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75 Atomists: Basic Principles they have an infinite number of shapes, the former a determinate number; both say that there are indivisibles of determinate shape. Things come to be from these elements and separation occurs according to Leucippus through the void and through contact (for that is how each thing is divided), but according to Plato by contact only; for he says that there is no void. We have discussed indivisible planes in an earlier work.62 For the present we may dispense with a more extended examination of the consequences of the postulation of indivisible solids, but, to undertake a brief digression, it is necessary to say that each of the indivisibles is incapable of being affected (for it cannot be affected except through the void) and not productive of any effect - for it is not possible for it to be hard or cold. Yet there is this absurdity, that heat alone is ascribed to the round shape;63 for it is necessary that the opposite too, cold, should belong to some other shape. And it would also be absurd if those, i.e., heat and coldness, belong to specific shapes, but heaviness and lightness, hardness and softness do not belong; yet Democritus says that each of the indivisibles is heavier in proportion to its greater size, so that it is clear that it will be hotter too. And since they are so, it is impossible that they should not be affected by one another, e.g., a moderately hot one by one which is very much hotter. Moreover, if some are hard, some must be soft too. But now soft is defined in terms of being affected; for what yields is soft. Moreover it is absurd either if nothing belongs to them except shape, or if only one extra property belongs, e.g., hot in one case, cold in another; for then their nature would not be uniform. Similarly it is impossible for more properties to belong to a single one; for being indivisible it will have its properties at the same point, so that if it is affected at one point by being made cold, it will be differently affected, or have a different effect, at the same 62 De Caelo 111.1 and 7; IV.2 63 In general, the atomists' theory is that all properties apart from the intrinsic properties of the atoms, viz. size, shape, impenetrability, motion, ordering, and arrangement, i) are properties of aggregates, and ii) are such that their characterizing the aggregates is explained by the intrinsic qualities of the atoms. Aristotle argues that the atomists make a unique exception of heat, treating it as an intrinsic property of spherical atoms, and that this exception is arbitrary. It is not clear that he is fair to the atomists. While the evidence is that they believed that fire was an unstable aggregate of spherical atoms (106a-b), that is consistent with their holding that heat is a property of aggregates of spherical atoms, not of these atoms individually. Hence there is no reason to accept that their account of heat constituted a departure from their general theory of sensible qualities. In the remainder of this paragraph Aristotle draws out further consequences, which he alleges to be absurd, of the attribution of sensible properties such as heat to atoms.

The Atomists -- Leucippus and Democritus  

MACEDONIA is GREECE and will always be GREECE- (if they are desperate to steal a name, Monkeydonkeys suits them just fine) ΦΕΚ,ΚΚΕ,ΚΝΕ,ΚΟΜΜ...

The Atomists -- Leucippus and Democritus  

MACEDONIA is GREECE and will always be GREECE- (if they are desperate to steal a name, Monkeydonkeys suits them just fine) ΦΕΚ,ΚΚΕ,ΚΝΕ,ΚΟΜΜ...

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