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TERM 2 2013 Vol: 7 Issue: 2

N e wsletter Children and Young People’s Mental Health

From the SCHOOL-LINK COORDINATORS

Contact Details Helen Astolfi & Dani Szikszai School-Link Coordinators Gateway Centre, Suite 1, Level 2 237 Mann St, Gosford 2250 Ph: (02) 4304 7878 Fax: (02) 4304 7800

Welcome to term 2 School-Link newsletter for 2013. The weather is getting cooler and the summer months are sadly behind us! Please disseminate this newsletter throughout the school so all staff have access to the information provided each term. This is of particular importance in understanding the role of School-Link (particularly for new staff) and the services provided at ycentral (Children & Young People’s Mental Health and headspace).

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: From the SL Coordinators

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School-Link Consultation Line

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School-Link DVD Training

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ycentral and headspace Gosford

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Pride in Diversity

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ycentral Van at Community Events

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Information for Families

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Evidence Based Practice

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School News

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Services @ ycentral

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Call for Artworks - NAIDOC Week

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Over the past few weeks all School Counsellors, School Principals and Head Teacher Welfare would have received letters from School Link regarding our new consultancy service, the School Link Consultation Line. The School-Link line has been established to support schools working with students experiencing mental health problems. The service is now available to all schools located within the Central Coast Local Health District. This does not replace the usual referral process to ycentral but is available for consultation and support. School-Link is always looking for opportunities to strengthen our commitment to local young people and the prevention and early intervention of mental health problems. Recently staff from CYPMH attended youth week events at Newcastle University Ourimbah Campus, Salvation Army Oasis Youth Centre, skate competition, Wadalba Skate Park and Kincumber High. In the coming months School-Link will be involved with Mindplay (see inside this issue for more information), a year 11 drama competition and our Schools Photography & Short Film Competition. The film and photography competition will be in October and preliminary information will be sent out to schools very soon. Both these events promote help-seeking behaviour and mental illness stigma reduction amongst youth. This issue has included some information specifically for families. It was discussed at the School-Link steering committee that this may be helpful for schools to send out in their own newsletters. So please feel free to use any of the information in the School-Link newsletters, just citing the source. We hope you enjoy the Term 2 School-Link newsletter and if you would like any articles included please contact us.

cheers Helen and Dani

CIRCULATION PLEASE DISTRIBUTE TO : This document may be reproduced in whole or part subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgement of the source

Principal

Deputy Principal

School Counsellor

Head Teacher-Welfare

Head Teacher-PD/H/PE

Year Advisors

Learning Support Team

Staff Room

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TERM 2 2013 Vol: 7 Issue: 2

School-Link Consultation Line

School-Link Consultation Line The staff at CC CYPMH, DEC and staff within schools have worked together for many years. However, collaboration and sharing the care of students experiencing mental health problems has not necessarily occurred using a systematic approach. As a result of the Collaborative Practice survey we have now launched the School-Link Consultation Line. The SchoolLink Consultation Line is for the ‘exclusive use’ of school staff and a direct contact number to access the School-Link Coordinator(s). The consultation line will provide prompt referral and clinical support, for all schools across the Central Coast Local Health District. The School-Link Consultation Line does not replace the usual referral process but is available to discuss any queries or clinical issues regarding a student. The School-Link phone line will be held by a School-Link Coordinator Monday to Friday 8:30-5:00 (excepting public holidays). This service is a ‘non–acute’ service so messages may be left on the phone to be followed up within 72 hours. The School-Link Coordinator will provide information and consultation on service options available and help schools determine appropriate pathways to care and referral options for school staff who may be concerned about the mental health status of a young person within their school. Letters have been sent out to School Counsellors, School Principals and Head Teacher Welfare across the state schools and relevant school staff in the Catholic, Independant and Private School sector. The School-Link Consultation stickers have also been sent attached with the letters. These stickers can be placed on the relevant land lines and mobile phones so that you have this number with you at all times. If your school requires more stickers please do not hesitate to contact Helen or Dani and we will send more out to you. Please NOTE: The School-Link Consultation line does not replace the Mental Health Telephone Access Line or the normal referral procedure through headspace Contact MH Telephone Access Line for more immediate acute services on 1800 011 511

For more information contact Dani or Helen on the School-Link Consultation Line

0414 193 139

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School-Link DVD Training Program School-Link DVD Training Program The School-Link DVD Training Program is a self-paced learning resource designed for School and TAFE counsellors and Youth Mental Health clinicians. The DVD replaces the School-Link phase training provided by the Insititute of Psychiatry for school-counsellors and Youth Mental Health clinicians. The aim of the School-Link DVD Training Program is to provide a resource to enhance skills in the recognition, intervention, planning, treatment, support and prevention of mental health problems in children and young people by improving clinician’s knowledge and skills and enhancing interagency collaboration. School-Link have sent out the DVD’s to all school counsellors on the Central Coast. If you require further support regarding the roll-out of the DVD please do not hesitate to contact school-link. Module 1: Assessment and formulation of mental disorders in young people

Module 7: Mental health and wellbeing in same sex attracted young people

Module 2: Depression in adolescents

Module 8: Mental health and wellbeing in CALD young people

Module 3: Anxiety in children and young people Module 4: Self-harm in adolescents Module 5: Coexisting mental disorder and substance use problems in young people Module 6: Mental health and wellbeing in Aboriginal young people: Strength in culture

Module 9: Introduction to Cognitive Behaviour Therapy (CBT) and exposure based CBT Module 10: Introduction to Interpersonal Psychotherapy for adolescents (IPT-A)

For more information contact Dani or Helen on the School-Link Consultion Line 0414 193 139

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ycentral and headspace update

ycentral website update What’s new on the ycentral website for May 2013 Families Week Afternoon Tea and CYPMH Carers Booklet Launch http://www.ycentral.com.au/events IDAHO DAY http://www.ycentral.com.au/events Pride in Diversity http://www.ycentral.com.au/events/archive

headspace Gosford - update We have a facebook business page now for headspace Gosford. Please go on and ‘like’ it to become a fan! The link is http://www.facebook.com/pages/headspace-Gosford/ or just search for the ‘headspace Gosford’ page. Please feel free to share the page with others. Please also bear in mind that clients, staff and community partners will be ‘liking’ the page so it may be worth ensuring your security settings are relatively private on your own facebook profile page and to never accept friend requests from clients (if they find you on Facebook). We will be posting photos, news and events on this page regularly. There is also a disclaimer in the ‘About us’ section to explain the page is for INFORMATION ONLY and not help seeking.

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prideindiversity - engaging allies for change

Pride in Diversity is Australia’s first and only not-for-profit workplace program designed specifically to assist Australian employers with the inclusion of lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and Intersex (LGBTI) employees. As a member-based program, Pride in Diversity works closely with human resourses, diversity professionals and LGBTI Network Leaders in all aspects of LGBTI and within all sectors of the Australian workforce. No matter your starting point, we work with your team to understand the importance of LGBT inclusion and to map out a strategy that will enable you to successfully work towards best practice. Drawing from extensive experience in organisational development, diversity practice and the implementation of LGBT related initiatives within the workplace, Pride in Diversity brings with it years of both practical experience and know-how. Being positive towards gay employees is the ultimate litmus test for an inclusive culture and takes an Australian diversity strategy to the next level by ensuring that workplaces are inclusive of all employees, regardless of race/ethnicity, gender, age, sexual orientation, disability or religion. While LGBT is an assumed agenda item on most progressive diversity strategies in the US and UK, it is still relatively new to Australia. As a result, there are not a lot of practitioners who have the experience or expertise to assist diversity and HR executives with the implementation of LGBT related strategies, or that offer LGBT specific advice and support. This program provides Australian employers with that support. The Pride in Diversity program has been designed to assist you in strengthening your brand and reputation as an inclusive employer by providing you with the expertise and support required to implement or strengthen the LGBT component of your diversity strategy. For more information go to the website: www.prideindiversity.com.au

Top marks for new Rainbow Tick The unreliable rainbow sticker has now been replaced with a ‘world first’ national Rainbow Tick system to guarantee certain health services in Australia provide LGBTI-friendly care. Health and human services from local GPs to hospitals can apply for the rainbow tick accreditation bodies, Quality, Innovation and Performance. LGBTI rights advocates and health professionals alike are welcoming the new official standard which will ensure those who get the tick will know how to approach LGBTI issues the right way. It has six standards that health services must meet, such as having LGBTI needs represented in policy and relevant forms changed to include gender diversity and intersex status. Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria worked with partners to create the standards that were launched on Friday 19th April at the Health in Difference conference in Melbourne. Gay and Lesbian Health Victoria director Liam Leonard said the rainbow tick was the first of its nature in the world. “For an agency to meet them they have to meet formal processes of accrediation, not another gay agency saying there is a gay doctor, they to go through rigorous process and that’s a first in the world,” he said. “It’s not just putting posters in your waiting room, it’s changing all your intake forms, it’s having a risk register for LGBTI clients, it’s professional development.” He said there there were two ways that organisations would benefit from the new system. Firstly, health agencies want to show they can cater for community diversity. “The second thing is there is so much going on in the LGBTI space at the moment that I think there’s just a pay-off for organisations to show that they are engaging with that.” The six standards services are assessed against are: • Disclosure and documentation; • Organisational capability; • Professional development; and • Consumer consultation; • Access and intake. • GLBTI cultural safety; Source: Star Observer, Issue 1172, 2013

For more information go to www.glhv.org.au

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ycentral Van @ Community Events

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ycentral Van @ Community Events

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Information for Families

What you can do to ‘bully-proof’ your kid? While there is no guaranteed bully-proofing strategy, there are some steps that can help reduce victimisation: As a parent it is helpful to figure out which strategies may best fit your child’s needs and situation. Step 1: Stay Cool Staying cool and avoiding a reaction is an early step to avoid escalating bullying. Some strategies to assist a child to remain calm include: Empowering your child: Stress to your child that he can control how he reacts to a bullying situation “You can’t control what another person says or does, but you can control how you react.” Identify motivation: If your child understands that a bully wants a reaction he may be more likely to stay cool. Turn down strong feelings: Help your child learn ways to turn down a heated look and switch to a neutral expression. Suggest replacers: If your child tears up easily, they will need to learn what to do instead of crying, such as walking away quickly, count to ten or hum a song in your head. Step 2: Be Assertive Helping kids to appear assertive and confident (not passive or aggressive) can be important in reducing bullying. Children do need to practice being assertive and learning to be confident in their own skin so that when they need to stand up for themselves they do. Developing a strong posture, strong, steady voice a firm no and walk away response can reduce victimisation. Step 3: Use a Comeback A one line assertive response delivered using a firm voice and strong body language has potential to diffuse bullying and stop it from proceeding to the next level. Annoying, agitating, insulting, threatening or making fun of a bully can make things worse so a neutral response or sometimes a humorous response can diffuse teasing or taunting. What else can you do to help your child Kids who appear capable, confident and resourceful are generally more successful at deflecting bullying. Arming your child with confidence is one of the best defences. Finding a hobby, interest, sport or talent that your child enjoys and excels at to boost inner strength. Children who are isolated from peers can be an easy target. Does your child have a support network? Social skills are beneficial and teachable – can your child benefit from learning how to start conversations, join a group, encourage others or make friends. Take a look at how other kids dress and act. Clothes, haircuts, shoe styles and accessories do matter and help kids gain peer approval. Kids appearance, behaviour and hygiene does influence peer acceptance.

Bullying bystanders stand up!!!! In August last year headspace Gosford hosted a private screening of the film ‘Bully’ for members of the Department of Education and Communities and Central Coast Local Health District. The confronting film highlighted the impacts that bullying has on our young people. As a result of this screening, it was decided that a working party would be established to assist with combatting this issue at a local level. headspace Gosford has delivered on their promise to take further action and have established a working party in partnership with faculty members from a number of Central Coast High Schools, clinical staff from Children and Young People’s Mental Health, a School Link representative and a headspace Gosford representative. Simon Ashley-Binge, Manager of headspace Gosford is excited about the new initiative and says; “The main aim of this program is to promote and protect the mental health of all members of the school community. The goal is to reduce bullying problems via communication and teamwork in all of our individual schools. We want to create a shift from the focus being on fixing individuals, to that of creating healthy systems in all Central Coast schools.” Bullying can undermine a child’s wellbeing and ability to learn, and yet only a small percentage of children and teens ever tell anyone they are being bullied. The focus of the working party will be on cyber-bullying, encouraging bystanding students to speak up, and on shifting the culture of schools to be one of positive behaviour and remembering to be kind to one another. Schools need to support the culture that says ‘It’s OK for students to report bullying incidences’ – this way the cycle of silence can be broken. The private working party will meet bi-monthly at headspace Gosford in the Gateway Centre. headspace Gosford, located Level 2 Gateway Centre 237 Mann St Gosford, provides support for young people aged 12 – 25. headspace can help with: • general health; • mental health and wellbeing; • alcohol and other drug services; and • education, employment and other services.

For more information on headspace Gosford www.headspace.org.au/gosford

This piece is an excerpt from Bully, an action plan for teachers, parents, and communities to combat the bullying crisis. Edited by Lee Hirsch & Cynthia Lowen with Dina Santorelli.

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Less Heat - More Warmth - Ian Luscombe How can we deal with this? An obvious initial strategy is that of being aware that this can actually occur. That these children can use intimidating tactics, provocative gestures, hurtful, cruel and foul language in an attempt to get the adult to fulfill the abusive role. Knowing this is the first step in preventing ourselves from reconfirming the child’s world view. By seeing the child’s provocative actions for what they are, can allow us Here’s the story: to approach these children with less heat and more warmth. Many years ago a close friend of mine was enrolled in a “body Implicit in some of these provocative actions is the notion work” course. During one of the workshops on this course, that the children are also testing you to see if you can be participants were asked to lie on the floor and get into a trusted not to hurt them and not reject them. meditative state. When they were about five minutes into their relaxation, just as they were experiencing a wonderfully Remember, when dealing with these kids don’t be surprised sublime state, the teacher slammed two saucepan lids if their behaviour gets worse before it gets better. In fact, together. Such a thunderclap had the obvious effect. Some expect it to. people swore at the teacher, others sat in bewildered Another useful strategy is that of having some stock phrases amazement, while a fair few were in tears, too startled to or planned language at the ready. Such language is of speak. The obvious question, “Why?” was demanded of the particular importance when we feel under pressure and are teacher. She explained, rather perfunctorily, that she wanted not sure of what to do next. When dealing with these children them to experience what she called a “startled reaction.” I we need to come from our head (planned) and not from our guess they did. gut (reactive). Rather than get into a power struggle with the child and threaten something in the heat of the moment that After a short time was spent processing how the participants we cannot follow through later, or threaten something that is had felt about what had happened, she asked them to again punitive and only serves to reconfirm the child’s hostile view lie on the floor and meditate. Trusting lot that they were of the world, it is better to say something that allows both they complied, only this time they were forewarned that in the child and the adult some time to cool down. Something three minutes she would bash the saucepan lids together. that provides an opportunity for both to reflect upon what After about two minutes people started to get unsettled, the is happening. An example of one such phrase, which I use fidgeting became more obvious and the general restlessness quite often with oppositional children who continually refuse more pronounced. The atmosphere became increasingly to follow instructions is: “I want you to make a good choice, charged as the three minute deadline approached. About so you will need to follow the instruction. I’ll give you a a half minute after the deadline had elapsed the sense of couple of minutes to think about it and I’ll come back and anticipation became excruciating, so much so that someone check on you.” finally snapped and yelled out, “Slam the bloody lids together!” It was only after the lids had been banged that This provides some breathing space for the child to think about their actions and, more importantly, shows the child participants began to relax. that despite their having behaved in a provocative and Leaving ethical considerations of this experiment aside, how challenging fashion, the adults around them will remain calm is this story relevant to our management of some children (outwardly at least) and not become hostile towards them. who have emotional or behavioural problems? Quite simply, it is to do with expectation and belief. If we substitute the Further, it allows the adult to work out what they will do saucepan lids for a regular clout over the ear, belittling cruel next. The adults, by behaving in such a controlled manner, statements or constant ridicule, then we can gain a small are modelling to the child a different way of being in the (very small) measure of understanding of the expectations world. They are showing that, even when under pressure, adults can still be caring, supportive and nurturing, while at of these children. the same time being firm, persistent and consistent. Even If a child has grown up in an abusive environment – either though it may be difficult to discern in some children any physically or emotionally – then that child will carry around a behavioural or attitudinal change while they are at Redbank, ‘memory store’ (Dodge, 1986) of what their world is like. And the effects of modelling appropriate behaviour is powerful for such children their world is a none too pleasant place. and should not be underestimated. When these children experience a temporary reprieve from such abuse, such as when they go to school or come to As important as the child’s expectations of the world are to Redbank, locked into their body and mind is the strong belief them, are the adult’s expectations of what they believe the that the world is a dangerous place, that adults cannot be child can – or can’t – achieve. The better the behaviour you trusted, that adults abuse. It is not uncommon for them to expect, the better the behaviour you will get. Always expect expect that the abuse will continue and will go about trying a lot. And leave the saucepan lids in the cupboard. to recreate the abusive environment from which they’ve Ian Luscombe, Principal, Redbank School come. Just like the poor fellow who wanted the saucepans Ian.luscombe@det.nsw.edu.au lids hit together to ease his sense of anxiety, these children will go around with a sense of dreaded expectation that may Sourced from Childrens Hospital Westmead School-Link Newsletter Mental only be temporarily relieved by having adults conform to Health and Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities, their negative view of the world, the belief that adults will Volume 4, Issue 1 2013, Pg 8-9. eventually hurt them in one way or another. I like stories. I particularly like true stories that have about them a sense of unreality, stories that leave the listener wondering whether they’ve just been privy to someone’s weird life experience, or have simply been entertained by an urban myth. This following story is true. It is a story that I have told many times to teacher groups at workshops and seminars to illustrate an important concept.

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St Edwards at Peninsula Links Peninsula Link Day is about linking services ot the community. The day brings together a range of government and non-government organisations, businesses, and community volunteers to provide free services to homeless people or those doing it tough.The day provides: • a sense of community with an inclusive, welcoming environment, quality activities and services; • free access to services to homeless people and those at risk of homelessness, on one day, in the one location; • opportunity to engage and increase the collaborative involvement of homeless people, businesses, not for profits, government sector and volunteers to work together.

St Edwards College proudly supports Peninsula Links day and were pleased to have ten year 10 students representing us. St Edwards enjoys being involved as it is a great sight to see many Social Justice agencies on the Central Coast come together in solidarity to offer their services to people suffering lonliness, mental illness, homelessness, disability and other disadvantage. It is vital for our young people, as part of their learning to engage with people who are disadvantaged, starting right here on the CC. Education is a matter of the heart, not just the head - so an opportunity like this offers us insight into reality. Isaac Bean, Nathan Lara, David Cunningham, Connor Killalea, were a few of our students who attended. Pat Dell, St Edwards College,

Year 11 students act out for Mental Health Year 11 drama students from the wider Hunter region and Central Coast have been invited to audition for MindPlay – an exciting annual drama competition providing accessible means for young people to explore mental health issues and win cash prizes for their school.

Entries will be judged on both the accuracy of the mental health message and the quality of their dramatic performance, by judges with both clinical health and theatre backgrounds. The theme of MindPlay this year is resilience. The term resilience is used in mental health to describe a person’s capacity to cope with changes and chalThe competition, which been running for over 16 years in lenges, and to bounce back during difficult times. Newcastle, is designed to foster creativity and connection among students, while promoting mental health awareness, MindPlay Coordinator, Georgia Davies, said the competiearly help-seeking behaviour and reducing the stigma associ- tion has been a popular community event over the years. ated with mental illness. “We all have a role to play in promoting resilience and wellbeing and removing misconceptions around mental illEach year, schools from far as Taree and Gosford converge ness.” Simon Ashley-Binge, manager of headspace Goson Newcastle to showcase a 15-minute dramatic work ex- ford said “A partnership with the Hunter Institute of Menploring a mental health theme, which they themselves have tal Health is an exciting opportunity to support creative written and developed. Of these auditions, six schools are outlets and increase help-seeking behaviours in Central chosen to perform at a Grand Final evening, which will take Coast youth”. place this year on Saturday 22 June at Hunter Theatre, Cameron St. Broadmeadow. Last year’s finalists included Dungog High, Lambton High, Rutherford Technology High, Belmont High, Toronto High In April, students attended a free workshop with international and Hunter Valley Grammar School. This year three Cenplaywrights Suzie Miller and Caleb Lewis as part of the Mind- tral Coast schools have entered the competition; Gosford Play initiative. This annual scriptwriting workshop aims to give High, Lisarow High and Narara Valley High. budding scriptwriters a rare insight into script development. Cash prizes will be awarded to the top three schools, with In 2013, the Hunter Institute of Mental Health will partner with first prize of $1250 sponsored by Newcastle Rotary Club youth organisations headspace Hunter and headspace Gos- Enterprises. Other sponsors this year include Tantrum ford, who will assist in the coordination of the event and pro- Theatre, Xstrata Coal and Limelight Creative Media. vide expert sources of information for the students as they Auditions this year will take place on Saturday 1 June and research their pieces. tickets for the Grand Final will be on sale shortly. For more information on MindPlay please contact the Hunter Institute of Mental Health on (02) 49246900 or see our website www.himh.org.au/mindplay.

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Service’s @ ycentral

Children & Young People’s Mental Health Traditionally CC CYPMH focused predominantly on the provision of tertiary mental health services for young people aged 12-24 years, more recently service expansion has included the provision of care to women in the perinatal period and families with complex mental health and alcohol and other drug issues. The service also has a strong focus on promotion, prevention, early intervention, research and evaluation. In total there are seven teams within CC CYPMH. Teams specifically focussing on young people:

• headspace Gosford is an entry point for young people

who need help but are at ‘LOW RISK’. The aim of headspace is to engage with young people who are NOT experiencing a mental health crisis as our response time to see a young person can be up to 72 hours. For mental health crisis phone Statewide Mental Health Telephone Access Line on 1800 011 511;

• The Promotion, Prevention & Early intervention incor-

porates a number of portfolios including parenting and children of parents with a mental illness (COPMI), schoollink, eymh, community awareness and increasing mental health literacy and research and evaluation.

For new appointments with headspace @ ycentral please call 4304 7870 between 9.00am-4.00pm Monday to Friday To change or cancel an appointment call 4304 7870 between 8.30am - 5.00pm

At ycentral there are also a range of other services and

• ypage provides information, mental health assessment, collocated partners: brief intervention and referral for children and young people aged 0-24 years;

• Brief Intervention Team meets the needs of young people who may be reluctant to engage with CYPMH clinical case management teams (YPPI or YMH) or require a more time limited follow up service;

• Youth Mental Health provides intensive case manage-

ment for young people aged 12-24 years with a range of mental health problems and mental illness (except psychosis);

• ycentral GP Clinics At ycentral young people can at-

tend the GP Clinics to address issues such as women’s health, eating disorders, sexual health, men’s health and general health. The clinics are bulk billed under a Mental Health Care plan.

• Private Allied Health Providers can provide counselling

services through the Medicare Better Access to Mental Health (BAMHS) scheme. Referral can be mede via headspec of GP’s.

• Young People & Early Psychosis Team (YPPI) provides specialist intensive case management supporting young people with early psychosis; and

• Youth Mental Health Recovery and Therapeutic

Groups offers a range of specifically designed groups to meet the holistic needs of young people with mental health problems.

Other teams within CYPMH include: • Perinatal Infant Mental Health Team This team provides support and interventions which focus on promoting the development of a positive infant relationship and positive mental health of parents and baby;

For urgent assistance Phone Statewide Mental Health Telephone Access Line (24 hrs/7) on 1800 011 511. This service will take your details and make a referral to CYPMH if appropriate. Alternatively they may give you advice or information about other services which may be better suited to the needs of the client.

• Whole Family Team The Whole Family Team focuses on

providing a range of interventions for the whole family where there is parental mental health and/or drug and alcohol problems and child protection concerns (Department of Community Services & specialist services referral only);

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Call for Artworks.....NAIDOC Week Art Exhibition

n: atio m r rg info 006 c.o ore 49737 etmp m s For one: rg oris Ph ns@m mpc.o t o e oriz riss il: h b: mo a Em We

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