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TERM 2 2012 Vol: 6 Issue: 2

N e wsletter Children and Young People’s Mental Health

Contact Details

From the SCHOOL-LINK COORDINATOR

Helen Astolfi School-Link Coordinator Gateway Centre, Suite 1, Level 2 237 Mann St, Gosford 2250 Ph: (02) 4304 7878 Fax: (02) 4304 7800

Welcome to the term 2 School-Link newsletter it has been a very busy time without our full-time School-Link Coordinator. However, I am pleased to announce NSW Health has permanantly funded the School-Link Program across the state. School-Link is a state-wide initiative funded by NSW Health working in partnership with the Department of Education and Communities (DEC) and other services. This collaboration aims to improve mental health for children and young people, as well as enhancing partnerships between child and adolescent mental health services and their local schools and TAFE colleges. The contract arrangements that have previously been in place for many years with School-Link has meant an ever changing workforce. Now with the permanant funding we may see a more stable School-Link workforce both locally and across the state.

INSIDE THIS ISSUE: From the SL Coordinator

1

ycentral Van Launch

2

ycentral QR Code

4

Services & Information for Carers

5

MH & Well-Being Conference

6

Evidence Based Treatment

7

MH Promotion & Prevention

9

Aboriginal Culture Day

10

Photography & Short Film Comp

11

Health Promotion for Schools

12

SMILES Program

13

RYSS & PSN

14

Justice & Forensic MH SL

15

Parenting App

16

headspace & ycentral

17

I would like to welcome and introduce Dani Szikszai to the full-time School-Link position. Dani comes to us from the Hunter Institute of Mental Health and has worked on a range of youth mental health projects related to schools including Response Ability, the Mindframe National Media Initiative and Mindplay. I am looking forward to working with Dani and she is already running with a number of our programs that have been put on hold - so welcome Dani it is truly great to have you on board. As you will see throughout the newsletter. there has been a lot of activity within Children and Young People’s Mental Health (CYPMH), headspace CC and youth related services across the coast. The ycentral Community Outreach van has been launched across a range of community events such as Going Off At The Swamp (GOATS) Festival and Peninsula Links. In partnership with DEC, Catholic Schools and Central Coast Local Health District (CCLHD) Health Promotion Unit are in the process of organising the 2012 Mental Health and Wellbeing Schools Conference. It is going to be a fantastic event with lots of interesting and inspiring presenters, see inside for further details and mark out in your diary. Finally, Hornsby Ku-ring-gai Hospital welcomed the Honourable Jillian Skinner NSW Minister for Health to perform the ground breaking ceremony to mark the formal construction of the new Mental Health Development Project. Included in the construction is a 12-bed Child and Adolescent Mental Health inpatient facility. This is great news for the CC as our young people will also have access to the youth mental health purpose built facility. Cheers Helen & Dani

CIRCULATION PLEASE DISTRIBUTE TO : This document may be reproduced in whole or part subject to the inclusion of an acknowledgement of the source

Principal

Deputy Principal

School Counsellor

Head Teacher-Welfare

Head Teacher-PD/H/PE

Year Advisors

Learning Support Team

Staff Room

MENTAL HEALTH AND EDUCATION WORKING TOGETHER


school-link

TERM 2 2012

N e wsletter

Vol: 6 Issue: 2

Launch of ycentral van

ycentral Community Outreach Van ycentral is very excited to launch our new outreach van The van is a key component to ycentral outreach program that will allow young people to meet and interact with staff from ycentral to dispel any myths regarding mental health and mental health services, it is hoped this initiative will reduce stigma associated with mental health. The ycentral outreach van will provide opportunities for promotion, prevention and early intervention for mental health across the community, focussing specifically on young people 12-24 years, but also targeting families, carers, schools and other services. It will provide an avenue for young people to access information through a means that is non-confrontational and youth friendly. The ycentral van will be hitting the streets with giveaway show bags and information about healthy relationships, how to stress less, links to websites and friendly health professionals. We are grateful for the generosity of Spandex (Spandex specialises in sign making and digital print) who kindly donated time, energy and bore the expense of getting the ycentral outreach van wrapped. Sincere thanks to Spandex and Local Signs for their hard work. The first launch of the van was in youth week at the ‘Going Off At The Swamp’ (GOATS) Festival in San Remo on Sunday the 15th April. There was also a BBQ at Terrigal Beach on Friday 20th April near the surf club. ycentral would like to thank Gosford City Council (GCC) Lifeguards for their support at many of our events over the past years. Craig Healey, Supervisor, GCC Lifeguards and his team are committed to supporting ycentral events that promote youth mental health. We continue to enjoy a great partnership and look forward to our next joint venture.....!!!!

A big thankyou to Spandex for their generosity with the fantastic results of the wrapping of the van. Spandex donated their time, energy and cost of the entire job. The ycentral Community Outreach Van has been seen around the coast at a range of community activities already. Last week the van was seen at the Peninsula Links Day (PLD) held at Woy Woy. The PLD day targets people within the local community who are ‘doing it tough’ and provides them with a range of personal services such as haircuts, massage, clothing, food hampers, Central Coast Local Health District Podiatry Services and Community Nursing immunisations to name a few. Additionally, government and non-government services attended to raise their profile within the community to increase their access to those needing assistance. Over 500 people organisations such as the Salvation Army, Carer Respite, Central Coast Local Health District Children & Young People’s Mental Health, Accommodation Services, Centrelink and Job Services. These were just a few of the services on the day with Rotary and Salvation Army provided everyone with a sausage sandwich and cold drink. Deborah O’Neill Federal MP for Robertson also spent a couple of hours talking to the different organisations including staff from ycentral. Deborah was also more than happy to have her photo taken with the ycentral staff and our Van. Deborah has always been a great supporter of ycentral services which includes Children & Young People’s Mental Health and headspace CC. The van also attended the CC Schools Indigenous touch footy game as part of Reconciliation Week. If you see the van out and about come and say hello to the friendly staff from ycentral.

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ycentral van launch @ community events

Youth Week van launch at GOATS Festival

Youth Week van launch BBQ at Terrigal Beach

Peninsula Links Community Event - ycentral staff with Deborah O’Neill Federal MP for Robertson

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ycentral QR Code

So what’s a QR Code??? QR Code (Quick Response Code) is the trademark for a type of matrix barcode (or two-dimensional code) first designed for the automotive industry. More recently, the system has become popular outside the industry due to its fast readability and large storage capacity compared to standard barcodes. The code consists of black modules (square dots) arranged in a square pattern on a white background. They have in recent years become common in consumer advertising and packaging, because the dissemination of smarphones has put a barcode reader in everyone’s pocket for the first time. As a result, the QR code has become a focus of advertising strategy, since it provides quick and effortless access to the brand’s website. So download the free QR reader app on your smart phone and scan the ycentral QR image to get to the website.....there you will have access to both CYPMH and headspace CC information.....great for our young people!

School-Link Training School-Link is a state-wide initiative funded by NSW Health working in partnership with Department of Education and Training and other services. This collaboration aims to improve mental health for children and young people, as well as enhancing partnerships between child and adolescent mental health services and their local schools and TAFE colleges. Key focus areas of the CYPMH School-Link Program: • supported pathways to care for children and young people with mental health problems; • supporting mental health promotion, prevention and early intervention programs in schools and TAFE; • training for school and TAFE staff, child and adolescent mental health staff and other workers on mental health; and • enhancing consultation, liaison, referral and support between health and education staff. st lth Fir a e this H l nta 12 in e 0 2 M r ere o f If you are interested in training for your staff, finding out about prese like alt dates ld g u in o in w a n@ vention and early intervention programs and/or improving links with Aid Tr r - or if you ntact Hele o e c tt your local Youth Mental Health Service we would be happy to speak e newsle dates pleas 04 7878 with you. Contact Helen @ ycentral on 4304 7878 e iv l t ra 43 na ycent

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Services and Information for Carers New Retreat for Carers

About Carers

Carers can often spend many hours or days at the bedside of their loved one during a hospital stay, however, it can often be at the expense of their own health and wellbeing. The Central Coast Local Health District (CCLHD) Carer Retreat has been opened to give carers a place where they can take a break, have a free cuppa and unwind. Located at 21 Beane Street, Gosford the Carer Retreat is housed in the same building as the Carer Support Unit. It is a short walk from the wards or a short trip on the CCLHD courtesy bus. The retreat provides a quiet place where carers can enjoy calming music, read a book or newspaper, eat their lunch or just rest. The Carer Retreat also offers business centre amenities including access to phones, computers, the internet and mobile phone chargers.

Carers are usually family members or friends who provide support to children or adults who have a disability, mental illness, chronic condition or who are frail and aged. Carers may provide care for a few hours a week or every day and are often unpaid. They may receive incomes from a range of sources including government pensions and benefits. Many carers don’t consider themselves to be carers - they see themselves as just family members. As a result, they may not ask for help, and can sometimes miss out on a wide range of services available today to help carers meet their responsibilities.

Often the wards are extremely busy and there is no appropriate place for a carer to make a private phone call to relatives or agencies such as Centrelink. The Carer Retreat will provide the privacy needed for any situation. Volunteers are available to orientate carers to the facilities and the Carer Support Team is also located at the Carer Retreat for information and advice to support carers in their role.

Who are Young Carers Young carers are children and young people, 25 years or under, who care for and support a family member who has a long term physical illness, mental health problem, disability or drug and/or alcohol problem. Young carers might be a sibling, child, grandchild or other relative who provides the main caring role (primary carer) or who just provides some assistance with the care. Young carers may or may not live with the person they care for and may or may not provide daily care.

Young carers may have more responsibilities than their friends - sometimes a lot more

Supporting young carers s in secondary school Chances are that you have at least two young carers in your class

Free Call: 1800 242 636*

Sian Keane Manager, & Volunteers of Carers Support CCLHD

www.youngcarers.net.au *1800 242 636 is

a free call except

from mobile phones

. Calls from mobile

phones are charge

d at mobile rates.

Primary and Secondary Teachers Carer resources available at www. youngcarers.net.au

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TERM 2 2012 Vol: 6 Issue: 2

Mental Health and Well-Being Conference School-Link in partnership with NSW DEC, Catholic Schools Office, Broken Bay Diocese, Central Coast Local Health District, Health Promoting High Schools Network and Children and Young People’s Mental Health - School-Link will be hosting the second Mental Health and Schools conference

20th December, 2012 9am to 3pm St Edwards College East Gosford This year the conference will also look at the broader issues of mental health and well-being in our young people and will therefore be relevant to a range of school staff. Conference program and registration details will be forwarded when finalised. In the meantime save the date to your diary!!!! For more information contact Helen on 4304 7878 or email hastolfi@nsccahs.health.nsw.gov.au

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Evidence Based Treatment and Prevention Title: Adolescent school absenteeism: modelling social and individual risk factors Authors: Jo Magne Ingul1,2, Christian A. Klo¨ ckner2, Wendy K. Silverman3 & Hans M. Nordahl2,4 1Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Health Trust, Kirkegt 2, 7600 Levanger, Norway. E-mail: jo.magne.ingul@hnt.no 2Department of Psychology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, NTNU, Trondheim 7491, Norway 3Florida International University, Miami, USA 4Department of Psychiatry, Levanger Hospital, Nord-Trøndelag Health Trust, Norway Background: School absenteeism is a complex problem that includes risk factors associated with individual traits, socio-economic conditions, family structure, the school and society. The consequences of extensive school absenteeism can be detrimental for the youth. Method: In this exploratory study we aimed to investigate the relative importance of different risk factors on school absenteeism. We assessed 865 Norwegian high school students testing a model of school absenteeism using Exploratory Structural Equation Modelling (ESEM). Results: Analysis show that on the individual level most of the measured risk factors were significantly associated with absenteeism. School absenteeism was predicted by externalising behaviour, family work and health, and school environment directly. Conclusion: The implications of the findings on school absenteeism are that it will be important to focus more on the context and co-occurrence of these problems in order to fully understand them. Key Practitioner Message: • School absenteeism has been associated with many social, contextual and psychiatric risk factors and is a major predictor of adult psychosocial problems. • Risk factors appear to act differently when grouped as opposed to solitary. • Externalising problems and family work and health are more important than internalising problems in predicting school absenteeism. • The number of risk factors or balance between risk and protective factors are more important than single factors in predicting school absenteeism. • Clinically this calls for broad assessments and individually tailored interventions. School-Link - A rapid review MH-Kids commissioned the Sax Institute to complete a rapid evidence review to summarise the evidence for the effectiveness of school based programs targeting the prevention of or early intervention in mental health problems in children and adolescents. It also aimed to summarise information about shared care collaborative models between schools and mental health providers. The report is intended to provide an evidence base to inform the future directions of the NSW School-Link Initiative. Broadly speaking there were two main findings, firstly that there are effective prevention programs that can be introduced into schools to prevent the onset of mental disorders, and secondly with respect to the health led programs, at this stage, there is insufficient evidence to evaluate the effectiveness of collaborative care models, and, in particular, there is no evidence to determine whether they improve the mental health of those who need early intervention. Except for the NSW School-Link Initiative, most of the new programs, such as headspace, are recent developments.The report has been uploaded to the Sax Insititute’s website:‘School based intervention programs and shared care collaborative models targeting the prevention of or early intervention in child and adolescent mental health problems: a systematic review’.

If you would like to download the full report go to http://www.saxinstitute.org.au/policyresearchexchange/EvidenceCheckReviews.

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More research.......

How COURAGE can help students learn and achieve….

In terms of educational strategies, the study signals the importance of perseverance and the benefits of reducing academic fear and anxiety. Strategies that teachers and parents can use to boost perseverance are to encourage students to set goals; to decide what they are aiming for and how to get there.

Teaching students how to bring courage into their day-today school life can improve their learning, performance, and engagement at school. This is a key implication of research by Professor Andrew Martin, from the Faculty of Education & Social Work at the University of Sydney. His research on academic courage was recently published in ‘School Psychology Also, students who are taught how to manage their study Quarterly’. by planning, using their time well, and prioritising will have some of the tools to help them to persist in the face of The study looks at how courage in the classroom can be difficult tasks. Ways to reduce fear of failure and anxiety linked to academic performance and engagement. It exam- about schoolwork include teaching students that mistakes ined four approaches to schoolwork in high school - courage, are opportunities for learning and to see their academic confidence, avoidance and helplessness. Professor Andrew performance in terms of personal progress and improveMartin explains, “Courage is defined as perseverance in the ment. face of academic difficulty and fear”. For example, Professor Martin’s previous research has Confidence, by contrast, is perseverance without the presence found that focusing on personal best goals can be a way of fear. “On some important outcomes (including achievement of reducing anxiety in competitive educational situations. in literacy and numeracy) courage was as effective an ap- “Shifting students’ focus onto controllable elements such proach as confidence. On other outcomes, confidence was as effort and goal setting is aimed at empowering stumore effective, however, courage was a very close second. dents and reducing problematic levels of academic fear,” So, while we already knew that confidence is linked to posi- Professor Martin said. The research sample for this study tive educational outcomes, this study is significant because comprised 7,637 high school students from 14 Australian it shows that courage is also an educationally effective re- schools. sponse - particularly in the face of fear and anxiety.” “The wonderful news for students, their teachers and parents, is that if students who lack confidence can be given strategies and the encouragement to persist, they can have good academic outcomes - indeed, matching that of confident students at the same level of ability.” Confidence may not always come easily to students, so it is heartening, Professor Martin observes, that if students persevere when they are confronted with academic challenges, it can help improve their performance and engagement. “An extra benefit is that teaching our children perseverance in the presence of fear may be a way to build their confidence. If they achieve positive outcomes as a result of being courageous, that courage may then become a springboard to confidence,” Professor Martin said.

UNIVERSITY OF SYDNEY WEBSITE, PUBLISHED 19TH AUGUST 2011 For full research paper Professor Andrew Martin, Courage in the classroom: Exploring a new framework predicting academic per-formance and engagement School Psychology Quarterly 2011, Vol 26, No 2, 145-160.

Thanks to Sydney Local Health District School-Link Term 4 2011

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CRUfADschools: MH Promotion and Prevention Courses Who are CRUfADschools? CRUfADschools is a not-for-profit initiative of the Clinical Research Unit for Anxiety and Depression (CRUfAD) at St Vincent’s Hospital, Sydney Australia. It is affiliated with the School of Psychiatry and National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre at the University of New South Wales.

Prevention of Anxiety and Depression Anxiety or depressive disorders are common in adolescents and early onset has been shown to be associated with a more chronic course of illness. The good news is that anxiety and depression in adolescents can be prevented. Effective prevention in early adolescence can help prevent impairment in adulthood. CRUfADschools is a universal prevention program that has been shown to prevent anxiety and depression. The program is targeted at Year 6-10 students and is suitable for universal classroom teaching.

What is CRUfADschools? CRUfADschools is a collection of free online courses that school teachers can use to teach students about health and well-being. The resources are designed to help students develop critical skills and knowledge that will enable them to take care of their own health. Students will also be equipped with the skills and knowledge to act effectively to help others. CRUfADschools can be accessed over the internet by teachers and their students. All of the courses address the Health and Personal Development syllabus outcomes, especially those concerned with mental health and wellbeing. The anxiety and depression course is based on Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT).

About the Courses CRUfADschools provides fun, interactive prevention courses on anxiety and depression as well as: • Stress • Alcohol • Cannabis These courses are designed to be easily implemented into a PDHPE program and will take 6 to 8 lessons. These lessons can be supplemented with the additional activities that are downloadable by the teacher.

Course Structure Courses contain four elements: (1) Teacher Resources; (2) Online questionnaires; (3) Scenarios in the form of comic-based stores; and (4) Student resources.

Evidence for CRUfADschools At CRUfADschools, researching the effectiveness of our programs is very important. Results from trials for CRUfADschools have been published in Australian and international journals. Research results show that all CRUfADschools courses improve student outcomes. The CRUfADschools interventions reduced anxiety and depressive symptoms in adolescents who completed the online and offline CBT program that was implemented by classroom teachers. Another study involving 16 schools showed that the Alcohol course increased knowledge, improved attitudes and decreased binge drinking. A cohort trial of the Stress course in 10 schools improved coping skills, improved knowledge, and decreased psychological distress (For more information about the research visit the CRUfADschools website).

Check out CRUfADschools: https://schools.crufad.org/course/show Schools can sign up and access the courses free of charge

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Aboriginal Culture Day

St Phillips Christian College held an Aboriginal Culture Day “Both ladies were fortunate enough to have escaped beearlier this month to honour Aboriginal people and learn from ing stolen from their parents, Auntie Lila was only seven years old when her cousins were stolen and recounted their history. how painful that was. Students participated in activities such as painting with Aboriginal artist Colin Wightman, didgeridoo performances, bush “Auntie Nita explained how she had overcome a childhood tucker cooking and learning the colours of the Aboriginal flag. where she received little to no education and then finally as an adult enrolled first in Ourimbah TAFE and then finally “We started the day with acknowledgement to country by Bob in Macquarie University where she completed a degree in Williams, a traditional dance and song from the Mingaletta Aboriginal studies at the age of 68. Didge Group, led by young Kamille. We then had a presentation and very kind gift from Stephen Hobday and his family of “I was so blessed to have such amazing role models that a reconciliation painting by Aboriginal artist Colin Wightman”, speak into the lives of our children and to share about such an important part of our national culture and heritage. said principal Ms Michelle Kelly. “While I enjoyed all of it the highlight for me was meeting Lila “Auntie Lila also sang her own songs about the land. Our Grace Kirby aka ‘Auntie Lila’ and Anita Selwyn aka ‘Auntie students were in awe of the stories they had to tell between them and learnt so more in one day about AborigiNita’. nal culture and history than they could in a month of readThey shared their stories of what is was like growing up as ing text books,” she said. Aboriginal children. ‘They had beautiful memories to share as well as heart wrenching stories of abuse and discrimination. Michelle Kelly Principal St Phillips Christian College

Mingaletta Didge Group

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Mental Health Photography & Short Film Comp

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Central Coast Health Promotion for schools in 2012 Q4:H2O

For stage 2 students in term 1, 2012 to promote healthy drinks. Similar in format to the popular Q4: Live Outside the Box activity, this includes a student card to record drinks for one week, posters, Teachers Resource Book (plus interactive whiteboard resource) and newsletter snippets. Most schools have registered, but it’s not too late – get in touch!

Live Life Well @ School

This project is now available to ALL schools: DEC, Catholic and independent primary schools. LLW@S is a DEC and NSW Health partnership to assist primary schools to develop and implement nutrition education and physical activity programs to support quality teaching practices in PDHPE. To date 87% of Central Coast DEC schools have participated in LLW@S. The 2 day teacher workshop has funding for teacher relief, plus a $2,000 Implementation Action Grant. Next workshop dates are term 1, March 22 and 23, 2012 at Gorokan.

PDHPE Network

Offers popular after-school workshops in terms 1 to 3. Workshops are designed to provide teachers with practical skills they can use in leading and promoting physical activity and nutrition. A flyer is sent to Network members and to your school Principal. Individual school consultancy is also available.

Crunch & Sip

State-wide initiative offered to all schools to support a fruit/vegetable and water break. Registered Schools receive a Crunch & Sip Resource Pack. Certified schools with a school policy receive a fence sign and classroom posters.

Canteen Network

Canteen Network meetings are offered each term to support and update canteen workers to implement the Fresh Tastes @ school healthy canteen strategy. Individual consultancy is also available. Schools are invited to apply for the Central Coast Healthy Canteen Award for 2012 – schools are recognised with a bright green apple fence sign.

Q4: Family Activation Pack

These fun-filled packs with games and activities are based on the 12 Fundamental Movement Skills. They will be available again for schools to distribute to their families.

Q4: L iv theeBOutsid e Mini ox pass p a

ort f vail www able to do or K-Yea r .heal thpro wnload f 2 rom motio n.com .au

Live Outside the Box

This popular activity is available to all schools for STAGE 3 only. In any term. To order please call: 9879 0443 or email tobinfo@doh. health.nsw.gov.au

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The SMILES Program

A School Holiday program for 8-12 year olds, who have a family member experiencing a mental health problem (specifically schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, depression or anxiety) The SMILES Program is designed to achieve:

• • • • •

This is achieved through:

Education about mental illness

Increased ability to cope effectively

A new freedom for self expression

•  Artwork & music

Development of creativity

•  Peer support

Reduction in feelings of isolation

•  Interactive exercises

Increase in self-esteem and much more!

•  Relaxation exercises

This all takes place in a fun-filled, supportive and caring atmosphere.

When:

9am - 3pm daily Tuesday 10th to Thursday 12th July 2012

Where:

East Gosford Scouts Hall, Wattle Street East Gosford

If required, you may be eligible for transport assistance through the Young Carers Program - Please contact the CCRC on 1800 052 222

For further information and registration contact the facilitators: Tanya Doyle, Uniting Care, Mental Health, 4322 1855 tanya.doyle@ucmh.org.au Ruth Phelan, CYPMH, Central Coast Local Health District, 4304 7878

Internationally recognised as best practice by the American Journal of Orthopsychiatry (Accepted Apr 2003, published Jul 2004).

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Positive Support Network

FREE.....FREE.....FREE.....!!!! A fantastic program for Schools and School Camps....!!!

Positive Support Network (PSN) HIV Trivia Game Now Available to be run in your school! This activity covers issues relevant to HIV/AIDS & STI’s in a fun and interactive way for years 10, 11 & 12 for the PDHPE/Crossroads/Wellness Program curriculum Co-facilitated by Positive Speakers who are trained and supported by PSN. Contact: Paul Maudlin @ PSN on 4323 2905 email: posnet@tpg.com.au

GENQ @ Regional Youth Support Services GenQ is now WEEKLY in Gosford starting 6th March. The Interlynk Lounge will be open for access to the GenQ group.... exclusively! Every Tuesday will be the GenQ afternoon from 2 - 5pm. @ Regional Youth Support Services 123 Donnison St Gosford contact Jamie on 4323 2374 genq@ryss.com.au WYONG GenQ 1st Wednesday of the month @ San Remo Neighbourhood Centre 28 Brava Ave San Remo Contact Corina 4390 7888

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Justice Health School-Link Initiative Justice & Forensic Mental Health Network School- Young people who experience a multitude of risk factors Link Initiative - supporting young offenders get back on across personal, family and social contexts will have an track through education

The Justice & Forensic Mental Health Network (JFMHN) provides health care to adults and young people in contact with the criminal justice system, both in custody and in the community, and those within the NSW forensic mental health system. Even though our clients have come into contact with the criminal justice system, the vast majority spend only a short period of time in our custody and thus it is vital that they receive support from mainstream services in the community. JFMHN is committed to working with other Government departments and Non-Government Organisations to reduce the stigma of young people in contact with the criminal justice system, to improve their health and consequently reduce criminal recidivism. In 2009 JFMHN received funding to establish its own SchoolLink initiative in recognition of the complicated and demanding needs of young people who find themselves in contact with, or at risk of coming into contact with, the criminal justice system. It has a unique role providing state-wide support to clients with highly complex and challenging problems. The JFMHN School-Link Initiative aims to:

• raise awareness of the health and well-being needs of • • •

young people who come in contact with the criminal justice system; raise awareness of the protective function that education and vocational endeavours can have for mental health and well-being of young people; facilitate understanding of the circumstances that influence a young persons successful engagement with education; support young people associated with, or in danger of being associated with, the criminal justice system to optimise access and engagement with health and education services.

Young People in Custody Data shows that for young people who are in custody the average age of leaving school is 14.4 years, with the median age being 15 years. Only 38% of young people in detention reported going to school in the six months prior to custody, 88% had been suspended from school at least once. Two thirds had been suspended three times or more. Nearly half had been excluded from school and 41% had attended a special class or special school.

increased likelihood of engaging in criminal activity. For those who are missing the protective factors of a steady education, good health and a supportive nurturing environment these risks are all the more concerning (Wilson & Tully, 2009). Research in Australia and internationally consistently shows that successful engagement and completion of education can be protective for mental health, physical health, future socio-economic status and employment as well as contact with the justice system (Geib et al 2011; Sander, 2010). Early school-leavers are more likely to experience the following;

• • • • •

poorer mental and physical health; higher unemployment rates; lower incomes and lifetime accumulated wealth; higher rates of crime; and LESS engagement in “active citizenship”. (Lamb & Rice, 2008)

A high proportion of young people in the criminal justice system have experienced disengagement from school and poor academic achievement. The inter-connection between early behaviour problems and academic difficulties are well documented (Geib et al 2011; Sprott et al 2005).

For more information on the Justice Health School-Link Initiative and Justice Health Services please contact: Kim Eisler Justice Health School-Link Project Officer Ph: 02 8372 3023 kim.eisler@justicehealth.nsw.gov.au

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Parenting App

THE AUSTRALIAN PARENTING APP FOR PARENTS OF ADOLESCENTS

Free app available on iTunes App Store and Android Market

Finding challenges in raising 9-24 year olds? FREE Australian Parenting App: • the stages of adolescence • what parenting styles and communication techniques work • how to keep a positive approach to discipline! Rosemount Good Shepherd Youth & Family Services (assisting families since 1982.) The Australian Parenting App shares our knowledge, tips and tools.

N A I L TRA APPS S U A THERENTIONF AGDOLESCENT PAR PARENTS FO

Australian Parenting App FREE from iTunes App Store or Android Market. To contact Rosemount Good Shepherd Youth & Family Services Phone 02 8571 7800 or visit our website www.rosemountgs.org.au

www.rosemountgs.org.au Finding challenges in raising 9 - 24 year olds? FREE Australian Parenting App: • the stages of adolescence • what parenting styles and communication techniques work • how to keep a positive approach to discipline

Rosemount Good Shepherd Youth & Family Services (assisting families since 1982). The Australian Parenting App shares the knowledge, tips and tools of the organisation

Australian Parenting App FREE from iTunes App Store or Android Market. www.rosemountgs.org.au

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How headspace Can Help

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headspace and School Support Online resources include; • A secondary school suicide postvention toolkit that will provide practical, step-by-step guidance; and • a range of fact sheets aimed at school staff, specific to the Outreach Teams to Schools service.

headspace and School Support headspace is excited to announce the launch of headspace School Support, a national support service for all secondary schools across Australia that are affected by the suicide of a student. The service will deliver suicide postvention services to schools through email, telephone and face-to-face support, as well as providing a range of online resources. Currently telephone and email support is available for schools, between the hours of 9am and 5pm AEST, Monday to Friday and is provided by the headspace National Office team, located in Melbourne. A number of clinical resources have also been developed and are available via the website (headspace.org.au/school support). These include the headspace School Support Suicide Postvention Toolkit – A guide for secondary schools and suicide-related fact sheets, as well as recommended links to other resources and information. Over the next 6 months teams in each state and territory will be established and will be able to work with schools at a local level. Until the teams are established support will be limited to phone and email support through the National Office. headspace will provide a service consisting initially of website information and resources, email and telephone support. • The website will consist of a number of service specific pages, based within the existing headspace website, which is aimed at secondary school staff.

The following resources are all available for free download on the headspace website

• How to talk to Young People About Suicide • Suicide Risk Factors • How to Respond to the Media Following a Suicide

• Managing Social Media Following a Suicide • Suicide Contagion • Grief Response: How Young People May Respond to Suicide

• Memorialisation and Planning for Important Events

• Parent Fact Sheet

Suicide intervention in schools

Suicide Postvention Toolkit A guide for secondary schools

headspace.org.au/schoolsupport

An evidence summary

headspace.org.au/schoolsupport

After a registration process, users will have the option to: • access online resources; • email a query; or • contact an Outreach Team worker directly via a 1800 phone number. To access the School Support resources go to the headspace website (www. headspace.org.au/schoolsupport) or phone 1800 688 248 Email: schoolsupport@headspace.org.au

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Services collocated at ycentral

Children & Young People’s Mental Health The main focus of the clinical streams of CYPMH is young people aged 12-24 years experiencing moderate to severe mental health problems and mental illness. Children under 12 who are experiencing a ‘mental health crisis’ will be seen by this service for ‘urgent’ assessment and shortterm follow up while facilitating the involvement of more appropriate services. The clinical services within CYPMH • ypage provides information, mental health assessment, brief intervention and referral for children and young people aged 0-24 years; • Brief Intervention Team meets the needs of young people who may be reluctant to engage with CYPMH clinical case management teams (YPPI or YMH) or who require a more time limited follow up service; • Youth Mental Health Team (YMH) provides intensive case management for young people aged 12-24 years with a range of mental health problems and mental illness (except psychosis); • Youth Mental Health Recovery and Therapeutic Groups offers a range of specifically designed groups to meet the holistic needs of young people with mental health problems; • Young People & Early Psychosis Team (YPPI) provides specialist intensive case management supporting young people with early psychosis; • Perinatal Infant Mental Health provides support and interventions which focus on promoting the development of a positive infant relationship and positive mental health of parents and baby. ycentral GP Clinics At ycentral young people can attend the GP Clinics to address issues such as women’s health, eating disorders, sexual health, men’s health and general health. The clinics are bulk billed under a Mental Health Care plan. Phone Statewide Mental Health Telephone Access Line (24 hrs/7 days a week) on 1800 011 511. This service will take your details and make a referral to CYPMH if appropriate. Alternatively they may give you advice or information about other services which may be better suited to the needs of the client.

The Whole Family Team The Whole Family Team focuses on providing a range of interventions for the whole family where there is parental mental health and/or drug and alcohol problems and child protection concerns- Department of Community Services & Specialist Services Referral only. In addition to these, there are also a range of Mental Health Prevention, Promotion, Early Intervention, Research and Evaluation Programs within CYPMH which include: • mental health and parenting; • children of parents with mental illness; • school-link (promoting mental health in schools); • community partnerships; • mental health research and evaluation; • youth mental health projects; • primary health clinics. headspace CC is an entry point for young people who need help but are at ‘LOW RISK’. The aim of headspace is to engage with young people who are NOT experiencing a mental health crisis as our response time to see a young person can be up to 72 hours for mental health crisis phone Statewide Mental Health Telephone Access Line on 1800 011 511

Appointments at headspace CC Callers arranging new appointments with headspace @ ycentral are asked to call between 1.00pm4.00pm (Monday to Friday) Changing or cancelling appointments please call between 8.30am - 5.00pm (Monday to Friday). 4304 7870.

1800 011 511

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Youth Mental Health First Aid

Mental Health First Aid Courses are available on the Central Coast for local services, organisations, businesses, government and community members. Mental Health First Aid is the initial help given to someone experiencing a mental health problem before professional help is sought. Participants will learn the signs & symptoms of common mental health problems, where & how to get help & what sort of help has been shown by research to be effective.

STANDARD MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID This 12-hour course aims to train people to assist adults in mental health crisis or in the early stages of a mental health problem. 2012 COURSE DATES

7/8 17/18 7/8 8/9 21/22 6/7

March April June August November December

YOUTH MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID This 14-hour course aims to train adults to assist young people in mental health crisis or in the early stages of a mental health problem. 2012 COURSE DATES

12/13 3/4 5/6 7/8

April July September November

PLEASE NOTE: THESE COURSES ARE HELD IN GOSFORD AND ARE AVAILABLE TO PEOPLE LIVING OR WORKING ON THE CENTRAL COAST. FOR INFORMATION ABOUT OTHER COURSES OFFERED AROUND AUSTRALIA, VISIT THE MHFA WEBSITE.

FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO BOOK: PHONE: 4320 3170 (Mon/Tue/Wed) or EMAIL: ljardine@nsccahs.health.nsw.gov.au BUSINESS / GOVERNMENT - $60pp SPECIFIC COURSE AT OWN PREMISES - $900 FOR UP TO 15 PEOPLE. NGO / COMMUNITY MEMBER - $50pp SPECIFIC COURSE AT OWN PREMISES - $750 for up to 15 people. CCLHD - $40pp SPECIFIC COURSE AT OWN PREMISES - $600 for up to 15 people.

For specific courses with more than 15 people, an additional per person charge will apply.

CARERS - $20pp CARERS CAN ALSO CONTACT UNITING CARE (4322 1855) or ARAFMI (4369 4233). The Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander MHFA Course, a 14-hour course for people working with Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders, is also available. Contact Lisa on Ph: 4394 7822 or Email: lhamilton@nsccahs.health.nsw.gov.au for details.

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Schoolinkterm 2 2012  

Schoollink is a newsletter produced by ycentral

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