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ChildFest is District Attorney Jerry Wilson this Saturday! abruptly retired Mar. 31 Story inside

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Jim Hunt to speak F

Yancey County News Brush Creek - Burnsville - Cane River

Crabtree - Egypt - Green Mountain - Jacks Creek

Pensacola - Price’s Creek - Ramseytown - South Toe

www.yanceycountynews.com vTo be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.v April 3, 2014 • Vol. 4, No. 14 v Recipient of the E.W. Scripps Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment v

Gearing up for the FBEMC election By Nicole DelCogliano Special to the Yancey County News The election for board of director positions for the French Broad Electric Membership Cooperative is May 3, and the nominating committee had until March 19 to select candidates. Last spring, the election at Madison High School experienced a massive turnout due to a concerted voter mobilization by a group of concerned members. Three new candidates ran for the board by petitioning the French Broad EMC by collecting 50 signatures per candidate. This entitled their names to be added to the list

of candidates running. While the candidates did not get elected, the voter turnout was huge and those seeking change said they were able to highlight issues regarding the Cooperative’s management. They said they were concerned about a variety of issues, including executive compensation for EMC employees, alternative energy policies and net metering, and right-of-way vegetation management changes including the use of herbicides, private property issues, and what they see as a lack of transparency regarding EMC decision-making.

The upcoming election again has three new candidates running, George Lehto and Gerald Davis (Madison County) and Barron Brown (Yancey County). They are contesting seats held by Joe Justice and Gordon Randolph (Madison) and Jimmy Ray (Yancey). The French Broad EMC was created in 1939 as a part of the federal Rural Electrification Administration’s efforts to electrify rural areas. Due to the rugged topography and difficult terrain, private utilities did not see electrifying these areas as economically beneficial. See page 4

Flames and destruction Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News

Little remains of the upper lodge and restaurant at Wolf Ridge after fire erupted before dawn last Wednesday. Arson investigators from the State Bureau of Investigation have been hard pressed to determine the cause of the fire because the wooden 10,500 square-foot structure burned so completely, leaving few clues as to what sparked the blaze.

Wiebe honored as top small farmer In a state where the average age of a farmer is 57, the new face of farming in North Carolina belongs to a 34-yearold grower from Yancey County with a passion for agriculture; 6 acres of USDA organically certified vegetables, and an earlier career as a model. Ryan Wiebe was named the 2014 North Carolina Small Farmer of the Year by The Cooperative Extension Program at North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University during ceremonies Wednesday on the campus. Ryan Wiebe is named North Carolina Small Farmer of the Year. Wiebe’s recognition was of special note

given the theme of this year’s Small Farms Week celebration: “Innovations for the Next Generation.” The 6-acre Wiebe Farmin’ began in 2004 with assistance from Yancey County Cooperative Extension and A&T’s Extension program. Known for its organic vegetables, quality packaging and clean operation, Wiebe Farmin’ ships 3-to-5 tons of produce weekly during its peak growing season and See page 7


2 APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS

Burnsville Elementary receives star gazing grant

Fourth grade classes at Burnsville Elementary were awarded a $4,000 grant from the Burrough’s Wellcome Fund last week for a project that will shed light on some of universe’s greatest scientific mysteries. “Illuminating Light” is a science education initiative which will highlight and capitalize on an innovative opportunity in the community. Through this project, students will be “illuminated” to the invisible properties of light and how those properties interact on earth, on the moon, and in the universe. Through the purchase of a spectrometer, prisms, lasers, and other demonstrative implements, students will be better engaged in the classroom through inquirybased learning and experimentation with quality-made science materials. Additionally, through the purchase of student telescopes

and infrared spectacles, students will be invited to special classroom studies where they will take advantage of Yancey County’s high elevation and dark skies to observe lunar stages and orbit, and how light interacts with the earth and moon. “So often during class, certain topics require visual representation in order to truly connect with my students,” said fourth grade teacher Steve Grindstaff. “What lags unfortunately is disengagement of the course material. I have seen in many of my students a potential that could only be brought to life if I could find ways to engage them.” W h i l e Ya n c e y C o u n t y ’s geographic isolation and high altitude have limited economic development in some areas, these aspects of the county are perfect

for dark skies. Partnering with the Blue Ridge Astronomy Group, the school plans to use the awarded materials to host star-gazing events at the school. These activities in the night will be fun and exciting capstone events that support the curriculum. (If any students are not able to make the star-gazing event, a special telescope will be purchased that will video record the activity to be seen the next

day.) In the classroom, students will be primed for their star-gazing nights by learning about the properties of light using real science materials and not just lecture-based learning. Seeing with their own eyes the dispersion of light connects with students much more than hearing about it with their ears. The Burroughs Wellcome Fund was founded in 1955 as the corporate foundation of the pharmaceutical firm Burroughs Wellcome Co. The granting agency is an independent private foundation dedicated to advancing the biomedical sciences by supporting research and other scientific and educational activities.

USDA expands efforts for organic farming industry From the USDA The organic farm industry continues to grow domestically and globally, with over 25,000 certified organic operations in more than 120 different countries around the world, according to the USDA. Through the Agricultural Marketing Service’s National Organic Program, USDA has helped an additional 763 producers become certified organic in just 2013, an increase of 4.2 percent from the previous year. The industry today encompasses a record breaking 18,513 certified organic farms and businesses in the United States alone, representing a 245 percent increase since 2002. The 2013 list of certified USDA organic operations shows an increased rate of domestic growth within the industry, resuming previous trends. “Consumer demand for organic products has grown exponentially over the past decade. With retail sales valued at $35 billion last year,

WHO WE ARE

The Yancey County News is the only independent newspaper in Yancey County. It is owned, operated and published by

Susan Austin ........ Advertising/Publisher Jonathan Austin ........... Editor/Publisher who are the sole participants and members of

Yancey County News LLC 105 W. Main St., Suite F Burnsville, NC 28714 828-691-0806 or 691-0807 jonathan@yanceycountynews.com susan@yanceycountynews.com The Yancey County News (USPS publication No. 3528) is published weekly for $25 per year in Yancey County, $35 per year out of county. Published by Yancey County News LLC, Periodicals postage paid at Burnsville, NC. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Yancey County News, 105 W. Main St., Suite F, Burnsville, NC 28714 Printed in Boone by the Watauga Democrat on recycled paper.

To be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard. vRecipient of the 2012 Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism and the Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, integrity and tenacity in rural journalism v

the organic industry represents a tremendous economic opportunity for farmers, ranchers and rural communities,” said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack. “New support in the 2014 Farm Bill will enhance USDA’s efforts to help producers and small business tap into this market and support organic agriculture as it continues to grow and thrive.” USDA has a number of new and expanded efforts to connect organic farmers and businesses with resources that will ensure the continued growth of the organic industry domestically and abroad. During this Administration, USDA has signed three major trade agreements on organic products, first with Canada and then with the European Union and Japan. The trading partners are eager to establish organic equivalency arrangements with the U.S. because they recognize the strength of the National Organic Program and the value of the USDA organic label. USDA is also helping organic stakeholders access programs that support conservation, provide access to loans and grants, fund organic research and education, and mitigate pest emergencies. Funds are currently available for research projects under the National Institute of Food and Agriculture’s Organic Agriculture Research and Extension Initiative to solve critical organic agriculture issues, priorities, or problems. The program also funds research projects to enhance the ability of organic producers and processors to grow and market their products. Additional information is available online, and request for proposals are due by May 8. Additionally, the recently-signed 2014 Farm Bill includes provisions that are a greater support to the organic community, including: • $20 million annually for dedicated organic research, agricultural extension programs, and education. • $5 million to fund data

collection on organic agriculture that will give policymakers, organic farmers, and organic businesses data needed to make sound policy, business, and marketing decisions • Expanded options for organic crop insurance to protect farmers • Expanded exemptions for organic producers who are paying into commodity “check off” programs, and authority for USDA to consider an application for the organic sector to establish its own check off • Improved enforcement authority for the National Organic Program to conduct investigations • $5 million for a technology upgrade of the National Organic Program to provide upto-date information about certified organic operations across the supply chain • $11.5 million annually for certification cost-share assistance, which reimburses the costs of annual certification for organic farmers and livestock producers by covering 75 percent of certification costs, up to $750 per year.

Acupuncture offered in group setting Experience the healing benefits of low cost acupuncture in a peaceful group setting at Mountain Community Acupuncture. The program is offered in Burnsville on Thursdays, 3–7 p.m., at  131 N. Main St., and in Spruce Pine on Saturdays, 12-4 p.m. at 31 Cross St. The cost is $15-$35; pay what you can. Appointments are appreciated, and walk-ins welcome. Call 828-536-9709 for information, or email  mountainacu@gmail.com .

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APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS 3

Last Yancey school day penciled in for June 13 From Dr. Tony Tipton School Superintendent The inclement weather last week forced Yancey County Schools to hold its first Saturday school session of the 2013-14 school year on March 29. By making up time Saturday, the last scheduled day for students is June 17. By adding 15 minutes to the end of each day from March 17 through the remainder of this school year, YCS will bank enough hours to forgive 2 ½ days.

The current plan is to use these 2 ½ days to move the last day of school for students back to Friday, June 13. It is important to remember that graduation date has not been set. This year, as in past years, YCS will wait until about mid-April to set a firm graduation date. It is our hope to have graduation on Saturday, June 14th. North Carolina general statute defines the last day of school as the Friday closest to June 11, which

this year is June 13. YCS, as other mountain counties, has a waiver that allows the school board to go past June 11 because of inclement weather. By adding the extra 15 minutes, going to Saturday School, and amending the calendar with teacher workdays, YCS has taken these steps to meet the state’s

requirement of instructional hours but still reach the goal of June 13 as the last student day while still keeping the Spring break holiday. However, with three weeks or more of possible bad weather anything could still happen including moving the last day of school and graduation later into June.

Former N.C. Gov. Jim Hunt to speak at Mars Hill, campaign for Hicks in Burnsville Mars Hill University will host a lecture by former North Carolina governor James B. Hunt Jr., on April 15, at 3:30 p.m. in Moore Auditorium. Hunt’s lecture, titled “The State of Education in North Carolina,” will be the second event in the University Lecture Series, which is in its inaugural year.  Hunt is the state’s longestserving governor, having been elected to four terms, from 1977 to1985 and from 1993 to 2001.  Long recognized as an advocate for education, he was an early proponent of teaching standards and early childhood education.  “The governor is recognized nationwide for his dedication to

improving educational opportunity as well as raising expectations for student achievement,” said said Mars Hill President Dan Lunsford. “As a former public school educator myself, I have seen first-hand the governor’s advocacy and support for education in the state at all levels.” According to Lunsford, the Mars Hill education program is one of the institution’s largest and most active major groups. Hunt will travel to Burnsville after the Mars Hill event for a fundraiser for N.C. House candidate Dean Hicks of Burnsville. The fundraiser is April 15 at 6:30 p.m. in the Town Center.

“Experience Matters” NOTICE OF MEETINGS OF THE YANCEY COUNTY BOARD OF EQUALIZATION AND REVIEW Pursuant to N.C.G.S. 105-322, the Yancey County Board of Equalization and Review will meet as required by law. PURPOSE OF MEETINGS To hear, upon request, any and all taxpayers who own or control taxable property assessed for taxation in Yancey County, with respect to the valuation of such property, or the property of others, and to fulfill other duties and responsibilities as required by law.

ELECT

Britt Springer District Attorney

• Chief Prosecutor for Watauga, Avery, Mitchell, Yancey, and Madison counties • 10+ Years as Assistant District Attorney • Responsible for sending child sex offenders to prison for a combined 1000+ years • Endorsed by Jerry Wilson, DA and Chief District Attorney Judge Alexander Lyerly Paid for by The Committee to Elect Britt Bingham Springer DA

TIME OF MEETINGS The Board will convene for its first meeting on April 14th, 2014 at 5:00pm. The Board will adjourn for the purpose of accepting requests for hearing at its meeting on May 5th, 2014. Requests for hearing must be received no later than final adjournment, which is scheduled for May 5th, 2014 at 9:00 AM. Meetings will begin promptly at 5:00pm in Commissioners Board Room on the second floor of the Yancey County Courthouse. In the event of an earlier or a later adjournment, notice to that effect will be published in this newspaper. The schedule for the hearing of appeals which were timely filed will be posted at the office of the Assessor, serving as Clerk to the Board, and will also be provided to individuals and organizations that have requested notice pursuant to N.C.G.S. 143-318.12. All requests for hearing should be made to: Jeff A Boone, Clerk to the Yancey County Board of Equalization and Review 110 Town Square, Courthouse Room 2 Burnsville, NC 28714 Telephone: (828) 682-2198 Fax: (828) 682-4817 Email: jeff.boone@yanceycountync.gov


4 APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS

Some are urging changes in way utility holds election From the front Therefore the North Carolina REA surveyed and assisted communities in forming rural electric membership cooperatives, helped find financial backing and power sourcing from private utilities to bring electricity to underserved areas. Our area continues to be considered a difficult terrain to operate in, as evidenced by the multi-year process to expand broadband access. The EMC today is minimally regulated by the NCREA, which oversees the bylaws and any revisions. According to Frances Liles of NCREA, these documents are “reviewed by the administrator of the NCREA.” The board of directors are elected by the members and “are not under the jurisdiction of the NCREA.” The board of directors represents each of the five districts that the EMC covers. Members can vote via proxy or by attending the annual meeting and casting a vote. One of the concerns raised by members last spring was the voting process itself. The procedures are outlined in the bylaws of the French Broad EMC under Articles 3 and 4, which detail the annual meeting, election committees and processes and director specifics. Some members say they felt that the bylaws were written to be hard to understand and interpret and made the voting process cumbersome and difficult to participate in. The nominating committee “may include more nominees than there are to be elected…”, but regularly does not. Each year, the incumbent is nominated again and other candidates must collect signatures to be considered. Some members, like Raven Tata, an artist in Yancey County, would like to see “a diverse group of knowledgeable candidates fully vetted by an honest and open nominating committee.” Nominating committee member R. L. McIntosh likens the nominating committee to how candidates get elected in national elections. The committee nominates their preferred candidate and if someone else wants to challenge that, they must mount their own campaign. McIntosh has served on the nominating committee for a dozen or so years, each year getting selected in February by the board of directors. The nominating committee meets once a year to select candidates. McIntosh said that the Cooperative’s CEO often comes to the meetings to give an update and report on the EMC, but does not influence the selection of nominees. Many NC cooperative operate this way, requiring candidates to gather signatures ranging from 10-50 per petition to get nominated. Last May, voter turnout at the annual meeting was at record levels with 3,600 votes tallied. Voters can carry up to five proxies for those not able to attend the election.

Last year, observers were allowed on the main floor, in the ballot room and in the vote counting room. Julie Mayfield, co-director of the Western North Carolina Alliance participated as an election observer. Her organization became involved in the campaign for new directors when members of the Alliance expressed concerns over EMC decisions regarding right-of-way herbicide spraying to reduce vegetation and solar limitations. She participated in the vote counting. Three teams made up of current directors worked to count votes; one would read the names out and the others would mark them down. Occasionally they would check in with each other to make sure their numbers aligned. Julie Mayfield felt that it was “a very welcoming and congenial atmosphere” and her presence was appreciated. A few things she noted that were of concern were: Ballots were put in the box all at once and there was no way to verify if more than five proxies had been put in. She suggests fanning out the ballots to ensure no more than five are present. She said she felt that the process of collecting and distributing proxies has little oversight and leaves room for lots of discrepancies. She said if online voting were allowed or voting prior to the annual meeting at your local office, a lot of the issues associated with proxy voting would be eliminated. But FBENC CEO Jeff Loven says adopting new voting procedures would add costs to the cooperative, “that alone would double the cost of our annual meeting to our membership.” Many cooperatives offer a variety of voting methods, including mail in and online voting. Loven said “It could compromise the integrity of the process. Many members would receive their voting packet at the local post office only to throw it away in the trash. Anyone could collect these packets and mail in the ballot enclosed.” The proxy collection process last year raised these very concerns about integrity, since the process is not monitored and loosely defined. According to Carolyn Lewellen, an election observer last May, the proxy voting is already compromising the voting integrity, “it looked to me that sometimes multiple clumps of ballots were being jammed into the box. There must be some more efficient way that voting can be arranged. For example, every member could vote with some mail in or online process conducted by a third party with no stake in the outcome.” Blue Ridge Electric Membership Cooperative, based in Lenoir, serving seven counties and 58,000 customers, offers online voting, mail in, and day-of voting. Their election is managed by a third party organization. According to

Renee Whitener, the cooperative’s director of public relations, “We have a professional independent third party, election administrator who handles our election process and is approved by the Credentials and Election Committee, which is made up of cooperative members, each year.  Employees, candidates or board members may not accept a proxy; all processes of the election are handled by the firm. Also, the election administrator reviews proxies received by mail to ensure they have the proper acknowledgements for execution.” The philosophy is described on the utility’s website: “With a service area stretching from the foothills into the mountains and across seven counties combined with busy family schedules, this option enables members who can’t attend the annual meeting to vote for their board of directors. One advantage of being served by a cooperative is the right to elect peers — other members — to serve on the board of directors to lead and guide their cooperative. The option to vote electronically, by mail, or in person at the annual meeting is designed to provide a better opportunity for more members to take part in this democratic process.” When Blue Ridge EMC implemented mail in voting in 2011 and online voting in 2012, voting increased from approximately less than 1,000 to more than 7,500 voters. According to Whitener, “It’s produced a good value for members because we were able to balance costs by changing our annual meeting format once we saw the tremendous participation in mail and online voting compared to the declining interest in attending our traditional “country fair” setting for the annual meeting. We now have a business meeting setting for the annual meeting at our corporate office and that’s helped us avoid spending thousands of dollars on entertainment, food, and facility rentals. At the same time, we’ve seen steady member participation in the annual director election increase.” For this article I was unable to procure professional or personal biography information about the current FBEMC board members. Their names are listed on the utility’s website, but no contact information is available. Loven said he cannot give out their personal information to members without their permission, yet he said members can look them up in the phone book to contact them. Of the current members up for election, Joe Justice was the only one I was able to reach. He has been on the board for 39 years in Madison County. The primary concern he has regarding the management of the EMC is keeping rates cheap for customers. He believes the election process works fine and has done so since 1939. I could not reach other candidates

for comments regarding last year’s election and what they see as the pertinent issues for the cooperative moving into the future. The board member’s tenures range from 1 year to 39, with an average tenure of 22 years. The Center for Non Profit Excellence has guidelines and best practices listed for board of directors in nonprofits on their website. It says that board director terms for non profits average three years, with the opportunity to serve one additional term. The French Broad EMC bylaws do not set term limits, which seems a common practice in North Carolina cooperatives. According to Loven, “Having experience on our board has tremendous value to our cooperative… the electric business is complicated, to say the least, and it takes years to gain a comprehensive understanding of how things work.” The two new candidates running in Madison County - George Lehto and Gerald Davis -say they have experience in the world of electricity. Lehto worked for the Rural Electrification Administration installing lines and poles, taught electronics in the Navy, and has been a small contractor refurbishing older homes. Davis is a retired chemical engineer and Vice President of McCarroll Construction. He has served on boards previously in these capacities. He has an FCC license in electronics and can maintain broadcast equipment. Barron Brown, seeking the seat representing Yancey, describes himself as a small business craftsman and fabricator with a degree in electrical engineering. Upcoming articles will focus more specifically on the candidates running (new and incumbents), right-of-way vegetation management and net metering/ alternative energy concerns. Questions can be sent to FBMEMBER@gmail.com Nicole DelCogliano lives in Yancey county and has a farm with her husband and two daughters. She is in graduate school at ASU and is researching cooperatives.

The Best Photography.

Period.

Yancey County News


APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS 5

Spring brings many fish to a fever pitch

As outdoorsmen, we rely almost completely on animal’s natural instincts. Mating and reproduction are some of the most basic of those instincts that can be predicted. Everyone knows the rut for deer is the peak time for whitetail hunting. The bucks throw caution to the wind as they search for a willing mate, even if it means exiting the protection of their thick cover during broad daylight at just a scent of a female or sound of a competing male’s grunt. But this is not limited to our most popular hunting pursuit. Every year over the last decade or so I have watched a series of underwater cameras on the Wolf River in Wisconsin beginning in March. They are similar to the various bird nest cameras or zoo cameras that grace the news every now and then, except they show underwater life.

Bill Howard’s

Outdoors

If you are lucky, you the depths and cover up to the shallow can catch a sturgeon shorelines to prepare for their annual ritual. hovering in and out of The male largemouth - the predominate the view of the screen. predator of the freshwater - begins his bedding Most of the time, when process as well. He is hungry and angry and the activity heats up, it will attack anything that comes near the is because of the sucker nesting area. The trophy, though, is the big f i s h s p a w n . T h e r e female. She carries the eggs and has put on may be several dozen the weight. She may hover just off the bed of the bottom feeders out of sight until her confidence and safety bouncing and rolling allows her to re-enter. It all becomes a game over each other. Within a few weeks the sucker of wits. Can the angler outsmart the prey? We fish begin their spawn here in the Carolinas can learn when, but we have to become wise as well. to the tendencies and match the techniques. When I first caught glimpse of a sucker Spring does not only bring the fish to a spawn, I was amazed at the sight before me. I fevered pitch though. Neither is fish the only have never been to Alaska, but I imagined the ones we have to outplay the game with. suckers crashing the running water with their The old gobbler begins his redundant calls tails in the shallows were a miniature version announcing his dominance. His harem will of a salmon run on the Copper River. feed and cluck; he will follow and strut. A During the same time span, another species smaller jake stands no chance against a beard begins their journey up the river basins. The dragging tom during the prime mating season. shad, whether hickory or American, will Spring sets off a glorious sequence of populate the rivers quickly and chomp at events of what we would ‘humanize’ as love, anything small enough to digest. Their hunger and we humans love it. is only fueled for the tiresome swim against Bill Howard is a member of North Carolina the currents over hundreds of miles so they Bowhunters Association and Pope & Young. can lay eggs and fertilize them. He can be reached at billhowardoutdoors@ Of course, once the shad begin their track, gmail.com. the stripers follow behind. The stripers are a favorite amongst anglers on the Roanoke River. The significance to a small area in Eastern North Carolina is historical in context, garnering nationwide excitement at the peak. Traffic jams in Atlanta Politics, Music and Food! have nothing on the with Catering by gunwale to gunwale occurrences from the boats lining the river’s BBQ, baked beans, slaw, surface. dinner roll, and drink! As the stripers ramp up their spawn, our $12 per person, still waters begin to including entertainment. swell with activity as well. Pan fish such as bream fan the - Senate Candidate bottoms of ponds and Currently: lakes in what appears McDowell County Commissioner - Now Serving 12th year as an underwater McDowell Technical Community College - Director of External Relations lunar landscape. The Smoky Mountain Mental Health, Board of Directors & other civic activities crappies come from

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6 APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS

Citing health problems, Wilson leaves DA post By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News Longtime District Attorney Jerry Wilson has stepped down due to medical problems, he announced in an email Tuesday morning. Wilson resigned effective March 31. Wilson was prosecutor for Yancey, Avery, Madison, Mitchell, and Watauga counties. He spent years as an assistant district attorney and was first elected district attorney in 2002. Prior to that he spent six years in private practice. He first announced his plans to not seek

reelection over a year ago in an interview with the Yancey County News, but his medical condition forced him to leave his post earlier than planned. “A few months ago I announced I would retired on the last day of this year. Unfortunately, medical problems have forced me to move my retirement date forward. Monday, March 31st, 2014 marked my last day as District Attorney in the 24th District. I count it a special honor that the people of this district have allowed me to serve them as District Attorney and Prosecutor

for over 30 years.” Assistant District Attorney Britt Springer, one of three Republicans seeking to replace Wilson, said staff in the governor’s office “have been meeting all this morning” seeking to choose a replacement for Wilson. “I don’t think any of the candidates will be chosen,” she said in order to not play favorites in advance of the May 6 primary. “We’re going to get through this,” she said, voicing support and admiration for Wilson.

A firefighter creates a fire block with a leaf blower last week at a woods fire near Circle J Ranch Drive in the Jacks Creek community. The fire was one of many that were sparked in the dry and windy conditions.

Hi my name is Mary Ann. I am a fuzzy handful of love, waiting on you at the Humane Society. I can snuggle and warm you up on these cold early Spring days, and will romp and play in the leaves come autumn. Can your home be mine? Hello my name is Baby, and trust me, I am a very big baby.  I am a 6 month old Corgi -Basset mix.  Although my little legs are very short, I can keep up with what ever life throws at me!   I love to be cuddled and held.  I love other dogs, cats and kids.  Did i mention that I am already housebroken?  So hurry up and come get me!!

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State funds efforts to save hemlocks

N.C. Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler has announced the allocation of seed funding for a new effort to restore North Carolina’s hemlock trees to long-term health. Hemlocks across We s t e r n N o r t h Carolina are being decimated by the hemlock woolly adelgid, an insect that sucks the sap of young twigs, which leads to tree death. Dead hemlocks can n e g a t i v e l y a ff e c t nesting songbirds, trout populations, plant nurseries and landscapers, homeowners and tourism. T h e N . C . Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services will use $100,000 f r o m t h e s t a t e ’s legal settlement with the Tennessee Valley Authority to start the Hemlock Restoration Initiative. Troxler made the

announcement at a meeting of the General Assembly’s Agriculture and Forestry Awareness Study Commission at DuPont State Recreational Forest.  “We can and must do more to restore hemlocks on public and private lands as soon as possible,” Troxler said. “Our goal is to ensure that, by 2025, Eastern and Carolina hemlocks in North Carolina can resist the adelgid and survive to maturity.” Troxler said many people, groups and agencies already are working on promising approaches to return hemlocks to long-term health. These include the search for naturally resistant trees, testing of predator beetles that eat adelgids, and efforts to bring in resistance from similar tree species. “We are focused on speeding up the most promising ideas, not reinventing the wheel,” he said.


APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS 7

Ryan Wiebe honored at top small farmer

From the front about 20 tons, a n n u a l l y. T h e operation has expanded from a quarter-acre garden yielding produce sold to individual customers at tailgate markets to an agribusiness that cultivates a wholesale market of grocers, restaurants and other food suppliers. “I’d like to thank A&T for starting me off in farming 10 years ago and I’m continuing today,” Wiebe said to a packed campus audience. “I owe a lot to Yancey County Extension and (retired agricultural technician) Claude Deyton. He really saw something in me that I didn’t know even existed.” In addition to his

recognizes the smallscale producers in North Carolina who generate $350,000 or less, annually, in agricultural gross sales.

successful organic o p e r a t i o n , Wi e b e was noted for his willingness to help other farmers, and his innovative use of plasticulture, which involves growing

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vegetables on black plastic and drip irrigation. N.C. A&T officials presented Wiebe with a plaque, monogrammed jacket and $1,500 gift. Small Farms Week

Childfest 2014 is this Saturday Child Fest 2014, Mitchell Yancey Partnership for Children’s (Smart Start), long-running celebration of children and families is happening this weekend. This free event is Saturday, April 5, from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. at Mitchell High School in Ledger. Child Fest has a mixture of arts, crafts, games, face painting and other fun activities to keep your family entertained. While your kids are making a wild hat, you can learn about services for families in our local community. You won’t want to miss the magician performance as it is

includes puppetry, ventriloquism, audience participation and of course, magic! And Teddy’s for Maddie will be hosting the Teddy Bear Clinic. Did we mention the bicycle rodeo with free helmets to give away- as long as they last? T h e M i t c h e l l - Ya n c e y Partnership for Children, Child Care Resource and Referral, Mitchell County United Way and local businesses work together to ensure that Child Fest is free. For more information, contact the Mitchell-Yancey Partnership for Children at 682-0047 or 7655130.

Parkway Playhouse goes Wonka

Parkway Playhouse Junior will present the wildly imaginative Willy Wonka Jr. on April 11 at 7:30 p.m. and April 12 at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. at the playhouse. Based on Roald Dahl’s legendary children’s novel Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Willy Wonka Jr. is vivid musical that features a songs from the classic 1971 film. At the center of this story is the enigmatic candy manufacturer, Willy Wonka; who stages a contest by hiding five golden tickets in five of his scrumptious candy bars. Whoever finds these rare tickets will win a free tour of the mysterious Wonka Factory and a lifetime supply of candy. Four of the five winning children are insufferable brats: the fifth is a likable young lad named Charlie Bucket who takes the tour in the company of his equally amiable grandfather. Once inside Wonka’s factory all is not what it seems, including the eccentric candy-maker himself; the children must learn to follow Mr. Wonka’s rules in the factory--or suffer the consequences. The cast includes students from Mitchell, Avery, Yancey, and Madison

counties. Student performers are: Jacob Bacon, Levi Bradford, Elijah Briggs, Willa Briggs, Baleigh Bryant, Logan Bryant, Natalie Calkins, Laela Cash, Corey Chandler, Jonathan Chandler, Lexi Cranor, Izzy Davis, Sydney Edwards, Aspen Elliot, Beckett Gall, Hunter Gall, Jeremy Heidenfelder, Kade Hoilman, Maggie Howell, Charlotte Hubbard, Emma Hubbard, Ursula Kelley, Henry Kramer, James Kramer, Amira Malas, Aaron Neighbors, Eli North, Oscar North, Laura Oosterloo, Liza Patrick, Lily Polgar, Kadence Ray, Paige Rizzuto, Drew Smoker, Eva Soto, Paloma Soto, Hana Stella, Kai’ana Stella, Austin Tinna, Tristi Townsend, Logan Walden, Luke Watrous, Polly Watrous, Asya Williams, and Samarie Wilson. The production is being directed by Kristen Donelle Livengood, with choreography by Mary Katherine Smith-Gall and music direction by Andrea Bailey. Parkway Playhouse Jr. is the performing arts program established by Parkway Playhouse for students with an interest in the arts. Tickets are only available at the door, ranging from $5.50-$11.

Celo Health Center would like to welcome Kirstin Rule, Certified Nurse-Midwife. She has recently moved with her husband and four children to Yancey County from Asheville. Kirstin has 12 years experience as a midwife - attending both home and hospital deliveries. At Celo Health Center, Kirstin’s scope of practice will be limited to hospital births. Her Kirstin Rule and Emily Cade Chappelear love of midwifery began when she worked on the maternity ward of a mission hospital in Haiti alongside her missionary parents, Dr. Steve and Nancy James. She will be working parttime at Celo Health Center beginning in April. She is looking forward to joining Dr. Dorothy DeGuzman, Dr. Scott Rogers, and Dr. Philip Mitchell as they provide prenatal, intra-partum and postpartum care to women and their families. Kirstin will also offer annual physicals, including pap smears, well woman primary care, family planning, and pre-conception counseling. Celo is also pleased to announce the return of Emily Cade Chappelear, PA-C. Emily first came to Celo Health Center in 2008 to complete her clinical rotations. After her marriage to Alex Chappelear, DO, she moved to the Tri-City area of Tennessee and worked as a Physician Assistant with the Bluff City Medical Center. Emily will be treating patients of all ages with both acute and chronic medical conditions; and will be available for annual physicals. The staff of Celo Health Center is delighted to welcome Emily back to the Practice. Emily, Alex and their daughter, Jupiter will live in the Celo Community.

For more information or to make an appointment with either Kirstin or Emily, please call Celo Health Center at 828-675-4116.


8 APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS

Don’t debate unsafe influences with teen girl By John Rosemond Q: My 14-yearold daughter says I d o n ’t t r u s t h e r because, unlike her best friend’s parents, I won’t allow her to stay home alone for several days while I go out of town. Her friend’s parents do this at least once a month while they go to their second home and their two teenagers - 14 and 16 - have thrown at least two raucous alcohol (and most likely sex) parties in their absence. I have tried to explain to my daughter that this is not typical parenting and I am concerned about her and her brother’s welfare.  But I am struggling with a way to do this without throwing other parents “under the bus,” so to speak. In addition, my daughter may not even think this is bad parenting and just think I’m making excuses for myself. A: Your problem is your concern about throwing these other parents under the proverbial bus. As a result, you are mincing words, pulling your punches, avoiding the real issue, and failing to make yourself perfectly clear. For example, you’ve told your daughter this is “not typical parenting.” I give you high marks for your deft use of polite euphemisms, but the bald fact is her friend’s parents are a couple of irresponsible narcissists. They obviously put the satisfaction of their own hedonistic appetites way out in front of their children’s welfare. The upshot of this is that their children are putting other people’s children at significant risk. It’s time the entire community stopped turning a blind eye to this and, yes, threw them under the bus. The next time they leave their children at home alone while they go seek their monthly pleasure fix, someone needs to make a phone call

Living

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to Child Protective Services. You need to be crystal clear with your daughter, as in, “I’m only going to say this once, so listen very carefully. It is highly irresponsible of your friend’s parents to leave their children home alone for days at a time while they go entertain themselves. It is also against the law, child of mine, and it is only a matter of time before the authorities step in to this situation. I am not going to break the law, much less endanger your welfare. “And now, about you, young lady, and your feeling that I

don’t trust you. The mere fact that you think your friend’s situation is desirable tells me that if I left you alone for several days, you would definitely throw a party to demonstrate to other kids how totally cool you are. So, yes, I don’t trust you, and I’m not leaving you alone. This discussion is now over, for good.” And with that, get up and leave the room. Your other problem, I strongly suspect, is one you share with lots of today’s parents: you don’t want your daughter to dislike you. As a consequence, you

engage in debates C o n t a c t f a m i l y Rosemond at www. with her, trying to get psychologist John rosemond.com. her to say what no 14-year-old has ever said: “Wow Mom! When you put it that way, a bright clear light went on in my head and I suddenly got it! Yes! I agree with you! Oh Mom, you’re such a great Mom to care so much for me! I love you, Mom!” Absurd, isn’t it? Now, it’s time for you to shake off those mean old “I want my daughter to like me” blues and be the parent she needs you to be, whether she likes the parent she needs or not.

Towing Service with Rollback Truck!

I Buy Junk Vehicles!

Week of 4/7/14 - 4/13/14

Pay Fair Price Will Pick Up Vehicle

828-208-7522

828-675-0809

Your Representatives Sen. Richard Burr (R) 217 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-3154 - Fax: (202) 228-2981 Asheville: Federal Building, 151 Patton Ave., Suite 204 Asheville, N.C. 28801 Phone: (828) 350-2437 - Fax: (828) 350-2439 Sen. Kay Hagan (D) 521 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6342 - Fax: (202) 228-2563 Asheville address: 82 Patton Ave., Suite 635 Asheville, N.C. 28801 Phone: (828) 257-6510 - Fax: (828) 257-6514 11th District Rep. Mark Meadows (R) 1516 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6401 N.C. Elected Officials N.C. Senate District 47 Sen. Ralph Hise (R) Address: N.C. Senate 16 W. Jones St., Room 1026 Raleigh, N.C. 27601-2808 Phone: (919) 733-3460 and (828) 766-8329 Email: Ralph.Hise@ncleg.net N.C. House District 118 Rep. Michele D. Presnell (R) Address: N.C. House of Representatives 16 W. Jones St., Room 1025 Raleigh, N.C. 27601-1096 Phone: (919) 733-5732 and (828) 682-6342 Email: Michele.Presnell@ncleg.net

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APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS 9

CLASSIFIEDS

CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS • CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS

LAND FOR SALE

44.330 ACRES - NATIONAL FOREST joins at back and side boundary! 3600’ Elevations astounding VIEWS - wooded mountain land, ideal for Hunt Club or Survivalist retreat- with plenty of firewood, deer and other game and springs. Short walk too Appalachian Trail! No Restrictions. www.lunsfordrealty. biz $110.825! Lunsford Realty 828-678-3400. FOR RENT or SALE - Brick rancher of three bedrooms, one bath. Living, dining - kitchen, u t i l i t y. c a r p o r t . G a r a g e . Outbuildings. 4.62 ACRES - ideal for gardens, horses. Plenty of firewood. Trout Stream nearby! Rent -$600 month - NO pets! Sale $159,500 - some owner financing with substantial down. www. lunsfordrealty.biz Lunsford Realty 828-678-3400. M T. M I T C H E L L G O L F COURSE - .77 ACRE - gentle slope ideal building site with VIEWS of South Toe River and mountains, landscaped by “Nature” with abundant laurel, ivy, Galax and native flora! Septic approval, community water. Golf, hiking, fishing in South Toe River - protective neighborhood OWNERS WILL FINANCE!!! $55,000 - Lunsford Realty 828678-3400. South Toe land for sale 5.5 acres off Colberts Creek Road. Creek frontage, borders National Forest, privacy, mixture of lush rhododendron, pines and hardwoods, level to moderate grade, south/southeast exposure, garden spot, view of Black Mountains, beautiful rock formation, active springs with spring boxes and pipe, and close proximity to South Toe River and

Carolina Hemlock Recreation Area. At least 3-4 potential house sites. Transferable septic permit already obtained. Electric close by. We are selling in order to buy a larger parcel (10-15 acres) and will consider land swap option. Asking price: $84,900. We would love to answer any questions you have or meet with you to show you this beautiful property. Contact Lisa at 828-208-1221.

Homes For Rent Thurston Associates 828-682-4552

● 1Br/1Ba New studio cottage. Celo area $800/month, includes yard maintenance. ● 1Br/1Ba high end efficiency in a private home. $800/month, including utilities. ● 3Br/2Ba furnished log home. West Yancey, $1,200/month ● 2Br/2Ba furnished log home. Celo. $800/month.

FOR RENT House For Rent: 16 minutes south of Burnsville off Hwy. 197. Catttail Creek Rd. $675/month plus utilities, deposit, pet deposit. Approx. 900 square ft. 3 bdrm., 1 bath, laundry room, small yard, kitchen/dining/living room is one room. Small stove. Beautiful area. email: ronm2u@hotmail.com 828 551 9775

MAYtime

Compost & Garden Soil Topsoil Worm Castings 828-231-9352 www.maytimecomposting.com

DoneRite Lawncare All lawn care needs, Snow removal, firewood supplies and much more.

Call 284-0032 and have it DoneRite!

Get the ONLY locally owned Yancey County newspaper! That’s right, this is the only newspaper that is 100 percent owned by Yancey residents! It is the only one NOT majority owned by an out-of -state newspaper chain!

828-675-9532 Boxwoods for Sale. $10 each. 828.208.0406. AKC registered chocolate lab puppies for sale. Please contact 208-3524 for more information.

Adult day care - Heritage Adult Day Retreat located just west of Burnsville offers low cost affordable quality day care for your loved one giving you the opportunity to take care of yourself and . things you need to do without Week of 4/7/14 - 4/13/14 worry. Qualified/caring AVON Representatives staff. Grants available. For needed in this area. Great information please call 828products for Easter! Only 682-1556 $15/Kit. Call Sheila Hill, Free Manure – Will load. 682-6303 Clear Creek Ranch. 6754510 J&J MOWING Roof Leak? Call Brad at All of your lawn care needs Tip Top Roofing, 25 years+ will be taken care of with one experience. References. call! Jimmy McMahan and 682-3451 Joshua McMahan offer over Sewing alterations. Call 50 years combines experience! 208-3999. Will clean your home or Call 675-4357 or 675-4014 business. Call 208-3688

House For Rent in town, 3 BDRM, 2 Bath, 2 story house, large BM, Fireplace, Central Cooling/ Heating Pump, Garage, Decks, Balconies/ Patio, Fully Fenced, Appliances with Washer/Dryer. $900/ Month. No pets preferred. Call (828) 682-7499 .

SERVICES

FOR SALE Golden Delicious apples, Virginia Beauty apples at Arbuckle Road. Please call

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Drink like Lassie 6 Quick cut 10 Give and take? 14 Pointless 15 White House worker 16 Pirelli product 17 Like some substances 19 Charitable gift 20 Embed one plant into another 21 What's-hisname 23 Draw conclusions 25 Prefix with night or day 26 Carrying cargo 29 Go ashore 34 Genesis follower 36 Pub crawler 37 Money of China 38 Give a hand 39 Seagoing one 42 Casino cube 43 Sprawling story 45 "Goodfellas" fellas 46 Say the Pledge, say 48 Like some candidates 51 Nautical hazard 52 Vacation rental 53 Fill with joy 55 Free from slavery 59 Purported 63 Protection (var.) 64 Playground snitch 66 Adjust a Steinway 67 ____ vera 68 Tortilla chip dip 69 Take notice of 70 Urgent want 71 Like some curtains DOWN 1 Head parasites

HOST HOME PROVIDER A re yo u a b l e t o provide a loving home? Community Alternatives of North Carolina is currently searching for dynamic folks in the area to support IDD individuals within a home environment. Training is provided. Call 828-284-2776 or email jcall@ rescare.com for more information.

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10 APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS

Obituaries

Lucy Cook

Lucy Cook, 97, of the Minpro community, died Friday, March 28, 2014, at her home surrounded by her loving family. A native of Mitchell County, she was a daughter of the late Charlie and Ella Carpenter Cook. She was also preceded in death by a son, Ray Cook; a sister, Georgia Aldridge and six brothers: Frank, Bill, Fred, Donald, Claude and Pete Cook. Lucy worked for a number of years at Carpenter & Phillips Mica Co. and also Penland School. She was the oldest member of Pine Branch Baptist Church. She enjoyed gardening, canning and working in her flowers. Survivors include five daughters: Mary Alice Williams and husband, Floyd, of Spruce Pine, Barbara Duncan and husband, Don, of Bakersville, Shirlene Burleson and husband, Calvin, of Spruce Pine, Rhonda Buchanan and husband, Paul, of Bakersville, and Linda Wilcox of Spruce Pine; two sons, Samuel J. Cook and wife, Katrina, and Kenny G. Cook and wife, Diana, all of Spruce Pine; daughterin-law Anna Mae Duvall of Spruce Pine; 22 grandchildren,

23 great-grandchildren and 11 great-great-grandchildren and a host of nieces and nephews. Funeral was Sunday at Pine Branch Baptist Church with her grandson, the Rev. Steve Williams, and the Rev. Bobby Joe Greene officiating. Interment followed in the church cemetery. Memorials may be made to Hospice of Mitchell County at 236 Hospital Dr, Spruce Pine, NC 28777 or to the Gideon’s International at PO Box 611, Spruce Pine, NC 28777. Island; grandchildren Julia Jared Sellers, David Donald Lee Harrison Sellers, Harrison and Gracelyn Harrison. Donald Lee Harrison, 68, of Several nieces, nephews and South Toe, died Wednesday, cousins also survive. March 26th, 2014 at Newport A memorial service was Medical Center in Tennessee. on Saturday in the Chapel of A native of Yancey County, he Yancey Funeral Services. The was a son of the late Eugene and Rev. Charles Carroll officiated. Viola Self Harrison. He was also A private inurnment will be held preceded in death by a sister, at a later date. Mary-Nettie Autrey and brothers Memorials may be made to Robert and Bill Harrison. He Hospice of Yancey County, 856 was in the financing business for Georges Fork Road, Burnsville, 40 years. Donald was a loving N C 2 8 7 1 4 , o r G i d e o n s husband, father and grandfather International, PO Box 264, who enjoyed traveling and Burnsville, NC 28714. spending time in his cabin. Surviving are his wife, Patsy Myrtle Delaney Robinson Harrison; daughter Tammy Sellers and husband, Myrtle Dochie Hensley Randy, of Double Island; sons Dulaney, 87, of the Shoal Creek Tim Harrison and girlfriend, community, died Monday, Kim, of Marion and Steve March 24, 2014, at Brookside Harrison and wife, Alicia, Rehabilitation and Care. of South Toe; sister Glenda A native of Yancey County, Ruth King and husband, Gene, she was a daughter of the late of Rutherfordton; brothers Furman and Alice Willis Hensley Clarence Harrison and wife, and the wife of Lloyd Dulaney, Genevieve, of South Toe, and who passed away in 2003. She Douglas Harrison of Double was also preceded in death by Island; sister-in-law Betty a grandson, Stanley Laws, and Young of Newdale; brothers- a great-granddaughter, Natasha in-law Frank Robinson and Bolick. wife, Brenda, of Double Island, Myrtle was the oldest member and Rabon Robinson of Double

Director of Social Services Yancey County

Yancey County Board of Social Services is seeking qualified applicants for the position of Social Services Director. The Director serves as the Executive Officer of the County Department of Social Services, executing the authority of the Department as defined in G.S.108A-14. The Director appoints and supervises all Department of Social Services staff in the delivery of agency services to the residents of the County and will provide leadership and direction for program development, establishing program standards, and monitoring and evaluating quality of service delivery. The Director will supervise budget activities and will act as spokesperson for the agency relative to program issues. The Director will represent the agency with government officials, other Human Services providers and with community planning efforts. Qualified candidates must possess: Thorough knowledge of the legal and philosophical basis for public welfare programs, including client rights; Thorough knowledge of the principles and practice of social work; Thorough knowledge of management principles, techniques and practices; Knowledge of the agency’s organization, operation and objectives, and applicable federal and state laws, rules and regulations; Ability to exercise sound judgment in analyzing situations and making decisions; Ability to direct employees and programs in the various areas of responsibility; Ability to develop and maintain effective working relationships with the general public and with federal, state and local officials and Commitment to quality services for clients. Minimum Training and Experience Requirements: A Master’s degree in social work and two years of supervisory experience in the delivery of client services; or a bachelor’s degree in social work and three years of supervisory

of Pilgrims Chapel Free Will Baptist Church Surviving are her daughters: Betty Jean Laws, Margie Dulaney, and Madge Robinson; grandchildren Michelle Hill Brewer and husband, Richard, Michael Laws and wife, Ashley, Delores Garland and husband, Bart, and Anthony Laws and wife, Amanda; great-grandchildren Brianna and Blake Laws, Maddison and Emmaline Garland, Travis Wilson and Brandy and Nick Bolick and Emily; great-greatgrandson Ayden Wilson all of Burnsville; sisters Martha Profitt and husband, Carnel, of Sylva, and Grace Patrick of Zephyrhills, Fla., and a brother, Glen Hensley, of Hickory. Funeral was in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home with the Revs. Clyde Thomason and Russell Hughes officiating. A graveside service was in the Dulaney Cemetery on Shoal Creek. Memorials may be made to Hospice of Yancey County, 856 Georges Fork Road, Burnsville, NC 28714 or Gideons International, P. O. Box 264, Burnsville, NC 28714.

experience in the delivery of client services, one of which must have been in Social Services; or graduation from a four year college or university and three years of supervisory experience in the delivery of client services, two of which must have been in Social Services; or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Salary is commensurate with experience and State personnel guidelines. PRE-EMPLOYMENT DRUG SCREENING AND BACKGROUND CHECK ARE REQUIRED. BI-LINGUAL (SPANISH) APPLICANTS PREFERRED. Interested candidates submit: Letter of Interest and Resume NC PD 107 Transcripts Three (3) references to Liz Tinney, Department of Commerce/Employment Service liz.tinney@nccommerce.com or Yancey County DSS Attn: Denise Peterson PO Box 67 Burnsville, NC 28714 Applications accepted until April 7, 2014. Applicants will be given credit only for information provided in response to this announcement. No additional information will be solicited by the Yancey County DSS; therefore, persons who submit incomplete applications may not receive full credit for their education, training and experience. YANCEY COUNTY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER AND COMPLIES WITH REQUIREMENTS OF THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT. Previously received applications for the Director’s position will remain on file for six months.


What’s to eat at the elementary schools? APRIL 3, 2014 • YANCEY COUNTY NEWS 11

Friday, April 4

Monday, April 7

Tues, April 8

Wed, April 9

Breakfast Scrambled Eggs/ Sausage Patty /WG Cereal WG Toast Juice/Pears Milk/Choc Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk/FF Choc Milk

Lunch Chix Fillet S’wich Chix Quesadillas Sunbutter S’wich Broccoli/Pinto Beans Peaches/Pears Milk FF Choc Milk

Lunch SW Chix Nachos Corn Dogs Sunbutter S’wich Carrot Stix/Baked Beans/Apple Crisp Fruit Cocktail Milk/Choc Milk

Lunch Chix Stir-Fry Rice/Fish Nuggets Cornbread Slaw/Pinto Beans Pineapple Bits Mandarin Oranges Milk/ FF Choc Milk

Lunch Turkey w/Gravy Roll/Chix Fillet S’wich/ Sunbutter w Jelly S’wich/Mashed Potatoes/Green Beans/Peaches Milk/FF Choc Milk

Thurs, April 10

Friday, April 11

Breakfast

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza

Pancake/Sausage Patty

WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Chix Nuggets/Roll Sunbutter S’wich Salad/Broccoli Pears/Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

WG Cereal

WG Toast/Juice Peaches Milk/Choc Milk Lunch Turkey Pie Meatball Sub Sunbutter S’wich Glazed Carrots Green Beans Baked Apples Peaches Milk FF Choc Milk

Food for thought for middle school Friday, April 4

Monday, April 7

Tuesday, April 8

Wed, April 9

Thurs, April 10

Friday, April 11

Breakfast Scrambled Eggs/ Sausage Patty /WG Cereal WG Toast Juice/Pears Milk/Choc Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza

WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

WG Toast/Juice Peaches Milk/Choc Milk

Lunch Chix Fillet S’wich Chix Quesadillas Broccoli/Pinto Beans Peaches/Pears Milk FF Choc Milk

Lunch SW Chix Nachos Corn Dogs Carrot Stix/Baked Beans/Apple Crisp Fruit Cocktail Milk/Choc Milk

Lunch Chix Stir-Fry Rice/Fish Nuggets Cornbread Slaw/Pinto Beans Pineapple Bits Mandarin Oranges Milk/ FF Choc Milk

Lunch Turkey w/Gravy Roll/Chix Tenders Mashed Potatoes Green Beans Peaches Milk/FF Choc Milk

Pancake/Sausage Patty

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Chix Nuggets/Roll Salad/Broccoli Pears/Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

WG Cereal

Lunch Turkey Pie Meatball Sub Glazed Carrots Green Beans/Baked Apples Peaches Milk FF Choc Milk

Chowing down at Mountain Heritage Friday, April 4

Monday, April 7

Tuesday, April 8

Wed, April 9

Breakfast Scrambled Eggs/ Sausage Patty /WG Cereal WG Toast Juice/Pears Milk/Choc Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk/FF Choc Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk/FF Choc Milk

Lunch Chix Fillet S’wich Chix Quesadillas Broccoli/Pinto Beans Peaches/Pears Milk FF Choc Milk

Lunch SW Chix Nachos Corn Dogs Ch. Garlic Flatbread Carrot Stix/Baked Beans/Apple Crisp Fruit Cocktail Milk/Choc Milk

Lunch Chix Stir-Fry Rice/Fish Nuggets Chix Quesadilla Cornbread Slaw/Pinto Beans Pineapple Bits Mandarin Oranges Milk/ FF Choc Milk

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Comedian appears for Democratic fundraiser Comedian Roy Zimmerman sings original satirical songs about class warfare, creationis m, s amesex marriage, guns, marijuana, abstinence, ignorance, war and greed, and has been lauded by top artists and media. Iconic singer Joni Mitchell said, “Roy’s lyrics move beyond poetry and achieve perfection,” while the

Los Angeles Times said, “Zimmerman displays a lacerating wit and keen awareness of society’s foibles that bring to mind a latter-day Tom Lehrer.” Lehrer himself said “I congratulate Roy Zimmerman on reintroducing literacy to comedy songs. And the rhymes actually rhyme, they don’t just rhyme.” Zimmerman will appear Thursday, April

10, at 6:30 p.m. in the TRAC great room, 269 Oak Avenue, Spruce Pine. This is a fundraiser for the Mitchell County Democratic Party. Tickets available at Kirkwood’s Cafe in Burnsville, OOAK Gallery in Micaville, The Dispensary in Spruce Pine, UPS Pack and Ship in Spruce Pine, Kaye’s Kitchen in Newland, and Banner Elk Properties.

Buy Yancey County News at Mitchell-Yancey Habitat for Humanity Restore 563 Oak Ave., Spruce Pine and Habitat keeps


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Yancey County News April 3, 2014, edition