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Yancey County News Brush Creek - Burnsville - Cane River

Crabtree - Egypt - Green Mountain - Jacks Creek

Pensacola - Price’s Creek - Ramseytown - South Toe

www.yanceycountynews.com vTo be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.v May 23, 2013 W Vol. 3, No. 21 v Recipient of the 2011 E.W. Scripps Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment v

Photos by Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News Flood waters ravaged parts of Yancey County Sunday afternoon. Above, the bridge is out to the W.M. Boring Chapel Free Will Baptist Church. At right, a sinkhole developed outside Jacks Creek Presbyterian Church. Below, flooding and mud inside Phil’s Tire Service. Below right, debris spans Jacks Creek where this bridge came to rest.

Flood washes away bridges, soaks businesses By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News Memories of the harsh and devastating floods of 1977 came to mind for some Jacks Creek residents Sunday afternoon as flash flooding forced the creek and other streams out of their banks onto higher and higher ground. “It was like a river,” said John Steever, who rushed to help as water and a large sinkhole threatened Jacks Creek Presbyterian Church. “I’ve never seen rain that hard.” Some areas received as much as three inches of rain in just a few hours on Sunday, according to the National Weather Service. The deluge flooded the low end of West Main Street in Burnsville and numerous areas in Jacks Creek and Clearmont. Tim Freeman at Phil’s Tire Service said flood waters came up in the garage through drains in the floor. “We had two feet of water

inside,” he said. Next door, muddy water rose in the parking lot of Burnsville Chevrolet, and bags and bags of donated clothes were ruined at the Salvation Army, located at 623 West Main Street. “We had just gotten restocked on clothes,” said Salvation Army Capt. Kenneth Clewis. “Many got wet.” In fact, Clewis and volunteers spent Monday morning carrying bags of wet clothes out of the wet storerooms to be thrown away. Along Jacks Creek, many watches as the waters quickly rose to flood road, field and farm. Several bridges on private drives were swept away, one “floating like a raft” as it careened downstream, an onlooker said. Steever said water backed up in an underground system of culverts behind the sanctuary of Jacks Creek Presbyterian. “It couldn’t get over the road” and into Jacks

Creek “and backed up,” erupting in the church yard and hollowing out a house-sized sinkhole just yards from the church door. The water rose into the sanctuary and members piled furniture onto the altar to keep it dry. Muddy water flooded the basement at the church and rose through the furnace ducts, swamping the carpeted sanctuary and lapping the legs of the pews. Elsewhere along Jacks Creek residents said the water seemed to surge in just moments, overtopping bridges, roads, and fields planted with spring crops and ornamentals. Minor damage was reported at the elementary schools at Bee Log and at Clearmont, where the school was stranded on a makeshift island as waters flowed around it on Sunday afternoon. More flood photos inside!


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Recipient of the 2012 Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism and the Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, integrity and tenacity in rural journalism v

Opinion/Outlooks

School board implements security changes The Yancey County Schools administration issued this announcement earlier this month: Earlier this year, the Yancey County School Board instructed Superintendent Dr. Tony Tipton to research sustainable and affordable options for improving school safety and to make school safety needs the top priority in developing the budget for the 2013-14 school year. At its regular monthly meeting on Monday, May 6, 2013, Dr. Tipton outlined a proposal for the 2013-14 school year for safety improvements acknowledging that while needed, these proposed measures will cause a delay in the completion of some previously scheduled facility improvements. In developing this proposal, Dr. Tipton met with school principals, members of the community, state highway patrol and the local sheriff’s office. Additionally, several school administrators and both resource officers attended a School Safety Seminar in Avery County held by nationally-recognized school safety specialist Mike Dorn. The five-point plan as outlined by Dr. Tipton includes the following:

Balloon launch helps honor those who have been lost The Third Annual Andy Austin Memorial and Balloon Raising will occur Sunday, May 26 from 2-5 p.m. at Burnsville Town Square. Everyone has lost family and seems more and more of our families are being affected by death. Everyone please come out and release a balloon in memory of a loved one. Balloons are provided and participants can write names and messages on them. The balloon release is set for 5 p.m. “Everyone is welcome! Please bring a picture of your loved one and place it on a table to be viewed by all!”

WHO WE ARE

The Yancey County News is the only independent newspaper in Yancey County. It is owned, operated and published by

Susan Austin ........ Advertising/Publisher Jonathan Austin ........... Editor/Publisher who are the sole participants and members of

Yancey County News LLC 132 W. Main Street Burnsville, NC 28714 828-678-3900 jonathan@yanceycountynews.com susan@yanceycountynews.com The Yancey County News (USPS publication No. 3528) is published weekly - every Thursday - for $25 per year in Yancey County, $35 per year out of county. Published by Yancey County News LLC, Periodicals postage paid at Burnsville, NC. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Yancey County News, 132 W. Main St., Burnsville, NC 28714 Printed in Boone by the Watauga Democrat on recycled paper.

To be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.

• Main Entrance AiPhone Installation – Elementary Schools • Proximity “Smart Card” System Installation – Elementary & Middle Schools • Security Camera Upgrades - Where Needed • School Resource Officer – Cane River Middle School • Begin Reviewing Options at Mountain Heritage High School The “smart card” technology will allow staff to enter the school by using an assigned picture ID Smart Card while visitors will use the intercom and video system at the door to call the office, who will then communicate with the visitor by voice and video and “buzz” them into the building if needed. After careful analysis of security camera coverage at each school, individual schools will receive both internal and external cameras as identified in the analysis except for Mountain Heritage High School who received a brand new camera system last year. Mountain Heritage will receive additional external cameras only. Currently, Yancey County Schools employs two resource officers – one stationed at

Mountain Heritage and one stationed at East Yancey Middle School. These officers also respond to other school sites as needed, provide additional security at evening functions and events at schools as well as school board meetings. In order to provide equal coverage for the western end of the county, Dr. Tipton proposed the addition of a school resource officer to be stationed at Cane River Middle School who, as in the position at East Yancey, will have other duties outside the role of School Resource Officer. The goal is that when school opens Monday, August 19th, everyone will see a more secure school site. Over the last few months most schools have been locked down requiring visitors to knock on the door to gain entrance into the building. While this has been an inconvenience, most parents understand and appreciate the temporary inconvenience of having to knock while a plan for a safer school environment was being developed. Dr. Tipton acknowledged his gratitude to the community and school staff for their understanding and patience.

Get the kids ready for the summer! The Mitchell Yancey Substance Abuse Task Force and Graham Children’s Health Services has compiled a directory of summer activities for our youth in Mitchell and Yancey Counties. All children and teens from kindergarten up to 12th grade will receive a copy through their school which will send them home with students the week of May 20th. Additional paper copies will be available at all library branches and both Ingles Markets in Spruce Pine and Burnsville. For those with internet access a complete guide can be viewed on WKYK or downloaded at www.healthyyancey.org. “One of the goals of our Task Force is to put useful tools into the hands of parents which can enable them to keep their children occupied in healthy and safe activities. The guide that we have produced this year is expanded to include both Mitchell and Yancey Counties. We were also able to translate the guide into Spanish this year.” said Mechelle Akers, Chairperson of the Mitchell Yancey Substance Abuse Task Force. “We hope families will engage their children in healthy activities this summer – there are all kinds of opportunities for children including day camps, reading programs at the library, free tennis camp, swimming and arts and crafts” said Amy Sheele, Director of Graham Children’s Health Services. Graham Children’s Health Services received funding from the American Medical Association Foundation’s Healthy Living Grant to produce the Summer Activity Guide. This program addresses urgent healthy lifestyle issues by

providing mini-grants to implement grassroots health education in communities throughout the United States. In 2012, selected projects target youth and address the topic of prescription medication safety. Graham Children’s Health Services was one of 25 nonprofits across the country that received such a distinction this year. This program is provided by the AMA Foundation and supported by an unrestricted grant from Purdue Pharma L.P. If you do not have internet access but would like a copy of the Summer Resource Guide, please call Graham Children’s Health Services at 682-7899.

Tipton graduates management program at Duke University Ti m Ti p t o n , E x e c u t i v e Director of the Yancey Humane Society earned the Certificate in Nonprofit Management from Duke University on April 29. The prestigious program dissects all key areas of the management of nonprofit organizations. Identified areas include: Concepts, Components, and Culture of nonprofits, Grant Writing, Cost Centered Accounting, Program

Evaluation for Funding and Sustainability, Integrating Social Enterprise and Responsibility, Nonprofit Strategy, Employment Law for Nonprofits, Dynamics of Executive Director/Board Relations, and Advancing Foundation Relationships. Each year, 96 students complete the intensive track program taught in Durham. Sessions attract a diverse array of

students from across the United States and from around the world. According to program director Nancy Love, “The goal of the program is to ensure that the vital services provided by nonprofit corporations continue to grow in scope and quality. Better management of nonprofit corporations translates into more vigorous and vibrant communities.”


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Barbara Tipton one of two new principals in Yancey The Yancey County Board of Education has approved hiring former superintendent Dr. Barbara Tipton - wife of current superintendent Dr. Tony Tipton - as principal of Burnsville Elementary School. The board also selected Miranda Elkins, current assistant principal at Cane River Middle School, as principal for South Toe Elementary School, replacing Doris Deyton, who is retiring at the end of this school term. According to a press release issued by Yancey County Schools,

Elkins has served as math teacher, coach, athletic director and assistant principal. “Ms. Elkins brings many years of experience to her new position,” Dr. Tony Tipton said. Elkins said she believes “that a family atmosphere is of the utmost importance to success in education - a lesson I have learned from my short tenure at Bee Log Elementary and my many years at Cane River Middle.” The board approved Burnsville Elementary Principal Shane Cassida as K12 Curriculum /

Home Base Director. Board Chairman Mike Orr said the board sought applicants to replace Cassida and “they chose the best candidate” in selecting Dr. Barbara Tipton, a former Yancey Schools superintendent and wife of the current superintendent. “She has proven herself in Yancey and Madison as an administrator, She applied for the job and was the best candidate, he said. Orr, a retired teacher himself, said he has no qualms about the hiring. “She lives here, began her

career here and wants to end her career here,” he said. Dr. Barbara Tipton spent six years as assistant principal at Burnsville Elementary, four years as principal at Cane River Middle, two years as superintendent and the last six years as principal at Madison Middle School. Orr said the board is moving forward progressively and “is confident in the leadership that is in place ... countywide.” Dr. Barbara Tipton said she was pleased to return to Yancey Schools.

Commissioners, others in region urge funding for clean water By Kirk Ross Carolina Public Press As the state Senate prepared to unveil its budget proposal, conservation groups in Western North Carolina were keen to see what the spending plan might hold for a key state trust fund that’s fueled investment in water quality projects and watershed protection throughout WNC. The Clean Water Management Trust Fund, which since its inception in 1996 has distributed more than $200 million in grants in the region and more than $977 million statewide, has seen its funding fall by nearly 90 percent in the past two budget cycles and faces an even deeper cut this year. Gov. Pat McCrory’s budget proposal, released in March, included $6,750,000 this year for the fund, by far the lowest amount in its history. The CWMTF, along with other trust funds for state parks and recreation and the North Carolina Natural Heritage Program, all saw record low funding proposed. Meanwhile, WNC supporters of clean water efforts say that short-changing a program that’s been a boost to the region’s economy is the wrong move. At their regular monthly meeting, the Yancey County Board of Commissioners unanimously approved a resolution voicing support for the Clean Water Management Trust Fund, and urged the governor and legislature to increase funding in the current budget. The commission also approved resolutions supporting the state Parks and Recreation Trust Fund and urged maintaining appropriatons for the North Carolina Rural Center. Commission Chairman Johnny Riddle voiced support for all three resolutions as legislators and the governor move to cut the three budgets. He said the resolutions were important “even though they might fall on deaf ears” in Raleigh. Others in the region feel budget items like the Clean Water Waste Management Trust Fund are important as well. “To me, the Clean Water Management Trust Fund is the best economic development tool we have in WNC and in the state,” said Karen Cragnolin, executive director of Ashevillebased RiverLink, a nonprofit that works as a watchdog for the French Broad River. Cragnolin, who has been a board member of the fund since its inception, said the arrival of craft breweries in the mountains of WNC is one obvious way to make the case that the push for clean water the fund has helped finance over the years has provided results. With the support of the Clean Water Management Trust Fund, work is underway to restore this stream near the New Belgium Brewing site in West Asheville. Since its inception, the fund has distributed more than

$200 million in grants for projects in the 18 westernmost counties of the state. Colby Rabon/Carolina Public Press The fund, she said, has played a critical role during the transition in the region’s economy from manufacturing to tourism and recreation by helping to restore streams and watersheds, cleaning up brownfields near the French Broad and conserving prime lands like DuPont State Forest. “We know the health of our economy depends on the health of the environment,” Cragnolin said. When it was founded, the CWMFT was designed to review, rank and distribute grants to projects statewide for watershed protection and conservation, storm water and wastewater improvements and stream and wetlands restoration. The annual spending target for the fund was $100 million but averaged only half that, except during a stretch of years from 2005 to 2008 when it was fully funded. Like many of the state’s trust funds, in the slow recovery from the recent recession, the fund’s appropriation has been a source of money to offset budget shortfalls elsewhere. In her last two years in office, Gov. Bev Perdue proposed a significant drop in money for the fund. The GOP leadership in the House and Senate cut it even deeper, taking the annual appropriation down to $11.25 million per year — then not only the lowest in its history, but a mere one-third of the amount of the previous low. The legislature also added restrictions on how the money could be used, putting an emphasis on buffers around military bases in the eastern part of the state, but those restrictions were later dropped. A look at the types of grants distributed in WNC over the years closely follows the region’s topography. At the headwaters of the region’s rivers, in places like Avery County, CWMTF grants have been used mainly for land acquisition and conservation easements. Downstream, grants have been used to restore stream banks and help local governments better manage storm water and wastewater. In most cases, the grants have leveraged funding from state and local government sources as well as conservation groups and advocates. Carl Silverstein, executive director of the Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy, said he’s worried that the fund’s budget struggles could discourage private landowners who are interested in conservation projects. “I’m afraid there could be a chilling effect for private contribution and investment if the agency isn’t seen as viable,” he said. The CWMTF, he said, has helped finance extensive headwater protections in WNC. Last year, the conservancy received a

$600,000 CWMTF grant to help it purchase the 601-acre Grassy Ridge Tract, in the Roan Highlands. The fund’s contribution augmented funds from a coalition of organizations and individuals for the $2.7 million purchase, which includes the headwaters of Roaring Creek, a wild trout stream that flows into the North Toe River watershed. “It is just a chart-topping property,” Silverstein said. “It’s been on our list of highest priorities for 40 years.” Silverstein said it’s a bad time to back away from land acquisition and conservation projects. “We still see real estate values in the low range,” he said. “It’s a good time to be investing in protecting water sources.” There is a big potential to protect headwaters in WNC, a move that later proves cost effective, he added. “When the headwaters have siltation and pollution, it impacts every part of the system downstream.” Jay Leutze, a trustee with Southern Appalachian Highlands Conservancy, agreed on the need to keep watershed protection moving forward. He said that positive change in the North Toe River watershed is a testament to the effectiveness of the fund in boosting voluntary ways to protect water quality. “When I was a kid, mountain people would not eat fish out of the North Toe,” he said. “Since 1996 we’ve seen a steady improvement in water quality. More areas are fishable and swimmable. People are coming here to go fishing and paddling.” As critical as cleaning up rivers and land acquisition has been in the highlands, it’s important, he said, to remember that the water quickly leaves Avery County. “Everybody’s drinking water from up here,” he said. The impact of lower funding is already taking its toll, especially downstream. To spread around its dwindling resources, the fund capped grants for wastewater projects at $600,000. As a result, applications from local governments with wastewater and storm water projects have fallen. Richard Rogers, executive director of the CWMTF, said the types of connection projects that local governments sought grants for in the past often come with multimillion-dollar price tags. They also aren’t easy to divide into phases. “It’s not enough to lay the pipe halfway to the wastewater treatment plant,” he said. Rogers said the low level of funding has made it difficult to pursue larger projects, and it’s also had an effect on expectations. When McCrory’s budget was released in February, it included an appropriation for the fund for only the first year of the biennial budget. At the time, state budget director Art Pope said the lack of a second year budget amount does not imply the program will be ended, just that a figure had yet to be set.


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Obituaries Gordon D. Hensley Gordon D. “Runt” Hensley, 65, of McKinney Branch, passed away Friday, May 17, 2013, at Blue Ridge Regional Hospital. A native of Yancey County, he was a son of the late Frank and Vivian McIntosh Hensley. He was also preceded in death by his stepmother, Ollie Lovin Hensley; and brothers Dean, Bill and Randy Hensley. Gordon was a Vietnam Army veteran. Surviving are four brothers, Robert Hensley of Tucson, Ariz., Roy Lee Hensley of Mars Hill, Edwin Hensley of Weaverville and Pete Hensley of Burnsville; a sister, Diane Franklin of Burnsville; and several nieces and nephews. Funeral was Monday in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home. The Rev. Bud Edwards officiated. A graveside service was in the Marietta Atkins Cemetery with military grave rites conducted by the Sgt. E L Randolph, Chapter 57 D A V.

Louise Bayuik Louise Bayuik, 88, of Spruce Pine, went home to be with the Lord on Friday, May 17th, 2013 at the Brian Center Health and Rehabilitation. A native of Mitchell County, she was a daughter of the late Molten and Nola Pittman Buchanan and wife of the late Michael Paul Bayuik. She was also preceded in death by two sisters, Georgie Fisher and Annie Boone. Louise was a hard worker who provided for her family and grandchildren, and loved with all her heart. Surviving is her daughter, Mary Anderson; sons Paul, Mike and Jeff Bayuik, all of Spruce Pine; and sisters Juanita Smith, Katherine Wheeler and Louella Polechio, all of Spruce Pine; grandchildren Tabitha and Michael Bayuik, Hannah and Christopher Anderson and girlfriend Haley; great-grandchildren Skyler, Brayden and Layla Anderson and Gabriel Gonzalez. Several nieces, nephews and cousins also survive. Funeral was Sunday in Sullins Branch Baptist Church, with the Rev. Ken Jenkins officiating. Burial was in the Sullins Branch Baptist Church Cemetery. Donations may be made to the family to offset funeral expenses.

Dennis Derwin Woody D e n n i s D e r w i n Wo o d y, 5 8 , o f Bakersville, died Thursday, May 16, 2013, in the Johnson City Medical Center. He was the son of the late Claude and Oveda Duncan Woody, and he worked as

Eva Jean (Detwiler) Dickey. He is survived by his mother, Eva Jean Weisgerber of Clearwater, Fla.; daughter Janet (Winston) Segui of Gaithersburg, Md.; son Robert (Lisa) Weisgerber of Carnation, Wash.; and daughter Rebecca (Bryan) Myers of Fairbanks, Alaska; former wife Susan Weisgerber of Mount Pleasant, Penn.; sisters Jeanne Versley of Sarasota, Fla.; Cinda Weisgerber of Novato, Calif.; and Jac’line Weisgerber of Clearwater, FL; and dear friend Wendy Reid of Burnsville. He also leaves behind nine grandchildren who brought him great joy: Isabella, Josiah, Micah and Noah Segui; Caleb and Alexa Weisgerber; and Abigail, Seth and Joshua Myers. Bob was predeceased by his father Howard E. Weisgerber. The family received friends on Saturday, May 4, at Brooks Funeral Home, Mount Pleasant, Penn., and funeral was held May 5. Burial followed at Mt. Olive Cemetery in Connellsville, Penn., adjacent to the Conrad R. Chaney farmland where Bob spent much time Conrad R. Chaney, 67, of Rock Hill, growing up. Bob’s memory continues to S.C., died Wednesday, May 15, 2013, in be honored by donations to Penland School of Crafts, P.O. Box 37, Penland, North CMC Pineville Hospital. A native of Lexington, Ky., he was a Carolina, 28765. son of the late Gifford and Velma Rice Chaney. He was also preceded in death by a brother, Gordon Chaney. He was an Air Force veteran. Surviving are his wife, Wanda Johnson Chaney; two sons, Jeff Chaney and wife, Katie, of Lexington, Ky., and Jon Chaney and wife, Carisa, of Georgetown, Ky.; 3 step daughters: Machelle Brinkley of Micaville Elementary will be hosting Davidson, De De Wilson of Weaverville, its first “Academic Success Night” to and Stephanie Talbott and husband, Shawn, of Farmville; three grandchildren; honor alumni graduating seniors at four step-grandchildren; one step great- Mountain Heritage High School, and a new granddaughter and a special niece also generation of Micaville stars, upcoming Kindergartners. survives. This festive afternoon will be held from Funeral was Saturday in the Chapel of 4 p.m. until 7 p.m. on May 23 at Micaville Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home. Rev. Dale Banks will officiate. Burial was in Elementary School. Graduating seniors will be honored with the Crabtree Baptist Church Cemetery with military grave rites conducted by Sgt. E. L. a free dinner, with ceremony, recognizing their accomplishment. Randolph, Chapter 57 DAV. Guests will enjoy a hot dog cookout, Memorials may be made to Hospice of provided by the PTO, Smores with our very York County, 1230 Ebenezer Road, Rock Hill, SC 29732 or The American Heart own bonfire, carnival games, fun houses, Association, P. O. Box 5216, Glen Allen, and much more. All upcoming Micaville Kindergartners that attend will receive a VA 23058 or www.heart.org. free Micaville t-shirt! Come participate in our raffle that Robert G. Weisgerber includes two tickets to Dollywood, and a Robert “Bob” Glenn Weisgerber, 68, drawing for the kids toward a chance to of Burnsville, died unexpectedly on the win a basket full of reading and math tools. Admission at the gate: Hot Dog Dinner, afternoon of Monday, April 29, 2013. Bob was born on April 13, 1945, in $3.00; Hot Dog Dinner with games, $6; Mount Pleasant, Penn., the son of Robert Game tickets only, $.50 each. Glenn (who died before Bob was born) and an industrial engineer for Ethan Allen. He was a member of McKinney Cove Baptist Church, where he served as a Sunday School teacher and deacon. Derwin leaves behind his wife of 37 years, Kay Buchanan Woody; son Wesley Woody and wife, Jyoti, of Apex; sister, Annette Charlton and husband, Johnny, of Burnsville; brother, Junior Woody and wife Kay of Shelby; and several nieces and nephews. Derwin loved watching movies with his son and playing video games with all his nieces and nephews. Funeral was Sunday in the McKinney Cove Baptist Church with Todd Ayers and Don Ford officiating. Burial was in the Wilson-Young Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Mckinney Cove Baptist Church, c/o Bess Henson, 1160 McKinney Cove Rd., Bakersville, NC 28705

Micaville Elementary to honor those coming and those leaving

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YES, begin my subscription to the Yancey County News! (In Yancey - $25; Out-of-county $35.) Mail this coupon and your check to: The Yancey County News, 132 W. Main St., Burnsville, NC 28714 NAME: ___________________________________________MAILING ADDRESS: ______________________________________________ TOWN: _____________________________ STATE: __________ PHONE: ___________________ EMAIL: __________________________


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Try extreme fishing with a souped-up Jet Ski Extreme sports are usually thought of as snowboarding, motocross racing, or skydiving. They are hardly ever mentioned with hunting or fishing. But there are plenty of subcultures within the outdoors community such as kayak angling and traditional bow hunting, however. One subculture sprung up in New Zealand and Australia a few decades ago that just in the past few years has developed a following here in the United States. Jet Skis have only been taken seriously as a recreational type of vehicle. Even though they are basically a small version of a boat, the laws are considerably different regarding their use. But there are some who have recognized their usefulness in a form of extreme fishing. Brian Lockwood, also known as ‘Jet ski Brian,’ began using his Jet Ski to catch bait fish for offshore fishing a while back. He began in the sounds off the North Carolina and Virginia coasts as well as some of the tributaries. As he continued this practice he realized the fuel was cheaper, it was easier to take out than a large offshore boat, and if properly equipped, he believed he could possibly use it for larger trips. And large trips could be considered an understatement. Brian has taken his jet ski as far as 100 miles offshore. Just last year, he caught 120 cobia, with one weighing in excess of 77 pounds.

Bill Howard’s

Outdoors

A vessel he once considered a play toy became his primary means of his pursuit for water-based big game and popular near shore and inshore fish as well. Properly equipped also became a phrase to live by. Safety would have to be the number 1 priority. Items ranging from SPOT locators to GPS devices to VHF radios had to be integrated onto the jet ski in order to take the passion to the next level. He wired in back up batteries to control both the electronics and provide a second source of energy for the starting system. Emergency flares, water dyes, mirrors, whistles and even navigation lights, even though it is unlawful to use a jet ski at night, became the norm. Brian primarily fishes the Chesapeake Bay area and routinely

heads out to sea off of Cape Hatteras for everything from cobia to stripers. He has fished for sailfish, dolphin and tuna, and will scuba and free dive to spearfish from the Jet Ski. I first heard of Brian a couple of years ago. Last year he was featured in a segment on Animal Planet’s Off the Hook: Extreme Catches television series. His passion and love for Jet Ski angling has driven him to share everything he knows and has learned over the years. He will hold seminars and speaking engagements and bring along his ski and gear to show any that are interested. I have long wondered why a Jet Ski has not been used for this purpose, and now I know it has. I now daydream about trips down many of the rivers throughout North Carolina. My thoughts encompass how to properly rig the ski in pursuit of largemouth, smallmouth, and catfish. I look at jet skis in a different way thanks to Brian. I cannot wait to head out with him myself later this summer. Brian, myself, ocean as far we can see and a few rods as we try for Wahoo, amberjack, and anything else that will take the bait. Then, maybe a day trip down

the French Broad or Yadkin. Maybe even the Cape Fear or a trip up north to the Potomac. Just like with opening the mind to using Jet Skis for fishing, the imagination is the only limit. If you would like a little something different on your next trip, contact Brian Lockwood at JetSkiBrian.com and click the contact button. B i l l H o w a rd i s a n a v i d bowhunter and outdoorsman. He teaches hunter education (IHEA) and bowhunter education (IBEP) in North Carolina. He is a member of North Carolina Bowhunters Association and Pope & Young, and is an official measurer for both. He can be reached at billhoward outdoors@ gmail.com.

Winner weighs in on bass fishing volunteer division on Douglas Lake Travis Lilly of Bluff City, Tenn., weighed a five-bass limit totaling 24 pounds, 12 ounces Saturday to win the Walmart Bass Fishing League Volunteer Division event on Douglas Lake. For his victory, Lilly earned $3,545. “It was one of those days when everything fell in place,” said Lilly. “I didn’t lose any fish and things went right. I bounced around the lake a little bit but all of the fish that I brought to the scale came from the same area. I started the day and finished the day in the same place.” Lilly indicated he was targeting post-spawn bass that had moved out on to points. He was primarily using swimbaits indicating that color really wasn’t a factor in catching his bass. “It was actually kind of funny,” Lilly went on to say. “When I went back to the area I started in there was a boat sitting on that point. I asked him if he would mind if I fished the spot and he said no that he had already fished it. A couple of casts later I landed my biggest fish of the day, a 6 ½-pounder. “This is the first time that I have committed to fishing off-shore and it actually went well.” Rounding out the top 10 pros were:

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2nd: Sam McCowan, Pounding Mill, Va., five bass, 22-7, $1,773 3rd: Bobby Ferguson, Chuckey, Tenn., four bass, 21-13, $1,181 4th: Nick Meadows, Cedar Bluff, Va., five bass, 20-8, $827 5th: Gary Pilkenton, Morristown, Tenn., five bass, 19-15, $709 6th: Tim Saylor, Johnson City, Tenn., five bass, 19-12, $650 7th: Derrick Snavely, Rogersville, Tenn., five bass, 18-11, $591 8th: Guy Sams, Elizabethton, Tenn., five bass, 18-7, $532 9th: Ken Vicchio, Bluff City, Tenn., five bass, 17-12, $473 plus $300 Evinrude bonus 10th: Daniel Morgan, Dayton, Tenn., five bass, 17-6, $414. Justin McGaha of Knoxville, Tenn., weighed five bass totaling 14 pounds, 5 ounces Saturday to win the Co-angler Division. McGaha earned $1,773 for his victory. Rounding out the top 10 co-anglers were: 2nd: Dennis Lewis, Powell, Tenn., five bass, 14-0, $886

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3rd: Jason Yates, Dandridge, Tenn., five bass, 12-14, $591 4th: Bud McKelvey, Lenoir City, Tenn., tied with Sam Overton, Heiskell, Tenn., five bass, 12-6, $384 each. 6th: Jonathan Saddler, Bristol, Tenn., five bass, 12-5, $325 7th: Matt Brown, Harriman, Tenn., five bass, 11-7, $295 8th: Eric Topole, Corryton, Tenn., five bass, 10-12, $266 9th: Chris Seese, Lenoir City, Tenn., three b10th: Rob Linkous, Rogersville, Tenn., five bass, 10-6, $207. The next BFL Volunteer Division tournament is scheduled for June 8 on Lake Cherokee in Morristown, Tenn. After the last divisional tournament is complete, the top 40 boaters and 40 co-anglers based on point standings will qualify for the Oct. 17-19 Regional Championship on Lake Hartwell. Boaters will compete for a top award of a Ranger Z518 with a 200-horsepower Evinrude or Mercury outboard and a Chevy Silverado.

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• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Bridges, crops swept away in sudden flash flooding

Photos by Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News

Top and above right: Several Jacks Creek bridge were swept away or severely damaged. At right, farmland was covered wth thick mud. Above; as the water receded a large crack appeared in the shop floor at Phil’s Tire Center, and Salvation Army Capt. Kenny Clewis shows the stacks of ruined clothes. Center: Pews are raised at Jacks Creek Presbyterian Church as workers stripped out wet carpeting.


may 23, 2013

What seemed to be hundreds of residents turned out last week for the open house at United Community Bank in Burnsville. Customers received free tomato plants for the garden, as well as a lunch of griled hamburgers and hotdogs.

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 7

WE PURCHASE ESTATES AND DO

ESTATE CONSIGNMENT GRAND OPENING Buy Yancey County News at Mitchell-Yancey Habitat for Humanity Restore 563 Oak Ave., Spruce Pine and Habitat keeps half of the money! Open Tues – Fri, 9-5; Sat 9-2

JUNE 1

682-3232 • 112 W. Main St., Burnsville

Relay golf tournament

The public is invited to the Third Annual American Cancer Society’s Relay For Life Golf Tournament. All proceeds go to benefit Relay For Life of Yancey County. This 4-person, captains choice tournament will be held at Mt Mitchell Golf Course on June 2 with a 1 p.m. shotgun start. Entry fee of $400 per team ($360 if paid before May 31.) The tournament features a longest drive, closest to the pin and putting challenge for prizes. Prizes will also be awarded to the top 3 teams, and drawings will be held for door prizes. Lunch and drinks provided. F o r m o r e information or registration contact Robert Laws; (828)284-2378, bbertlaws@gmail. com or Steve Robinson; (828)2840200, brdofpra76@ gmail.com.

Boy I’m tired of running! Hurry in to catch me and take me home! By the way, my name is Lola, a 7-month-old Beagle/ Doxie mix. Ahhhh! Don’t you even think about listening to that puppy. You need a cat to lie on your bed, instead of a puppy who will just want to play all the time! My name is Pepper. Come in and make me yours!

Call the shelter at 682-9510 for more information on these or other pets, or plan to visit us at 962 Cane River School Road.


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may 23, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

What’s to eat at the elementary schools? Friday, May 24

Monday, May 27

Tues, May 28

Wed, May 29

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pancakes Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Spaghetti/Roll Sunbutter S’wich Tossed Salad Broccoli Fruit Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hamburger Steak Roll/Chix Taco Salad Tossed Salad Refried Beans Applesauce Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hot Dog/Baked Ham/Mac&Cheese Cornbread Sunbutter S’wich Baked Beans/Slaw Pears/Apple Crisp Milk

Lunch Pizza Stix w/Marin Ham&Cheese S’wich/Sunbutter S’wich/Corn Carrot Stix/Peaches Cranberry Crunch Milk

Thurs, May 30

Friday, May 31

Breakfast

Pancake&Sausage Stix

Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Half School Day! Manager’s Choice

Lunch Toasted Cheese S’wich/ Sunbutter S’wich/Veggie Beef Soup/Broccoli Pears Applesauce Milk

Food for thought for middle school Friday, May 24

Monday, May 27

Tuesday, May 28

Wed, May 29

Breakfast

Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Chix Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Chix Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Spaghetti/Roll Tossed Salad Broccoli Fruit Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hamburger Steak Roll/Chix Taco Salad Tossed Salad Refried Beans Applesauce Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hot Dog/Baked Ham/Mac&Cheese Cornbread Baked Beans/Slaw Pears/Apple Crisp Milk

Lunch Pizza Stix w/Marin Ham&Cheese S’wich Corn Carrot Stix/Peaches Cranberry Crunch Milk

Pancake&Sausage Stix

Thurs, May 30

Friday, May 31

Breakfast

Pancake&Sausage Stix Breakfast Pizza

Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Half School Day!

Lunch Toasted Cheese S’wich/ Sunbutter S’wich/Veggie Beef Soup/Mega Pizza Broccoli Pears Applesauce Milk

Manager’s Choice

Thurs, May 30

Friday, May 31

Chowing down at Mountain Heritage Friday, May 24

Monday, May 27

Tuesday, May 28

Wed, May 29

Breakfast

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Chix Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Chix Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Hamburger Steak Roll/ Pizza Stix w/ Marinara Corn Carrot Stix/Peaches Cranberry Crunch Milk

Lunch Hot Dog/Baked Ham/Mac&Cheese Cornbread Chix Quesadilla Baked Beans/Slaw Pears/Apple Crisp Milk

Pancake&Sausage Stix

Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Spaghetti/Roll Mega Chix S’wich Tossed Salad Broccoli Fruit Fruit Cocktail Milk

Visit these fine establishments for your copy of the

Yancey County News Guy’s General Store • Lil’ Smokys • Poplar Grove Appalachian Java • B&B Convenience Store in Hamrick • Mountain Energy • Felicity’s Closet • Samir’s Convenience Store • Cruz Thru • Whitson’s General Store • Efflers Convenience Store, Busick • Westall Grocery • TRAC in Spruce Pine • Habitat Store in Spruce Pine Pine Stamey’s in Spruce Pine

Breakfast

Pancake&Sausage Stix Breakfast Pizza

Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Half School Day!

Lunch Manager’s Choice Lunch 5/20/13 - 5/26/13 Soft Shell Beef TacoWeek ofToasted Cheese Ham&Cheese S’wich/ Sunbutter S’wich/Chix Tenders S’wich/Mega Chix Roll/ Tossed Salad S’wich/Veggie Beef Refried Beans Soup/ Broccoli Applesauce Pears Fruit Cocktail Applesauce Milk Milk

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Edited by Margie E. Burke

Difficulty : Easy

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HOW TO SOLVE:        Answer to Last Week's Sudoku

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CLASSIFIEDS

may 23, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 9

CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS • CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS

FOR RENT

For rent: Large LR with fireplace , DR, Kitchen with island, Large master Br with full bath, 2nd Br with full bath, partial basement with w/d hookup. In town of Burnsville. Has attached small (second story) one bedroom apt. with separate entrance. $800 per month. References and security required. Also can be rented separately both have own utilities @$550 + $300 Available immediately. CALL 865-712-6887.

For Rent In town, 3 BDRM, 2 Bath, 2 story house, large BM, Fireplace, Central Cooling/Heating Pump, Garage, Decks, Balconies/ Patio, Fully Fenced, Appliances with Washer/ Dryer. $900/Month. No pets preferred. Call (828) 6827499 . For Rent - Brick rancher three bedrooms, bath, living, dining, kitchen, utility room. Carport. Nice yard, room for garden. Out in the country. NO PETS inside or out. $700 month. Lunsford

Realty 678-3400

ITEMS OR SALE

Boxwoods for Sale. $10 each. 828.208.0406. Sofa and Love Seat - Large, Black with multicolored swirls in over stuffed fluffy upholstery - like new condition $275 obo - call 865-306-0111. MOVING: Miscellaneous FurnitureforSale.Ongoing.Please call 828-688-4161 .

SERVICES Roof Leak? Call Brad at Tip Top Roofing, 25 years+ experience. Residential, commercial roof repair and maintenance, roof coatings,

Mobile DJ Service providing sound entertainment for any occasion! For a quote (828)284-2875 Semon7@gmail.com

TBA Tim Brown Architecture custom residential commercial institutional

tbaarch.com

312.401.1236

You save money every time you use Yancey County News! WE DO NOT CHARGE for obituaries!

Administrator’s notices cost half what others charge. Susan@ yanceycountynews.com

gutter repair, roof inspection. References. 682-3451 Sewing alterations. Call 208-3999. Low Interest Loans to Qualified Home Owners for Any home improvement projects. 828-273-0970 Blue Belle Farms, A U’Neat Gift shop and makers of Goat Soaps and Lotions is currently seeking Crafters to join the fun! You keep 100% of YOUR proceeds for a very small rental fee. Please stop

by 127 West Main Street to partner for a 45 minute see what everyone is talking interview. We are an equal about in beautiful Downtown opportunity business. Call for an appointment 24/7 – Burnsville! Will clean your home or 828-776-2463. business. Call 208-3688. Sewing alterations. Call Want to open a Restaurant? Looking for interested parties 208-3999. for a Unique Opportunity in TOWING Week SERVICE ofWith 5/27/13 - 6/2/13 Rollback Truck! I Buy JUNK Burnsville city limits. For more information, please contact VEHICLES! Pay Fair Price! WILL PICK UP VEHICLE! info@mhmec.com or 828Call 828-284-7522 or 828- 208-2594 . 284-7537.

LOST & FOUND

OPPORTUNITIES

Friend to Friend is now looking for entrepreneurs to partner with in a small Internet business. If you have a gift of gab and a small investment you can start today. Bring your

LOSTTRI-COLORBEAGLE .. “DAISY” Our beagle is mostly black, has a brown head, weight about 30 lb. Sweet, sweet pet whose family is grieving for her. Last seen on Madison Mountain (Hwy 19). Lost on May 7. Please

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Flat-topped hill 5 Coverage 10 Toss, like a coin 14 Elliptical 15 Sword 16 Go on horseback 17 Building toy 18 Over-dramatize 19 She, to Pedro 20 Hang down 22 Ante follower 23 Fall flower 24 1980's TV dancing drama 26 Hankering 28 Sunday screaminducers, briefly 31 Warning word 33 506, to Nero 36 AMA's concern 38 Workers who don't strike 40 Simpleton 41 Old saying 43 Carpentry need 44 Sun's path 46 What some competitions are 48 Very small 49 Novice 51 Up till now 52 Wound covering 53 Bounce around 55 Free-for-all 58 North Pole worker 60 Wood inlay, eg. 64 Put out 65 Restaurant favorite 67 Assistant 68 Hotel pillow find 69 Tranquility 70 Ball of yarn 71 Sandwich cookie 72 Pale 73 Police, slangily DOWN 1 Candy-making implement

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call us if you have any information or may have seen her. Call (828) 206-2820 or (828) 689-2821

Carpenter Bee Traps now available. $15 each. Send email to edschil@msn.com, or phone 828-675-0191 .

by Margie E. Burke

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At any time Palm tree type Distant Helena to Santa Fe direction Arched surface Woodwind instrument Quibble over nonsense Before, in poems Just off the vine Cheerful tone Run slowly, as an engine Bartlett, eg. Agreement Civil rights org. Hindu title of respect Melodious Tossed, like a ball It can be wild Mercury model Put into effect Journal A ventriloquist throws his

35 Water passage 37 Hawaii garland 39 Houston to Milwaukee direction 42 Metabolic disorder 45 Set the ____ 47 Eye part 50 Wipe out 52 Heated contest

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Educate Office note Arabian prince Script snippet Wife of Jacob Flooring material It may be bright Salamander Health resort Barbie's beau

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10 may 23, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Get apple cider vinegar and used it daily

By Medea Galligan MS Nutrition, CHHC, AADP Raw, organic, unfiltered and unpasteurized, apple cider vinegar is so much more than a salad dressing - you can use it on your skin, your hair, your house, and even your pets can benefit from its qualities. Apple cider vinegar is a completely natural product. It is made from apple juice and is fermented to hard apple cider. It is then fermented a second time to apple cider vinegar. There are literally dozens of uses! When using natural apple cider vinegar for our personal health and cleaning uses, we also instantly decrease the consumption of unnatural chemicals in our homes and daily lives.

Diabetes and Weight Loss Although there has been surprisingly little research about using vinegar for therapeutic health purposes, there are numerous dramatic claims about it. Perhaps the most researched and the most promising of apple cider vinegar’s benefits are in the area of type 2 diabetes. Several studies have found that vinegar may help lower blood glucose levels. In 2004, a study cited in the American Diabetes Foundation’s publication Diabetes Care found that taking vinegar before meals significantly increased insulin sensitivity and dramatically reduced the insulin and glucose spikes that occur after meals. Although the research to date looks favorable, more studies are needed to confirm the extent of vinegar’s insulin stabilization benefits. Recent studies have also shown that apple cider vinegar can aid in weight loss. For daily weight management, add 2 teaspoons of apple cider vinegar to 16 ounces of water. This concoction can be sipped throughout the day. Data shows some limited yet significant weight loss benefits from sustained daily intake of acetic acid (which is a main ingredient in apple cider vinegar). In a 2009 study published in Bioscience, Biotechnology, and Biochemistry, it was found that subjects that consumed acetic acid for 12 weeks experienced significant declines in body weight, abdominal fat, waist circumference and triglycerides. Reducing Allergies and Candida

This vinegar helps to break up mucous throughout the body and cleanse the lymph nodes. Believe it or not, research suggests that apple cider vinegar can help with allergies because of its ability to reduce mucous and sinus congestion. When reducing the effects of allergies, it can also help stave off sinus infections and their related symptoms (sore throats and headaches). This vinegar is rich in natural enzymes that can help rid your body of candida -- yeasts that are attributed to thrush in humans. Candida also is blamed for creating symptoms of fatigue, poor memory, sugar cravings, and yeast infections.

For Glowing Hair and Skin Apple cider vinegar can be used as a rinse for your hair after shampooing, and will aid in increased body and shine. I recommend recycling an old shampoo bottle, then filling it with 1/2 a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar and a cup of cold water. Pour the solution through your hair after shampooing several times a week for dramatic results. Natural apple cider vinegar also regulates the pH of your skin. Dilute apple cider vinegar with two parts water, and spread the concoction over your face with a cotton ball to replace your current toner. You can do this at night after washing, and in the morning before you apply your moisturizer. A dab of apple cider vinegar can also be left on the skin overnight to fade age spots or acne scars. It is also a recommended agent for warts. For warts, soak a cotton ball in apple cider vinegar, then fasten the cotton ball over the wart with a Band-Aid overnight. The skin may swell some as it reacts with the solution. However, the wart will fall off. Once it falls off, the treatment should be continued for a few more days, to make sure the wart doesn’t return. Detoxification As part of balancing the body’s pH, apple cider vinegar creates an overall detoxification of the body. Research shows that it can help stimulate cardiovascular circulation and help detoxify the liver. Apple cider vinegar will balance your entire inner body system. The body constantly strives to achieve a state of equilibrium. Apple cider vinegar helps the body maintain a healthy alkaline pH level. Research shows that higher acid levels (lower pH level) leads to a lack of energy and higher incidences of infection. Reduces Heartburn Though it might seem like an oxymoron to treat stomach acid with an acid-containing vinegar, there is research suggesting that apple cider vinegar works by correcting low acid, hence reducing heartburn. Natural remedy experts say you should begin to feel relief

very shortly after taking a teaspoon phytochemicals found in fruits and of apple cider vinegar followed by vegetables. a glass of water. Note that apple As A Healthy Condiment cider vinegar will not give relief Apple cider vinegar makes if you have an ulcer. a delightful salad dressing. You can even make a vinegar-based For Your Pets The use of apple cider vinegar coleslaw, rather than the usual is effective in repelling fleas and creamy mayonnaise-based one. It ticks on your pets. One part vinegar is good on fish as well, and serves and one part water can be sprayed as a great tenderizing marinade on your pets fur and rubbed in for meat, giving it a bit of zing. generously to the skin. Saturate the And it’s tasty drizzled over cooked entire coat, and continue every day greens. It is possible that drinking a mild tonic of vinegar and water for a few days to a week. just before meals might improve your body’s ability to absorb Natural Home Cleaner Apple cider vinegar will the essential minerals locked in clean your toilets and have your foods. Apple cider vinegar might bathroom smelling like apples! help you get more out of your Just pour apple cider vinegar vegetables and all your foods. If you are considering taking into the toilet, and allow it to sit overnight. It can also be used in it medicinally, remember that you dishwashers as a substitute for dish should always dilute it with water detergent. Mix 1/2 cup of apple or juice before swallowing, and if cider vinegar with 1 cup water. you plan on drinking it daily you You can use this solution to clean should consider using a straw. microwaves, kitchen surfaces, Pure, straight apple cider vinegar windows, glasses and mirrors, too. can damage your tooth enamel or the tissues of your mouth and throat. For Your Produce Sources Vinegar is one of the best 1. J o h n s t o n , C S , K i m , natural agents for removing certain pesticides and bacteria from your CM, Buller, AJ. 2004. Vinegar fresh produce. Use a solution of 10 improves insulin sensitivity to percent vinegar to 90 percent water a high-carbohydrate meal in as a bath to briefly soak produce. subjects with insulin resistance Just place your veggies or fruit or type 2 diabetes. Diabetes Care in the solution, swish it around, 27(January): 281-282 http://care. and rinse thoroughly. Just don’t diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/ use this process on fragile fruits full/27/1/281 2. Fushimi T, Suruga K, (like berries), since they could be damaged in the process or soak Oshima Y, Fukiharu M, Tsukamoto up too much vinegar through their Y, Goda T. 2006. Dietary acetic acid reduces serum cholesterol porous skins. and triacylglycerols in rats fed a Possible Cancer Combatant? cholesterol-rich diet. British Journal A few laboratory studies have of Nutrition (May)95(5):916-924 3. Kondo S, Tayama K, found that vinegar may be able to kill cancer cells or slow their Tsukamoto Y, Ikeda K, Yamori growth. However, epidemiological Y. 2001. Antihypertensive effects studies of people have yielded of acetic acid and vinegar on confusing results. It could be spontaneously hypertensive rats. partially related to the fact that Bioscience, Biotechnology, and vinegar is a diluted acid, specifically Biochemistry 65(12) 2690-2694. 4. Vinegar History, http:// acetic acid, which is responsible for its sour taste and pungent smell. www.apple-cider-vinegar-benefits. The pH changes it induces may com/vinegar-history.html contribute to some of its actions. Medea L Galligan earned her Some of the dramatic benefits Masters of Science in Nutrition may also be derived from yet- from Oklahoma State University, to-be-identified phytochemicals and also attended the Institute (beneficial compounds in plants) for Integrative Nutrition’s Health that scientists are now discovering Coach Training Program. Visit in a number of different foods. www.HealthyLifestyle Concepts. In fact, many of your strongest com for more information. weapons against cancer are the

Cabbage and asparagus salad Compliments of www.HealthyCookingConcepts.com This Asian-style salad is both beautiful and Dressing 1/2 cup Bragg’s unfiltered apple cider vinegar delicious! With color, crunch and contrasting flavors this makes a wonderful main dish for lunch 2 tablespoons mirin 2 tablespoon tamari or shoyu or dinner. Serves 4. 1/4 cup rice vinegar 1 tablespoon olive oil Ingredients Directions 1 pound asparagus cut into 2 inch pieces 1. Steam or waterless cook asparagus until tender. 1 cup red cabbage, shredded 2. Refresh in cold water. 1 cup green cabbage, shredded 3. In a small bowl or container with a lid, prepare 1 cup sprouts dressing. 1/4 bunch watercress 4. In a large bowl combine asparagus, cabbage, 2 cup snow pea-shoots sprouts and dressing. 1 tablespoon chopped mint 5. Serve over watercress and garnish with pea1/4 cup toasted chopped peanuts shoots, mint leaves and toasted peanuts. Enjoy!


mAY 23, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 11

Delaying first grade can work for some kids

By John Rosemond Q: Our son’s fifth birthday is in August. He did just fine, socially and academically, in preschool, but the counselor at the school he’s slated to attend has recommended that we hold him back a year because of his late birthday. She says that kids with late birthdays, especially boys, do better if they’re given an extra year of maturation before starting school. What do you think? A: The practice of postponing Kindergarten for so-called “late birthday” children generally defined as children having birthdays after May - got its start about 20 years ago and has generated the usual unintended consequences. Prime among those is the fact that by delaying the start of school for children having birthdays after May, schools only create a new crop of children with late birthdays - those occurring after January. It’s true that during early elementary school, boys are less mature in several respects than girls. In general, their attention spans tend to be shorter. Therefore, they’re more impulsive and more easily distracted. It’s also true, however, that some children, boys as well as girls, experience developmental “spurts” during Kindergarten. The slightly immature, impulsive 5-year-old may be at the norm one

Living

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year later. As a result of this rather uniform recommendation, a disproportionate number of late-birthday children are given test batteries to further determine their readiness for school. The fact is, however, that the predictive reliability of IQ tests and other measures of ability is questionable with children this young. And when such tests are off the mark with a given child, they tend to be lower rather than higher. The late-birthday recommendation is also influenced by the test score mania that currently grips American schools, public and private. Giving close to 20 percent of children an extra year of preschool is bound to raise overall test performance during the early elementary school years.

For a number of reasons, classroom discipline has relaxed considerably since the 1960s. This has unharnessed the impulsivity and distractibility of boys, especially. I have to believe that this contributes significantly to the fact that disproportionate numbers of boys are diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder during early elementary school. If the hypothesis is true, then some kids are being medicated primarily because school discipline isn’t what it used to be. Holding late-birthday kids back a year may mitigate this problem somewhat, but it fails to address the larger issue. My general feeling is that if a child’s birthday allows him to attend school, and the child doesn’t have obvious developmental delays, then he should attend school. If at the end of that school year, his teacher recommends an additional year in Kindergarten, then leave him in Kindergarten. One of my grandchildren spent two years in Kindergarten and he’s now a nearly straight-A student in high school. That second year gave him lots of confidence he wouldn’t have obtained by spending another year in preschool. North Carolina family psychologist John Rosemond answers questions at rosemond. com.

Killer sought on parole violation is caught Yancey County deputies recently captured a convicted murderer who was living in the South Toe community while wanted for parole violation stemming from his release from prison in Texas. Luis Garcia Rodriguez, who was convicted of murder in Texas in the 1980s and who was paroled after 20 years served on a 60-year sentence, was taken into custody and prepared for extradition back to Texas. The sheriff’s office posted this statement on its Facebook page to announce the arrest: “According to Sheriff Gary Banks, on Saturday, May 11, in the late evening hours, deputies from the Yancey County Sheriff’s Office responded to a reported domestic situation at a residence located in the South Toe Community. Upon arrival at the residence, deputies met with a female victim who reported that she had been assaulted by her boyfriend who had fled the scene prior to officers arriving. As deputies continued to investigate the incident, the victim informed officers of several concerns she had regarding her boyfriend and the fact that he may not actually be who he says he is. Officers then located several marijuana plants that were being grown inside of a small outbuilding located on the property. Deputies then discovered several pieces of identification that included drivers’ licenses, Social Security cards, a birth certificate, and bank cards, most of which had the suspects’ photo on them, but were under several different names. Officers conducted a search of the area and were able to locate the vehicle that the suspect had fled the scene in, located a short distance away from the residence, but it had been abandoned. The victim proceeded to the magistrate’s office to secure warrants on the suspect as the officers canvassed the area in an attempt to locate the suspect. After several hours of searching the area, officers were not able to locate the suspect. In the morning hours of Sunday, May 12, the Yancey County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call from the same residence as the night before, stating that the suspect was back at the residence, had a gun, and was attempting

to force his way into the residence. Officers arrived and the suspect had not gained access into the residence but had fled prior to the arrival of officers. Officers conducted a thorough search of the area and were able to locate the male suspect hiding in a wooded area a short distance from the residence. The male was taken into custody and transported to the Yancey County Jail. Upon arrival at the jail, the male produced a Nevada driver’s license, copy of a birth certificate, and a Social Security card under the name William Ronald Haynes. The male was served with warrants under that name for assault on a female, manufacturing marijuana, and possession of several fraudulent identification documents. Bond was not authorized at this time due to the fact that there was a domestic violence charge that required a 48 hour period of no bond. After the 48 hour period on the domestic charge was completed, the male was ordered to be held under a $50,000 secured bond on the charges. Later on that day, officers attempted to interview the suspect in an attempt to determine his true identity. The male refused to answer any questions from officers. Due to the fact that the male was charged with the felony crime of manufacturing marijuana, officers fingerprinted the suspect. These fingerprints were submitted electronically and queried through the North Carolina database and the National Fingerprint database for comparison to known offenders and wanted persons. There were no records generated back from either of these queries. After no success with fingerprint submission, officers began to attempt to locate anyone that possibly knew the suspect. Officers were able to determine through several interviews that the suspect had possibly been in prison at some point in Texas under the name of Luis Rodriguez for the charge of murder and had been released on parole. Officers also determined that the same suspect under the name, William Ronald Haynes, had been charged with three different criminal offenses in Las Vegas, Nevada. The booking photo from the charges in Las Vegas was the same male

that was in custody in Yancey County. Based on this information, officers then requested that the fingerprints be queried through the national fingerprint database a second time. After this query, nothing came back to the male in custody. On Monday, May 13, officers spent several hours on the phone with different agencies in Texas including Texas Department of Corrections and Texas Parole. None of these agencies were able to provide assistance in determining the true identity of the suspect. Officers then contacted the North Carolina and Texas Fusion Centers and requested their assistance in running a query of the fingerprints through the Texas database as well as any assistance they could provide in analyzing the pieces of data that the officers had received. A short time later, officers were informed by the Texas Fusion Center that the query of the fingerprints that had been submitted had resulted in a match of a Hispanic male named Luis Garcia Rodriguez in Texas. Based on this information, the Fusion Center was able to provide a photograph of this male, and officers were able to determine that this was in fact the male that they had in custody. Officers then determined that this male had been incarcerated in the state of Texas for murder in 1987 and was sentenced to 60 years in prison. He was then later released on parole. A warrant was issued for his arrest on January 30, 2007, for violation of the terms and conditions of his release by Texas Parole. Texas Parole was then contacted and provided officers with documentation of the warrant and identifying information on the parolee. After receiving this information, the male is currently being held with no bond pursuant to the warrant from Texas, awaiting Texas Parole extraditing the suspect back to Texas.” Editor’s note: The Texas Fusion Center is a repository for homeland security information and incident reporting. It provides intelligence support to law enforcement and public safety authorities, and consolidates information and data on suspicious activities and threats from all jurisdictions.


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Yancey County News - May 23, 2013  

The only independent and locally owned newspaper in Yancey County.