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89 Atomists: Basic Principles slowly downwards, but in fact the opposite occurs, as larger amounts of fire and of earth travel more quickly to their appropriate place. b. SIMPLICIUS Commentary on De Caelo 569.5-9 The followers of Democritus and later Epicurus say that all atoms are of the same nature and have weight, but because some are heavier they sink down and in so doing push the lighter ones up, thus, they say, making it appear that some are light and some heavy. [Cf. 269.4-14, 712.27-31.] c. THEMISTIUS Commentary on De Caelo 215.6-8 They [i.e., Leucippus and Democritus] must say that bodies are in themselves heavier, but appear lighter through containing void, and similarly Epicurus makes the atom heavy, but indivisible. 62. CICERO De Finibus 1.6.17 He [i.e., Democritus] thinks that what he calls atoms, that is bodies indivisible because of their solidity, travel about in an infinite void, in which there is neither top nor bottom nor middle nor end nor limit, in such a way that they collide and stick together, from which results everything that there is and that is perceived. That motion of atoms must be understood as having had no beginning, but as having gone on from eternity. 63. a. EUSEBIUS Praeparatio Evangelica XIV.23.2-3 [quoting DIONYSIUS, third-century Bishop of Alexandria] Those who give the name 'atoms' to an infinite number of tiny, indestructible bodies, and postulate empty space unbounded in extent, say that these atoms travel at random in the void. In their disorderly rush they collide by chance, get entangled through their variety of shapes and latch on to one another, thus making the world and the things in it, or rather infinitely many worlds. Epicurus and Democritus were of this opinion; but they differed to this extent, that the former held that the atoms were all extremely small and hence imperceptible, while Democritus held that some atoms were extremely large. Both say that there are atoms, and that they are so called because of their indestructible solidity. b. PHILOPONUS Commentary on Physics 398.16-17 For not only do they [the atoms] have different shapes, but some are larger and others smaller. 64. a. ARISTOTLE Physics 251bl4-17 On the subject of time, everyone with one exception [i.e., Plato] seems to agree that it did not come into being. This is the argument that Democritus uses to prove that it is impossible for everything to have come into being; for time did not come into being.

The Atomists -- Leucippus and Democritus  

MACEDONIA is GREECE and will always be GREECE- (if they are desperate to steal a name, Monkeydonkeys suits them just fine) ΦΕΚ,ΚΚΕ,ΚΝΕ,ΚΟΜΜ...

The Atomists -- Leucippus and Democritus  

MACEDONIA is GREECE and will always be GREECE- (if they are desperate to steal a name, Monkeydonkeys suits them just fine) ΦΕΚ,ΚΚΕ,ΚΝΕ,ΚΟΜΜ...

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