Issuu on Google+

JASPER KRABBÉ

CLOSER TO YOU


2


3


4


5


CLOSER TO YOU JASPER KRABBÉ


Closer to you

“You can never find someone’s identity in a single fixed image,” says Jasper Krabbé’. “Today, in this era of Facebook and instant information, there are hundreds and thousands of images out there, often showing exactly the same subject. Like on a Google search, I was interested in discovering whether from a huge number of images, one complete picture can finally emerge. From my many images of Floor, both exuberant and withdrawn, I hope what comes out is the reality of who she is.“

Whether highly realistic or merely a few minimal lines showing a profile, Jasper’s recent drawings continue the long tradition in which the portrait represents the purest relationship between the interpretation of an image and its context. Employing various materials, in a mismatch of styles and framing, two hundred of his portraits of Floor, most of them reproduced in this book, are also installed in broken order in the Kunsthal in Rotterdam. He decided to limit his series to a precise period – twelve months in the life of the woman with whom he has been together for 15 years. He set out to encompass all the emotional subtleties and exaggerations, honesty and secrecy, to overlap the territory between intimacy and public behaviour. The result provides a panorama of visual obsession, close surveillance and undeniable affection. She is shown with make-up, and without make-up, wearing fashionable clothes and nude. Sometimes she poses with confidence, sometimes she appears uncertain.

“I’m fascinated by all the different appearances she has. Floor has so many distinct looks, from melancholic and silent, to being brutally shameless in-yourface. This is also reflected in the way each portrait is made. Some are confined, literally boxed-in with paint. Some are isolated in solitude, others are open, less cropped, more relaxed. The difference in her mood is translated through the technique, although sometimes it’s the other way around.” This creates an ever-changing point-of-view, a celebration of diversity, free from repetition. Each sequence of portraits is created using different techniques and shifting moods. Images and references are combined, the perspective is altered. The atmosphere partly depends on the way each scene is set-up. The narrative lies in the intimacy itself, focusing on the small moments in a larger life-story. “It’s a declaration of love, and a method of research, but it’s in no way scientific. I’m trying to get closer to the woman with whom I live. It’s about getting through layers to find the true identity.” 8


In Jasper’s imagery, Floor’s attitude ranges in scope from the brazenly sexual to the bored, as she undertakes the casual activities of domestic life. The artist himself refers back to Bonnard’s wife portrayed in the bath, or stepping out of the bath, and the women in the paintings of Balthus, combing their hair. Jasper notes that he has been partly inspired by artists long gone, by the shadows and silhouettes of Modigliani, Schiele and Munch, and the erotic drawings of Ingres, but also by his younger contemporaries. However, he is equally inspired by  the visual language of film-posters, street art, old trading cards and packaging.

In many of his early paintings, Jasper depicted objects and architectural details including Thai statues, Moroccan arabesques and Italian columns to fix them to precise geographical locations. In his recent portraits of his wife, this is less obvious. She has been depicted at home in Amsterdam, in London, in Spain, in the south of France, in hotel rooms, and in such hopelessly romantic places as Bali, Biarritz and Curaçao. The location, however, is less important than her reaction to her surroundings, seen in the angle of her face, the tilt of her head, the direction of her gaze. We often see her located in transit, in unscripted moments such as when she is looking for duty-free lipstick at Schiphol airport. Jasper’s representations themselves cross many stylistic boundaries, the academic versus the refined versus the rough. Many take a graphic approach. These are far from romantic, resembling instead instructional illustrations or meticulous sketches for a brochure.

Other works are not strictly classical portraits at all, maybe only showing the back of Floor’s head, a highlighted limb, or several superimposed images. Reveling in their own brand of originality, some of these works are like those out-of-focus snapshots you immediately discard, but which in fact might be more honest representations of a person than the flattering, staged photos shown to friends. However, even with only the use of a few lines of dull colour, the close bond between the artist and his subject is immediately evident. “Some of the pictures are almost deathly portraits, in which the light alludes to life. I wanted to freeze the silent atmosphere. Floor is asleep. In my mind, this also incorporates the emotion of being able to think that she might not be here. You try to put this emotion of loss into the image. So I think that several of my drawings reveal a morbid feeling, perhaps with a mask-like face. 9


10


I have also made a few pictures in which I think she is hiding, moments in which she doesn’t want to be seen. At these times, she seems very distant. In a way, she can be very shy. But it’s still all part of me being continually on her case, nonstop.” Jasper pauses, then he shrugs with a smile. “You don’t want to make your own wife into an object, but ….”

I’ve known Jasper, and followed his work, since he was still a teenager. I’ve been Floor’s friend for as long as she has been together with Jasper. And from the very beginning, I’ve also known her through Jasper’s eyes, mirrored, reflected and transformed in his watercolours, drawings, rushed ink sketches and rough paintings, as well as in a couple of his large-scale portraits on canvas. Over this time, in different cities, I’ve also curated several shows of Jasper’s paintings and drawings.

Today, Floor is cooking in the kitchen. She is using several pots and pans on the stove at the same time, plus lots of chopped garlic. I’ve flown in from Rome and I am visiting Jasper and Floor in their Amsterdam house. We’ve just shared a bottle of red wine together. But now, Jasper is driving one of his daughters to a dance-class on his motorbike. So here I am, alone with Floor and a couple of ginger-coloured cats. Sometimes, the joy of being an observer, like the thrill of being an artist, is that you don’t necessarily need to be impartial.

The fact that Floor is a beautiful woman is an objective truth. The fact that in her professional life, she is a doctor specialized in aesthetic medicine, makes this anatomical focus additionally fascinating. She is a beautiful woman, in no need of cosmetic help, working in the field of making other women more beautiful, and feel more attractive. She is a natural beauty, assisting in the rejuvenation and synthetic beauty of other women. And she is the ongoing subject of an artist, her husband, who sees this beauty in all its many facets and moods, on a daily basis. Jasper even paints Floor while she is dreaming. So I mention to Floor that in the 1960s and 1970s, David Hockney regularly drew his young Californian partner Peter Schlesinger while he was asleep, or laying in the sun, or reading, or whenever else Schlesinger wasn’t aware he was being scrutinized. Hockney turned Schlesinger into his complicit model, and one of the few authentic male muses of the 20th century. But eventually, this constant attention made Schlesinger feel that the artist’s voyeurism was invasive and intrusive, even an imposition. 11


Floor responds. “I don’t feel that I am being watched, not at all. But if I was, I would like it. If I’m reading a book, and Jasper is making a portrait, that’s fine. Sometimes I don’t even realize that he is drawing me. I trust him. I trust that he won’t make me scary or ugly. We’ve been together so long, I find it unusual that he still spends time looking so closely at me. Even after all these years.” “Of course, I like some of his images more than others, but even so, I still have a distance from them. They aren’t me. They are pictures of me.”

Jasper Krabbé is best known for his vast oil paintings of sparse landscapes in bleached colours and his composite works, resembling schematic diaries, in which hundreds of pages from small notebooks are affixed in neat rows to broad canvases. The human figure often appears as a fragment in a larger setting. He also produces reams of smaller works, including jewel-like self-portraits. Five years ago, one hundred of these self-portraits were gathered together in a book, as a volume dedicated to the equal roles of artistic perception and selfperception, as a manual of gestural bravura. Jasper notes that a sense of confrontation exists in his paintings of Floor, revealing different layers of annoyance and aggravation to those which are present in his self-portraiture. “When the subject is outside of me, it clearly gives me distance. The subject is over there, not in your own skin, not pricking at your nerves. So my pictures of Floor are not as introverted as my selfportraits. They don’t seem so lonely. They are softer, more gentle, caught with a looser hand. With myself, I seem to be tougher, constantly angry.” In the series dedicated to his wife, the materials and frames are almost always used, second-hand, or found. Her face emerges from the surface of torn cardboard, handmade watercolour paper, wooden panels, and note book pages. Her features are outlined and shaded in lead pencil, crayon, watercolour, gouache, charcoal and thin paint. The techniques are opaque. The finished works often appear damaged, oxidized, fragile yet resilient. “I am drawing on paper which is not meant to be drawn on. It’s too thin and it tears. Or it is a strip of hard cardboard that shows rubbed marks and dents. The ink catches on the paper. I achieve these effects for free, from these older materials I use. Chance helps the end result. The pencil line doesn’t stick properly to the raw cardboard. The paint forms a pool. It gives a disturbance which I really like, and it adds to the idea that the picture belongs to the moment in which it is created. It’s also connected to the idea that Floor is ageless, so a portrait of her might have been produced in the Renaissance, or in the 19th century, or ten minutes ago.” 12


In some portraits, the paper provided the starting point, in others, the painting was inspired by a particular junk-shop frame. The more elaborate frames make a bold statement, others draw little attention. Some are made from plastic and cost 50 cents to buy, others are antique, gilded and expensive. In their diversity, they punctuate the wall like Morse Code.

“I bought several Indian frames from a store in Paris. They were meant for devotional images, or holy texts, the focus of a daily offering, to be worshipped every day. They spoke to me about the spiritual aura of a physical object. Besides their age, their function was very much in line with my idea of my portraits of Floor as being part of a shrine. The Indian frames show the signs of change over time. The varnish has peeled off. Some of the glass was already broken, so I have left it that way. But I also like the humbleness of someone who has bought a cheap frame from a supermarket, not as an aesthetic choice, but as a practical one.” For Jasper, it is essential that all the works come together in the single idea that Floor could have been born at any time. She is an ageless beauty, simultaneously ancient and contemporary, depicted using the aesthetics and incidental beauty of chance.

“I like the space, the shift, between all the different styles I use. For example, an abstract, primitive mood in one painting only becomes apparent when the work itself is finished. In retrospect, I see the influence of African sculptures. I suppose you can say that the true link filling all the spaces in between, is my hand. And how I see Floor, through my portraits of her. The more personal it is, the more universal it becomes.”

Jonathan Turner

13


22


23


24


26


27


28


30


31


32


34


35


36


37


38


40


INDEX

257


25 Indian ink and graphite on paper 35 x 27 cm Amsterdam 2010

26 Graphite on paper 33 x 25 cm San Sebastian 2010

27 Coloured crayon on paper 23 x 20 cm Amsterdam 2010

29 Crayon on cardboard 26.5 x 21.5 cm Puymeras 2010

30 Coloured crayon on paper 30.5 x 23 cm Dalfsen 2010

31 Graphite on paper 24.5 x 31.5 cm Puymeras 2010

33 Indian ink on paper 32.5 x 25 cm Amsterdam 2010

34 Coloured crayon on paper 32 x 26 cm Dalfsen 2010

35 Watercolour and graphite on cardboard 32 x 26.5 cm St. Paul de Vence 2010

36 Watercolour on paper 34 x 26 cm Arles 2010

37 Coloured crayon on cardboard 25.5 x 19.5 cm Ibiza 2010

39 Watercolour on paper 24.5 x 32.5 cm London 2011

40 Pen and collage on paper 26.5 x 20 cm Amsterdam 2011

40 Pen on cardboard 16 x 12 cm Biarritz 2010

41 Graphite on paper 25.5 x 19.5 cm Arles 2010

258


43 Coloured crayon on paper 26.5 x 20 cm San Sebastian 2010

44 Coloured crayon on paper 18.5 x 13.5 cm Puymeras 2010

45 Graphite and coloured crayon on cardboard 23 x 28.5 cm Biarritz 2010

47 Coloured crayon on cardboard 23.5 x 20.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

48 Graphite on paper 25 x 31 cm Claviers 2010

49 Coloured crayon on cardboard 22 x 21 cm San Sebastian 2010

50 Ink and graphite on paper 31.5 x 26 cm Biarritz 2010

51 Graphite on paper 34 x 26.5 cm Vence 2010

53 Indian ink and graphite on paper 31.5 x 25.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

54 Coloured crayon on paper 25 x 32.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

56 Watercolour on cardboard 30 x 20.5 cm Claviers 2010

57 Watercolour and graphite on cardboard 28.5 x 23.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

59 Ink on paper 37.5 x 23.5 cm Paris 2010

60 Crayon on paper 29.5 x 21.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

61 Coloured crayon on paper 20 x 15 cm Curaรงao 2011

259


63 Watercolour and coloured crayon on paper 32 x 26 cm St. Tropez 2010

64 Coloured crayon on paper 22 x 17 cm Curaรงao 2010

66 Watercolour on paper 30 x 22 cm Dalfsen 2010

67 Ink and crayon on paper 37 x 29 cm Ramatuelle 2010

68 Watercolour on paper 26.5 x 21.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

69 Ink on paper 35 x 27 cm Paris 2010

70 Watercolour on paper 31.5 x 25 cm Dalfsen 2010

72 Coloured crayon on cardboard 25 x 17 cm Paris 2010

73 Coloured crayon on paper 26.5 x 20.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

74 Graphite on paper 48.5 x 41 cm Paris 2010

75 Ink on paper 34 x 26 cm Amsterdam 2010

76 Graphite on paper 19.5 x 25.5 cm San Sebastian 2010

77 Coloured crayon on cardboard 34.5 x 24.5 cm San Sebastian 2010

79 Watercolour on paper 32.5 x 24.5cm Claviers 2010

80 Coloured crayon on paper 18 x 13 cm St. Paul de Vence 2010

260


81 Coloured crayon on paper 25 x 31 cm San Sebastian 2010

83 Coloured crayon on paper 28 x 23 cm Claviers 2010

84 Coloured crayon on paper 22.5 x 17.5 cm Claviers 2010

85 Coloured crayon on paper 22 x 17 cm Arles 2010

87 Coloured crayon on cardboard 27.5 x 22.5 cm Paris 2010

88 Watercolour on paper 34 x 26 cm Bloemendaal 2010

89 Coloured crayon on paper 21.5 x 27.5 cm Klein Curaรงao 2010

90 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32 x 22.5 cm Faucon 2010

91 Ink on paper 26 x 20 cm Dalfsen 2010

92 Graphite on paper 20 x 15 cm San Sebastian 2010

93 Watercolour on paper 28.5 x 23.5 cm Amsterdam 2011

94 Watercolour and graphite on paper 29.5 x 24.5 cm Paris 2010

96 Pencil on cardboard 36 x 28 cm Dalfsen 2010

97 Graphite on paper 44.5 x 33.5 cm Nuits St. Georges 2010

98 Watercolour on paper 24.5 x 32.5 cm London 2011

261


99 Ink on cardboard 37.5 x 34 cm Paris 2010

101 Watercolour and coloured crayon on paper 45.5 x 35.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

102 Coloured crayon on cardboard 26 x 21 cm Paris 2010

104 Watercolour and graphite on cardboard 18.5 x 26 cm San Sebastian 2010

105 Coloured crayon on cardboard 32 x 23 cm Paris 2010

106 Graphite and watercolour on paper 26 x 45.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

108 Coloured crayon, watercolour on paper 34 x 26 cm St. Tropez 2010

111 Watercolour on paper 33 x 25 cm Bilbao 2010

113 Coloured crayon on paper 30.5 x 22.5 cm Ommen 2010

114 Coloured pencil on paper 26 x 34 cm Amsterdam 2010

115 Watercolour and graphite on paper 33 x 25 cm Claviers 2010

117 Ink on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Claviers 2010

119 Watercolour on paper 32 x 22.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

120 Indian ink on cardboard 37 x 30.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

122 Watercolour and graphite on paper 19.5 x 14.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

262


123 Graphite on cardboard 32.5 x 28 cm Ramatuelle 2010

124 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm. San Sebastian 2010

126 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32 x 26 cm Claviers 2010

127 Coloured crayon on cardboard 23.5 x 17.5 cm Madrid 2010

129 Watercolour on paper 41 x 33.5 cm Paris 2010

130 Graphite on cardboard 34 x 26.5 cm Curaรงao 2010

131 Graphite on cardboard 34 x 25.5 cm Amsterdam 2011

132 Coloured crayon on paper 27 x 22 cm Faucon 2010

133 Watercolour and coloured crayon on paper 29 x 23 cm Amsterdam 2011

135 Watercolour on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

136 Graphite and watercolour on paper 25 x 32.5 cm St. Paul de Vence 2010

137 Red chalk on paper 33 x 25 cm Paris 2010

138 Graphite on paper 26 x 20.5 cm St. Paul de Vence 2010

139 Pen on cardboard 27 x 21.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

140 Indian ink on cardboard 23 x 28 cm Amsterdam 2009

263


141 Graphite on cardboard 20.5 x 32.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

142 Graphite on paper 45 x 50 cm Amsterdam 2010

143 Indian ink on paper 47 x 37 cm Amsterdam 2011

144 Ink on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

145 Watercolour and indian ink on paper 42 x 32.5 cm Amsterdam 2009

146 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm St. Jean de Luz 2010

148 Coloured crayon on paper 27 x 23 cm Dalfsen 2011

149 Coloured crayon on paper 23 x 18 cm Amsterdam 2011

150 Graphite on cardboard and paper 33 x 42.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

152 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Biarritz 2010

153 Watercolour and tape on cardboard 27.5 x 22 cm Paris 2010

154 Watercolour on paper 26 x 34 cm St. Jean de Luz 2010

155 Watercolour on paper 34 x 26 cm Amsterdam 2010

156 Watercolour on paper 26 x 34 cm Amsterdam 2010

158 Coloured crayon and watercolour on cardboard 27 x 35 cm Bali 2011

264


159 Coloured crayon on paper 17 x 12.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

161 Graphite on paper 37 x 28.5 cm Paris 2010

162 Coloured crayon on cardboard 20 x 25 cm San Sebastian 2010

163 Watercolour on paper 34 x 26 cm Biarritz 2010

164 Coloured crayon on paper 27 x 37 cm Mallorca 2011

167 Coloured crayon on cardboard 30 x 23 cm Klein Curaรงao 2010

168 Watercolour on cardboard 23 x 34 cm Dalfsen 2011

169 Coloured crayon and graphite on cardboard 18 x 30 cm Curaรงao 2011

171 Coloured crayon on cardboard 27 x 22 cm Curaรงao 2011

172 Coloured crayon on cardboard 31.5 x 23.5 cm London 2010

173 Coloured crayon on cardboard 25 x 20 cm Arles 2010

175 Coloured crayon on paper 47 x 36 cm Bali 2011

177 Watercolour and graphite on paper 33.5 x 25 cm Claviers 2010

178 Coloured caryon on cardboard 24 x 41 cm Dalfsen 2010

179 Graphite on cardboard 27 x 22 cm Dalfsen 2010

265


180 Watercolour on cardboard 31.5 x 23 cm San Sebastian 2010

182 Coloured crayon on paper 36 x 27 cm Dalfsen 2011

183 Watercolour on paper 32 x 27 cm Bali 2011

184 Watercolour on paper 28.5 x 22.5 cm Paris 2010

185 Watercolour and tape on paper 36.5 x 26.5 cm Amsterdam 2011

187 Coloured crayon on paper 32 x 27.5 cm London 2011

188 Watercolour on paper 42 x 50.5 cm Ommen 2011

190 Coloured crayon on paper 13 x 17 cm Puymeras 2010

191 Watercolour and graphite on cardboard 42 x 24.5 cm Mallorca 2011

192 Graphite on paper 31 x 25.5 cm London 2010

194 Coloured crayon on paper 53.5 x 43.5 cm Amsterdam 2011

195 Coloured crayon on paper 41 x 37 cm Amsterdam 2010

196 Graphite on paper 43.5 x 33.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

197 Graphite on paper 31 x 27.5 cm Maastricht 2011

198 Graphite and watercolour on paper 30.5 x 24.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

266


199 Graphite on paper 57 x 44 cm Amsterdam 2011

200 Watercolour and graphite on paper 31 x 26 cm Ramatuelle 2010

201 Coloured crayon on cardboard 32.5 x 27 cm Biarritz 2010

202 Watercolour and crayon on paper 34.5 x 26 cm Puymeras 2010

205 Watercolour on paper 31.5 x 24 cm Amsterdam 2010

206 Coloured crayon on cardboard 32.5 x 27.5 cm Maastricht 2011

207 Coulored crayon on paper 32 x 25 cm Amsterdam 2011

208 Graphite on paper 33.5 x 24.5 cm Antwerp 2011

209 Coloured pencil on paper 26 x 34 cm London 2011

211 Graphite on paper 27 x 20 cm London 2011

212 Coloured crayon on paper 28 x 21 cm Amsterdam 2011

213 Coloured crayon on cardboard 31 x 26.5 cm Mallorca 2011

214 Graphite graphite on paper 44 x 57 cm Bali 2011

216 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Puymeras 2010

217 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Faucon 2010

267


219 Coloured crayon on paper 44 x 33 cm Bali 2011

220 Watercolour and graphite on paper 33 x 25 cm San Sebastian 2010

221 Watercolour on paper 33 x 25 cm Amsterdam 2010

223 Graphite on paper 55 x 42 cm Amsterdam 2011

224 Graphite on paper 31.5 x 26 cm Claviers 2010

226 Watercolour and graphite on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm San Sebastian 2010

227 Coloured crayon on paper 31 x 23.5 cm Port de Soller 2011

228 Coloured crayon on paper 23.5 x 20 cm Amsterdam 2010

229 Watercolour on paper 26.5 x 20 cm Amsterdam 2011

231 Watercolour, graphite on paper 57 x 44 cm Amsterdam 2011

232 Coloured crayon on cardboard 26 x 21 cm Antwerp 2011

233 Coloured crayon on paper 41 x 30 cm Amsterdam 2010

235 Graphite on paper 32 x 22.5 cm Amsterdam 2011

236 Indian ink on paper 25 x 20 cm Amsterdam 2010

237 Coloured crayon on cardboard 40 x 32 cm Faucon 2010

268


238 Coloured crayon on cardboard 20 x 23 cm Mallorca 2011

239 Crayon on cardboard 30 x 25.5 cm Ommen 2011

241 Coloured crayon on paper 32.5 x 27.5 cm Soller 2011

242 Indian ink on cardboard 43.5 x 43.5 cm London 2011

244 Watercolour on paper 25 x 33.5 cm Dalfsen 2010

245 Indian ink on paper 44.5 x 36 cm Amsterdam 2011

246 Graphite and watercolour on paper 32.5 x 24.5 cm Claviers 2010

247 Graphite and tape on paper 19.5 x 25.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

249 Watercolour and graphite on paper 48 x 38 cm Amsterdam 2011

250 Graphite on paper 19.5 x 25.5 cm Amsterdam 2010

251 Graphite on paper 26.5 x 21.5 cm Dalfsen 2011

253 Coloured crayon on cardboard 42.5 x 32 cm Amsterdam 2010

254 Watercolour on cardboard 23 x 24 cm Amsterdam 2010

6 Florrie (Swan) Oil on canvas 230 x 140 cm Amsterdam 2011

10 Coloured crayon on cardboard 23 x 17 cm London 2011

269


270


271


COLOPHON

WBOOKS, ZWOLLE INFO@WBOOKS.COM WWW.WBOOKS.COM WWW.JASPERKRABBE.COM DESIGN AND CONCEPT JASPER KRABBÉ GRAPHIC DESIGN RICHARD VAN DER HORST PHOTOGRAPHY © ANNE DOKTER (pgs. 2, 4, 14, 270) © CARMEN KEMMINK (pg. 1) © PHOTOGRAPHY AND IMAGE EDITING KEES KUIL ADDITIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY JASPER KRABBÉ (pg. 22) TEXT JONATHAN TURNER PIETJE TEGENBOSCH TRANSLATION ARTICLE PIETJE TEGENBOSCH JANEY TUCKER DTP FREDDY ABRAHAMS PRINT PRINTER TRENTO JASPER KRABBÉ WOULD LIKE TO THANK RICHARD VAN DER HORST FOR HIS KEEN EYE. KEES KUIL FOR HIS PATIENCE AT THE SCREEN. ANNE DOKTER FOR HER PICTURES OF THE STUDIO. CARMEN KEMMINK FOR HER PICTURE ‘IN DE NIS’. EMILY ANSENK AND JANNET DE GOEDE AT DE KUNSTHAL. HANS VAN DE WILLIGE, CARIJN OOMKENS AND TJEERD DAM AT WBOOKS. JONATHAN TURNER FOR HIS ENDURING SUPPORT. PIETJE TEGENBOSCH FOR JUMPING IN AT THE LAST MOMENT. EXCELLIJST, L’ENCADREUR, MERTENS. CHRISTINE BERTHOLLIER IN PARIS FOR THE INDIAN FRAMES. SIET ZUYDERHOF FOR THE BUNCH OF FRAMES HE STILL HAD LYING AROUND. JAN SIX FOR THE 17TH CENTURY FRAMES. AND LAST BUT NOT LEAST FLORRIE WHO SAT FOR EVERY PAGE. THIS BOOK WAS PUBLISHED ON THE OCCASION OF THE EXHIBITION JASPER KRABBÉ CLOSER TO YOU KUNSTHAL ROTTERDAM, FEBRUARY 23 - MAY 20, 2012 WWW.KUNSTHAL.NL © 2012 jasper krabbé © 2012 wbooks / the authors ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. NO PART OF THE CONTENTS OF THIS BOOK MAY BE REPRODUCED OR TRANSMITTED IN ANY FORM OR BY ANY MEANS, ELECTRONIC OR MECHANICAL, INCLUDING PHOTOCOPY, RECORDING, OR ANY OTHER INFORMATION STORAGE AND RETRIEVAL SYSTEM, WITHOUT THE PRIOR WRITTEN PERMISSION OF THE COPYRIGHT HOLDERS. THE PUBLISHERS HAVE MADE EVERY EFFORT TO ACKNOWLEDGE THE COPYRIGHT OF WORKS ILLUSTRATED IN THIS BOOK. SHOULD ANY PERSON, DESPITE THIS, FEEL THAT AN OMISSION HAS BEEN MADE, THEY ARE REQUESTED TO INFORM THE PUBLISHERS OF THIS FACT. image back cover graphite on paper 19.5 x 25.5 cm st.tropez 2009 isbn 978 90 891 0280 5 isbn 978 90 400 0718 7 (special edition) nur 653 272


/File-1327929372