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www.yanceycountynews.com vTo be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.v Feb. 2, 2012 W Vol. 2, No. 5

County & Mnt. Air in mediation

Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News

Mitchell and Mountain Heritage high schools joined in spirit and effort at the basketball game Tuesday night to show support for breast cancer research, Clubs collected donations while teams and cheerleaders sported pink as a sign of support for cancer victims and survivors.

By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News Yancey County and entities involved in the ownership of properties in the Mountain Air development have begun formal mediation in an attempt to resolve the disputed tax bill for some of the development property. At issue is the valuation of properties in the Settlers Edge development and the properties that Mountain Air defines as amenities, such as the country club and the golf course. Mountain Air representatives appealed a $482 million valuation, claiming that there was no valid method used for arriving at the rate. The mediation process is an alternative solution suggested by the state Court of Appeals, County Manager Nathan Bennett said. See page 9

Nonprofits face tough pressure across region

By Peggy Manning Carolina Public Press MANNA FoodBank experienced a 40 percent increase in requests for emergency food assistance last year. When it started in 1983, the nonprofit distributed 40,000 pounds of food. Last year, the organization distributed almost 10 million pounds of food. Now, the nonprofit’s leaders, like most nonprofits, are reconfiguring the agency to be able to continue providing services. That is a balancing act, nonprofit leaders say, when their own resources become limited. MANNA, which started in the basement of Eliada Homes in the Leicester section of Buncombe County, has grown immensely in the past 29 years. It implemented programs

to address the specific needs for the area’s most vulnerable populations, focusing primarily on children and elderly residents. The organization adjusted its practices and increased food distribution to area agencies, doing everything from streamlining operations to acquiring new sources of food, including harvesting rights to an apple orchard. Many organizations across Western North Carolina are finding it tough to raise money and keep up with demand in what is an even tougher economy. There have been closures and layoffs throughout the region’s nonprofit sector at the exact time there are more requests for services. And, MANNA was no exception. See page 13

Elisabeth McGuirk fills up “MANNA Packs for Kids” at MANNA FoodBank in Asheville. The kids meals are sent to some 136 primary and elementary schools in Western North Carolina to feed children who receive free or reduced cost lunches. MANNA is among a group nonprofits in the region trying finding ways to streamline as demand for services increases and funding sources are strained. (Matt Rose/Carolina Public Press)


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Schools

Dr. Tipton’s ‘State of the School System’ report By Dr. Tony Tipton YCS Superintendent Sometimes we get so involved in the day to day work that we forget what we have accomplished. It is good to take a few minutes to reflect on where we are and where we are going as a school system. I would like to look at both the curricular and non- curricular aspect of Yancey County Schools. Curricular 1. Yancey County Schools (YCS) Board of Education established a 1 year priority list in both curricular and facility needs. 2. YCS applied for and received a waiver for conversion of the 5 extra student days the General Assembly approved over the summer. These 5 days will be used throughout the school year to provide our staff with required training on the new Common Core/ Essential Standards. This marks the first time in NC history when a completely new K-12 curriculum will be introduced. 3. The new state-wide McREL online teacher/administrator evaluation instrument is being implemented at this time. Administrators have completed initial and mid-year evaluations at this point of the year. 4. The Calendar Committee has worked hard in designing a school calendar for 201213 which goes from 180 student days to 185, eliminating 5 mandatory teacher work days and ensuring that we start and finish the school year within the time limits set by the state. We are still waiting on the official word from the state legislature on exactly how many school days we will be required to complete next year. 5. East Yancey and Cane River Middle Schools were recipients of a three-year, $263,040 grant from the Department of Public Health, Child and Youth Branch. The grant will support operating costs to staff nurses, mental health professionals, nutritionists, and clerical staff at each of the school’s new health center facilities starting the 2012-2013 school year. This grant will allow YCS to continue to staff the health centers as we have in the past. With this grant, and the grant received this summer to construct the two new health centers, YCS can offer basic medical care for our middle school

students resulting in a higher attendance rate and less strain on parents having to miss work to take students to see a doctor for routine basic medical concerns. 6. YCS is in the process of using the Race to the Top federal grant money to establish wireless connectivity in all schools by the end of this school year. This will allow Yancey County teachers to better provide 21st Century instruction to all our students. 7. YCS has applied for a Golden Leaf Grant that will allow us to provide the schools with some type of handheld devices that will work with the wireless Internet connectivity being installed in all schools. The state is moving toward all tests being online and this will require a great deal of wireless connectivity as well as many additional devices for the test administration. 8. YCS is using this school year to align with the new Common Core/Essential Standards which will begin with the 2012-13 school year. 9. Superintendent’s Office is providing a weekly newsletter, Superintendent Report, while revamping the monthly Vision Newsletter. 10. Complete update of county-wide school media centers from Follett Software to new Destiny Card Catalog Software System. Non-Curricular 1. Applied for and received a grant to build two new Middle School Health Centers. Construction is currently scheduled to begin in March and should be completed by midSeptember, 2012. Conducted qualifications interviews and selected an architectural firm to build the two Middle School Health Centers. 3. Installed lights on the softball field at Mountain Heritage High. 4. Installed new front steps at Bee Log Elementary. 5. Replaced the gym seats at both East Yancey Middle School and Cane River Middle School. 6. Installed a new camera system at Mountain Heritage High. 7. Installed additional security cameras at Bald Creek Elementary to increase security

coverage. 8. Replaced a chiller at Cane River Middle School. 9. Repaired the floor of the walk-in freezer in the Maintenance Department. 10. Replaced a hot water heater in the Burnsville Elementary cafeteria. 11. Installed brighter lights in the gym at Mountain Heritage High School. 12. Installed drainage lines around Bald Creek Elementary to divert runoff water away from the building. 13. Started obtaining estimates to repair the visitor’s bleachers on the football field at Mountain Heritage High. What is next this school year? 1. We will meet with each school staff during February to prioritize capital needs for the 2012-13 school year. This meeting will give us a focused approach on what is needed at each school and where our efforts should be placed. This will be the basis for preparing next year’s priority list. 2. In February, Superintendent and School Board Members will meet in a joint session with County Commissioners for budgetary planning. 3. In April, Central Office Leadership Team will meet with individual schools’ administration, School Improvement Chair and data team to prioritize curriculum Page 3 of 3 needs. This will be the basis for preparing the 2012-13 School Improvement Plans. 4. Continue with the joint community, high school, and central office project of replacing the old bent flag pole at the front entrance of Mountain Heritage. Summer Months Projects 5. Finish installing the new windows at Bee Log Elementary. 6. Replace the elevator at Mountain Heritage. 7. New roof on the cafeteria at Micaville Elementary. 8. New roof at the Yancey County Schools Central Office.

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Opinion/Outlooks

State pay scales are driving workers out of their jobs When I recently read about how some politicians are angry about the cuts in education and about how important an education is; I had to interject and share a story with you: My name is Jeremy Canipe. I am the former president of the Yancey County Young Democrats (2006-2007), Top 5 YD of 2007 award winner, former treasurer of the Buncombe Young Democrats (2008), and the former 3rd vice chair of the 11th Congressional District Democrats (20102011). I have worked for the state of North Carolina in the Department of Correction for 14 years. I also work at the Asheville Federal Building, and I am a small business owner. In my role as a state employee, the education that I worked hard to get has not paid off. To begin, it is getting very difficult to continue to be a state employee. We are venturing into our fifth year without a pay raise or a COLA, while the price of everything (insurance being the most noteworthy) has increased greatly. Three years ago, when I had the opportunity to pay $43 a month for 90/10 coverage, my co-pays to my specialists were $35 and prescriptions were $10-$15. Now, I have to cancel doctor’s appointments sometimes because I can’t afford the $70 copay, and prescriptions are now $40. If I did not have secondary employment, I could not afford to live due to medical costs. The state

employee health plan is a complete sham, and I have proof. If a person wanted to cover their spouse and children through the state employee health plan, it would cost the state employee close to $700 a month. You can go on Blue Cross/Blue Shield’s website in North Carolina as a private citizen and purchase the same coverage for $300 a month. How can this be possible? There are literally thousands of active and retired state employees on the state health plan, so it makes absolutely no sense that we would not get a much better rate and coverage than a normal person by themselves. The main issue I want to bring to your attention is the erroneous pay scales that the NCDOC uses. I was a correctional officer for about 9 years. While I was working, I went ahead and got my Associates Degree in criminal justice. I am now a correctional case manager, and this position requires a degree. The whole time I have been a case manager (who is still certified and acts as a correctional officer on occasion), I make about $50 per month less than a correctional officer, who is only required to have a GED. The North Carolina legislature has always said that we need to send more tax dollars to the education fund, and there is now a proposal on the table to raise taxes again to fund education further. If education is so important in the

state of North Carolina, then why doesn’t the state employees’ pay scale reflect it? For an example; in the states of Virginia and South Carolina, their equivalent of “case managers” make 10-15% more than regular correctional officers do, because a degree is required. This can be verified on their respective websites. I know correctional officers right now who have in 6-7 years less service than I do, and they make more money than I do……and I’m the one with the degree! To put this further in perspective for you; I have a friend who works in a prison with the same job title as me (and he has a 4-year degree). He leaves work every day and goes to work on a second job. He has a wife and two children at home. Even with 2 jobs, he is eligible for food stamps every month, which he chooses not to collect. We are being paid right above the poverty line. That speaks volumes for how much an education is worth when working for the state. I could actually go back to correctional officer status and make more money. Don’t get me wrong; I am very thankful for both of my jobs. However, it gets really old to hear the same old posturing about how important education is and how the taxpayers need to shell out more money for it while the state itself doesn’t practice what it preaches. Jeremy L. Canipe Candler

Ray Rapp’s legislative report from Raleigh As January came to an end, the governmental landscape changed dramatically in Raleigh. Starting with the General Assembly’s “midnight massacre” directed at teachers during the first week of the month, things became more tumultuous with the resignation of Health and Human Services Secretary Lanier Cansler (a Republican) and last week’s announcement that Governor Beverly Perdue (a Democrat) will not seek reelection. My take on all of this is that partisan passions have taken over our public discourse and ideological considerations, especially in the General Assembly, trump constitutional

principles and common sense in the conduct of the peoples’ business. It is a sad commentary that this atmosphere has led the Governor to decide not to seek re-election in hopes, as she said, that her decision “will open the door to an honest and bipartisan effort to help our schools.” The current budget cuts to early childhood education, K-12, community colleges and universities have left North Carolina ranked 49th in the nation (behind Mississippi and South Carolina) in per pupil spending on students in grades K through 12. Political “gotcha games” aren’t going to fix this funding shortage and they continue to undermine good government, as we saw in the loss last year of 1,600 jobs when Continental Tire decided to forego North Carolina for South Carolina after the political firestorm between the Governor and the GOP leadership in the General Assembly. Simply stated, it is time to stop finger-pointing, roll up our sleeves together and lend our hands to help with the economic and education crises that grip our state. Environmental recognition It was an honor to be recognized last week as one of the 33 State Representatives who scored a 100% on Environment North Carolina’s Legislative Score Card. The announcement was made in a press conference held on January 25 in Raleigh that called attention to my colleagues and my efforts to counter “repeated attacks . . . on the state’s air, water and open spaces.” The scorecard “tracks 10 contested votes in the House . . .that have largely become law, including those that push back a key deadline in the Jordan Lake clean-up plan; remove protections for an unspoiled trout stream near Brevard; and drastically limit the conservation of important green spaces across the state such as those surround the Blue Ridge Parkway.” Legislative listening sessions

A special “shout out” to Jenifer Morgan for hosting the Legislative Listening session for some 50 persons at the Celo Community Center on January 24. The next “listening sessions” (numbers 11 and 12) are scheduled in Yancey County on February 21 at the Bee Log School and on February 23 at the Cane River Middle School. Each session begins at 7:00 p.m. To date there have been listening sessions held in Maggie Valley, Cruso, Fines Creek, Clyde, and Canton in Haywood County; Beech Glen, Mars Hill and Spring Creek in Madison County; and Burnsville and Celo in Yancey County. Around the District Since the last “Raleigh Report” on January 20, I have had the chance to take part in a number of meetings and events: On Monday, January 23, I spent the day in Haywood County beginning with a morning meeting at the Chamber of Commerce Office hosted by the organization’s President Ron Leatherwood and its Executive Director CeCe Hipps to discuss signage directing traffic to Cherokee and Harrah’s Casino via U.S. 19 and U.S. 70. After the meeting I had the chance to visit the Town Managers in Waynesville and Clyde, Lee Galloway and Joy Garland, in their offices to discuss their communities’ concerns. Later in the afternoon I briefly addressed the Haywood County Commissioners where I joined Juanita Dixon and Patsy Dowling to thank Chairman Mark Swanger and each member of the Board for designating the MARC Building as a senior resource center to be administered by Mountain Projects. On Wednesday, January 25, at the invitation of Bill Eaker, I attended the ribbon-cutting for the region’s second BioWheels RTS Brightfield Solar Integrated Electric Vehicle Charging station in front of the Land of Sky Regional Council Offices in Asheville.


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Obituaries C.W. Robertson Jr.

C. W. Robertson Jr., 86, of the Pensacola community, died Wednesday, Feb. 1, 2012, in the Charles George Veterans Administration Medical Center. A native of Yancey County, he was a son of the late Cleophus and Mallie Silver Robertson. Funeral services will be held at 3 p.m. Friday in the Pensacola Methodist Church, of which he was a member. The Rev. A. J. Moore will officiate. Burial will be in the Robertson-Silver Cemetery. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the church.

sister, Pauline Allen, and a brother, Clayborn Higgins. She was an employee of Hickory Springs Manufacturing with 29 years of service. She was of the Baptist faith. Surviving are four daughters: Brenda Arrowood and husband, Eddie, of Elizabethton, Tenn., Remona Noah and husband, Richard, of Thomasville, Pam Lackey and husband, David, of Wilkesboro, and Teresa McManus and husband, Ernie, of Purlear; six grandchildren: Shane Noah, Kristi Wolfe, Joel Church, Brandon Arrowood, Misty Transeau and Keisha McManus; five great-grandchildren: Kiarah Shaw, Gavin Wolfe, Alex Noah, Isaac Norris, Lorelai Transeau; a sister, Kathleen Rathburn of Burnsville and several nieces and nephews. Funeral was Wednesday in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home with the Rev. Danny Cook officiating. Graveside service was 11 a.m. Thursday in the Eddie McMahan Cemetery.

Funeral was held Thursday with the Rev. Fred Proctor, the Rev. Ken Jenkins and the Rev. Danny Silvers officiating. Burial followed in the Crabtree Chapel Church Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Mitchell County Animal Rescue 2492 US Hwy 19E, Spruce Pine, NC 28777.

Ronnie Eugene Penland

Ronnie Eugene Penland, 55, of Burnsville, died Sunday, January 29, 2012, at Blue Ridge Regional Hospital. A native of Yancey County, he was a son of the late Jack and Jewell Mathis Penland. Surviving are his son, Kenneth Penland of Asheville; a step-daughter: Brittany Kittel of Asheville; a granddaughter, Jazzy Kittel; three sisters, Ethel McPeters, Polly Blankenship and Tammy Penland, all of Burnsville; and two brothers, Jackie Penland and Joey Penland, of Swannanoa. Graveside service was Tuesday in the Metcalf Cemetery on Horton Creek with the Rev. David Bryant officiating.

Sina May Hughes

Gladys Thomas Garland

Gladys Thomas Garland, 91, of the Brush Creek Community, died Saturday, Jan. 28, 2012, at Mountain Manor Assisted Living. A native of Yancey County, she was a daughter of the late Dewey and Pearl Hall Thomas. She was the wife of Howard Garland, who died in 2003. She was preceded in death by a sister, Madge Hopson. A retired employee of Burnsville Hosiery Mill with 53 years of service, Gladys early employment was as ‘Rosie the Riveter’ in the ship yards in Wilmington, Del., during World War II. She was a member of West Burnsville Baptist Church. Surviving are a son: Jerry Garland and wife, Patti, of Green Mountain; a daughter: Sandy Smith and husband, Dee, of Asheville; four grandchildren: Bart Garland (Delores), Paige Carpenter (Ty), Lana Melton (Mark) and Summer Smith (Clark Duncan); five greatgrandchildren: Maddison, Emmaline, Sam, Meredith and Josh; two sisters: June Robinson of Green Mountain and Maxine Turbyfill of Burnsville; three brothers: Gene Thomas of Old Fort, Dean Thomas of Taylors, S.C., and Marvin Thomas of Green Mountain. Several nieces and nephews also survive. Funeral service was Monday in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home with the Rev. Charlie Carroway officiating. Burial was in the Double Island Baptist Church Cemetery. Memorials may be made to Gideons International, P. O. Box 264, Burnsville, NC 28714.

Ima Jean Higgins Bowlin

Ima Jean Higgins Bowlin, 70, of Elizabethton, Tenn., died Monday, Jan. 30, 2012, in the Johnson City Medical Center. A native of Yancey County, she was a daughter of the late Vince and Pearl McIntosh Higgins and the wife of Norman Bowlin, who died in 2002. She was also preceded in death by a

Heidi Higgins

Heidi Higgins, 73, of Burnsville, died Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012, at her home after a long illness. Surviving are her husband, Joseph L. Higgins of Burnsville; a daughter, Cindy Lee Millison of Delaware; a son, James Higgins and wife, Rosa, of Burnsville; and six grandchildren: Dalton and Devin Higgins of Erwin, Tenn., and Christopher, Timmy, Jamie Lee and Keith Millison Jr., of Delaware. A memorial service will be held at a later date.

Rocky Van Parker

Rocky Van Parker, 59, of McKinney Mine Road, died on Monday, January 30, 2012, at his home. A native of Mitchell County, he was a son of the late John Clayton “J.C.” Parker, who passed away 1975 and Alma Parker Pate of Crabtree. He was also preceded in death by an infant sister, Sammy Lou Parker. He was retired from Baxters after 25 years of service. Rocky loved fishing and was an avid deer hunter. Surviving are his mother, Alma Parker Pate and stepfather Reece Pate, of Crabtree; companion, Charlene “Shorty” Hoyle of Bakersville; daughter, Melinda Parker and companion, Alfonzo Hernandez, of Charlotte; two granddaughters: Alyssa Parsons of Newland and Roxanna Parker of Charlotte; a sister, Alfreda Hughes, and husband, Mark, of Bear Creek; a brother, Robert Parker and wife, Diana, of Crabtree; niece and nephew Holly and Clay Parker, and his faithful dogs Cookie and Sam.

Sina May Hughes, 96, died Tuesday, January 31, 2012, at Brookside Rehabilitation and Care. A native of Yancey County, she was a daughter to the late Haze and Emma Jean Hughes Stiles. She was also preceded in death by daughters and son-in-law Maude Etta Hughes, Ola Mae and Vernon Woody; son James “Duck” Hughes; stepsons Scotty Hughes and Vero Hughes; five sisters and a brother. Sina loved gardening and flowers. Surviving are her daughters Polly Lane and husband, Ray, of Burnsville, and Joyce Buchanan of Johnson City, Tenn.; sons Paul Hughes of Windom, Billy Hughes of Newdale and Roger Hughes of Spruce Pine; stepdaughters Jean Ray of Burnsville and Emma Lee Shoe of Hickory; sister Viola S. Briggs of Marion; 21 grandchildren, 39 great-grandchildren and 10 great-great grandchildren. Funeral service will be at 1 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 3 in the Chapel of Yancey Funeral Service with the Rev. Billy Mitchell officiating. Burial will be in the Morning Star Baptist Church Cemetery. The family will receive friends one hour prior to the service at the funeral home.

Savannah Cooper Peterson Savannah Cooper Peterson, 100, of Johnson City, Tenn., died Jan. 28, 2012, at her home. She was a daughter of the late Dove M. and Nora Ann Hughes Cooper and a native of Mitchell County. She was a homemaker and a member of Bailey Church of The Brethren. Survivors include daughters Vergie Peterson, of Erwin, Tenn., Mable Peterson, Mildred Gerstner, and Verlon K. Peterson, all of Johnson City, a son, Klint Peterson, of Green Mountain, a grandson, Clifton Greer Peterson, a great-granddaughter, Morgan Peterson, and half-sister Mary Helen Cooper, of Old Fort, Tenn. She was preceded in death by her husband, Jake G. Peterson, three sisters, Ida Morrell, Nola Ensor, and Pearl Cooper, and brothers, Jessie Bright Cooper, and Cecil Cooper, and a half-sister, Dove Ann Tapp. Funeral was Wednesday with Joe Brown officiating. Henline Hughes Funeral Home is assisting the Peterson Family.


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As the county unemployment rate increases and county leaders strive to limit spending, the Yancey County News thinks it appropriate to publish the salaries of county employees. This list was provided by the county manager’s office at the request of the newspaper. The county finance officer noted: “or the part-time employees, if they had a timesheet in this payroll, I averaged their total yearly salary based on this time sheet. If they did not have a timesheet in this payroll, I took their gross wages for 2011.” 2011-2012 SALARIES # LAST FIRST HIRE DATE JOB TITLE PAY DESC SALARY BI-WEEKLY HOURS 1 BURLESON BRANDI 8/2/1999 FINANCE OFFICER SALARY $42,000.00 80 320 MILLER MONA 9/17/2007 PT-ASST FINANCE OFFICER HOURLY $21,138.00 60 374 HENSLEY LYNNE 12/1/2008 PT-FINANCE DIRECTOR PT-SALARY $10,000.00 VARIES 396 HENSLEY MYRA ASSISTANT PART-TIME $10,296.00 36 376 ROBINSON J. JASON CLERK TO THE BOARD SALARY $5,000.00 VARIES 471 AUSTIN JILL 12/1/2010 COMMISSION MEMBER ELECTEDSAL $7,687.89 VARIES 379 RIDDLE JOHNNY 12/1/2008 COMMISSION CHAIRMAN ELECTEDSAL $8,899.69 VARIES 474 PRESNELL MICHELE 12/1/2010 COMMISSION MEMBER ELECTEDSAL $7,687.89 VARIES 473 HOLLAND MARVIN 12/1/2010 COMMISSION MEMBER ELECTEDSAL $7,687.89 VARIES 472 ENGLAND DALE 12/1/2010 COMMISSION MEMBER ELECTEDSAL $7,687.89 VARIES 211 BENNETT NATHAN 12/1/2008 COUNTY MANAGER SALARY $60,000.00 80 272 CHANDLER DAKOTHA 2/27/2008 ASST TO THE MANAGER HOURLY $21,840.00 65 187 BUCHANAN JEAN ASSISTANT HOURLY $10,296.00 36 6 DAVIS WILLIAM 1/24/2000 E911 DIR./EM COORD SALARY $39,972.24 80 7 THOMAS MARK 5/25/2001 911 DISPATCH ADMIN. SALARY $30,555.20 80 218 MURPHY DEREK PART TIME - EM COORD SALARY $14,400.00 VARIES 9 WALKINGSTICK WILLIAM 12/16/2002 MAPPING TECHNICIAN SALARY $30,855.06 80 443 MCKINNEY MICHAEL INFORMATION TECH SALARY $38,000.00 80 425 WILSON SANDRA 12/14/2009 YCTA - ADMIN ASST SALARY $24,794.20 80 3 AUSTIN LYNN 1/2/2003 YCTA - DIRECTOR SALARY $33,499.96 80 275 FENDER LAUREN PT-ASST HOURLY $5,967.00 30 20 JOBE WILLOREE 12/3/1984 REGISTER OF DEEDS ELECTEDSAL $59,241.33 80 21 BENNETT JANICE 10/9/2000 ASST REG OF DEEDS SALARY $28,042.21 80 22 PENLAND DEIRDRE 3/17/2003 DEPUTY REG OF DEEDS SALARY $25,663.82 80 395 JOBE SUSAN DEPUTY REG OF DEEDS PT-HOURLY $9,902.88 36 24 BUCHANAN CONNIE 1/25/1999 VEHICLE TAX CLERK SALARY $26,180.61 80 25 FOX BETTY 1/25/1985 ASST TAX ASSESSOR SALARY $18,183.36 48 8 BOONE JEFF 2/1/1999 TAX ADMINISTRATOR SALARY $40,002.84 80 442 PITTMAN ZACHARY DEPUTY TAX COLLECTOR SALARY $23,613.46 80 384 WILSON DEBORAH 2/9/2009 TAX APPRAISER SALARY $29,385.78 80 441 THOMAS FONDA TAX COLLECTOR SALARY $32,397.82 80 29 ROBINSON LORETTA 8/4/1986 DIRECTOR - BRD OF ELECT SALARY $37,198.35 80 30 WOODY MARY BETH 12/1/2008 ASST-ELECTIONS DIRECTOR SALARY $23,613.53 80 32 BANKS GARY 12/3/1990 SHERIFF SALARY $61,360.00 84 50 ROBINSON JOHN 1/10/1993 LIEUTENANT DETECTIVE HRLYBEN $40,404.00 84 43 HIGGINS RYAN 6/20/2000 LIEUTENANT HRLYBEN $39,312.00 84 45 HUGHES DANIEL 8/15/1994 LIEUTENANT HRLYBEN $39,312.00 84 39 BRASWELL FLOYD 1/25/1999 DEPUTY/BALIFF HRLYBEN $32,301.36 84 711 SHUFORD BRIAN 3/7/2011 INVESTIGATOR HRLYBEN $35,490.00 84 42 LETTERMAN MARK 7/22/1995 DRUG INVESTIGATOR HRLYBEN $37,674.00 84 303 BURLESON SHARON 5/16/2007 RECORDS SALARY $29,120.00 80 417 BAILEY ROSCOE 7/13/2009 DEPUTY/K-9 TEAMLEADER HRLYBEN $35,577.36 84 251 DAVIS MICHAEL 10/1/2005 DEPUTY HRLYBEN $33,087.60 84 427 FORTNER THOMAS 1/23/2010 DEPUTY HRLYBEN $31,668.00 84 215 WILSON AUSTIN 1/19/2005 DEPUTY HRLYBEN $34,944.00 84 428 FARMER JERRY 1/23/2010 DEPUTY HRLYBEN $32,760.00 84 478 EDMONDS JASON 3/14/2011 DEPUTY HRLYBEN $35,271.60 84 390 BOWMAN NICHOLAS 7/13/2011 DEPUTY HRLYBEN $28,392.00 84 48 CASTEEL JONATHAN PT-DEPUTY HRLY $750 VARIES 2011 TOTAL 707 SHUFORD RANDALL 5/3/2011 PT-DEPUTY HRLY $10,780.00 VARIES 2011 TOTAL 31 BANKS KERMIT PT-DEPUTY HRLY $7,731.00 VARIES 2011 TOTAL 454 MITCHELL BRANDON 7/17/2010 PT-DEPUTY HRLY $6,203.50 VARIES 2011 TOTAL 429 TURNER RICK 4/25/2010 PT-DEPUTY HRLY $4,780.00 VARIES 2011 TOTAL 35 LEDFORD JUDY PT-DEPUTY HRLY $7,696.00 VARIES 2011 TOTAL 481 KNIGHTEN THOMAS 4/15/2011 ANIMAL CONTROL HRLY-PT $23,400.00 60 206 VOLAND RHONDA 10/25/2004 DISPATCH SUPERVISOR HRLYBEN $30,576.00 84 261 LISTER DONALD 5/16/2011 DISPATCHER HRLYBEN $28,392.00 84 431 BURLESON SAUNDRA 8/22/2007 DISPATCHER HRLYBEN $28,938.00 84 315 BIDDIX LINDA 8/22/2007 DISPATCHER HRLYBEN $26,426.40 84 337 ANGLIN WILLIE DISPATCHER HRLYBEN $34,944.00 84 394 GEOUGE AMANDA DISPATCHER HRLYBEN $28,938.00 84 314 PROFFITT JOHN 8/15/2007 CHIEF DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $34,944.00 84 51 BANKS DAVID 7/25/2002 SGT DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $31,122.00 84 366 KING NINA 8/3/2008 SGT DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $30,576.00 84 52 BANKS KIMBERLY 10/15/2003 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,392.00 84 163 CASTEEL BILLY 5/7/2004 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,392.00 84 340 RANDOLPH WILLIAM 2/23/2008 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $27,234.00 84 359 SILVERS RONALD 7/1/2008 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,064.40 84 367 WOOD ALMA 8/4/2008 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,064.40 84 438 ROBINSON MICHAEL 4/27/2010 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,064.40 84 475 WOODBY TAMMY 12/11/2010 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,938.00 84 499 ROGERS SCOTT 7/6/2011 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $29,484.00 84 479 BURLESON REMONA 4/4/2011 DETENTION OFFICER HRLYBEN $28,064.40 84 483 SCHARF STEVEN 5/2/2011 PT DETENTION OFFICER HRLY $8,018.40 24 500 SILVER JENNIFER 7/14/2011 PT DETENTION OFFICER HRLY $8,018.40 24 404 STREET DAVID 7/27/2011 PT DETENTION OFFICER HRLY $8,018.40 24 186 BERRY IVAN 7/29/2011 PT DETENTION OFFICER HRLY $8,018.40 24 342 BUCHANAN HOWARD 7/11/2011 PT DETENTION OFFICER HRLY $8,018.40 24 47 HILLIARD SHANE GROUNDS SECURITY SALARY $35,000.00 84 72 MCPETERS CHARLES A. 3/27/1989 RECYCLING COORDINATOR SALARY $27,825.72 80 302 GRIGGS RANDY 5/4/2007 RECYCLING ASST SALARY $19,864.00 80 397 BOLICK NICK GROUNDSKEEPER HOURLY $5,616.00 24 484 ALLEN JEFF GROUNDSKEEPER HOURLY $11,232.00 48 386 MCINTOSH BRIAN 7/13/2009 MAINTENANCE SALARY $23,608.00 80 76 ADKINS DAVID 8/29/2001 MAINTENANCE SALARY $28,516.80 80 Continued on next page 257 THOMASON CLYDE 1/3/2006 CUSTODIAN SALARY $23,054.20 80


6

Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

# LAST FIRST HIRE DATE JOB TITLE PAY DESC SALARY BI-WEEKLY HOURS 292 RANDOLPH BRANDON 1/18/2007 INTERN/INTERIM P. WORKS SALARY $22,170.71 80 89 MURPHY JOHN 7/19/2000 BUILDING INSPECTOR SALARY $42,701.80 80 90 GRAYBEAL JUANITA 11/1/2000 ASST BUILDING INSPECTOR SALARY $26,321.55 80 287 MCCURRY NEIL 11/1/2006 BUILDING INSPECTOR SALARY $42,919.70 80 399 HALL RANDALL 5/19/2009 PARK DIRECTOR SALARY $31,435.82 80 440 HALL EVAN 4/17/2010 PARK ASST DIRECTOR HOURLY $22,880.00 60 92 HOLLOWAY STANLEY 8/15/1992 AGENT SALARY $15,906.54 80 93 CHRISAWN NORMA 9/1/1996 EXTENSION ADMIN ASST SALARY $11,074.70 80 97 SIMPSON JO 10/6/1999 EFNEP PROGRAM COORD SALARY $17,228.64 80 99 CHUVALA RICHARD MOUNTAIN CHALLENGE SALARY $23,504.00 80 102 SEMON LINDA 1/27/1998 AGENT SALARY $14,522.51 80 197 WILSON BRENDA 10/12/2004 EXTENSION ADMIN ASST SALARY $9,193.83 80 98 HEDRICK SUSIE 1/26/2007 4-H AFTERSCHOOL HOURLY $13,013.00 50 198 TAYLOR GLENNA 10/11/2004 JCPC ADMINISTRATOR HOURLY $12,285.00 50 278 CHAPMAN SYBIL 3/1/2007 4-H AFTERSCHOOL HOURLY $16,956.00 80 503 MCINTOSH ELIZABETH 4-H AFTERSCHOOL HOURLY $10,725.00 50 502 ENGLAND GAIL 4-H AFTERSCHOOL HOURLY $10,725.00 50 160 FOX RUSS 3/14/2001 PARKS & REC DIRECTOR SALARY $33,300.02 80 161 TIPTON ROBBIE 10/29/2003 PARKS & REC ASST DIRECTOR SALARY $28,507.44 80 200 AUSTIN RACHEL 10/18/2004 911 DISPATCHER SALARY $25,552.80 84 203 GARLAND TABBATHA 10/18/2004 911 DISPATCHER SALARY $25,552.80 84 276 DAVIS ALANA 3/3/2008 911 DISPATCHER SALARY $27,256.32 84 299 DUNCAN REGINA 5/8/2007 911 DISPATCHER SALARY $27,256.32 84 480 TIPTON ANGELA 4/25/2011 911 PART-TIME DISPATCHER HOURLY $3,354.00 12 444 ROBINSON JOSH 911 PART-TIME DISPATCHER HOURLY $6,708.00 24 323 BUCHANAN APRIL 10/24/2007 911 PART-TIME DISPATCHER HOURLY $3,354.00 12 445 MCCURRY ISAAC 5/7/2010 911 PART-TIME DISPATCHER HOURLY $3,354.00 12 222 HOWELL JEFFERY 3/9/2005 RECREATION GRNDS DIR. SALARY $39,143.00 80 284 STYLES JEANNE 9/6/2007 CULT. RESOURCE COMMISS SALARY $35,646.16 80 434 ALLEN LARRY 3/31/2010 VETERANS SERVICES HOURLY $12,597.00 32 377 MCMAHAN JAMIE 12/1/2008 COUNTY PLANNER SALARY $25,006.80 60 420 BOYD LAURA YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $13,806.00 60 221 ABERNETHY LEONA 11/16/1962 YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $19,427.00 80 13 EVANS SHEILA 1/13/1997 YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $15,756.00 60 16 SCOTT MAXINE 8/25/2003 YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $22,068.80 80 18 MOORE COY 6/6/2000 YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $13,837.20 60 418 DUNCAN KIMBERLY 7/20/2009 YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $13,806.00 60 465 MORROW DANNY YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $7,656.00 40 466 BOYER NORA YCTA VAN DRIVER HOURLY $9,945.00 50 57 PETERSON HERMAN 2/3/1999 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 58 LAWS CARLIE 9/18/1998 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 ROBINSON RONNIE RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 61 SILVERS MILLIE 11/13/1993 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 506 MOSS HAROLD RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 66 WOODY EMERSON 6/1/1992 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 69 WILSON ARTHUR 11/13/2002 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 70 BRYANT LYDA 5/8/2003 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 DSS - Child Day Care 162 BYRD SHELBA 5/5/2004 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 229 ROBERTS EARL 5/3/2005 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 153 WATSON, LORRAINE 230 LASSITER DAVID 5/24/2005 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 EDU DEV AIDE II $17,760.34 249 BAILEY SIDNEY 9/27/2005 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 312 ROBINSON WARREN 7/13/2007 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 154 RAY, KIMBERLY 338 PATE GERALD 1/28/2008 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 EDU DEV AIDE II $21,358.48 329 HABERTHIER JOSEPH 1/3/2008 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 330 BRYANT RC 1/7/2008 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 191 ODOM, TAMMY 387 FOXX DENNIS 2/19/2009 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 DAY CARE TEACHER I 388 SMITH JAMES 2/19/2009 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 $20,398.25 389 MILLER RONALD 2/19/2009 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 430 ROBINSON JOHNNIE 2/25/2009 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 721 BLEVINS, SABRINA 419 BOONE JOHN 7/30/2009 RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 DAY CARE DIRECTOR 446 BUCHANAN TOMMY RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 $23,613.53 225 BRADFORD JAMES RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 COOPER RANDALL RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 365 BYRD, LYNN MILLER JACK RECYCLING CTR ATTENDANT HOURLY $8,377.20 36 DAY CARE COOK II $15,221.49 77 BUCHANAN CAMILLE 10/26/2001 PART-TIME SCALEHOUSE HOURLY $4,773.60 18 78 BLEVINS ROBERT 9/17/1990 HEAVY EQUIP. OPERATOR SALARY $26,208.00 80 457 SOLESBY, APRIL $15,982.46 79 SUMMERLIN TERESA 8/4/1993 SCALEHOUSE OPERATOR SALARY $27,622.40 80 214 ALLEN ANTHONY 11/28/2010 LANDFILL SUPERVISOR SALARY $32,397.82 80 DSS Administration # NAME JOB TITLE SALARY 103 ELKINS, ALICE DIRECTOR $64,054.12 104 BUCHANAN, KIMBERLY PROCESSING ASST IV $26,726.18 333 PETERSON, DENISE ADMIN ASST $36,391.16 106 KATES, AUDREY COMPUTER SYS ADMIN I $34,215.48 107 GROW, SHARON PROCESSING ASST III $20,947.97 DSS Income Maintenance 109 MCKINNEY, KAREN IM SUPERVISOR II $38,014.60 391 LEADBITTER, REBECCAH IMC II - MED $22,489.07 118 DUNCAN, M. YEVONNE PROG INTEGRITY/IMC INVESTS $26,653.64 119 FREEMAN, KATHY VEHICLE OPERATOR II $18,501.60 121 MCINTOSH, CYNTHIA IM SUPERVISOR II $36,235.68 123 HOOVER, SHARON IMC III - LEAD WORKER $28,286.70 36 FARMER, REGINA COMM SERV TECH $22,488.96 259 ATKINS, DINAH IMC II SALARY $27,154.14 295 RHYMER, JODIE IMC II SALARY $22,488.96 336 WILSON, IDA IMC II SALARY $22,489.07 382 HUSKINS, HEATHER IMC I SALARY $22,489.07 383 WILSON, HAZEL PROCESSING ASST III $16,781.69 345 COOMBER, CARLA IMC II SALARY $22,489.07 393 KING, MELISSA IMC II SALARY $22,489.07 504 STREET, SARAH IMC SALARY $22,488.96 126 THOMPSON, SHARON IMC TECH HOURLY $10,108.00 124 MCINTOSH, RITA IMC F&N HOURLY $5,093.40

Child and Family Services 127 ROGERS, MICHELLE SW PROGRAM MANAGER $50,441.04 128 MCKINNEY, DEBBIE SW SUPERVISOR III SALARY $47,993.66 129 BUCHANAN, STACEY SW II - DAY CARE COORD $37,925.16 132 THANOS, MICHAEL STEVE SW III SALARY $32,981.52 136 MCINTOSH, JAMES SW III - LEAD $41,089.62 145 LEDFORD, CINDY SW III - LEAD $33,641.14 148 MOORE, JACK SW III $31,644.86 268 REATO-STAMEY, NICOLE SW II - LEAD $33,226.56 485 ODOM, TEKEESHA $24,794.20 286 PENDLEY, BILLY SW III $31,644.38 313 HUSKINS, ERIN SW III $38,463.94 343 DAVIS, REBECCA SW I $31,644.38 392 TRIVETT, REBECCA COMM SERV TECH $19,426.91 347 HILL, SHEILA PROCESSING ASST III $17,107.48 380 ROBINSON, TONYA SW II $31,644.38 453 COOPER, DARLA COMM SERV TECH $19,426.91 VICKERS, REGINALD PART-TIME $10,712.00 140 ROBERTS, MELISSA SW III $31,644.38 505 YATES, PEARLIE SW SALARY $29,014.44 469 WISE, KERRI SW II $24,794.20 467 PARRISH, STEPHANIE SW III $31,644.38 468 LIBOW, SONYA SW II $24,794.20


Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 7

Regional Market Reports Which markets offer Yancey farmers the best return on their investment? Should they head west, east or south? Agriculture and food industries accounted for $29,057,488 in Yancey County income in 2000, or 7.77 percent of the total county income. Livestock, poultry, and their products accounted for 23 percent of the total agricultural market. So this list recounts the prices in the last week at regional farm markets.

Harward Brothers Livestock Market, Turnersburg, NC Weighted Average Report for Monday Jan 30, 2012 Cattle Receipts: 1673 Last Week: 932 Last Year: 1635 Slaughter cows trended mostly steady, bulls trended mostly 2.00 higher. Feeder cattle trended mostly steady. Slaughter cows made up 15 percent of the offering, slaughter bulls 2 percent, replacement cows 1 percent, other cows 1 percent, and feeders 81 percent. The feeder supply included 31 percent steers, 39 percent heifers, and 29 percent bulls. Near 19 percent of the run weighed over 600 lbs. Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 4 215-235 226 180.00-181.00 180.26 WNC Regional Livestock Center, Canton - Weighted Average Report for Monday 11 255-290 273 162.50-195.00 182.74 Jan 30, 2012 - Cattle Receipts: 208 Last Week: 128 44 300-345 332 167.00-207.50 185.40 Last Year: 47 38 350-395 377 165.00-207.00 178.60 Slaughter cattle trended 6.00 to 12.00 higher. Feeder Tennessee Sheep 16 400-447 424 170.00-198.00 180.00 cattle trended 7.00 to 15.00 higher. Slaughter cows made and Goat Auction 29 450-495 465 160.00-189.00 178.24 up 22 percent of the offering, slaughter bulls 4 percent, 34 500-549 535 146.00-172.50 164.25 replacement cows 5 percent, and feeders 69 percent. The 17 550-595 572 147.00-167.00 159.37 1/27/12 Tennessee Livestock feeder supply included 36 percent steers, 41 percent heifers, 10 600-640 617 142.00-155.00 149.29 and 22 percent bulls. Near 25 percent of the run weighed 8 650-680 672 137.50-145.00 140.03 Producers Graded Goat and Sheep over 600 lbs. 4 750-795 778 122.00-131.00 127.19 Sale. Receipts: 535 (493 Goats; Feeder Steers Medium and Large 1 - 2 4 810-840 824 118.00-129.00 122.04 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 42 Sheep) Last Sale 807 Next Small 1 - 2 3 260-275 270 190.00-212.50 202.45 Sale Feb 10, 2012. (Second and 3 185-195 192 122.50-165.00 150.59 7 300-345 332 190.00-217.00 205.65 fourth Friday of each month) 4 210-225 216 130.00-160.00 149.77 7 350-390 371 167.00-215.00 197.33 Goats sold per hundred weight 5 255-290 271 117.50-132.50 125.66 8 400-445 419 160.00-200.00 180.67 7 310-345 331 130.00-166.00 143.88 (cwt) unless otherwise noted, 3 450-460 457 179.00-183.00 181.49 12 350-395 374 100.00-160.00 140.11 weights,actual or estimated. 1 530-530 530 167.00 167.00 2 400-435 418 150.00-160.00 154.79 Slaughter Classes: Kids 4 550-585 568 135.00-166.00 153.74 7 465-490 477 100.00-160.00 133.24 Selection 1 1 645-645 645 142.00 142.00 4 500-540 520 130.00-145.00 139.15 25-35 lbs 183.00-220.00 2 655-675 665 146.00 146.00 2 570-595 583 120.00-135.00 127.34 3 710-730 723 125.00-136.00 131.96 36-50 lbs 188.00-201.00 Medium and Large 3 1 800-800 800 126.00 126.00 51-65 lbs 190.00-200.00 3 255-285 265 132.50-170.00 154.39 2 1485-1795 1640 94.00 94.00 66-80 lbs 188.00-191.00 2 310-320 315 158.00-160.00 158.98 Small 1 - 2 81-90 lbs 179.00-188.00 4 350-380 365 110.00-165.00 133.82 2 300-315 308 132.00-147.50 139.94 2 615-645 630 115.00-129.00 122.17 Selection 2 1 815-815 815 83.00 83.00 2 870-885 878 95.00-106.00 100.45 25-35 lbs 182.50-185.00 Medium and Large 3 Holstein Large 3 36-50 lbs 185.50-189.00 1 485-485 485 127.00 127.00 3 200-225 212 114.00-117.00 115.65 51-65 lbs 173.00-180.00 1 560-560 560 80.00 80.00 5 260-295 274 95.00-114.00 105.65 66-80 lbs 187.00 Holstein Large 3 2 300-305 303 114.00 114.00 1 385-385 385 113.00 113.00 89-113 lbs 157.00 4 360-390 375 80.00-122.00 103.67 1 475-475 475 113.00 113.00 Selection 3 3 405-440 423 109.00-117.00 111.68 1 1355-1355 1355 76.00 76.00 25-35 lbs 162.00-172.00 2 495-495 495 111.00-114.00 112.50 36-50 lbs 165.00-182.00 2 585-590 588 75.00-100.00 87.45 Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1 - 2 3 630-640 637 89.00-105.00 94.61 51-65 lbs 167.50-168.50 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 2 700-705 703 85.00-87.00 86.00 66-80 lbs 153.00 1 225-225 225 180.00 180.00 2 1070-1070 1070 82.00-88.00 85.00 Yearlings Selection 2-3 4 255-290 271 152.50-174.00 164.95 Feeder Heifers Medium and Large 1 - 2 All wgts 114.00-166.00 3 300-345 328 165.00-175.00 170.81 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price Slaughter Bucks/Billies 3 350-395 375 147.00-164.00 152.96 4 165-180 173 160.00-175.00 168.59 5 405-445 427 144.00-165.00 150.63 All Wgts 93.00-110.00 4 220-245 233 150.00-170.00 161.60 11 450-490 468 140.00-154.00 148.57 Slaughter Nannies/Does 11 250-295 271 150.00-174.00 164.87 10 510-545 534 137.00-154.00 143.95 All wgts 83.00-131.00 (Thin 19 305-345 323 150.00-179.00 167.02 5 555-580 563 138.00-144.00 141.60 85.50-90.50) 37 350-395 376 152.50-190.00 168.16 2 610-615 613 131.00-132.00 131.50 52 400-445 421 146.00-205.00 166.43 Kids; Feeders Selection 3 3 655-675 665 115.00-121.00 116.97 54 450-495 472 140.00-177.00 155.50 28-53 lbs 156.00-180.00 2 710-720 715 124.00-125.00 124.50 40 500-545 522 136.00-157.00 144.63 SHEEP Slaughter Lambs-Includes 1 765-765 765 116.00 116.00 28 550-595 573 128.00-148.00 140.14 all breeds, sold per hundred 1 800-800 800 100.00 100.00 14 600-645 620 124.00-138.00 129.75 weight (cwt). Choice and Prime Small 1 - 2 7 660-685 669 123.00-136.00 125.54 1 415-415 415 140.00 140.00 40-60 lbs 180.00-241.00 Good 7 715-725 721 118.00-125.00 122.30 1 520-520 520 123.00 123.00 Choice and Prime 61-80 lbs 3 760-795 782 121.00-122.00 121.34 1 665-665 665 100.00 100.00 196.00-216.00 Good 165.00 3 800-810 805 110.00-117.00 113.68 Medium and Large 3 Choice and Prime 81-100 lbs Small 1 - 2 2 360-390 375 125.00-140.00 132.20 4 265-295 278 140.00-145.00 143.55 Good Choice and Prime 100-120 1 425-425 425 140.00 140.00 11 300-345 323 110.00-145.00 127.45 lbs Good Choice and Prime 120Feeder Bulls Medium and Large 1 - 2 150 lbs Slaughter Ewes Utility Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price Upstate Livestock Exchange, Williamston, SC and Good:All wgts Slaughter 3 405-445 422 172.50-188.00 182.22 Report for Monday Jan 30, 2012 Rams: All Wgts Not well tested 2 470-480 475 163.00-167.00 164.98 Cattle Receipts: 710 Last week: 401 Last

3 6 2 3 2 2 2 2

510-545 555-585 630-645 660-680 705-745 760-790 800-810 900-900

527 150.00-157.00 152.26 year: 968. Slaughter cows and bulls 2.00-3.00 571 135.00-150.00 143.76 Tennessee Dept of Ag-USDA higher, Feeder steers and heifers 2.00-3.00 higher. 638 114.00-139.00 126.65 Market News, Nashville, TN Slaughter cows made up 13 percent of the 670 118.00-138.00 130.58 offering, slaughter bulls 2 percent, replacement Lewis Langell, OIC (615) 725 92.00-110.00 100.75 cows 9 percent, other cows 1 percent, and feeders 837-5164 775 114.00-117.00 115.47 74 percent. The feeder supply included 35 805 89.00-108.00 98.56 percent steers, 38 percent heifers, and 27 percent 900 94.00-116.00 105.00 bulls. Near 14 percent of the run weighed over Medium and Large 3 600 lbs. (Figures in parentheses are weighted 1 545-545 545 118.00 118.00 average weights and prices for each category) 2 550-590 570 127.00-140.00 133.73 Feeder Steers: Medium and Large 1-2 215-240 1 655-655 655 100.00 100.00 Brahman X lbs (227) 205.00-216.00 (208.88); Bred Cows Medium and Large 1 - 2 Young 255-295 lbs (274) 197.50-217.00 (206.39); 305-345 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price lbs (324) 185.00-212.00 (195.44); 355-395 lbs (378) 2 865-880 873 675.00-900.00 786.53 Per Head 1-3 Months Bred 181.00-208.00 (189.93); 400-445 lbs (418) 179.002 790-870 830 925.00-950.00 938.10 Per Head 4-6 Months Bred 198.00 (185.55); 450-485 lbs (464) 170.00-183.00 1 1280-1280 1280 999.00-1100.00 1100.00 Per Head 7-9 Months Bred (175.88); 500-545 lbs (531) 149.00-164.00 (154.89); Medium and Large 1 - 2 Middle Aged 550-595 lbs (565) 146.00-162.00 (153.10); 610-615 lbs 1 940-940 940 875.00 875.00 Per Head 1-3 Months Bred (614) 138.00-149.00 (141.75); 650-660 lbs (653) 1 1065-1065 1065 900.00 900.00 Per Head 4-6 Months Bred 125.00-132.00 (126.74); 700-720 lbs (710) 122.001 870-870 870 725.00 725.00 Per Head 7-9 Months Bred 127.00 (124.74); 765-785 lbs (775) 124.50-130.00 2 1210-1260 1235 875.00-975.00 926.01 Per Head 7-9 Months Bred (127.21). Small 1-2 220-225 lbs (223) 180.00-187.50 Slaughter Cows Breaker 70-80% Lean (183.71); 280-285 lbs (283) 175.00-185.00 (179.96); Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 320-340 lbs (332) 162.50-170.00 (165.83); 350-395 1 1315-1315 1315 67.00 67.00 lbs (381) 160.00-175.00 (166.44); 405-410 lbs (408) 4 1240-1385 1314 78.50-93.00 85.42 High Dressing 160.00-172.00 (165.96); 455-490 lbs (470) 135.001 1470-1470 1470 70.00 70.00 150.00 (141.56). Medium and Large 3 190-190 lbs (190) 5 1480-1750 1589 75.50-82.00 78.25 High Dressing 120.00-125.00 (122.50); 200-235 lbs (218) 102.50Boner 80-85% Lean 125.00 (114.66); 255-280 lbs (268) 120.00-135.00 3 127-870 604 75.00-76.00 75.52 (127.15); 300-320 lbs (310) 100.00-159.00 (128.55); 2 845-865 855 83.00-93.00 87.94 High Dressing 375-380 lbs (378) 120.00-130.00 (125.03); 415-435 lbs 1 830-830 830 55.00 55.00 Low Dressing (428) 125.00-145.00 (132.45). Holstein Large 4 585-595 11 965-1315 1069 60.00-74.00 66.54 lbs (590) 60.00-83.00 (71.60). Feeder Heifers: Medium 10 905-1370 1132 76.00-84.00 79.00 High Dressing and Large 1-2 270-285 lbs (278) 179.00-189.00 (184.14); 2 925-1090 1008 50.00-53.00 51.38 Low Dressing 300-345 lbs (326) 155.00-184.00 (165.04); 350-395 Lean 85-90% Lean lbs (375) 150.00-163.00 (155.63); 400-445 lbs (427) 2 655-760 708 34.00 34.00 Low Dressing 144.00-160.00 (149.81); 450-495 lbs (471) 146.002 875-1030 953 47.00-50.00 48.62 156.00 (151.37); 500-545 lbs (526) 131.00-149.00 Slaughter Bulls Yield Grade 1-2 (141.04); 550-585 lbs (570) 132.50-145.00 (139.83); Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 600-645 lbs (623) 124.00-129.00 (125.62); 680-680 2 1100-1470 1285 91.00-94.00 92.72 High Dressing lbs (680) 120.00-123.00 (121.50); 700-745 lbs (719) 1 1530-1530 1530 85.00 85.00 117.00-120.00 (118.24); 775-785 lbs (782) 101.005 1740-2135 1939 92.00-98.50 95.21 High Dressing 108.00 (104.32). Small 1-2 205-225 lbs (215) 145.00Cows/Calf Pairs: (1) Medium 1 and 2 1025 lbs middle age cows with 185 lbs calves 150.00 (147.38); 280-285 lbs (283) 160.00-165.00 1075.00 per pair. (162.48); 310-330 lbs (320) 140.00-142.00 (140.97); 380-395 lbs (387) 145.00-148.00 (146.40); 405-435 Source: NC Dept of Ag-USDA Market News Service, Raleigh, NC lbs (421) 135.00-139.00 (135.83); 485-485 lbs (485)

12 6 5 3 7 10

350-395 415-435 450-495 515-525 600-640 660-695

372 115.00-148.00 131.24 427 130.00-145.00 138.66 474 135.00-147.00 139.72 520 125.00-138.00 132.63 624 111.00-127.00 120.48 674 110.00-121.00 118.04 Medium and Large 3 3 150-175 160 110.00-160.00 140.21 2 220-245 233 120.00-160.00 141.08 4 335-345 341 118.00-127.50 123.02 3 350-355 353 120.00-150.00 134.07 5 400-445 418 102.50-144.00 129.03 4 480-495 489 95.00-141.00 123.91 3 530-545 540 111.00-136.00 124.90 2 570-590 580 107.00-110.00 108.47 5 610-645 628 115.00-126.00 121.03 6 650-690 670 104.00-121.00 116.20 2 725-725 725 110.00-111.00 110.50 3 750-780 770 105.00-110.00 106.96 Feeder Bulls Medium and Large 1 - 2 Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 44 400-440 423 150.00-198.00 169.06 47 450-495 476 140.00-184.00 161.68 49 500-545 523 139.00-168.00 153.82 21 555-595 573 145.00-160.00 152.36 27 600-645 625 133.00-154.00 142.72 7 655-695 675 125.00-140.00 132.01 12 700-745 725 120.00-136.00 129.62 6 750-770 759 120.00-129.00 126.64 Small 1 - 2 12 400-445 419 105.00-154.00 134.90 10 450-490 478 122.00-145.00 131.78 7 500-535 511 120.00-149.00 136.35 10 550-595 576 115.00-145.00 135.21 6 600-645 614 113.00-130.00 119.16 2 650-680 665 113.00-120.00 116.58 2 842-842 842 90.00 90.00 Medium and Large 3 11 410-445 431 120.00-160.00 137.53 5 460-490 478 110.00-170.00 130.33 4 560-597 584 116.00-141.00 126.47 2 620-640 630 100.00-105.00 102.46 3 705-705 705 103.00-122.00 111.67 Slaughter Cows Breaker 70-80% Lean Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 15 1085-1395 1266 75.00-83.00 79.85 16 1430-1790 1600 73.00-82.00 79.38 2 1610-1795 1703 84.00-85.00 84.53 High Dressing Boner 80-85% Lean 16 195-895 760 73.50-83.00 77.35 75 905-1380 1156 70.00-83.00 76.93 3 1155-1385 1233 83.50-85.00 84.44 High Dressing 23 1400-1980 1536 71.00-83.00 78.26 Lean 85-90% Lean 2 135-760 448 68.00-70.00 69.70 3 580-760 662 44.00-53.00 50.08 Low Dressing 5 850-1100 978 67.50-71.00 68.58 25 810-1395 1014 46.00-68.00 62.15 Low Dressing 3 1525-1635 1593 68.00-78.00 71.39 Other Cows Medium and Large 1 - 2 Young Head Wt Range Avg Wt Price Range Avg Price 5 935-1005 960 66.50-89.00 77.15 Medium and Large 1 - 2 Middle Aged 3 1010-1190 1077 62.00-79.50 73.23 Small 1 - 2 Young 2 635-645 640 76.00-95.00 85.57 Cows/Calf Pairs: (5) Small 1 and 2 695 lbs middle age cows with 130 lbs calves 840.00 per pair. Medium 1 and 2 860-1120 lbs middle age cows with 120-300 lbs calves 920.00-1190.00 per pair.

136.00-143.00 (139.00); 515-530 lbs (523) 125.00129.00 (126.97). Medium and Large 3 205-240 lbs (226) 115.00-135.00 (120.15); 350-395 lbs (371) 112.00-138.00 (124.81); 515-530 lbs (523) 110.00112.00 (110.99); 555-590 lbs (570) 60.50-121.00 (90.06); 633-633 lbs (633) 115.50 (115.50); 665-665 lbs (665) 75.00 (75.00). Feeder Bulls: Medium and Large 1-2 400-445 lbs (419) 175.00-185.00 (180.66); 450-495 lbs (468) 165.00-181.00 (169.77); 500-545 lbs (520) 154.00-167.00 (157.85); 550-590 lbs (569) 145.00-155.50 (149.86); 610-645 lbs (627) 132.00140.00 (137.03); 655-695 lbs (673) 125.00-133.00 (129.84); 720-730 lbs (725) 125.00-127.00 (125.99); 750-795 lbs (768) 115.00-122.00 (117.20); 815-820 lbs (818) 114.00-115.00 (114.50). Medium and Large 3 400-445 lbs (417) 115.00-138.00 (128.21); 515-540 lbs (531) 90.00-135.00 (122.85); 560-585 lbs (571) 110.00128.00 (122.66); 650-690 lbs (670) 115.00 (115.00). Bred Cows: Medium and Large 1-2 Young 730-895 lbs (814) 630.00-850.00 per head 4-6 months bred (763.05); 900-1110 lbs (998) 725.00-890.00 per head 4-6 months bred (798.46). Medium and Large 1-2 Young 770-855 lbs (813) 770.00-820.00 per head 7-9 months bred (796.31); 915-1170 lbs (1032) 770.00-1090.00 per head 7-9 months bred (894.55); 1260-1305 lbs (1283) 925.00-975.00 per head 7-9 months bred (950.44). Medium and Large 1-2 Middle Aged 925-1000 lbs (963) 700.00-735.00 per head 1-3 months bred (716.82). 695880 lbs (809) 645.00-745.00 per head 4-6 months bred (695.22); 1025-1050 lbs (1038) 765.00-785.00 per head 4-6 months bred (774.88). Slaughter Cows: Breaker 7080 percent lean 1145-1345 lbs (1260) 77.50-80 (78.53); 1405-1890 lbs (1565) 78.00-84.50 (81.61). Boner 80-85 percent lean 955-1370 lbs (1127) 74.50-83.50 (79.14); 1200-1390 lbs high dressing (1294) 84.00-85.50 (84.69); 1425-1520 lbs (1473) 79.00-81.00 (80.03). Lean 85-90 percent lean 670-795 lbs low dressing (733) 70.00-71.00 (70.46); 815-1220 lbs (1007) 70.50-76.50 (72.65); 8051130 lbs low dressing (937) 62.00-69.50 (65.92). (5) HOGS: Barrows-Gilts U S 2-4 205-345 lbs 76.00-85.00, Sows U S 3-4 455-720 lbs 66.00-74.00, B B Q PIGS 105-195 lbs 69.00-78.00.(53)GOATS: KIDS 1 20-40 lbs 50.00-55.00, KIDS 1 40-60 lbs 65.00-75.00, KIDS 1 60-80 lbs 92.50-95.00, KIDS 2 20-40 lbs 40.00-47.50, NANNIES 1 100-140 lbs 112.50-117.50, NANNIES 1 140-180 lbs 140.00-162.50, BILLIES 1 70-100 lbs 110.00-127.50, BILLIES 1 100-150 lbs 135.00-152.50, BILLIES 1 150-250 lbs 160.00-175.00. Source: SC Dept of Ag-USDA Market News Service.


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Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Jonathan Austin/Yancey County News

Photo by Brett Hopson


Feb. 2, 2012

Limited free quit-smoking assistance available If your New Year’s resolution was to quit tobacco for good, you don’t have to do it alone. QuitlineNC, the state’s tollfree telephone support service to help tobacco users quit, is making nicotine replacement therapy (patches, gum or lozenges) available at no cost for a limited time for North Carolina residents who enroll in quit coaching. Funds for the medication came from this year’s one-time transfer of money to the Department of Health and Human Services from the former Health and Wellness Trust Fund. “Despite the General Assembly’s elimination of the Health and Wellness Trust Fund, we are able to continue putting those dollars to work to reduce smoking rates and improve health in North Carolina,” Governor Bev Perdue said. “This is a great opportunity for citizens to get the support they need to make a healthy lifestyle change in 2012.” The Health and Wellness Trust Fund was established in 2001 to invest North

Carolina’s portion of the Tobacco Master Settlement Agreement in improving the health of all North Carolinians. A key mission was to prevent, reduce and remedy the effects of tobacco use. The General Assembly transferred funding to DHHS for only one year to continue HWTF’s programs in four areas. The QuitlineNC was not listed as one of the four areas, but the administration believes that funding for QuitlineNC is essential to improving the health of the state. The supply of nicotine replacement therapy includes enough for more than 9,500 residents and will be available on a first-come, first-serve basis. North Carolinians ready to quit smoking in 2012 may call the QuitlineNC at 1-800-QUIT-NOW (1-800784-8669) any time from 6 a.m. until 3 a.m., seven days a week, to sign up for overthe-counter medication and support. Callers who sign up for the four-call program will develop a personalized quit plan with a quit coach and

may receive up to eight weeks of medication mailed to their homes. Health officials say the combination of Quitline support and medication is a proven way to increase the odds that tobacco users will quit for good. “Nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) has been proven in well-designed research studies to significantly increase quit rates when used in combination with cessation counseling,” State Health Director Jeff Engel said. “In fact, in 2010, six-month quit rates for QuitlineNC callers who used nicotine patches and coaching for eight weeks were twice as high as those who received coaching with little or no nicotine therapy.” QuitlineNC has provided North Carolina tobacco users with telephone quit coaching since 2005. More than 9,840 people used the service during 2010. QuitlineNC is offered in English and Spanish, with translation services available for other languages.

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 9

WOW!

Pulitzer-winning poet to speak in Asheville N a t a s h a Tretheway, one of A m e r i c a ’s m o s t acclaimed poets and a compelling speaker, will offer a reading and talk at 7 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 23, in UNC Asheville’s Humanities Lecture Hall. This event is free and open to the public. Tretheway won the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for “Native

Guard” (2006, Houghton Mifflin). The title poem of this collection recalls one of the first black Confederate regiments mustered during the Civil War. The regiment was organized in New Orleans, but later stationed on an island near Trethewey’s hometown of Gulfport, Miss. “Native Guard,”

Trethewey’s third published collection, also contains poems examining feelings in Mississippi about Tretheway’s biracial heritage. Her parents travelled to Ohio to marry because they could not legally do so in their home state. Tretheway “has a gift for squeezing the contradictions of the South into very tightly controlled

Tax appeal being heard by mediator From the front

Bennett said the mediation began Jan. 13, before an appeals court judge who traveled to Burnsville for the session. “Bob Hunter is the mediator. He’s an appellate judge” from Marion. “The Court of Appeals, they have a policy where they strongly recommend mediation,” Bennett said. And has any progress been made? “There’s been considerable discussions,” Bennett said. “We believe that a resolution

is hopefully at hand. We’re just looking for a reasonable outcome for all parties.” He said the parties in the mediation were in separate rooms, with the mediator going from group to group presenting options that had been broached.

“I think progress has been made,” he said. “It is continuing to be discussed between all parties.” Involved in the mediation are not only the county and development o w n e r s , b u t “t h e country club itself and the homeowner’s association.”

lines,” according to a Washington Post review. In her UNC Asheville appearance, Trethewey will likely present poems from her newest collection, to be released this fall, which is concerned with colonialism in the Americas. “My obsessions stay the same – historical memory and historical erasure,” said Trethewey.

Anyone who went to the Mountain Heritage-Mitchell basketball games Tuesday night got a bonus if they decided to gas up at the Ingles in Spruce Pine, where gasoline prices were 30 cents lower than in Burnsville.


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Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

What’stoeatattheelementaryschools? Friday, Feb 3

Monday, Feb 6

Tues Feb 7

Wed Feb 8

Thurs Feb 9

Friday, Feb 10

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pancakes Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pancake&Sausage Stick/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Scrambled Eggs/ Toast/ Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Turkey Pie/BBQ S’wich/Sunbutter w/ Jelly S’wich/Baked Potatoes/Carrots/ Mandarin Oranges/ Pineapple Bits Milk

Chix Fillet San’wich/ Hamburger Steak/ Roll/SunBut’r S’Wich w/Jelly/Mixed Veggies/ Potato Rounds/Baked Apples/Pineapple Bits/ Milk

Lunch Chix Taco Salad/ Corn Dog/Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/Salad/ Peas/Peaches/Pears/ Milk

Lunch BBQ San’wich/ Fish San’wich/ Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/Slaw/B. Beans/Applesauce/ Mandarin Oranges Milk

Lunch Lasagna/Roll/Chix San’wich/ Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/ Salad/Corn/Fruit/ Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Sloppy Joe’s/ Chix Quesadillas/ Sunbutter w/Jelly S’wich/Cali Veggies/ Pinto Beans/Peaches/ Pears Milk

Lunch

Food for thought for middle school Friday, Feb 3

Monday, Feb 6

Tuesday, Feb 7

Wed., Feb 8

Thurs Nov Feb 9

Friday, Feb 10

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit/ Breakfast Pizza Cereal/Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Pancakes/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Pancakes/ Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Waffles Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pancake&Sausage Stick/ Breakfast Pizza/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit/Biscuit w/Jelly Cereal/Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch Turkey Pie/BBQ S’Wich/Chix Tender Biscuit/ Baked Potatoes/Carrots/ Mandarin Oranges/ Pineapple Bits Milk

Chix Fillet San’wich/ Hamburger Steak/ Roll/Chix Fingers/ Mixed Veggies/Potato Rounds/Baked Apples/ Pineapple Bits/ Milk

Lunch

Lunch Chix Taco Salad/ Corn Dog/Chix Quesadilla/Salad/ Peas/Peaches/Pears/ Milk

Lunch BBQ San’wich/Fish San’wich/Stuffed Crust Pizza/Slaw/B. Beans/Applesauce/ Mandarin Oranges Milk

Lunch Lasagna/Roll/Chix San’wich/ Chix Tenders/Salad/Corn/ Fruit/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Sloppy Joe’s/Chix Quesadillas/Stuffed Crust Pizza/Cali Veggies/Pinto Beans/ Peaches/Pears Milk

Chowing down at Mountain Heritage Friday, Feb 3

Monday, Feb 6

Tuesday, Feb 7

Wed., Feb 8

Thurs., Feb 9

Friday, Feb 10

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit/ Breakfast Pizza Cereal/Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza Pancakes/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit Pancakes/ Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Waffles Breakfast Pizza Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Pancake&Sausage Stick/ Breakfast Pizza/Cereal Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit/Biscuit w/Jelly Cereal/Animal Crackers Juice/Fruit/Milk

Lunch

Lunch Chix Taco Salad/ Corn Dog/Chix Quesadilla/Salad/ Peas/Peaches/Pears/ Milk

Lunch BBQ San’wich/Fish San’wich/Stuffed Crust Pizza/Slaw/B. Beans/Applesauce/ Mandarin Oranges Milk

Lunch Lasagna/Roll/Chix San’wich/ Chix Tenders/Salad/Corn/ Fruit/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Sloppy Joe’s/Chix Quesadillas/Stuffed Crust Pizza/Cali Veggies/Pinto Beans/ Peaches/Pears Milk

Lunch Turkey Pie/BBQ S’Wich/Chix Tender Biscuit/ Baked Potatoes/Carrots/ Mandarin Oranges/ Pineapple Bits Milk

Chix Fillet San’wich/ Hamburger Steak/ Roll/Chix Fingers/ Mixed Veggies/Potato Rounds/Baked Apples/ Pineapple Bits/ Milk

Teachers and principals! Share your good news here, for all to see! Email school news to Jonathan@yanceycountynews.com


Feb. 2, 2012

Stalking the wild Nutria

I headed out to the duck blind early. It was about 6am, another 45 minutes before shooting time. I spotted some a commotion deeper in the swamp. I adjusted my LED Lenser headlamp from wide angle light to a spotlight. I saw a bunched up brushy area ahead. It was likely a beaver hut. I scanned the water and could see ripples, but I could not find the source. Shooting light came and after a 20 minute span of high flying wood ducks and ringnecks I knew the hunt was likely over except for just a few stragglers and maybe some Canadian geese. Down near the beaver hut I saw some more ripples. I figured it could be a grebe, merganser, or maybe a woodie swimming from deeper in the swamp. Nope. Dead wrong. I caught the furry head. Trailing was a motion filled ‘S’. Not a beaver. But it was huge. Nutria usually make their homes in holes they build on the shoreline. Often, their digging will tear and expose roots. This particular one had not made a home of the beaver den; rather it seemed curious as to whether it was occupied. Nutria are as rat-like as it gets. Their long tail is round and slender like a rat, rather than the waffle shape of a beaver. Their head has rat features other than being much larger and having a blunt nose. Also unlike a beaver, its fur is of different lengths and appears unkempt. They were introduced to North America, relocated from South America, due to the fur trade industry. They were valued for both their meat and their hides. Once the value of the fur increased to a premium, at one time as valuable as mink, farmers found a way to raise them. They were easy to keep, had large litters, and females could breed the day after giving birth. Due to the farming of the nutria, the fur become over abundant and the value plummeted. A hurricane hit the Southeast and many of the farmed nutria escaped. Like many invasive species, they began to take over their habitats. Nutria feed only on

Bill Howard’s

Outdoors

the bottom of saplings and plants, leaving over 80% of the plant useless. They choked out the muskrat, as they shared habitats and dens. And with the beaver falling to near extinction, the nutria’s breeding habits, able to give birth nearly three times in a calendar year, the nutria overwhelmed many areas. If you know where to look, you can find nutria in nearly any southern state, and they range as far north as Ohio. They can expand further north if there are subsequent mild winters. The only barrier is they tend to get frostbite on their tails, causing infection and death. As mentioned prior, I took note of where I saw the nutria and the time. The next time I would be in the water, the bow would be in hand rather than the shotgun. A couple of days later, the nutria had a head start on me. As I was headed to where the blind was, I saw him already swimming well ahead as the water and air was clear. I positioned myself near the blind and could see it still swimming amongst the trees in the swamp. It only took 15 minutes for it to become curious enough to see what I was. Once it was in range, about 20 yards, I released the arrow towards its mark. No thrashing, no circling, no fighting. Just a roll over and the arrow was sticking nearly straight up. Once there, I had to look to see if it was a beaver and not a nutria. It was as huge up close as it looked the other day. I pulled it into the boat and headed to shore. This was by far the largest I have taken. B i l l H o w a rd i s a H u n t e r Education and a Bowhunter Education Instructor, a wildlife representative and the BCRS program chairman for the North Carolina Bowhunters Association, and an avid outdoorsman. He can be reached at billhoward outdoors@gmail.com.

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 11

Tax time means conservation funding time Helping conserve North Carolina’s nongame and endangered wildlife species is as simple as checking a box. By checking line 28 on your North Carolina State Income tax form this year, you can help the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission fund research, conservation and monitoring projects that benefit animals not hunted or fished. Every dollar of your tax check-off donation goes to the Commission’s Nongame and Endangered Wildlife Fund, where it matches federal and other grants, or is used to fund educational activities and watchable-wildlife projects like the North Carolina Birding Trail. Tax check-off donations are particularly important because they provide the largest and most significant source of state funding for nongame projects, said Chris McGrath, the Wildlife Diversity Program coordinator in the agency’s Wildlife Management Division. “Every dollar we receive in donations — whether it’s through the state income tax check-off, license plate registration or other means — is absolutely critical in helping us continue our work,” McGrath said. “In addition to matching other grants for nongame wildlife research, monitoring or habitat management, these funds are the only source available to produce informational materials, conduct events that connect the public to wildlife, or support wildlife-viewing opportunities and partnerships.” Over the years, projects conducted by wildlife diversity biologists have led to restoration of animals that were once considered critically endangered, such as the bald eagle and peregrine falcon. Conversely, biologists have worked with animals that aren’t yet endangered, such as the box turtle, freshwater mussels and many species of songbirds, to ensure that their populations remain viable and sustainable. In fact, much of the work biologists do today helps maintain viable, self-sustaining populations of all native wildlife, with an emphasis on priority species and habitats identified in North Carolina’s Wildlife Action Plan. They have conducted numerous surveys to determine the abundance and distribution of many species across the state — from Carolina northern flying squirrels that glide through the high-elevation forests of western North Carolina to robust redhorse, a fish that swims only in the Pee Dee River basin to colonial waterbirds that nest and raise their young on beaches and dredge islands along the coast.


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Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

CLASSIFIEDS

WANTED TO BUY

Need Cash? Got Clothes, Furniture, Household items? Planning a yard sale? Call 8928-284-9449. I will buy good condition items. No calls on Sunday of after 8 pm. Thanks. 10” - 12” Dewalt Radial Arm Saw, Wood Turning Lathe with variable speed and indexing head. Floor stand drill press with crank platform,16” band saw. Willing to pay for good value. 682-4439.

FOR SALE

4 Basenti Mixed Pups. ¾ blood, 3 months old. Dating from Bible times with child-like characteristics. Extremely clever, agile and kinship to houdini. Can be trained to tree squirrells or anything that moves on the ground. Without fear, long life span, no body odor, short hair, 30 pounds. Black and white, red and white, or red, black and white.Vet checked and first shots. A good inside dog that doesn’t bark much. $220/each.

727-687-1733

LAND FOR SALE

6.29 acres land plus 3 bedroom, 2 bath Mobile home for sale in Ramseytownship. Will finance with 10% downpayment. Listed at $110,000. 828-329-4958 1999 Toyota Camry, good condition, needs shocks. $1,950. Please call 828-208-7137

HELP WANTED

Homemaker/companion caregivers needed. Part time/full time for Burnsville and surrounding areas. Must have clean background, pass a drug test, and have reliable transportation. (828) 665-3922 Mitchell-Yancey Habitat would like a part time Volunteer Coordinator. Responsible for the recruitment and coordination of volunteers for the ReStore and Worksite. Working with individuals organizations and churches. 20 hr per month at $10 hr. Computer and

Good People skills required. If interested call Donna Thomas 828-766-9000. CNA I and II positions available. Part time/full time for Burnsville and surrounding areas. Must have clean background, pass a drug test, and have reliable transportation. (828) 665-3922 BOOTH Available in Busy Salon. Call 828-682-1288.

MISSING DOG

2 Year Old Female White Husky. Answers to Eryn (Aaron) Has one blue eye and one brown eye. $100.00 REWARD if returned safely. Missing since January 20, 2012 from Burnsville area. Please call 828-682-6008 or 828-284-8661 if you have any information. Please leave message if no answer.

SERVICES

Start your New Year off right! OUT with the OLD and IN with the NEW! Clean out those closets, donate to your favorite charity or list those items for sales here! FIFTY words for only FIVE DOLLARS! Call Susan to place your ad today! 678-3900. Willing to sit with the elderly. Can run (local) errands, do light housekeeping. Have references. Please call 828-682-7504. Leave message if no answer. Attention Snow Birds! Do you find yourself wondering if the beautiful mountain home you leave empty as you fly “south” for the cold winter months is safe, well maintained and protected? Wouldn’t you feel great if you knew your house were safe in the hands of a mature, professional house sitter? And what if that person would then be willing to fly to your additional home for those hot summer months as you return to the beautiful mountains of Yancey County? If this is an appealing idea, please drop an email to Susan@ yanceycountynews.com. Please use the subject line House Sitter.

Sewing alterations. Call 208-3999. Neighbors helping Neighbors, a Bolens Creek Community Project. Call 208-3999. GRADING EXCAVATING HAULING - RICE Grading and Hauling: Land Clearing, Roads, Ponds, Home Sites, Erosion Control, Gravel, Fill Dirt, Mulch, Septic Systems & Repair, Retaining Walls. FREE ESTIMATES. Firewood for sale! Call Tim Rice Burnsville 828-284-2979. It’s time to renew your subscription to the ONLY LOCALLY OWNED NEWSPAPER in beautiful YANCEY County! We are grateful to the ones who have already done so, and look forward to a maintaining our relationship with the many friends. Subscribe online at www.yanceycountynews.com, or drop us a check to 132 W. Main St., Burnsville, NC 28714. Our phone is 678-3900!

PLEASE HELP A Donation Fund has been set up at United Community Bank for Johnny Crain. He is in the last stages of Leukemia and Bone Cancer. He has no insurance. Name of Fund is Crain Hardship Fund. Please help our Neighbor in Need.


Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 13

Family

There’s a disconnect between Tough times for charity research and practice By John Rosemond

The media recently reported “new” research findings to the effect that rewards often backfire and selfLiving esteem is not the wonderful, uplifting personal attribute once thought. As a result, schools are rethinking their with teaching and classroom management philosophies. Wrong again! Research showing children that rewards often backfire and revealing the dark side of selfesteem has been available for quite some are never satisfied with any degree of time. Furthermore, the Internet permits catering. Concerning rewards, it has been anyone who is interested to access this information. This supposedly “new” known for quite some time that rewards stuff simply illustrates the disconnect often depress achievement levels. between research and practice in Likewise, people with high self-esteem American education. More directly put, tend to perform below their level of educational methodology is more driven ability. Why? Because they believe that by fad than fact. In effect, the classroom anything they do is worthy of merit; is in many ways a laboratory within therefore, they do the minimum, if that. A recent conversation with a Navy which experiments are conducted using commander illustrates the point. He children as guinea pigs. Was objective research done to verify told me that he deals “all the time” with the efficacy of the so-called “Open young recruits who believe that they Classroom” before that particular should be rewarded for whatever they philosophy captured America’s schools do, whenever they do it, even if they do in the early 1970s? No. Somebody nothing more than what is minimally sold an idea to a bunch of education expected of them. They have acquired bureaucrats and millions of dollars of this very entitled, uncooperative attitude the taxpayers’ money was wasted as from their parents and the schools they a consequence. How about Outcome- attended. Their parents can be forgiven. Based Education? Again, the research They were simply doing what Parents’ done to validate that particular flop was Magazine and other publications and of the sort my experimental methods talking heads told them to do. Educators, professor would have used to illustrate on the other hand, should have had the sloppy research methods. And again, wherewithal to ask the fundamental millions of dollars, etcetera. That’s question: Is there compelling evidence been pretty much the story of American that giving rewards for adequate or even improved performance actually education “reform” for forty years. For almost two decades, research improves academic achievement over done by people like Roy Baumeister of the long haul? Concerning classroom behavior, Florida State University has shown, as rewards often backfire. Give a child conclusively as social science research is capable of showing, that high self- who is aggressive during free play a esteem is associated with anti-social reward for not being aggressive for behavior. Think, for example, bullying. ten minutes and he is very likely to It appears that the higher one’s self- turn right around and be aggressive. regard, the lower his regard for others. He realizes, intuitively, that the only People with high self-regard believe reason he is being singled out for themselves to be entitled. What they a reward is precisely because he is want, they believe they deserve to have. aggressive; therefore, to keep the Because they deserve what they want, rewards coming he must continue to the ends justify the means. Think, for aggress. If school reform fads had paid off, example, Bernie Madoff. then today’s achievement levels would The functional attribute is one that went “out” with the rest of the bathwater be higher and classroom behavior in the 1960s: humility and modesty. would be better than they were in People who are humble pay attention the 1960s. The opposite is the case. to you. They try to figure out, in any The taxpayer is slowly catching on, situation, what they can do to help you evidenced by a growing revolt against and make you feel comfortable. It’s public education’s never-ending cry for about you, not the Almighty Them. On more money. Accountability can be a the other side of the equation, people painful thing. who possess high self-esteem want Family psychologist John people to pay attention to and do things Rosemond answers questions at for them. In fact, they tend to get upset if people don’t pay them attention and rosemond.com. cater to them. Furthermore, the folks in question are often malcontents who

From the front “Unfortunately, MANNA had to close a satellite branch in Franklin in 2011 because of redundancies in service and budget constraints,” said Joshua Stack, communications and marketing manager for MANNA. “However, service to our agencies in those areas has not diminished, and they continue to be adequately supplied by the food bank.” The strain of having to do more with less is forcing nonprofit leaders to both to look for ways to adapt to continue meeting needs and to proactively find solutions to funding and operational challenges. Demand up, money down Most nonprofits receive funding from a variety of sources, including private donors, community fundraising, federal and state grants, local government and the United Way. But as a result of the recession, local, state and federal governments have fewer funds and, in turn, have reduced funding to offer nonprofit organizations. The Giving USA Foundation and its research partner, the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, found that estimated total charitable contributions from individuals, corporations and foundations fell 3.6 percent between 2008 and 2009, from about $315 billion to slightly more than $303 billion. Donation levels rebounded somewhat in 2010, a report by the Association of Fundraising Professionals and the Center on Nonprofits and Philanthropy at the Urban Institute found. But, it continued, philanthropic giving still hadn’t reached prerecession levels. The United Way of Asheville and Buncombe County received $1.4 million more in requests last year than the agency had funds to provide, said Vicki Lloyd, director of marketing and communications. Requests for funds are examined each budget year and are distributed to specific areas outlined by the organization’s board of directors. “We moved our focus a couple of years ago to the areas of education, income and health,” Lloyd said. “Our goal is to make sure there are strong outcomes for our funding and that we are making a real difference in people’s lives.” The United Way’s 211 of Western North Carolina, a community service information line that links people to health and human services in Buncombe, Henderson, Madison and Transylvania counties, is receiving more calls from individuals seeking assistance for more complex situations, said 211 Director Rachael Nygaard. “We tend to have a broad picture of what is going on within the community, and what we are seeing is there is a significantly greater need within the community and a trend for nonprofits to do more with less,” Nygaard said. Trisha Lester, vice president of the N.C. Center for Nonprofits, acknowledges that dealing with challenging times like the current recession is the new reality for nonprofits. As a source of effective organizational practices for the state’s nonprofits, the center is able to look at the cumulative effect the economy, particularly cuts in funding, has had on agencies. “In 2008, many nonprofits took a step back and used the recession as an opportunity to look at their core services,” Lester said. “Those nonprofits have maintained vigor and great health and are not feeling the impact as much as some nonprofits. The smaller and younger nonprofits that do not have as much infrastructure as the older, more established ones may be having a more difficult time maintaining in this economic climate.” One of the wisest things a nonprofit can do to remain functional is to build up its operating reserves, she said. “The current state of the economy has shown that having a healthy operating reserve is critical,” Lester said. More nonprofits are coming together to share services, to search for efficiencies and to be good stewards of their available funds, she said. “When families have the stress of not having enough money, that causes conflict,” says Laura Jeffords, executive director of the center, a nonprofit founded in 1983 to help individuals and families deal with conflict. “There is a clear coalition with domestic violence and stressful financial situations.”


14

Feb. 2, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Legal Notices NOTICE OF SERVICE OF PROCESS BY PUBLICATION

STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA COUNTY OF YANCEY GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION FILE NO.: 12 CVD 11 Cordella Lee Fox, Plaintiff Vs. Alvin Patrick Ayers, Defendant TO: Alvin Patrick Ayers TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the above entitled action. The nature of the relief sought is as follows: Absolute divorce. You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than 7 March 2012, being 40 days from the date of the first publication of this Notice and upon your failure to do so, the Plaintiff will seek the relief sought by the pleading. This the 19th day of January, 2012. Nycole R. Howard. Attorney for Plaintiff Post Office Box 746 Burnsville, North Carolina 28714 (828) 682-4955 Published: January 26, February 2, 9, 2012. ___________________________ LEGAL NOTICE THE GREAT STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA IN THE COUNTY OF YANCEY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION 11 CvD 207 YANCEY COUNTY, a Body Politic, and Corporate of the Great State of North Carolina, Plaintiff Vs. NOTICE OF SALE JANA CARPENTER, Defendant UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of that Default Judgment and Order of Sale signed by the Honorable Tammy R. McEntyre, Clerk of Superior Court for Yancey County, North Carolina, dated 11 January 2012, and entered in the above captioned

proceeding, Donny J. Laws, Commissioner, will expose for sale at public auction on the 15th day of February 2012 at 2:30 o’clock p.m. at the front door of the Yancey County Courthouse in Burnsville, North Carolina, the following described real property: LOTS NUMBER 7A and 7B located in Jacks Creek township, Yancey County, North Carolina, as shown on a plat by K. O. Pankow, dated 27th of November 1972, recorded in Yancey County Map Book 1, Page 198, and reference is hereby made to such public record for a more definite description. AND BEING a portion of the land described in a Deed dated 25th of February 1972 from F. Marion Harrelson and wife, Vera Harrleson to Horseshoe Highlands, Inc., recorded in Yancey County Deed Book 148, Page 175. FOR TITLE REFERENCE: See Yancey County Deed Book 229, Page 713. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED ABOVE shall be sold in fee simple, free and clear of all interests, rights, claims, and liens whatever except that the sale shall be subject to taxes the amount of which cannot be definitely determined at the time of the judgment referenced herein above, and taxes and special assessments of taxing units which are not parties to the action ANY SUCCESSFUL BIDDER may be required to deposit with the Clerk of Superior Court for Yancey County immediately upon the conclusion of the sale a cash deposit of twenty percent (20%) of the prevailing bid. THE SALE WILL BE MADE SUBJECT to all applicable provisions of NC Gen. Stat. 105-374 and Article 29A of the North Carolina General Statutes. This the 25th day of January 2012. ________________________________ DONNY J. LAWS, Commissioner 131 East Main Court, Suite D PO Box 397, Burnsville, NC 28714 828) 682-9645 POSTED at the door of the Yancey County Courthouse in Burnsville, North Carolina, on this the 25th day of January 2012. _______________________________ DONNY J. LAWS, Commissioner 131 East Main Court, Suite D PO Box 397, Burnsville, NC 28714 (828) 682-9645 ________________________________ LEGAL NOTICE THE GREAT STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA IN THE COUNTY OF YANCEY IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE DISTRICT COURT DIVISION 11 CvD 206 YANCEY COUNTY, a Body Politic, and Corporate of the Great State of North Carolina, Plaintiff

Vs. NOTICE OF SALE IN ANN RYTHER; WILLIAM H. MATTINGLEY; THE HEIRS AT LAW OF QUINN M. CARDWELL, DECEASED; THE HEIRS AT LAW OF ROSE M. MATTINGLEY, DECEASED, Defendants UNDER AND BY VIRTUE of that Default Judgment and Order of Sale signed by the Honorable Tammy R. McEntyre, Clerk of Superior Court for Yancey County, North Carolina, dated 11 January 2012, and entered in the above captioned proceeding, Donny J. Laws, Commissioner, will expose for sale at public auction on the 15th day of February 2012 at 2:00 o’clock p.m. at the front door of the Yancey County Courthouse in Burnsville, North Carolina, the following described real property: THAT TRACT or parcel of land lying and being situated in Jacks Creek Township, Yancey County, North Carolina, consisting of ten tracts within English Hills subdivision, together with all appurtenances thereto, which such property is more particularly described by metes and bounds in that Deed dated 4 September 1972 from C. L. Byrd, et al. to Quinn M. Cardwell and Rose M. Mattingley, recorded of record at Yancey County Deed Book 149, Page 447, to which referenced is hereby made for a more particular description of the same as if set forth fully herein. THE PROPERTY DESCRIBED ABOVE shall be sold in fee simple, free and clear of all interests, rights, claims, and liens whatever except that the sale shall be subject to taxes the amount of which cannot be definitely determined at the time of the judgment referenced herein above, and taxes and special assessments of taxing units which are not parties to the action ANY SUCCESSFUL BIDDER may be required to deposit with the Clerk of Superior Court for Yancey County immediately upon the conclusion of the sale a cash deposit of twenty percent (20%) of the prevailing bid. THE SALE WILL BE MADE SUBJECT to all applicable provisions of NC Gen. Stat. 105-374 and Article 29A of the North Carolina General Statutes. This the 25th day of January 2012. ________________________________ DONNY J. LAWS, Commissioner 131 East Main Court, Suite D PO Box 397, Burnsville, NC 28714 828) 682-9645

THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE, YANCEY COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION Administrator / Executor notice Having qualified as Executor of the estate of Frank E. Macpherson of Yancey County of North Carolina, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the estate of said deceased to present them to the undersigned on or before 19th day of April 2012 or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This the 19th day of January 2012 Gwendolyn Green Macpherson Atty: Staunton Norris PA 151 Turkey Trot Lane Burnsville, NC 28714 1/19, 1/26, 2/2, 2/9, 2012 IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE, YANCEY COUNTY, NORTH CAROLINA SUPERIOR COURT DIVISION Administrator / Executor notice Having qualified as Executor of the estate of Edward Francis Belmont of Yancey County of North Carolina, this is to notify all persons, firms and corporations having claims against the estate of said deceased to present them to the undersigned on or before 19th day of April 2012 or this notice will be pleaded in bar of their recovery. All persons indebted to said estate please make immediate payment. This the 19th day of January 2012 Brenda Dargan 3945 Heavenside Ct. Orange Park, Fla. 32073

1/19, 1/26, 2/2, 2/9, 2012

POSTED at the door of the Yancey County Courthouse in Burnsville, North Carolina, on this the 25th day of January 2012. _______________________________ DONNY J. LAWS, Commissioner 131 East Main Court, Suite D PO Box 397, Burnsville, NC 28714 (828) 682-9645 ________________________________

Pottery class at MCC

Functional Pottery (48 Hours) Class will incorporate hand-building and wheel throwing with an emphasis on form and decorating techniques. Learn to use slips, alter thrown pieces, glaze your pieces, and explore the many combinations possible with glazing techniques. Beginners welcome! Classes are held at Yancey Center for Ceramic Art (YCCA). Please call 682-7315 for information. Additional fees to be paid to YCCA on the first day of class include: $45 Lab fee, $20 Firing fee, Clay fee $14 per 25 lbs, optional Tool Kit $18.50. Class begins February 21, at 9 AM at the Yancey Center for Ceramic Art (YCCA). F o r m o r e information visit www.mayland.edu and click on the Continuing Education link or call 682-7315.

Lucille Peterson celebrates Lucille Peterson celebrated her 90th birthday on Sunday, Jan. 22, 2012, with her family and friends. Thanks to all who came out to make this a very special day.


Jan. 26, 2012

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 15

Some guidance on a gluten-free diet

By Medea L Galligan Gluten, a protein found in grains such as wheat, rye, barley, and spelt, wreaks havoc in people with celiac disease, triggering an immune reaction that damages the small intestine and prevents absorption of nutrients. According to statistics from the University of Chicago Celiac Disease Center, an average of one out of every 133 otherwise healthy people in the United States suffer from celiac disease (CD), but previous studies have found that this number may be as high as 1 in 33 in at-risk populations. Those with celiac disease must avoid gluten to manage the condition, but according to the latest studies, there is an epidemic of people with hidden intolerance to wheat products and gluten who would benefit from avoiding it entirely as well. For many people, when they eliminate all gluten from their diets, they see a noticeable improvement in their energy and overall well-being.

So why is gluten bad for us? Gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, contain gliadin molecules. When gliadin in gluten becomes water soluble, it is free to bind to cells in your body. If you are sensitive, your body will make antibodies to gliadin and attack the cells gliadin has attached itself to, treating those cells as an infection. This immune response damages surrounding tissue and has the potential to set off, or exacerbate, MANY other health problems throughout your body, which is why gluten can have such a devastating effect on your overall health. Since gluten often hides in processed foods like ready-made soups, soy sauce, candies, cold cuts, and various low- and no-fat products, as well as refined grain products like bread, pizza crust, pasta, cookies and pastries, when you cut all of these foods from your diet, you end up cutting out primarily refined carbohydrates, which are likely to result in weight gain and obesity. So it’s very possible that switching to a gluten-free diet could help you lose weight, particularly if you’ve been eating a lot of refined gluten-containing foods. When eating gluten-free, however, you need to be careful that you’re replacing the gluten-containing foods with healthy choices, like vegetables and other whole foods. If you instead opt for gluten-free processed foods, like the wide assortment of gluten-free cookies, pasta and breads that are now commercially available, there’s a good chance that you will not lose weight, and may actually gain instead. To lose weight effectively, you’ve still got to follow the principles of a healthy diet, which includes avoiding gluten-containing grains and focusing on whole food choices, not processed alternatives. Which grains are naturally gluten-free? • Rice (white and brown, brown is unrefined, being a much healthier choice) • Corn (only have non GMO, try blue cornmeal for variety) • Quinoa (contains a balanced set of essential amino acids, making it a complete protein) • Amaranth (high in protein, also high in the amino acid lysine) • Buckwheat (try soba, Japanese wheatfree noodles, or groats, for an oatmeal alternative) • Millet (rich in B vitamins, another great wheat-free grain) A Note About Oats Although the protein in oats is not the exact same problematic protein found in wheat, rye, barley and spelt, commercial oats have been found to contain gluten, possibly due to cross

contamination in the harvesting, storing and milling process. It is best to eliminate oats from your diet as well if you need to avoid gluten entirely.

So what other foods are gluten-free? 1. Lots of fresh (organic and local if possible) produce - good for everybody and the MOST important food group- dark leafy greens, brightly colored peppers, squashes, broccoli, etc, should be 80-90 percent of your meals. 2. Potatoes, try red or blue for variety, and sweet potatoes, parsnips, beets, burdock, and other root vegetables to create a satisfying gluten-free side dish, hearty soup, or in place of rice with stir fry or waterless cooked vegetables. 3. Eggs, poultry, beef (organic and grassfed), wild caught fish- lean, quality proteins should be 10-20 percent of your meals. 4. If you are NOT allergic to casein and whey (the two proteins found in milk), and NOT lactose intolerant (unable to digest lactose, the sugar present in milk), then plain organic yogurt is a great source of protein, calcium, and healthy probiotics. So is fresh organic goat cheese (chevre) and feta. Also look for an imported wedge of good Parmesan or aged cheddar; both are high in calcium and have zero lactose. Organic dairy can also count as a great source of protein in the place of meat or fish in a meal. 5. Legumes, Nuts, and Seeds are another great source of protein, as well as good fats, minerals, and fiber. Try tahini, made from sesame seeds, on a brown rice cake for a delicious snack, or use it in a variety of Middle Eastern dishes. Almonds and almond butter also provide a delicious, healthy snack and are wonderful additions in a number of dishes.

Black beans, pintos, garbonzo beans (chick peas), and lentils provide a limitless array of high protein, low fat dishes when paired with a gluten-free grain, waterless cooked veggies, and fresh or dried herbs, spices, and sea salt to taste. Patience Is A Virtue! The most important thing to remember when starting on a gluten-free diet is to take it one day at a time and be patient! Most people don’t feel better immediately, and it may take 30 to 60 days for the inflammation to subside, and up to 9 to 12 months for the lining of your small intestine to heal. On some occasions, an individual may experience significant improvement within weeks of eliminating gluten from their diet, but in other cases people may feel considerably worse upon initially starting a gluten-free diet, which may be due to other unidentified food allergies and food sensitivities. It’s important to stick with the plan, because by around 6 to 9 months of eliminating gluten from your diet noticeable physical and mental, and emotional changes will have taken place. I sincerely hope this article has provided you with information on how to reduce gluten in your diet. Medea L Galligan, a local holistic health coach, earned her Masters of Science in Nutrition from Oklahoma State University, and also attended the Institute for Integrative Nutrition’s Health Coach Training Program, located in New York City. Since 1998, she has helped thousands of people of all ages improve their health and well being through support and encouragement, exploring which foods are right for them, and assisting them in bringing back the joy of cooking and eating. Visit www.HealthyLifestyle Concepts.com for more information.

Try this high-value nutrient recipe By Medea L Galligan This recipe of Quinoa with mixed vegetable serves 8. Quinoa, (pronounced keen-wah) a staple of the Incas, is a gluten-free whole protein and a good source of phosphorus, magnesium, iron, and fiber. ½ cup quinoa 1 cup carrot juice 1 low-sodium vegetable bouillon cube (to make 2 cups broth) 2 cloves garlic, crushed 2 tablespoons flax oil 1 tablespoon extra-virgin olive oil ½ red onion, diced 2 stalks celery, diced 1 red bell pepper, diced 2 small zucchini, quartered lengthwise and diced small ½ teaspoon sea salt 4 scallions, sliced 1/2 cup canned chick peas ¼ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons chopped fresh parsley Wash quinoa well, drain, and place in a saucepan with carrot juice and bouillon cube. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to maintain a steady simmer. Cover and cook for 15 minutes, or until liquid is absorbed. Remove from heat and set aside. Combine garlic with flax oil and set aside. Heat olive oil in a large, heavy pot and add onion, celery, and bell pepper, stirring constantly. As soon as mixture heats up, add zucchini and salt,

stirring constantly. When mixture is heated through and zucchini is wilted slightly, add quinoa. Stir well, then add scallions, chick peas and pepper. Remove from heat and stir in garlic and flax oil. Serve at once, generously garnished with chopped parsley. PER SERVING:115 cal, 46% fat cal, 6g fat, 1g sat fat, 0mg chol, 3g protein, 13g carb, 2g fiber, 204mg sodium.


16 Feb. 2, 2012 • yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Six honored as Trillium Court at MHHS

Delaney Trimble, escorted by Dean Trimble

Lexi Banks, escorted by Randy Banks

Whitney Bowers, escorted by Teddy Bowers

Lauren Evoy, escorted by Mickey Swann

Athena Theodorides, escorted by Yanni Theodorides

Ashleigh Bradford, escored by Levi Bradford

Trillium Queen Lexi Banks

2011 Queen Cassie Leadbitter

Alexa Butner, escorted by Ryan Butner


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