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YASMINACHOUEIRI - PORTFOLIO 2017 -


/ STRATEGICPLANNING

1-BYBLOS RESILENCE STRATEGY 2-BEIRUT RIVERLESS 3-NOT JUST ABOUT DALIEH 7-SCHEMA DIRECTEUR LUMIERE 9-SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIES 10- SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBORHOODS 12- BEIRUT'S URBAN GREENWAYS

// LANDSCAPEDESIGN

4-MANGROVE PLACE 5-LANDFORM HOUSE 6-GARLIC HOUSE 8-SUSTAINABLE URBAN DRAINAGE SYSTEMS 11- SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPES


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1 BYBLOS RESILIENCE STRATEGY

Resilience is the capacity of individuals, communities and systems to reduce the impact of any chronic stress or acute shock and to overcome the environmental, social and economic challenges. Byblos was selected as one of the 100 Resilient Cities around the world by the U.S. based Rockefeller Foundation. Accordingly, Byblos municipality along with local and international researches, academicians and experts (such as ARUP) developed Resilient Byblos, Connecting with Our Past, Creating Our Future.

MY ROLE I was a member of theOtherDada’s team. Together with Maya Karkour and Sarah-Lily Yassine we lead a multi-disciplinary work of the Environmental Working Group. We were responsible to identify the shocks and stresses that the city faces from an environmental perspective and to propose strategic solutions that increase the resilience of the city on this front. I was responsible to lead the research conducted by theOtherDada. We focused on the city’s connectivity by investigating innovative and sustainable interventions that encourage ecosystem resources management while preserving the cultural and natural heritage. We looked into solutions related to blue-green streets, wastewater bioremediation, soft mobility and biodiversity regeneration.


/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 1 BYBLOS RESILIENCE STRATEGY // 2016 LOCATION Byblos, Lebanon SIZE Byblos Municipal Borders

Potential location for Sewage Plant

PRESERVATION OF AGRICULTURAL LANDS

Notre Dame des Secours Jbeil Hospital SAQIET ZAYDANE BAY La Bonita Hotel

Byblos Marine

Ahiram Hotel

Wagon Park Jbeil

HISTORIC FISHING HARBOUR

Byblos Town Hall

Byblos sur mer Resto/Hotel

BYBLOS MEDIEVAL CITY Harbour Tower

Roman Road Ruins and Public Garden College des Soeurs des Saints Coeurs (SSCC) Jbeil

Saint John the Baptist Church

BYBLOS OLD SOUK

MODERN JETTY

DECUMANUS MAXIMUS ROAD

BYBLOS ARCHAEOLOGICAL Persian Phoenican Royal SITE Castle CHAMIYEH BAY

AREA PRONE TO EROSION

Tombs

Ruins Great Phoenican Phoenican Temple of Temple Baalat Gebal Phoenican Temple of the Obelisks

Othman El-Houssami House Early Bronze Age Residence (3rd Millenium)

Armenian Cemetary

N EI

EL

M AS -Y

E IN

Armenian Catholicosate Bird's Nest Armenian Orphanage PROPOSED CULTURAL HERITAGE SITE

POTENTIAL MARINE RESERVE AREA TO BE IDENTIFIED

PRIVATE BEACH RESORTS Al-Zireh island

College des Freres Maristes Jbeil-Amchit Sanawiyet Jbeil Al Rasmiya

IM OS L BYBL

ITS

Landmarks Historical ruins Decumanus Maximus road

POTENTIAL PHOENICIAN HARBOUR RUINS

Voie 13 Public Gravel Beach Public Sandy Beach Water Streams Agricutural lands Harbour limits Railway tracks Limits of historic city Private Beach Resorts Vermetid Reef

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2 BEIRUT RIVERLESS

Beirut RiverLESS addresses the deterioration of the Beirut River and of its connected infrastructure, resulting in a negative impact on the surrounding communities and environment. The project aims at Bringing Beirut River Back to Life and improving the living conditions of its neighboring communities, especially where the recent new population influx has increased the demand on basic services. The project was first initiated by theOtherDada and a pilot project, Beirut River 2.0, was further developed in partnership with LCEC (Lebanese Center for Energy Conservation) and UN-Habitat.

MY ROLE I was in charge of the team that developed Beirut RiverLESS Strategy. We followed the Biomimicry four-step Methodology: Scoping, Discovering, Creating and Evaluating. We assessed and analyzed the site challenges; looked at international best practices; and selected a set of 8 interventions that had the highest positive impact on the environment and people and that could be applied. To solve the problems of storm water and floods, we researched Beirut River Genius of Place where we found a champion organism Platanus Orientalis growing in the riparian ecosystem of Lebanon. Its canopy can intercepts almost 3,000 gallons of rainfall annually. Hence our solutions were inspired by this tree. Additional to re-introducing absorbent surfaces such as planting roof tops, and terraces in order to 1) delay rainwater runoff, 2) Reduce the volume of water reaching the ground and 3) Increase the areas of potential evaporation.


6 / STRATEGICPLANNING - 2 BEIRUT RIVERLESS // 2015 till now LOCATION Beirut, Lebanon STATUS Winning Project in “Disrupt Design” 2016 by MENA Design Research Center

1934

1948

1956

1968

1990-2000

2000

2013

2015

Dora bridge completed

Construction of a boulevard

Construction of river walls part 1

Construction of river walls part 2

Construction of Sukomi waste treatment in Beirut River Estuary

BRSS Project (Beirut River Solar Snake)

BEIRUT RIVER 2.0 BRINGING BEIRUT RIVER BACK TO LIFE

Urbanization along the river

#BeirutRiverLess

Qanater Zbaydeh, Roman aqueduct

Beirut River 2.0 addresses the deterioration of the Beirut river and connected infrastructure, resulting in a negative impact on the surrounding communities and environment. It aims at Bringing Beirut River Back to Life and improving the living conditions of the communities on each side of the river.

1933

Daychounieh dam

50 B.C.

#BeirutRiver2point0

@ BeirutRiver2.0

LET’S BRING BEIRUT RIVER BACK TO LIFE!

GENIUS OF PLACE

CHAMPION ORGANISM

Platanus Orientalis growing in riparian ecosystem of Lebanon

BIOLOGY FACTS

Oriental plane- Canopy : intercepts almost 3,000 gallons of rainfall annually

DESIGN PRINCIPLE

Multi-layered architecture Canopy: • Intercepts stores and breaks up water droplets • Slows rate at which water hits the ground • Increases the potential for evaporation

The methodology is composed of 5 parts: Scoping, Site Data Collection, Discovering, Creating & Evaluating. To break down the strategy into manageable parts, the river and watershed are divided into sections to be implemented in several phases starting with a Pilot Project in the lower part of the river. Different interventions will be tested and re-adapted following performance assessment and feedback from the community, thereby assuring the resilience, flexibility and adaptability of the project. After evaluation, interventions can be replicated on the other sections of the river, as well as in similar contexts across the country.

AWARENESS RAISING CAPACITY BUILDING ECOSYSTEM REHABILITATION NEIGHBOURHOOD IMPROVEMENT — generate toolkit that can be used and replicated in different areas — accommodate social, economic and environmental services — improve living conditions — engage local communities in equitable site use — reduce pollution & heat island effect — improve biodiversity & site performance — promote resilient urban development

www.lcec.org.lb The Lebanese Center for Energy Conservation (LCEC) is the national energy agency for Lebanon. It is a governmental organization affiliated to the Ministry of Energy and Water. It addresses end-use energy efficiency and renewable energy in Lebanon and provides leading programs and projects to public and private sectors.

BR 2.0 was first initiated by theOtherDada and further developed in partnership with LCEC and UN-Habitat.

OUR GOALS

www.unhabitat.org/lebanon The United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat) is the United Nations agency for human settlements. UN-Habitat is mandated to promote socially and environmentally sustainable towns and cities as well as to take the lead in disaster, mitigation, and post-crisis rehabilitation in human settlements with the goal of providing adequate shelter and living conditions for all.

Beirut River 2.0 (BR 2.0) addresses the deterioration of the Beirut river and connected infrastructure, resulting in a negative impact on the surrounding communities and environment. The project aims at Bringing Beirut River Back to Life and improving the living conditions of the communities on each side of the river, especially where new population influx has recently increased the demand on basic services.

PROJECT PARTNERS

INTRODUCTION

www.theOtherDada.com The architecture lab theOtherDada (tOD) defends an alternative position towards the current practice of sustainability. tOD’s design process is organic, dynamic and interactive, informed by their research into Biomimicry. They initiated BR 2.0 to revive the urban corridor of Beirut River.

KEY LIFE'S PRINCIPLE

• Incorporate Diversity • Decentralization • Combine Modular and Nested Components • Use Low Energy Processes • Use multi-Functional Design

Platanus Orientalis

APPLICATION IDEAS

Pervious and absorbent surfaces: planting roof tops, planting terraces and planting walls

ROLE REFERENCES Biomimicry Oregon. (2013). Nature’s Strategies for Managing Stormwater in the Willamette Valley - Genius of Place Project Report. Oregon: Biomimicry Oregon. Cotrone, V. (2014, August 4). A Green Solution to Stormwater Management [Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://extension.psu.edu/natural-resources/forests/news/2014/a-green-solution-to-stormwater-management Sattout, E and Zahreddine, H. (2013). Native Trees of Lebanon and Neighboring Countries, A Guide for Professionals & Amateurs. Lebanon: NDU Press. Venables, B. (2015, March 4). The Secret History Of The London Plane Tree. [Blog Post]. Retrieved from http://londonist.com/2015/03/the-secret-history-of-the-london-plane-tree

PLATANUS ORIENTALIS

• Delay rainwater runoff • Reducing the volume of water reaching the ground • Increase areas for potential evaporation

Salix alba 10-30m

Nerium oleander 2-6m

Laurus nobilis 10-18m

Alnus orientalis Decne 15m


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3 NOT JUST ABOUT DALIEH

The competition was an open call for architects, landscape architects, and planners to articulate creative, sensitive, and environmentally sustainable design proposals for the conservation and future development of Dalieh. We viewed Dalieh as a composition of many layers that tie into the network of the city in: Archaeology, Fishing Port, Biodiversity, Space Accessibility, Nature, and as a Sociocultural exchange location.

MY ROLE The proposal was made by a collaboration between theOtherDada (under my direction) and by Made for Brands. The two teams worked together to develop the ideas and the approaches. Our spatial configuration was based on the unique landscape of Dalieh by establishing 3 zones that reconnect people to nature: 1- A Protected Zone: composed of terrestrial and marine protected areas to preserve and rehabilitate the existing ecosystems, and to develop an ecotouristic trail. 2- An Informal Zone: to preserve and enhance the current socio-cultural exchanges, and to maintain Dalieh as a shared-space and an open-access zone. 3- A Formal Zone: limited to the previously disturbed areas with off-grid structures repurposed from existing elements and used as building blocks. We also developed the spatial configuration of the interventions including the research on the native flora and fauna maps, sections, and 3D renderings.


8 / STRATEGICPLANNING - 3 NOT JUST ABOUT DALIEH // 2015 LOCATION Beirut, Lebanon STATUS Winning Project of “Revitalizing Dalieh” Competition by Save Dalieh Campaign


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN

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4 MANGROVE PLACE

MANGROVE place is a residential compound containing five family villas, one reception villas (Majles) and a mosque. It is located on a reclaimed land facing the Persian Gulf. The main design concept was to move from a reclaimed land into a multi-ecosystem habitat. It addressed the extreme site challenges of: climate (hot and humid summers, cold and dry winters), very high sun exposure on the southern and western side, prevailing winds from the north-east side, poor soil and sea water intrusion on site.

MY ROLE The main landscape solution proposed the creation of 6 ecological areas where each had a precise list of flora that would be planted to attract specific fauna such as birds, pollinator and insects. As the environmental consultant in the team I was responsible to research the different ecological alternatives including Acacia Savannah Plains, Food Production, Oasis, Mangrove and Wetlands, Coastal Deserts and Deserts. I developed an extensive list of native flora and fauna species for each ecological zone. I also proposed different strategies to reduce the cooling needs of the buildings including passive and active strategies: orientation, insulation through the use of green walls and green roofs, and strategic openings to the West and South-West.


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 4 MANGROVE PLACE // 2015 LOCATION Khobar, KSA SIZE 22,000 m2

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 4 MANGROVE PLACE // 2015

Introducing solar panels and green roofs to reduce energy needs

Using recycled grey water to irrigate landscaped area

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 4 MANGROVE PLACE // 2015

Fauna and flora diversity in proposed ecological areas

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 4 MANGROVE PLACE // 2015

Cross-referencing between local Flora and Fauna

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN

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5 LANDFORM HOUSE

LANDFORM house is a residential villa. The architecture was inspired by the land-embedded monuments left by the Nabataeans in the Jordanian desert? Local natural materials such as Riyadh Stone, were used to create a house that appears to be carved out of earth and rising from the ground. The landscape was also morphed with the local context through the use of native plant species. The residence seems to blur the line between the natural and the artificial.

MY ROLE I was the main landscape designer of the team. I was responsible for, research, landscape design concept, design development and the execution drawings. The research and design concept aimed at recreating the lost ecosystem in order to introduce, protect and improve the proliferation of local wildlife and to enhance biodiversity in a dense desert city. I investigated the native plant and shrub species referred to in the traditional local gardens such as: the Gardens of Paradise, Janna, Bustan, Rawda and the Quran. The result was designing areas of different landscape characters: Aromatic, Dry, Floral, Fruits, and Fragrant. The final selection of the plant species was made in coordination with local landscape companies and nurseries. The execution drawings consisted of technical landscape design details made for the contractor in coordination with the architecture team.


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 5 LANDFORM HOUSE // 2013-2014 LOCATION Riyadh, KSA SIZE 3,000 m2

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 5 LANDFORM HOUSE // 2013-2014

case study

LANDFORM HOUSE

DESIGN FOCUS LANDSCAPE

FENCE

PLANT PROCUREMENT

reinterpreting the garden of paradise !

!

FRUIT TREE ORANGE AND DATES

WATER FEATURES AXIS

BBQ area with terrace - wall section

PLANT AND FLOWER DISPLAY

DRY LANDSCAPE

FRAGRANT TREES

FRUIT TREES

FLORAL DISPLAY

FRAGRANT CLIMBERS

AROMATIC HERBS

Case study - Reinterpreting the garden of paradise

Mass plan

Water cascade - wall section

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19


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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN

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6 GARLIC HOUSE

GARLIC house is a family weekend retreat. It is composed of two units: The Family house; has a small footprint to reduce its impact on the land. The façade is made of stones found on site and that will be constructed by local masons. The Guard house; is constructed on pilotis to keep the natural topography and to reduce the impact on wildlife and vegetation. Vegetables and fruits will be planted on its roof to produce local edible species. The house design applies the Living Building Challenge Environmental Certification, targeting a Zero Water Balance. This will be achieved through the reduction of water consumption and the collection of rainwater, which would be the only water source. Rainwater would be collected in an open-air pond, and would attract birds, pollinators, insects to improve the microclimate. In order to protect the fauna the water directed to domestic use would be treated without the use of chemicals.

MY ROLE I was responsible for the project’s water cycle. I developed an extensive water calculator looking into the water inputs and outputs: The water inputs were obtained from the expected precipitations on site taking into consideration: the climate change, the precipitation patterns and changes, and drought; and by using the lowest percentiles of precipitations for the past 100 years and reducing them by 20%. The water outputs were related to the consumption: of the expected (number of) occupants, by the different appliances, and by the different qualities of effluents. After the input and output volumes were compiled it was possible to calculate the deficit and/or the excess water balances of each year. As for the landscaped area I was also responsible of the research on the native landscape species to be introduced on site. The next step of the project would be to continue with the landscape design and planting plan.


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 6 GARLIC HOUSE // 2013-2014 LOCATION Thoum, Lebanon SIZE 7,000 m2

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 6 GARLIC HOUSE // 2013

Year 1

Input Fresh water from  previous year  Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total

Year 2

0

-

80% Grey Water of  previous year 2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57054.85714

Water from  Ponds  -

Input Fresh water from  previous year  Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total

Year 3

-

80% Grey Water of  previous year 2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57,054.9

Water from  Ponds  -

Input Fresh water from  previous year  Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total

Year 4

-

80% Grey Water of  previous year 2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57,054.9

Water from  Ponds  -

Input Fresh water from  previous year  Jan Feb March April May June July Aug Sept Oct Nov Dec Total

Calculation example

-

80% Grey Water of  previous year 2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57,054.9

Water from  Ponds  -

Excess water  from previous  month  6,727.7 8,846.6 15,574.3

Excess water  from previous  month  8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 4,509.0 6,727.7 8,846.6 64,316.3

Excess water  from previous  month  8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 4,509.0 6,727.7 8,846.6 64,316.3

Excess water  from previous  month  8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 4,509.0 6,727.7 8,846.6 64,316.3

Total

Water Demand Shower

2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 72,629.2

1,954.3 11,725.7 11,725.7 16,611.4 11,725.7 1,954.3 55,697.1

Handwash 462.9 2,777.1 2,777.1 3,934.3 2,777.1 462.9 13,191.4

Total

1,954.3 11,725.7 11,725.7 16,611.4 11,725.7 1,954.3 55,697.1

Handwash  462.9 2,777.1 2,777.1 3,934.3 2,777.1 462.9 13,191.4

Shower  1,954.3 11,725.7 11,725.7 16,611.4 11,725.7 1,954.3 55,697.1

Handwash  462.9 2,777.1 2,777.1 3,934.3 2,777.1 462.9 13,191.4

220.4 1,322.4 1,322.4 1,873.5 1,322.4 220.4 6,281.6

Ablution 720.0 1,692.0 1,980.0 2,880.0 2,628.0 1,476.0 11,376.0

Total 3,614.7 18,031.6 18,319.6 25,942.0 18,967.6 4,370.7 89,246.2

Total Need  +20% * 4,337.6 21,637.9 21,983.5 31,130.4 22,761.1 5,244.8 107,095.4

Deficit/Excess (4,337.6) (19,519.1) (10,010.9) (19,157.9) (5,861.7) 6,727.7 8,846.6 8,846.6 (34,466.3) (58,887.2)

Laundry  231.4 462.9 462.9 578.6 462.9 231.4 2,430.0

Dishwasher 25.7 51.4 51.4 64.3 51.4 25.7 270.0

Laundry  231.4 462.9 462.9 578.6 462.9 231.4 2,430.0

Dishwasher 25.7 51.4 51.4 64.3 51.4 25.7 270.0

Shower  1,954.3 11,725.7 11,725.7 16,611.4 11,725.7 1,954.3 55,697.1

Handwash  462.9 2,777.1 2,777.1 3,934.3 2,777.1 462.9 13,191.4

Laundry  231.4 462.9 462.9 578.6 462.9 231.4 2,430.0

Dishwasher  25.7 51.4 51.4 64.3 51.4 25.7 270.0

Grey Water

80% Grey Water  for next year

2,648.6 14,965.7 14,965.7 21,124.3 14,965.7 2,648.6 71,318.6

2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57,054.9

Output   WC  220.4 1,322.4 1,322.4 1,873.5 1,322.4 220.4 6,281.6

Ablution  720.0 1,692.0 1,980.0 2,880.0 2,628.0 1,476.0 11,376.0

Total  3,614.7 18,031.6 18,319.6 25,942.0 18,967.6 4,370.7 89,246.2

Total Need  +20% 4,337.6 21,637.9 21,983.5 31,130.4 22,761.1 5,244.8 107,095.4

Deficit/Excess 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 4,509.0 (15,010.1) (10,010.9) (19,157.9) (5,861.7) 6,727.7 8,846.6 8,846.6 14,275.7 (50,040.6)

Grey Water

80% Grey Water  for next year

2,648.6 14,965.7 14,965.7 21,124.3 14,965.7 2,648.6 71,318.6

2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57,054.9

Output   WC  220.4 1,322.4 1,322.4 1,873.5 1,322.4 220.4 6,281.6

Ablution  720.0 1,692.0 1,980.0 2,880.0 2,628.0 1,476.0 11,376.0

Total  3,614.7 18,031.6 18,319.6 25,942.0 18,967.6 4,370.7 89,246.2

Total Need  +20% 4,337.6 21,637.9 21,983.5 31,130.4 22,761.1 5,244.8 107,095.4

Deficit/Excess 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 4,509.0 (15,010.1) (10,010.9) (19,157.9) (5,861.7) 6,727.7 8,846.6 8,846.6 14,275.7 (50,040.6)

Water Demand

Total

8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 6,627.8 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 121,371.1

25.7 51.4 51.4 64.3 51.4 25.7 270.0

Output WC

Water Demand

Total

8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 6,627.8 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 121,371.1

231.4 462.9 462.9 578.6 462.9 231.4 2,430.0

Dishwasher

Water Demand Shower 

8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 6,627.8 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 121,371.1

Laundry

25

Grey Water

80% Grey Water  for next year

2,648.6 14,965.7 14,965.7 21,124.3 14,965.7 2,648.6 71,318.6

2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 57,054.9

Output   WC  220.4 1,322.4 1,322.4 1,873.5 1,322.4 220.4 6,281.6

Ablution  720.0 1,692.0 1,980.0 2,880.0 2,628.0 1,476.0 11,376.0

Total  3,614.7 18,031.6 18,319.6 25,942.0 18,967.6 4,370.7 89,246.2

Total Need  +20% 4,337.6 21,637.9 21,983.5 31,130.4 22,761.1 5,244.8 107,095.4

Deficit/Excess 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 8,846.6 4,509.0 (15,010.1) (10,010.9) (19,157.9) (5,861.7) 6,727.7 8,846.6 8,846.6 14,275.7 (50,040.6)

Grey Water 2,648.6 14,965.7 14,965.7 21,124.3 14,965.7 2,648.6 194,820.0

80% Grey Water  for next year 2,118.9 11,972.6 11,972.6 16,899.4 11,972.6 2,118.9 155,856.0

Simulations


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7 SCHEMA DIRECTEUR LUMIERE

The Lighting Master Plan of the streets and public spaces of the city of Beirut was a project financed by Ile de France, completed with 4B Architects and Aartill Lighting Consultant for the municipality of Beirut. The general objective of this project was to present general guidelines to the municipality of Beirut to reinstitute the street lighting structure of the city.

MY ROLE As an Urban Environmental Consultant my role focused on the urban analysis of the city and its integration with the lighting guidelines. This included conducting comprehensive field observations and data collection of the urban texture such as streets, buildings, public spaces; as well as understanding the lighting theories in public spaces and integrating them into the specific case of the city of Beirut. CONCEPTS The concepts applied aimed at: -Defining the night image for Beirut -Facilitating the understanding of the city -Exposing the important land marks -Correlating pedestrians and vehicles


/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 7 SCHEMA DIRECTEUR LUMIERE // 2013 LOCATION Beirut, Lebanon SIZE Municipal Borders of Beirut

FOCUS It proposed a system that: -Provided safety for the citizens -Provided a communication strategy to show the city's image -Took into consideration the esthetics of lighting public spaces -Focused on the functionality of the street lights to better light the streets-lighting not as esthetics but to reach good light streets.

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/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 7 SCHEMA DIRECTEUR LUMIERE // 2013

GUIDELINE The design applied the European Lighting Guideline EN30201 and identified each street according to specific categories. The guidelines allocated the lighting levels, the temperature and source for each street type depending on the function and usage of the different streets.

Secondary Raod: IODIDE

Urban Highway: SODIUM & LED

Cycling Path: LED

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/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 7 SCHEMA DIRECTEUR LUMIERE // 2013

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// LANDSCAPEDESIGN

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8 SUSTAINABLE URBAN DRAINAGE SYSTEMS

The objective of this project is to explore the different techniques of the Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems and their integration in a landscape design project. It is applied in a case study of a newly developed residential area in Obernai (Strasbourg region, France); using the techniques according to the site’s characteristics.

MY ROLE Introduced and applied the Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems (SUDS) into the landscape design concept of the project.


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 8 SUSTAINABLE URBAN DRAINAGE SYSTEMS // 2012 LOCATION Obernai (Strasbourg region), France SIZE N/A

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rosenm

ee

Bischoffsheim

Major collection point of water

Direction of the water Covered areas

Boersch

Obernai

Built Area

site

over swales

Built Area

Built Area

Ottrott Bernardswiller

Meistratzheim l'Ehn

Dachsbach

ben

1km

Flussgra

Accessible For Wheel Chairs Swales with vegetation Porous pavement- gravel/land cover

Goxwiller

600m

Parking

150m

The site is located in a plain. The elevations do not affect the water flow.

The intervention intentions are: 1-To cover the areas that are accessible to wheelchairs with concrete. The surrounding areas will be covered by porous materials such as gravel or land-cover plants. 2-To locate the major area of water collection. 3-To cover the areas that are not accessible to wheelchairs with swales. Those areas will be covered by small platforms when the swales interconnect with access points.

Topography Map

Land Use Map

rosenm

ee

Bischoffsheim

Boersch

+40.00

Built Area Intervention Inventions

site

Obernai

Forest Agriculture Built Area River Major Road

+0.00

Built Area

Built Area

Ottrott Meistratzheim Bernardswiller

Dachsbach

l'Ehn

Accessible For Wheel Chairs Pedestrian Access Points

Goxwiller

1km

ben

Flussgra

The site is located in an agriculture area. This means that interventions will not affect the natural flow of the water since it is already managed for agricultural purposes.

1-The site has three important conditions: 2-Some areas of the site should be accessible to wheelchairs. The sit has elevation differences. 3-The site has different access points for the design of the SUDS.

Regional Analysis

Site Conditions

Parking


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 8 SUSTAINABLE URBAN DRAINAGE SYSTEMS // 2012

A

D

A E

-The overall area has 51% of built spaces and 49% of open spaces. -From those open spaces 36% are porous (such as gravel or plants), and 14% are concrete.

D

C

B

C

Section BB

Section AA, BB, CC, DD Water infiltrates through the ground cover into the soil. It is transported by perforated pipes into the major collecting area. Section BB, DD Water flows from the concrete paths into the porous spaces. Section BB, DD Concrete paths are created, making them accessible to wheelchairs.

Concrete Gravel

B

Soil-Cover Shrubs

E

Tall Trees (10m) Mid-Size Trees (5m) Large Canopee trees

Master Plan

Section AA: Swales

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Section CC: Swales

Detailing

Section DD


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9 SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIES

This project focuses on a waste treatment power plant the AVR Duiven. The aim is to understand how the energy flows, find any possible losses in energy transmission and look for opportunities to make energy use more efficient. The project follows three main concepts the RRP concept, the Cascading Concept, the Diversification Concept.

MY ROLE Creating the project


/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 9 SUSTAINABLE INDUSTRIES // 2011 LOCATION Duiven, the Netherlands SIZE The AVR solid waste treatment plant

RRP CONCEPT This concept is inspired by Trias Energetica which consists of reduce energy consumption, use renewable energy, and supply the remaining demand cleanly and efficiently. -Reduce heat waste: reduce the heat waste by using better isolation systems. -Reuse energy waste: reuse the energy in a more efficient way. -Produce sustainable energy: production of renewable energy on site. CASCADING CONCEPT Reusing the remaining low quality energy of in activities that require lower levels of energy. This way the 'wastes' of energy of one activity are used as a 'source' of energy to another activity. DIVERSIFICATION CONCEPT Diversification is an economic strategy that pushes companies into innovation, and into a change their industrial structure (Textier, 2001). In this project the site has a waste treatment plant and a water treatment plant. The Diversification Concept suggests adding a plastic treatment plant to recycle plastic and to produce fuel; and a digester to recycle biomass and to produce gas.

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10 SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBORHOODS

The objective of this project is to explore the potential of an urban neighborhood, to change from linear to circular metabolism, and to minimize its footprint. It starts by calculating the initial ecological footprint of the neighborhood taking into account the consumption of energy, food, water, wastes (paper and green waste) and transport. Later it proposes a design for a circular resource approach and investigates the potential and practical implications of the harvest of water, energy, nutrients (N, P), paper and green waste.

MY ROLE I was the main landscape designer of the team. I was responsible for, research, landscape design concept, design development and the execution drawings. The research and design concept aimed at recreating the lost ecosystem in order to introduce, protect and improve the proliferation of local wildlife and to enhance biodiversity in a dense desert city. I investigated the native plant and shrub species referred to in the traditional local gardens such as: the Gardens of Paradise, Janna, Bustan, Rawda and the Quran. The result was designing areas of different landscape characters: Aromatic, Dry, Floral, Fruits, and Fragrant. The final selection of the plant species was made in coordination with local landscape companies and nurseries. The execution drawings consisted of technical landscape design details made for the contractor in coordination with the architecture team.


/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 10 SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBORHOODS // 2012 LOCATION Wageningen, the Netherlands SIZE 3.3 hectars per capita

The baseline shows the current ecological footprint of the neighborhood. The calculations were based on Chambers, Simmons and Wackernagel (2009), They include energy, water, waste, transport and food. Nonorganic wastes and building materials are not considered in this study as they are out of the scope. However the current footprint of the neighborhood is 3.3 hectares per capita.

The scheme shows the re-organization of resources to new assets for consumption

Concept of intervention

For the intervention two aspects are taken into account: technical opportunities and behavioral opportunities. The technical opportunities are divided as, primary resources that include the solar energy, wind energy, hydropower and geothermal; and the secondary resources are divided as heat and biomass. Some of the behavioral opportunities include using energy efficient technologies, turning off electronic equipments, eating less meat and other... The footprint is reduced by 28% and became 2.8 hectares per capita Footprint calculations

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/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 10 SUSTAINABLE NEIGHBORHOODS // 2012

Design Intervention

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11 SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPES

The objective of this study was to find out if there is a relation between, the diet and food production (agriculture), and the landscape of a Lebanese village: Dhour Shweir. We looked at the diets of Dhour Shweir’s residents at the beginning of the century and compared them to contemporary diets. This helped us create menus for both eras We also looked at the transformations that occurred in the landscape. And, we tried to find out if they were any relations between the food and landscape in Dhour Shweir. To understand the relation between food and landscape we followed an appraisal approach following the SEAGA handbook (Socio-Economic, and Gender Analysis program).

MY ROLE Creating the project


// LANDSCAPEDESIGN - 11 SUSTAINABLE LANDSCAPES // 2009 LOCATION Dhour Shweir, Lebanon SIZE Municipal borders

In the 1900s silk production was a main industry in Lebanon. Most of the villages planted mulberry trees for this purpose, Dhour Shweir did likewise. 1990

1950

In the 1950s the silk production died out. The villagers replaced the mulberry trees with apple trees. Today the agricultural activities decreased dramatically. The valley that was once used for the plantation of vegetable and trees is not used anymore. The municipality limited the urban expansion in some zones to protect the growth of a forest of pine, oak and acorn trees. Some families still use the spaces in front of their houses to plant few vegetables and fruit trees, but their number is minimal.

TODAY

Urban Development Mulberry Plantation Apple Plantation Forest Conservation Dhour Shweir landscape evolution

CONCLUSIONS From this study we realized that landscape is not only related to the diet but also to the economy. Agriculture changes took place due to changes that occurred in commercial habits. People realized that mulberry production was not as productive as apple production so they stopped planting mulberry trees. Today because transportation is easier, the village does not produce its own vegetable and fruits.

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12 BEIRUT'S URBAN GREENWAYS

The lack of green spaces in Beirut has an indirect environmental and psychological influence that affects the quality of urban life. The limited number and areas of conventional parks and green spaces fail to serve the needs of a growing population. Moreover they do not follow any sustainable greening or respect the urban biodiversity. The way ahead is to explore innovative urban greening that developed, with time, on whatever open space available. For this purpose, the derelict site of the BeirutDamascus Railway tracks has been chosen.

MY ROLE My Bachelor Final Year Project. ISSUE issue that this project addresses is the potential to reclaim the remaining green spaces in the public and unused spaces in Beirut, that fall within built up areas. AIM The aim of the project is to reclaim an existing public railway and its unused space by creating an Urban Greenway for the community.


/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 12 BEIRUT'S URBAN GREENWAYS // 2009 LOCATION Badawi, Beirut SIZE N/A

Communities Nature Activities History

To provide a linear open space for human interventions

Base Map Analysis of the Neighborhood

To protect the remaining natural, cultural and historical resources.

Topography

CONCEPT Greenways are corridors of protected open spaces designed for conservation and recreation. They usually follow natural land and water feature or abandoned railroads or canals and have 3 main functions:

To create connections among communities, through nature, parks, recreational activities...

Circulation & Accessibility

Urban Texture

Land Use

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/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 12 BEIRUT'S URBAN GREENWAYS // 2009

Matrix of the Analysis

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/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 12 BEIRUT'S URBAN GREENWAYS // 2009

Design process

Conceptual design

Cut plan Site analysis

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/ STRATEGICPLANNING - 12 BEIRUT'S URBAN GREENWAYS // 2009 Design Intervention & Sections

Section BB

Section CC

Plan Section DD

Section AA

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THANKYOU yasmina.choueiri@gmail.com +961 70 06 03 42

- yasminachoueiri.com -

Yasmina Choueiri Portfolio  

This portfolio represents my key projects.

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