a core made up of three separate parts. This is illustrated by a hexagon with the three parts of the core at its centre. Group 1 Language Chinese A Literature, Chinese A Literature and Language English A Literature, English A Literature and Language, Korean A Literature, Self taught A Language

Group2 Second Language English B Language, Chinese B Language &Chinese Ab Initio

Extended Essay Theory Of Knowledge

Group 3 Individuals in Society Business and Management, Economics, Psychology,, Environmental Systems and Societies, History, Global Politics

Creativity, Action, Service

Group 4 Experimental Sciences

Group 5 Mathematics

Biology, Chemistry, Physics& Environmental Systems and Societies, Computer Science

Mathematics HL, Mathematics SL, Mathematical Studies

Group 6 The Arts Visual Arts, Music

Students study six subjects selected from the subject groups. All three parts of the coreâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;extended essay, theory of knowledge and creativity, action, serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;are compulsory and are central to the philosophy of the Diploma Programme. Diploma students need to successfully study 6 subjects as well as covering the three core requirements. Extended Essay (EE), Theory of Knowledge(TOK) and Creativity, Action, Service (CAS). The next page provides an outline of the subjects offered at Yew Chung Beijing. When choosing their subjects, students need to carefully consider their options and future goals. Decisions should be made in consultation with parents and teachers and consideration given to balancing their interests, the field which they ultimately intend to follow and the requirements of universities to which they will be applying.

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Selecting Subjects Yew Chung currently offers the subjects shown in the table below. Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Group 5

Group 6

Language

Second Language

Individuals and Societies

Science

Maths

The Arts

English A Literature

English B Language

History

Biology

Maths HL

Visual Art

Economics

Chemistry

Maths SL

Music

Business and Management

Physics

Mathematical Studies

or

English A Language and Literature Chinese A Literature Chinese A Language and Literature

Korean A Literature

Self taught Language A Literature

Chinese B Language

Chinese Ab Initio Psychology

**Environmental Systems and Societies

**Environmental Systems and Societies

Any other subject from groups 1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C;4 or

Computer Science

Global Politics

Students choose a Group 1 Language from: English A Literature, English A Literature and Language, Chinese A Literature, Chinese A Language and Literature, Korean A Literature, Self taught Language A Literature --Students who wish to choose two Group 1 Languages for a bilingual IB Diploma can do so with approval --A self taught language must be approved and can only be taken at standard level. Students choose a Second Language from Group 2: English Language, Chinese Language, Chinese Ab Initio Students choose one of the following Humanities: History, Psychology, Business and Management, , Global Politics, Environmental Systems and Societies or Economics **Environmental systems and societies is a standard level transdisciplinary course. This will enable students to satisfy the requirements of two groups (group 3 and group 4) while studying one course. Students then select another course to complete the requirement of six. They also need to study a Science: Physics, Chemistry, Biology or Environmental Systems and Societies Students choose one of the three levels of Mathematics offered. Higher Level Maths, Standard Level Mathematics or Mathematical Studies. Finally Visual Arts or Music is an option for students. If the student does not want to study Visual Arts or Music they may choose another subject from groups 1 to 4 or Computer Science*

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 15 of 30


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The Three Core Requirements All Diploma Programme students must engage in the following three core requirements: • • •

Extended Essay Theory of Knowledge(TOK) Creativity, Action, Service (CAS)

Extended essay The extended essay has a prescribed limit of 4 000 words. It offers students the opportunity to investigate a topic of individual interest in one of their chosen subjects and acquaints them with the independent research and writing skills expected at university. It will be introduced in the first year of the diploma programme, and completed early on in the students’ final year. The extended essay will be supervised by a teacher of the chosen subject who will provide the candidate with advice and guidance. The school uses the ManageBac web site to manage interactions between students and their supervisors.

Theory of knowledge (TOK) Theory of Knowledge is a course in which students are encouraged to approach the process of knowledge from different perspectives. It aims at helping students become familiar with the problem of progress, accumulation and validation of knowledge, with problems related to the value systems we employ, while at the same time it develops their ability to judge and become critical thinkers. Theory of Knowledge investigates the different assumptions and ways of thinking used in searching for and establishing knowledge in the Sciences, Ethics, Religion, Politics and Art. This course has an assessment requirement of one 1200-1600 word essay on a chosen topic from 10 topics prescribed each year by the IB organisation and one or more presentations, of approximately 5 minutes duration, on a designated topic covered in the course. Students are timetabled two lessons per week for TOK. The school offers TOK in Chinese and English.

Creativity, action, service (CAS) The CAS programme compliments the academic disciplines of the IB experience, challenging the participants to develop a spirit of discovery, self-reliance and self-confidence. In CAS, students plan, carry out and reflect upon approved projects in the areas of creativity, action and service. Projects cover the arts, physical activities including sports or expeditions, and projects that serve others. The CAS supervisor coordinates the student’s activities with those of the IB Programme. He/she also assists each student with the preparation of a personal activity program that is representative of his interests, while at the same time supervising its progress. Students are timetabled one lesson per week for CAS. The school uses the ManageBac web site to manage all CAS activities. Students complete the CAS requirements during the two-year course and the vast majority of the CAS activities will take place outside of the school day. During the course they will keep a log of activities completed, create a journal of reflective writing about their experiences, and finish with a self-evaluation essay. To receive the IB Diploma students must successfully complete 6 subjects plus the Extended Essay, the CAS programme and Theory of Knowledge (TOK). If a student does not complete all aspects of the course then they cannot be awarded an IB Diploma. However, they can still receive IB Certificates for individual subjects successfully completed. Many Universities also recognise individual subject Certificates and students have successfully entered universities all over the world with certificates. It is recommended that at the start of the IB course most students attempt 6 subjects as well as the Extended Essay, TOK and CAS. If it is felt that a student is not coping with the requirements of the diploma the school will, after consultation with the student and their parents, allow the student to complete the IB certificate course only.

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Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL) Subjects Most IBDP subjects are offered at Higher Level (HL) and Standard Level (SL). The HL courses involve more work than SL and the work is more challenging. Some Universities recognise HL subjects as credit courses. That is, if they are completed to a satisfactory level then students may receive credit for them at university. To achieve the IB Diploma a student must take either 3 or 4 HL subjects. At Yew Chung Beijing International School, we recommend that students take 3HL and 3 SL subjects. It is recommended that students do not select their HL subjects until completing the first semester of Year 12. Their progress will then be reviewed at the end of the first year of the IB programme and their HL subjects will then be finally selected. Teachers, students and their parents will be involved in this process but the final decision rests with the student and their parents.

Bilingual Diploma Award From 2013 examination session onwards a bilingual diploma will be awarded to a successful candidate who fulfils one or both of the following criteria: â&#x20AC;˘ â&#x20AC;˘

completion of two languages selected from group 1 with the award of a grade 3 or higher in both completion of one of the subjects from group 3 or group 4 in a language that is not the same as the candidate's nominated group 1 language. The candidate must attain a grade 3 or higher in both t he group 1 language and the subject from group 3 or 4.

From 2013 onwards, pilot subjects and transdisciplinary subjects can contribute to a bilingual diploma, provided the above criteria are met. Additionally, if a candidate takes a transdisciplinary SL subject as an anticipated subject in 2012 this will contribute to the award of a bilingual diploma in 2013. Neither a school-based syllabus nor a subject taken by a candidate in addition to the six subjects for the diploma can contribute to the award of a bilingual diploma.

Pre-Requisites The school has placed some pre-requisites for entry into some subjects in accordance with advice from the IBO. It is strongly suggested that students and parents take heed of the advice given so that all students can achieve the best possible results in their Diploma/Certificate course.

Pilot Subjects Yew Chung International School of Beijing is proud to be one of twelve IB World Schools participating in the pilot subject offering of Global Politics for the 2014 examination session. The IB attempts to develop new subjects on a pilot basis, where a limited number of schools may offer on the understanding that the syllabus content and assessment methods may change during the lifetime of the syllabus. The number of schools taking part in a pilot, and the selection process, depend on the stage the pilot is at and the needs of pilot development. A pilot subject cannot be taken as a one-year course. Global Politics is tentatively scheduled to join the Group 3 Subject offerings as an open subject to all IB World Schools in the 2017 Examination Session.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 17 of 30


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Individual Subjects Group 1 Language (taught): First Language English A Literature: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

The English A Literature is a tailor-made appreciation course for students who have studied literary works in their previous cycle of studies and who wish to develop their love of literature. Although a demanding course, students will read and engage with a selection of works in a variety of genres (e.g. Novels, Poetry, Drama, Non-Fiction) and take great pleasure in discovering a wide range of authors from all over the world who present their culture and traditions and enrich our studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; perspectives and thinking. Through this course, students will develop their ability to respond analytically and critically to works of literature.

Pre-requisites:

IGCSE English First Language (C grade) and preferably although not compulsory IGCSE English Literature (C grade).

English A Literature and Language: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

The new English A Literature and Language course aims to develop in students skills of textual analysis and the understanding that texts, both literary and non-literary, can be seen as autonomous yet simultaneously related to culturally determined reading practices. The course is flexible and dynamic, and develops an understanding of the ways in which formal elements are used to create meaning in a text. It is designed for students who are competent English users and who show an interest in a wider breadth of study of the language, including both literature and language through a choice of texts that demonstrate how language develops in specific cultural contexts and how language is used in the media.

Pre-requisites:

IGCSE English First Language (C grade) and preferably although not compulsory IGCSE English Literature (C grade).

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Chinese A Literature: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

This is a course for the native Chinese speaker who has a love of literature. Students read a selection of texts in a variety of genres (e.g. Novels, Poetry, Drama) across a wide cross section of cultures, periods, styles and contexts. Through this course, students will develop their ability to communicate both verbally and through writing.

Pre-requisites:

This should be the language the student speaks at home.

Chinese A Literature and Language: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Chinese Literature and Language is designed for students who are competent English users and who show an interest in a wider breadth of study of the language, including both literature and language through a choice of options as diverse as global issues, society development, culture and the media. This course is extremely dynamic and will develop the students’ needs for independent thinking and creativity.

Pre-requisites:

This should be the language the student speaks at home.

Korean A Literature: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

This is a course for the native Korean speaker who has a love of literature. Students read a selection of texts in a variety of genres (e.g. Novels, Poetry, Drama) across a wide cross section of cultures, periods, styles and contexts. Through this course, students will develop their ability to communicate both verbally and through writing.

Pre-requisites:

This should be the language students speak at home.

Self- taught Language A Literature: First Language other than English, Chinese or Korean Level:

SL only

Overview:

The Self- taught Language A Literature is a tailor-made appreciation course for students who have studied literary works in their previous cycle of studies and who wish to develop their love of literature in their mother tongue. Although a demanding course, students will read and engage with a selection of works in a variety of genres (e.g. Novels, Poetry, Drama, Non-Fiction) and take great pleasure in discovering a wide range of authors from all over the world who present their culture and traditions and enrich our students’ perspectives and thinking. Through this course, students will develop their ability to respond analytically and critically to works of literature. The school’s supervisor will oversee their programme of study, preparation and conduct of the examinations.

Pre-requisites:

This should be the language the student speaks at home and they must be able to write and read fluently in their language. The student needs to work with their own tutor in collaboration with the school as it is not a taught language at school. *See the Head of English Language for further information*

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 19 of 30


20 Group 2 Language: Second Language English Language B: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

The English Language B course is designed for second language learners and focuses principally on the interaction between the speakers and writers of the target language. The aim of the course is to prepare students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. It also allows students to develop an awareness and appreciation of the cultures of the countries in which English is spoken. The skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are equally emphasised, taught and developed through the study of a range of authentic oral and written texts chosen by the teacher, and a variety of oral and written examinations is used to assess students' growing progress. At HL, students will study two works of literature to comply with the requirements of the new syllabus.

Pre-requisites:

IGCSE English as a Second Language or equivalent.

Chinese Language B: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Chinese Language is designed for foreign language learners and focuses principally on the interaction between the speakers and writers of the target language. The aim of the course is to prepare students to use the language appropriately in a range of situations and contexts and for a variety of purposes. The course also allows students to develop an awareness and appreciation of the cultures of the countries in which Chinese is spoken. The skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing are equally emphasised, and are taught and developed through the study of a range of authentic oral and written texts chosen by the teacher. A variety of oral and written examinations are used to assess students' listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills.

Pre-requisites:

Generally three years of language study in Chinese is needed. However, a good student with two years experience should be able to cope with the course requirements.

Chinese Language Ab Initio: Level:

SL

Overview:

The student will undertake written and spoken Chinese language study sufficient to enable the student to communicate at a level of proficiency that is equal to the minimum standard required for entry into Chinese Language B

Pre-requisites: This course of study is only available to students who have had little or no previous Chinese language experience usually less than 24 months.

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Group 3: Individuals and Societies Business and Management: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Business and Management is the critical study of the ways in which individuals and groups interact in a dynamic business environment. It is an academic discipline that examines how business decisions are made and how these decisions make an impact on internal and external environments. The ideals of international cooperation and responsible citizenship are at the heart of Business and Management. Students will develop the capacity to think critically, to examine businesses across different cultures and to view the business world holistically.

Pre-requisites:

No pre-requisite study is required.

Economics: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Economics is a dynamic social science, forming part of the study of individuals and societies. The study of economics is essentially about the concept of scarcity and the problem of resource allocation. Although economics involves the formulation of theory, it is not a purely theoretical subject: economic theories can be applied to real-world examples. Neither is economics a discrete subject, since economics incorporates elements of history, geography, psychology, sociology, political studies and many other related fields of study. Economics does not exist in a vacuum, because it naturally must consider how economic theory is to be applied in an international context. The scientific approach characterizes the standard methodology of economics. This methodology can be summarized as a progression from problem identification, through hypothesis formulation and testing, arriving finally at a conclusion. Alongside the empirical observations of positive economics, students of the subject are asked to formulate normative questions. Encouraging students to explore such questions forms the central focus of the economics course.

Pre-requisites:

No pre-requisite study is required.

History: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

The aim of history in the Diploma Programme is to explain trends and developments, continuity and change through time and through individual events. The course is concerned with individuals and societies in the widest context: political, social, economic, religious, technological and cultural. The process of historical inquiry, explanation and interpretation is a never-ending activity, for which historians develop values and conventions which themselves change over time. Students of history investigate a variety of sources, some of which may be of a contentious nature. As new generations seek to explain and analyse the past, they will face problems of determining the accuracy of what is claimed to be reliable historical knowledge and assessing conflicting interpretations of past events. The opportunities for opinions and interpretations which are culturally driven are many and they require sensitive but critical analysis.

Pre-requisites:

History to at least a Year 10 level should have been completed.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 21 of 30


22

Psychology: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

IB psychology takes a holistic approach that fosters intercultural understanding and respect. In the core of the IB psychology course, the biological level of analysis demonstrates what all humans share, whereas the cognitive and sociocultural levels of analysis reveal the immense diversity of influences that produce human behaviour and mental processes. Cultural diversity is explored and students are encouraged to develop empathy for the feelings, needs and lives of others within and outside their own culture. This empathy contributes to an international understanding.

Pre-requisites:

First Language English at IGCSE Level

Environmental Systems and Societies: Level:

SL only

Overview:

Environmental systems and societies is a transdisciplinary subject, environmental systems and societies is designed to combine the techniques and knowledge associated with group 4 (the experimental sciences) with those associated with group 3 (individuals and societies). The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention can be constantly drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues. The teaching approach therefore needs to be conducive to students evaluating the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of issues.

Pre-requisites:

Students will be able to study this course successfully with no specific previous knowledge of science or geography. However, as the course aims to foster an international perspective, awareness of local and global environmental concerns and an understanding of the scientific method, a course that shares these aims would be good preparation. **Environmental Sciences is a transdisciplinary subject and can also be found listed as a Group 4 Experimental Science subject

Global Politics: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Global politics is a pilot course in group three which explores fundamental political concepts aligned to contemporary global issues. It has emerged from the success of four existing school based syllabi (SBSs): peace and conflict, political thought, world politics and international relations, and human rights. It draws inspiration from the best aspects of these SBSs while developing its own subject matter, and builds on fundamental political concepts in a variety of contexts and geographic levels. The course nurtures the capacity to interpret competing and contestable claims in these areas and enables students, through an analytical approach, to interpret the impact of politics on global development. To this end global politics draws on a variety of disciplines in the social sciences and humanities. The course is being developed in collaboration with educators and consultants with diverse experience and expertise.

. Pre-requisites:

Minimum grade of C in either IGCSE Global Perspectives, IGCSE History, IGCSE Economics.

22


Group 4: Experimental Sciences Physics: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

The Physics course seeks to explain the basic features of the natural world mainly in terms of interactions between matter and energy. Both conceptual understanding and technological aspects of the subject are covered. Students learn how to bring order to a mass of observations; they study some of the fundamental laws of nature and by doing so gain a closer understanding of the boundaries of physical knowledge.

Pre-requisites:

At least a C grade in Co-ordinated Science or the equivalent and at least a C grade in Year 11 Mathematics.

Biology: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Biology is the study of living organisms at a variety of levels from molecular to biosphere. Students gain an understanding of the interactions between these levels and of the functioning of whole organisms. The course is particularly suitable for students wishing to pursue further study in subjects such as zoology, physiology, ecology, marine science, microbiology and biotechnology as well as other biological sciences.

Pre-requisites:

At least a C grade in Co-ordinated Science or the equivalent and at least a C grade in Year 11 Mathematics.

Chemistry: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Chemistry is the science of the composition, structure, properties, and reactions of matter, especially of atomic and molecular systems. Chemistry is an experimental science that combines academic study with the acquisition of practical and investigation skills. It is called the central science as chemical principals underpin both the physical environment in which we live and all biological systems.

Pre-requisites:

At least a C grade in Co-ordinated Science or the equivalent and at least a C grade in Year 11 Mathematics.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 23 of 30


24 Computer Science: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Computer science involves solving problems using computers. Therefore a full understanding of logical problem solving is required as well as a detailed knowledge of how computers operate. Successful computerized systems result from: a clear understanding of the problem to be solved; appropriate use of hardware based on a detailed knowledge of its capabilities and limitations; efficient use of algorithms and data structures; thorough and logical design; careful testing and integration of all these components. Students are expected to acquire mastery of the specified aspects of Java. Suitable mechanisms include encapsulation, polymorphism and inheritance, although other structured approaches are possible. Mastery of a particular aspect (or mechanism) of computer science is defined as the ability to use that aspect appropriately for some non-trivial purpose that is well documented. Mastery will be demonstrated through work submitted in the programme dossier. The computer science standard level (SL) course focuses on software development, fundamentals of computer systems and the relationship between computing systems and society. The higher level (HL) course encompasses all these elements but is extended to include: computer mathematics and logic; advanced data structures and algorithms; further system fundamentals; and file organisation.

Pre-requisites:

A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C Extended Mathematics

Environmental Systems and Societies: Level:

SL only

Overview:

Environmental systems and societies is a transdisciplinary subject, environmental systems and societies is designed to combine the techniques and knowledge associated with group 4 (the experimental sciences) with those associated with group 3 (individuals and societies). The prime intent of this course is to provide students with a coherent perspective of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies; one that enables them to adopt an informed personal response to the wide range of pressing environmental issues that they will inevitably come to face. Studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; attention can be constantly drawn to their own relationship with their environment and the significance of choices and decisions that they make in their own lives. It is intended that students develop a sound understanding of the interrelationships between environmental systems and societies, rather than a purely journalistic appreciation of environmental issues. The teaching approach therefore needs to be conducive to students evaluating the scientific, ethical and socio-political aspects of issues.

Pre-requisites:

Students will be able to study this course successfully with no specific previous knowledge of science or geography. However, as the course aims to foster an international perspective, awareness of local and global environmental concerns and an understanding of the scientific method, a course that shares these aims would be good preparation. **Environmental Sciences is a transdisciplinary subject and can also be found listed as a Group 3 Individuals and Societies

24


Group 5: Mathematics Mathematics HL: Level:

HL

Overview:

Mathematics HL is designed for students with very good abilities and an interest in Mathematics and for students who plan to take university courses that require a high level of Mathematics. Students study algebra, functions and equations, trigonometry, calculus, vectors and matrices, statistics and probability. There is a strong emphasis on applications throughout this course.

Pre-requisites:

IGCSE Additional Mathematics

Mathematics SL: Level:

SL

Overview:

Mathematics SL is designed for students with good abilities in Mathematics. Students study number and algebra, functions and equations, circular functions and trigonometry, vector geometry, statistics and probability and calculus.

Pre-requisites:

A â&#x20AC;&#x201C; C IGCSE Extended Mathematics

Mathematical Studies: Level:

SL

Overview:

Mathematics Studies is a course designed to be accessible to all students. Students study numbers and algebra, sets, logic and probability, geometry and trigonometry, statistics, functions, financial mathematics and introductory differential calculus.

Pre-requisites:

Mathematic to at least a Year 11 level should have been completed.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 25 of 30


26

Group 6: The Arts Visual Arts: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

Expression in the visual arts is characterised by forms of visual representation which reflect the cultures of different societies. Artistic expressions range from traditional forms embedded in particular societies and cultures to design, craft, electronic media, drawing, painting, print making and sculpture. Students are given the opportunity to have personal, social-cultural and aesthetic experiences through the production and understanding of art. There is also the opportunity for experimentation and purposeful creative work in various expressive media

Pre-requisites:

At least a C grade at IGCSE examination level or the equivalent. An interview with the Visual Arts teacher is essential before final acceptance into this course.

Music: Level:

HL/SL

Overview:

The aims of the IBO Music programme are to: • •

• • Pre-requisites:

give students the opportunity to explore and enjoy the diversity of music throughout the world encourage students to develop perceptual skills through a breadth of musical experiences, where they will learn to recognize, speculate, analyse, identify, discriminate and hypothesize in relation to music enable students to develop creatively their knowledge, abilities and understanding through performance and composition assist students to develop their potential as musicians both personally and collaboratively, in whatever capacity, to the full.

At least a C grade in IGCSE Music or the equivalent. IBO Music students must be prepared to practice their musical instrument for at least an hour a day. An audition is essential before final acceptance into this course.

26


Grades and Descriptors In each of the six subjects, a student receives a numeric grade between 1(minimum) and 7. A maximum of 3 points is awarded for combined performance in Theory of Knowledge and the Extended Essay. Therefore the maximum total diploma point score is 45. The matrix below shows how points are scored for TOK and the Extended Essay. Theory of Knowledge

E x t e n d e d e s s a y

Excellent A Good B Satisfactory C Mediocre D Elementary E Not submitted

Excellent A

Good B

Satisfactory C

Mediocre D

Not submitted

Failing Condition*

Elementary E 1+ Failing Condition* Failing Condition* Failing Condition* Failing Condition* Failing Condition*

3

2

2

2

3

2

1

1

2

1

1

0

2

1

0

0

1 + Failing Condition*

Failing Condition*

Failing Condition*

N

N

N

N

N

N

N N N N N

Award of the IB Diploma The IB diploma will be awarded to a candidate whose total score is at least 24 points provided all the following requirements have been met. o They have a grade three or above for all subjects. o Successfully completed their Extended Essay, TOK and CAS requirements. The IB has no policy on whether predicted grades should be released to candidates; this is left to the discretion of the school. A student who, for example, writes a good extended essay and whose performance in theory of knowledge is judged to be satisfactory will be awarded 1 point, while a student who writes a mediocre extended essay and whose performance in theory of knowledge is judged to be excellent will be awarded 2 points. Performance in both the extended essay and theory of knowledge of an elementary standard is a failing condition for the award of the diploma. From 2011 onwards, 28 points overall will be required to be eligible for the diploma if a student attains an “E” grade in either the extended essay or theory of knowledge. As previously, a grade “A” in one of the requirements earns an extra point even if the other is a grade “E”. Attaining a grade “E” in both the extended essay and theory of knowledge continues to represent an automatic failure. The IB scales and, therefore, the only permitted predictions for subjects, are as follows. Grade

7 Excellent performance 6 Very good performance 5 Good performance 4 Satisfactory performance 3 Mediocre performance 2 Poor performance 1 Very poor performance

The IB scale for theory of knowledge and the extended essay is as follows. Grade

A Excellent performance B Good performance C Satisfactory performance D Mediocre performance E Elementary performance

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 27 of 30


28

Authenticity of Student Work The IBO assigns Diploma Program teachers the responsibility to ensure that all candidates' material for assessment (internally or externally assessed) is prepared according to the requirements of their subject. Consequently, the IBO grants teachers (or supervisors in the case of extended essays) the authority to make judgments regarding the authenticity of the work submitted by candidates. All work submitted to the IBO for moderation or assessment must be authenticated by a teacher, and must not include any instances of suspected malpractice. The YCIS Beijing Academic Honesty Policy is given to all students at the beginning of each academic year.

Declaration of Compliance with IB Regulations on Malpractice All pupils taking the IB Diploma are subject to the Diploma Programme General Regulations, which state: Article 9: Responsible and ethical behaviour Candidates are required to act in a responsible and ethical manner throughout their participation in the Diploma Programme and examinations. In particular candidates must avoid any form of malpractice. The definition of malpractice appears in article 24: The IBO defines malpractice as behaviour that results in, or may result in, the candidate or any other candidate gaining an unfair advantage in one or more assessment components. Malpractice includes: (a) plagiarism: this is defined as the representation of the ideas or work of another person as the candidate's own (b) collusion: this is defined as supporting malpractice by another candidate, as inallowing one's work to be copied or submitted for assessment by another The consequence of malpractice is presented in article 25, item 5: If the final award committee decides that a case of malpractice has been established, no grade will be awarded in the subject(s) concerned. No diploma will be awarded to the candidate. Vade Mecum, 2003.

28


Conditions for the award of the IB Diploma Article 11: Grades Performance in each subject is graded on a scale of 1 point (minimum) to 7 points (maximum). For the IB diploma, a maximum of 3 points is awarded for combined performance in theory of knowledge and the extended essay. The maximum total Diploma Programme points score is, therefore, 45. Article 12: Award of the IB diploma 12.1 All assessment components for each of the six subjects and the additional IB diploma requirements must be completed in order to qualify for the award of the IB diploma, except under the conditions stipulated in Section VIICâ&#x20AC;&#x153; Special cases: incomplete assessmentâ&#x20AC;? of these general regulations. 12.2 The IB diploma will be awarded to a candidate whose total score is 24, 25,26 or 27 points, provided all the following requirements have been met. (a) Numeric grades have been awarded in all six subjects registered for the IB diploma. (b) All CAS requirements have been met. (c) Grades A (highest) to E (lowest) have been awarded for both theory of knowledge and an extended essay, with a grade of at least D in one of them. (d) There is no grade 1 in any subject. (e) There is no grade 2 at higher level. (f) There is no more than one grade 2 at standard level. (g) Overall, there are no more than three grades 3 or below. (h) At least 12 points have been gained on higher level subjects (candidates who register for four higher level subjects must gain at least 16 points at higher level). (i) At least 9 points have been gained on standard level subjects (candidates who register for two standard level subjects must gain at least 6 points at standard level). (j) The final award committee has not judged the candidate to be guilty of malpractice. 12.3 The IB diploma will be awarded to a candidate whose total score is 28 points or above, provided all the following requirements have been met. (a) Numeric grades have been awarded in all six subjects registered for the IB diploma. (b) All CAS requirements have been met. (c) Grades A (highest) to E (lowest) have been awarded for both theory of knowledge and an extended essay, with a grade of at least D in one of them. (d) There is no grade 1 in any subject. (e) There is no more than one grade 2 at higher level. (f) (There are no more than two grades 2 at standard level. (g) Overall, there are no more than three grades 3 or below. (h) At least 11 points have been gained on higher level subjects (candidates who register for four higher level subjects must gain at least 14 points at higher level). (i) At least 8 points have been gained on standard level subjects (candidates who register for two standard level subjects must gain at least 5 points at standard level). (j) The final award committee has not judged the candidate to be guilty of malpractice. 12.4 A maximum of three examination sessions is allowed in which to satisfy the requirements for the award of the IB diploma.

2011-2012 IB Diploma Handbook (revised) Page 29 of 30


30

Academic Leaders: Jessica Sun – Chinese Secondary School Co-ordinator jessicas@bj.ycef.com Chris Warren – IB Diploma Co-ordinator chrisw@bj.ycef.com Douglas Machin – IGCSE Co-ordinator douglasm@bj.ycef.com Ellen Clark – KS3 Coordinator ellenc@bj.ycef.com

Curriculum Support: Angelique Gougeon – Secondary Head of English angeliqueg@bj.ycef.com

Gareth Jones - Theory of Knowledge and Extended Essay garethj@bj.ycef.com

Counsellor’s: Ron Drisner - Guidance Counsellor rond@bj.ycef.com Ryan Jordan – University Guidance Counsellor ryanj@bj.ycef.com

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YCIS Beijing IB Handbook 2011-12 (revised)  

This handbook is a reference guide for current and prospective parents and students joining the IBDP programme at YCIS Beijing in August of...

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