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Look inside for...

Mulch those leaves Enjoy the for a great garden Sudoku!

Defending the animal shelter

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Yancey County News Crabtree - Egypt - Green Mountain - Jacks Creek

Brush Creek - Burnsville - Cane River

Pensacola - Price’s Creek - Ramseytown - South Toe

www.yanceycountynews.com vTo be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard.v Nov. 21, 2013 • Vol. 3, No. 47 v Recipient of the E.W. Scripps Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment v

Tax letter rattles some area artists

By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News

As the region’s artists gear up for the crafts tour, some are scratching their heads, distressed over a letter many have received from the county tax administration seeking information on the business personal property used by the artists and small businesses. The note reminds the business owner that they must fill out a business personal property listing abstract, which will be used to determine the amount of taxes due on the property in 2014. Some artists have told this newspaper they

fear they are being singled out for the business personal property tax, and wonder if other small businesses are receiving the letters. Denise Cook, executive director of the Toe River Arts Council, said the council is “trying to understand what is happening to our artists” as they stress over the property reporting requirements. “The artists want to do things the right way. They really want to be in compliance with the law,” she said. Representatives from TRAC have met with county tax officials to better understand the requirements for artists in reporting on their business personal property. “They said

you have to report everything; supplies and inventory,” Cook said. She said the tax requirement makes artists and craftspeople have to determine “how you define yourself. If you’re going to sell something, then the state and the county say you are required to fill out this form.” Cook said a focus on taxing the materials used to create art “makes it hard for the people who just sell occasionally. It kind of discourages small business development, but on the flip side, why should certain sectors be exempt? It is a double-edged sword.” See page 7

Pritchard murder trial set

By Jonathan Austin Yancey County News Trial is scheduled for Dec. 2 in Ya n c e y C o u n t y Superior Court in the case of John Herbert Pritchard and whether he committed seconddegree murder in providing another man with drugs that killed him. A November 2011 indictment accused Pritchard, 62, of providing morphine to Jonathan Traffic has been diverted off of South Main Street in Burnsville so crews can repave the street. Town workers were busy Monday removing old asphalt and leveling the road surface. Traffic is diverted onto West and East Russell Whitson Jr. in March 2011. Main Street, or onto East-West Boulevard. See Page 3

TRAC gears up for 20th year of tours

They say things get better with age. After two decades, and almost 40 tours, “they” are right as the Toe River Arts Council kicks off their 20th year of Studio Tours in Mitchell and Yancey counties, December 6-8. The Toe River Studio Tour is one of the largest and longest running studio tours in the country; you will find craftspeople and artists in nearly every medium, many tops in their field - from clay

to glass, fiber to paper, two and three-dimensional work, soap to candles, jewelry, metal, recycled and waiting to be used. The tour is a free, self-guided trip that will lead you to the scores of unique galleries situated between Mt. Mitchell and Roan Mountain. What better way to spend a weekend than to meander along the bright yellow lines in the road looking for the red and white studio tour signs, witnessing cerulean

blue skies, dusted white peaks, and noticing the slight nip on the tip of your nose as you open the car door, and the smell of fires blazing in the clear, fresh air. Meet the artists, see where they create and where they live. Our small communities offer an array of galleries, studios, and other special businesses you won’t want to miss. It’s a weekend of visual magic. The Toe River Studio Tour happens just twice a year - the first

mountain crafters’ co-op

weekend in June, the first weekend in December, when the weather’s not too hot nor too cold and the rain and snow seem to take time off, at least for part of the weekend. The Tour lasts three days. In case you want a head start and a first look, it begins Friday at noon. Studios are cleaned and open, usually with snacks and a smile. It closes at 4 p.m. when visitors are invited over to the Spruce Pine TRAC Gallery See page 3

127 W. Main St., Mon-Sat : 11-5

Handmade Stocking Stuffers and Custom-made Gift Baskets


2 nov. 21, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

A failed policy that must be abandoned

By Frank R. Baumgartner Recently, former President Jimmy Carter called for the abolition of the death penalty based on continued and significant evidence that, just as in 1972, the application of our ultimate punishment is as arbitrary as a lightning strike. North Carolina’s recent repeal of the Racial Justice Act was designed to remove an important barrier to the resumption of executions, on hold since 2006. But the state, like the nation, is unlikely to return to the days of greater use of the ultimate punishment. Nor should it. The death penalty has become almost purely symbolic, applied only in extremely rare instances, and in a limited number of legal jurisdictions that seem to have little in common except that they differ from the vast majority of the United States in their occasional use of capital punishment. The majority of death sentences since the modern resumption of the death penalty in 1976 come from only two percent of U.S. counties. The vast majority of counties, nationwide, have never witnessed an execution. In North Carolina, from 1976 through 2011, over 21,000 homicides occurred. But during that period there were only 43 executions: just one execution per 489 homicides, or 0.2 percent. Why so few? Actually, the North Carolina numbers are not far from the national average. Nationally, we often have 15,000 to 20,000 homicides each year, but we consistently execute fewer than 100 people per year. Death is simply not the penalty for murder, and it never has been. When the Supreme Court ruled the application of the death penalty to be unconstitutional in 1972, its focus was on the “arbitrary and capricious” nature of its application. The decision prompted a massive overhaul of

the nation’s death penalty system, including innumerable reforms in North Carolina. However, even the most well-intentioned reforms have not succeeded in making the death penalty’s application equitable. Our state has executed 43 individuals for murder since 1976. Collectively, these condemned inmates killed 56 victims. Fortytwo percent of people murdered in North Carolina during that time were black men. However, only one person has been executed for the crime of killing a black man. (A second was executed for killing three individuals, one of whom was a black man.) Forty-three percent of the victims of those executed in North Carolina were white women, even though white females represent only 13 percent of homicide victims during this period. In our state, people who kill white women are 40 times more likely to be executed than those who kill black men, based on the numbers from 1976 to present. Recent litigation associated with the nowdefunct Racial Justice Act demonstrated that blacks were systematically excluded from juries in capital trials at significantly higher rates than whites. The response of the legislature was to rescind the legislation in hopes that executions could resume. But we should recognize that the death penalty has never been used as the punishment for homicide. Rather, it has always been targeted at only a miniscule subset of homicides. The process is highly selective and subject to geographic disparities. The death penalty is also far more costly than the alternative punishment of life without the possibility of parole, and is used so rarely as to render moot any possible deterrent effect. More than 100 individuals, including several in our state, have been exonerated after being sentenced to death. This discovery of innocence has transformed the debate. Further, in North

Carolina as in most states, the vast majority of death sentences imposed by the courts are later overturned on appeal. Only about 20 percent of those sentenced to death nationwide have been executed. The more likely outcome is that the sentence is later changed to life in prison without parole. Rather than continue this costly and racially-charged symbol, we would all be better off with abolition. The Gallup poll recorded the lowest level of support for the death penalty in 40 years, based on its recent survey. Sixty percent (60 percent) of Americans say they support the death penalty, a sharp decline from the 80 percent support registered in 1994. When Gallup has asked respondents to choose between the death penalty and life without parole as a sentence for murder, less than 50 percent of Americans expressed support for the death penalty (Gallup, Oct. 29, 2013). There is, of course, little chance that our current legislative leaders in Raleigh will move away from their stated enthusiasm for the death penalty. But as more Americans recognize that the system is costly, arbitrary, ineffective, prone to error, and biased in terms of the race, class status, and gender of the victims, capital punishment will disappear. That trend has already begun. Six states have abolished the death penalty in the past six years, and many more, including North Carolina, have not carried out an execution in years. It is only a matter of time before our state recognizes that the death penalty is a failed policy that must be abandoned. When it does, it will be a victory for the due process of law and equal protection for all victims of horrible crimes. Frank R. Baumgartner is the Richard J. Richardson Distinguished Professor of Political Science at UNC-Chapel Hill.

Reader sees reasons to defend animal shelter I have read letters to the editor elsewhere, and it seems some good people are angry with one another. I don’t know the staff at the Yancey County Animal Shelter very well but what experience I have had with them has been positive. Jane Mummert has kindly heard me

WHO WE ARE

The Yancey County News is the only independent newspaper in Yancey County. It is owned, operated and published by

Susan Austin ........ Advertising/Publisher Jonathan Austin ........... Editor/Publisher who are the sole participants and members of

Yancey County News LLC 127 W. Main Street Burnsville, NC 28714 828-691-0806 or 691-0807 jonathan@yanceycountynews.com susan@yanceycountynews.com The Yancey County News (USPS publication No. 3528) is published weekly for $25 per year in Yancey County, $35 per year out of county. Published by Yancey County News LLC, Periodicals postage paid at Burnsville, NC. Postmaster: Send address changes to: Yancey County News, 127 W. Main St., Burnsville, NC 28714 Printed in Boone by the Watauga Democrat on recycled paper.

To be a voice, and to allow the voices of our community to be heard. vRecipient of the 2012 Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism and the Tom and Pat Gish Award for courage, integrity and tenacity in rural journalism v

out when I went to her about some neglected horses. There wasn’t much the animal shelter could do but they did lend a sympathetic ear. But when it was within their power to help, they did. Several of my animals have been spayed and neutered at greatly reduced cost and most recently, free! The rabies clinics that are offered are very much appreciated, and who can say how much suffering those low-cost shots prevent. And a few times I’ve had to take an animal to them that I had found and could not keep. I was so very thankful that a shelter was available. Maybe some of the animals I have taken to them were not adopted, but I’m sure that if left to fend for themselves the end would have been much worse than what it was in the hands of compassionate people. I can’t say I have found any faults with the local shelter but I suppose there are some, but I am confident they do the best they can. The tough choices that have been made concerning the animals’ lives have been mentioned in others’ letters to the editor, and my heart goes out to the little critters that must suffer loss, but at times heartbreaking decisions must be made.

I have had to make a few myself and maybe I have been judged harshly, but my decisions did not come easy and not without a lot of pain myself. To this day I grieve for some of the things I’ve had to do. I can’t say how much heartache there is for the good people at the shelter who must make these kinds of decisions on a regular basis. I don’t think I would be strong enough. The question I am asking is, why are there still so many stray and abandoned animals after years of the shelter offering discounted and even free spay and neuter clinics? If everyone with pets took a little more responsibility and made the trip to the animal shelter to have their pets fixed, perhaps the freezers that were mentioned in the Times Journal would not be necessary. So please have your pets fixed; they can live a full and happy life without offspring and it would prevent so much animal suffering, and, I’m guessing, the all-too-frequent heartbreak of the great people who accept the responsibility of the misplaced or unwanted pets. Loretta Ferguson

TheWall Street Journal has received the E.W. Scripps Award for Distinguished Service to the First Amendment. So has the newspaper you are reading right now. The New York Times has been honored with the Ancil Payne Award for Ethics in Journalism. So has the newspaper you are reading right now.

“The Yancey County News is the quintessential great rural newspaper.”

- Roy L. Moore, dean of the College of Communication at Middle Tennessee State University


Nov. 21, 2013

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Farm preservation grant deadline nears Pritchard murder

County governments and nonprofit groups pursuing farmland preservation projects have until Dec. 16 to apply for funding assistance from the N.C. Agricultural Development and Farmland Preservation Trust Fund. About $1.7 million is available through monies appropriated for the 2014-15 budget year by the General Assembly. “We have 86 county voluntary agricultural districts across the state and 50 county-wide farmland protection programs. We want to encourage more preservation efforts through the

trust fund,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. The fund’s purpose is to support projects that encourage the preservation of qualifying agricultural, horticultural and forest lands to foster the growth, development and sustainability of family farms. “Less than two percent of the world’s population currently farms, and our population continues to grow,” Troxler said. “It is imperative that we preserve farmland to meet the growing demand for food. “North Carolina farms and forests are the bedrock

foundation for our state’s $77 billion agribusiness industry.” Grants can be awarded to secure agricultural conservation easements on lands used for agricultural production; to support public and private enterprise programs that promote profitable and sustainable agricultural, horticultural and forestland activities; and for the development of agricultural plans. Applications and guidelines for the current funding cycle are available at www.ncadfp. org or by calling 919-707-3071. Applications are due by 5 p.m.

Compassionate Friends schedule memorial service

The local chapter of The Compassionate Friends will be holding their Annual Candlelight Memorial Service on Sunday, December 1, 2013 at 3pm at the Spruce Pine United Methodist Church. The Compassionate Friends is a support group for parents,

siblings and grandparents who have experienced the loss of a child of any age from any circumstance. Families are welcome to participate in this service even if they are not able to attend the monthly group meetings. Please bring a picture and/

or memento to be placed on the memorial table during the service. There will be a time for refreshments and fellowship following the candlelight service. Contact Tressa Dayton 828-765-4889 or Teresa Emory 828-2842287 for more information.

Galleries prepare for the tour

From the front where, from 5 to 7 p.m., you can meet the participating artists, see a sample or two of their work, enjoy a glass of wine, and some refreshments. The exhibit is set up geographically, so plans can be made and routes outlined for the next two days. After the reception, visitors are invited upstairs to the TRAC Arts Resource Center (ARC) for a special performance by Michael Reno Harrell, who will kick off the tour and the holiday season with his award-winning songs and stories. The tour continues both Saturday and Sunday from 10 to 5 p.m. On Sunday, you’ll leave, senses filled with the smells and sounds of the season and back seat filled with holiday gifts for you, your friends and family. There are over 75 places to stay in the area, from a couple of motels to bed and breakfast inns to cabins in the woods for two to ten. To take the tour all you need is the comprehensive 44-page guide, which you can pick up at either TRAC Gallery or at stores and businesses around the region. It lists all the participants, their art (with a representative image), directions and contact information, and five maps that will lead you right to their doors. Come spend a weekend in the mountains. “Do the Tour!” Experience what makes folks want to come back again and again, what makes those premier artists call this region home, and why aging is a good thing in studio tours. TRAC is a non-profit organization founded in 1976 to promote the arts in Mitchell and Yancey counties. For more information about the Arts Council’s programs and to get more

trial set for Dec. 2

From the front Whitson, 29, was found dead at a home off English Branch Road. He died of an overdose, according to the autopsy. The state has subpoenaed the medical examiner, Dr. Brent Hall, to give testimony in the trial. The state has also issued an order compelling the Charles G e o r g e Ve t e r a n s Administration Medical Center in Asheville to provide medical records that provide material evidence “should they indicate the prescription, administration, or other availability to the defendant of controlled substances that may have been involved in or connected to the drug-related charges and second-degree murder charge.” Pritchard was taken into custody Dec. 1,

2011, though initially released on bond, he is now in jail. Court records show Pritchard will also be tried on several felony drug charges, including for the sale and delivery of controlled substances, delivery of drugs, possession with intent to manufacture, sell and deliver schedule II drugs, maintaining a vehicle or dwelling for controlled substances, and felony probation violation. Pritchard has previously been convicted of felony drug charges, according to court records. In January 2011 he was convicted of delivery and sale of schedule II drugs, possession with intent to distribute schedule II drugs, and maintaining a dwelling for the use of controlled substances.

Your Representatives

information about the Holiday Studio Tour, visit the website, www.toeriverarts.org, call 828-682-7215 (Burnsville) or 828-765-0520 (Spruce Pine). For tickets to Michael Reno Harrell’s performance, stop by or call either gallery. Tickets are $10 in advance/$12 at the door. The Arts Resource Center is wheelchair accessible.

Sen. Richard Burr (R) Washington address: 217 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-3154 - Fax: (202) 228-2981 Asheville: Federal Building, 151 Patton Ave., Suite 204 Asheville, N.C. 28801 Phone: (828) 350-2437 - Fax: (828) 350-2439 Sen. Kay Hagan (D) Washington address: 521 Dirksen Senate Office Building Washington, D.C. 20510 Phone: (202) 224-6342 - Fax: (202) 228-2563 Asheville address: 82 Patton Ave., Suite 635 Asheville, N.C. 28801 Phone: (828) 257-6510 - Fax: (828) 257-6514 11th Congressional District Rep. Mark Meadows (R) Washington address: 1516 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515 Phone: (202) 225-6401 N.C. Elected Officials N.C. Senate District 47 Sen. Ralph Hise (R) Address: N.C. Senate 16 W. Jones St., Room 1026 Raleigh, N.C. 27601-2808 Phone: (919) 733-3460 and (828) 766-8329 Email: Ralph.Hise@ncleg.net N.C. House District 118 Rep. Michele D. Presnell (R) Address: N.C. House of Representatives 16 W. Jones St., Room 1025 Raleigh, N.C. 27601-1096 Phone: (919) 733-5732 and (828) 682-6342 Email: Michele.Presnell@ncleg.net

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Obituaries Reece B. Tipton

Memorials may be made to Hospice of Yancey County, 856 Georges Fork Reece B. Tipton, 61, of Burnsville, died Road, Burnsville, NC 28714, or Yancey Senior Citizens Center, 10 Swiss Avenue, Saturday, Nov. 16, 2013 at his home. A native of Yancey County, he was a son Burnsville, NC 28714. of the late Briscoe Tipton and Georgia Ann Betty Goforth Woody Griffith Tipton. He was also preceded in death by a brother, Arnold Tipton. Betty Goforth Woody, 75, of Hanging Reece was a loving, generous and caring Rock Road, died Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, at man who loved his family and friends and reading his Bible. He enjoyed fishing and her home. A native of Avery County, she was a watching TV, especially the show Lizard daughter of the late Brown and Goldie Lick Towing. Surviving are his sons, Billy Tipton of Ingram Goforth and wife of 42 years to Marshall and Adam Tipton of Asheville; the late Robert Lee Woody, who passed daughters Melissa Hudgins and husband, away in 1996. She was a member of Yellow Mark, of Burnsville, and Marrisa Bonham Mountain Baptist Church. Surviving are her daughters: Brenda and husband, Jason, of Asheville; brothers Dean Tipton and wife, Sherry, of Green Queen and husband, Shelby, of Spruce Pine, Mountain, Darrell Tipton and wife, and Sharon Hendry and husband, Bryan, of Rebecca, of Burnsville, Norman Tipton Manchester, Ky.; sons Robert Lee “Junior” and wife, Sandy, of Green Mountain, Woody of Spruce Pine and Richard Allan Elmer Tipton and wife, Barbara, of Green Woody and wife, Misty, of Spruce Pine; Mountain and Elbert Tipton and wife, brother Billy Ray Goforth and wife, Jackie, of Hickory; sisters Wanda Cannon Norma, of Newland; five grandchildren: and husband, Michael, of Burnsville, Chrystal Byrd, Gary Edwards, Amanda Doris Edwards of Burnsville, Helen Edwards, Tristin Mason and Noah Woody; Cannon of Burnsville and Ruth Martin eight great-grandchildren: Kelsey Byrd, and husband, John, of Spruce Pine; and Charles Byrd, Keaton Byrd, Adrianna grandchildren Alex, Isaac, Samantha, and Edwards, Dalton Towe, Taven Edwards, Crystal Hudgins and Autumn, Brody and Kelby Pitman and Colby Pitman and a Elijah Tipton. Many nieces, nephews and great-great grandson, Hudson Huskins. Funeral was Sunday in the chapel of cousins also survive. Yancey Funeral Service. The Rev. Jude Private graveside service was Monday. A memorial service was to be at 7 p.m. Hughes and Rev. Brent Price officiated. Tuesday, November 19, in the Chapel of Burial was in the Yellow Mountain Yancey Funeral Services. The Rev. Joe Cemetery. Brown was to officiate. The family was to Jimma Kylie Yelton receive friends from 5 p.m. until the service hour at the funeral home. Our sweet baby girl in heaven, Jimma Donations may be made to the funeral Kylie Yelton, was born and became one of home to help with funeral expenses. Jesus’ angels on Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013, at 9:30 p.m. at Mission Hospital. Virginia Hensley Griggs Surviving are her parents, Kyle Yelton and Martina Demick Yelton and a sister, Virginia Hensley Griggs, 85, of Burnsville, passed away Saturday, Nov. 16, Matanna Yelton, all of Burnsville; uncles 2013, at her home surrounded by family. Logan Gortney and Nicholas Yelton A native of Burnsville, she was a of Burnsville; aunt Chloe Gortney daughter of the late Carl and Stella Wright of Burnsville; maternal grandparents Hensley. She was preceded in death by Terry and Tina Gortney of Burnsville; her sister Lucille Harris, and son-in-law paternal grandparents Shawn Huskins and Beckey Yelton of Burnsville; and Frank Carroll. Virginia retired from the Yancey County great-grandparents Sharon Letterman of School System after 44 years of service as Burnsville and Terry and Debbie Carter of cook and manager at Burnsville Elementary Spartanburg, S.C. A memorial service will be held at a School. She was a member of West later date and will be announced by Yancey Burnsville Baptist Church. Surviving are her husband of 69 years, Funeral Services. D.T. Griggs; two daughters: Gloria Wilson William ‘Bill’ Patterson and husband, Larry, of Burnsville and Diane Carroll of Micaville; three sons: William “Bill” Patterson, 87, of Tommy Griggs and wife, Daphne, Darryl Burnsville, passed away on Wednesday, Griggs and wife, Cathy, and Randy Griggs and wife, Kristy, all of Burnsville; nine Nov. 13, 2013, at his home surrounded by grandchildren: Angie Parker and husband, his loving family. A native of Iredell County, he was a son Jermaine, Candi Fox and husband, Mike, of the late Theodore and Lillian Johnson Cindy, Casey, Derrick, A.J., Kaleigh, Tiffany and Frank; five great-grandchildren: Patterson. He was also preceded in death Brandon, Maci-Drew, Jazmyne, Kenyon by three sisters and one brother. Bill and Phyllis had a fun and adventurous and Griffen; two sisters: Irene Souther and life traveling all around the world, living in Hazel Souther of Burnsville; and several Australia for two years and Singapore for nieces and nephews. Funeral was Monday in the Chapel three years. After Bill retired in 1989, they of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home. continued traveling out west and camping The Rev. Charlie Carroway officiated. for many years. He was a loving husband, Graveside services was Tuesday morning father and grandfather who enjoyed fishing, was an avid golfer and was a part of one in the McCracken Cemetery.

of the first clean-up efforts in Hiroshima, Japan. Surviving is his wife of 56 years, Phyllis Patterson; daughter Katina Williamson and husband, Tim, of California; son Billy Patterson and wife, Debbie, of Kentucky; ten grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Several nieces and nephews also survive. Memorial service was Friday at Higgins Memorial United Methodist Church. The Rev. Wes Sharpe and the Rev. Joe Bennett officiated. Military honors will be conducted by the Sgt. E. L. Randolph, Chapter #57 D.A.V. Memorials may be made to Higgins Memorial United Methodist Church Kitchen Fund, 101 North Main Street, Burnsville, NC 28714.

Judy Ruth Clark Judy Ruth Clark, 66, of Bill Allen Branch Road and Tacoma, Wash., died Friday, Nov. 15, 2013, in Burnsville at the home of her mother and surrounded by loving family. She was born September 15, 1947, in Durant, Okla., the youngest daughter of John Albert Clark and Christine Hudson Clark. She was preceded in death by her father and a nephew, Thomas David Barton. Judy is survived by her mother, Christine “Granny” Hudson Clark; two sisters, Jeannette Frances Clark Maddox of Burnsville and Carole Ann Clark Vrooman of Texas; three daughters: Christine Denise Hanson and husband, Kelly; Renee Simmons and husband, Robert and their two children, Sarah Renee Simmons and Noah Allen Simmons, of Maple Valley, Wash.; and Roxan Hartwig of Tacoma; two sons, Joshua Thomas Hanson and Wesley Hanson of Alaska; and nieces and nephews. Judy was an avid gardener and loved the outdoors. She lived in Anchorage, Alaska for 25 years and enjoyed hiking on the glaciers and watching the moose and grizzly bears. She was a home care provider in Tacoma and was also employed by a landscaping company. Services will be held on a glacier in Alaska at a later date.

Dewey ‘Joby’ Silvers Dewey ‘Joby’ Silvers, 80, of Hickory Lane, passed away Tuesday, Nov. 12, 2013. He was a son of the late Thor and Florence Hensley Silvers of Flag Pond, Tenn. Dewey worked for Contel and GTE Telephone companies for 32 years and was a member of Burnsville Volunteer Fire Department for 30 years. Dewey is survived by his wife of 59 years, Shirley Shelton Silvers of Burnsville; a son, Faron Silvers of Burnsville; a daughter, Debbie Burke of Simpsonville, S.C.; two granddaughters; two grandsons; three great-granddaughters; two greatgrandsons; a sister, Dell Ledford of Erwin, Tenn.; four brothers, Harold, Jack and Worley Silvers of Flag Pond, and Luther Silvers of Longmont, Colo. Funeral was Saturday in the Chapel of Holcombe Brothers Funeral Home. Burial was in the Pate Cemetery on Bee Log Hill Road.


nov. 21, 2013

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Gifts can be special time with the kids ‘Tis the season when the stores will be packed and the streets will be filled with hopeful shoppers in search of that perfect gift. With the release of the new video game consoles that are guaranteed to lock your kids (and some adults) into near comatose states as they stare at the screens while only taking breaks for school and maybe sleep, here are a few alternative ideas of bonding ideas rather than purchased possessions. Anyone who has ever been in Scouts will likely remember when all the packs come together at some camp located near a lake. One of the highlights of the weekend is always the canoe races. Canoes can be rented for cheap and provide for joyful and interesting times. The venerable Old Town canoe has floated many a youngster over the years. A long paddle on the water is sure to brighten any kid’s outlook, and for good measure give the canoe a rock side-to-side a couple of times. Another event that is sure to please involves some raw chicken. I know, your face is probably squinting with your nose all crinkled up as you read that sentence. But if you put a little bit on a hook and toss it in the water

your kid will be amazed by what comes for it. For even more fun, go at night and set up a bonfire. When the rod tip gets hit with a hard thump and the strange creature with the flat mouth and tentacles stretching from its face is surfaced, there is no doubt that both you and your kid will examine the catfish with a sense of

Bill Howard’s

Outdoors

wonderment. While the fire is burning, we shouldn’t let it go waste. A staple of any good trip that includes a fire includes chocolate, graham crackers and marshmallows. I know somehow when those three ingredients are combined over an open flame the woods fairy sprinkles some type of pixie dust overtop and it becomes a necessary food group. Heck, even if the fish do not immediately bite, the s’mores will be fine in passing the time until they do. Near many of the lakes, rivers and streams

you can find a good field. After the farmers have cultivated the land and turned the soil another magical thing happens. In fact, it has almost become a lost art. At some point and time in a child’s life they all wish to visit the past. Not the past as in yesterday or even last year, but of times long, long ago. Amateur archaeologists is what we used to call ourselves. We would dream of digging and finding the next great monstrous dinosaur. Of course we never found one, but we did find other artifacts of equal intrigue, at least for a kid. There were many days we spent arrowhead hunting. Sometimes we would find finely chiseled rock that left no doubt to its purpose. Other times, we were just wishful and accepted that the small triangular shaped granite with a sharp side may be one. Either way, it ended up in our small tote bag or pocket as an addition to the collection. There are numerous other activities that you can initiate to create special times with your kids, but the key is to spend those moments together. As each seems like a product of time in our hurried lives, they are but a just a moment in our overall life. However, they can be a moment remembered and cherished forever. Bill Howard teaches hunter education and bow hunter education in North Carolina. He is a member of North Carolina Bowhunters Association and Pope & Young, and is an official measurer for both. He can be reached at billhowardoutdoors@gmail.com.

Committee to Elect

Tammy R. McEntyre

Yancey County Clerk of Superior Court Invites you to their ‘Kick Off Dinner’ Saturday, Nov. 23. Drop in 3 p.m. until 6 p.m. Come join the fun at the new Pensacola VFD building, NC 197-S - in the home community of Tammy R. McEntyre!

Join us for some good country cookin’!

• Pinto Beans • Cornbread • Onions Paid for by Tammy McEntyre

Plus all the ‘fixins’ you want!

Open invitation to ALL musicians, pickers and singers! We’ve invited a few of our friend just to get the party started: • Ron & Minnie Powell • The Allen Brothers • Brandon & Alan Thomason


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Students invited to enter photo contest

The N.C. Forest Service’s Urban and Community Forestry Program is accepting entries for its 2014 Arbor Day Photo Contest through Feb. 28. The contest is open to North Carolina students in fifth through 12th grades, including public, private and home schools. The theme is “Young and Old.” “The theme reflects not just the beauty of North Carolina’s trees and forests, but also the values and benefits that many generations have enjoyed,” said Agriculture Commissioner Steve Troxler. The competition will be

divided into fifth through eighth grades and ninth through 12th grades. A panel of judges will select a winner from each division and one grand prize winner. Honorable mentions may also be awarded. Winners of each division will receive $50 and a tree to plant on their school grounds. The grand prize winner will receive $150, a tree to plant at school and a framed reproduction of the winning photo. To enter, participants should download and complete an entry form, and include a caption and photographer’s

statement. One photo per photographer may be entered. Entry forms and a list of submission requirements can be found under the Urban and Community Forestry link on the N.C. Forest Service website at http:// ncforestservice.gov. Schools may select up to six best photos for entry. Winners will be selected and notified by March 14. Prizes will be awarded at the N.C. Arbor Day celebration on March 22 in Raleigh. For more information, contact Jennifer Rall at 919857-4849 or jennifer.rall@ ncagr.gov.

Glen Raven contributes to Anspach manufacturing school M a y l a n d Community College is pleased to announce that Glen Raven, Inc. has made a commitment to support the construction of M a y l a n d ’s n e w Anspach Advanced Manufacturing School. “ M a y l a n d Community College celebrates Glen Raven’s long history in Yancey County,” said Mayland Community College President John C. Boyd. “Glen Raven’s recent commitment will lead to the naming of the Glen Raven Classroom in the Anspach Advanced Manufacturing School.” The Anspach A d v a n c e d Manufacturing School will house equipment including multiple types of welding machines, a plasma cutter, bending machines, Solid Works programming, scanners, and a 3-D printer. Training at the facility will prepare students to sit for the American Welding Society’s national certification exam. Students will have the ability to utilize stateof-the-art equipment to develop superior design skills. Use of a 3-D printer will enable students to realize, troubleshoot, correct and build their designs. “We believe in endless possibilities and that no idea is a bad idea,” said Glen Raven, Inc. of Burnsville’s Plant Manager Wendell

Wi l s o n . “ We a r e always looking to the future and the needs that the future holds. We are conscious of the legacy that we as a company want to leave behind. That is why we welcomed this opportunity to make a contribution to the Anspach Advanced Manufacturing School.” In 1948, a weaving operation opened in Burnsville and focused

on nylon and polyester used in a wide array of products, from luggage to sail cloth. Through the years and changing economy, Glen Raven’s ability to identify and lead niche market segments contributed greatly to the company’s continued success. Today, the Burnsville facility weaves fabrics used in military and fire retardant products, sail boat

sails, and fabrics used in creating official American flags. The Anspach A d v a n c e d Manufacturing School will support the continued growth and expansion of the local workforce in the manufacturing industry by providing highly trained, highquality graduates, including welders and Associate Degree Applied Engineers.

Teen charged with rape

An 18-year-old is in jail charged with two counts of felony statutory rape, according to warrants filed with the clerk of court. Reynoldo Romero, of 667 John Henry Road, Burnsville, was arrested on warrants issued Nov. 12. One warrant was sought by R. J. Shuford of Burnsville Police Department, while the second was sought by Brian Shuford of Yancey County Sheriff’s Office. Both felony warrants were issued by Magistrate T.M. Hall. According to the warrants, Romero is accused of twice having sex with a 13-year-old girl between Jan. 1 and Aug. 31, 2013.

Romero

charge of obtaining property by false pretense. James Paul Young, 32, of 36 Henson Lane, Burnsville, was accused of taking money from Maphra Miller Copas “by means of false pretense which was calculated to deceive and did deceive.” According to the warrant, Young told the woman he would take $50 and her car and would get her a car battery. “He took the In an unrelated money and her car and case, a Burnsville man did not replace battery was arrested on a felony in (the) car.”

Hi my name is Shade. I am a 1-year old Irish Wolfhound/ Lab mix. I am great with other dogs and I love to play! Did I mention that I am well on my way to being housebroken? Hello my name is Spade. I am Shade’s twin brother. I think Shade forgot to mention that we would really like to get adopted together. Hurry in to take your new twins home today!

Call the shelter at 682-9510 for more information on these or other pets, or plan to visit us at 962 Cane River School Road.


nov. 14, 2013

Photo courtesy David Grose

Mountain Heritage Cougar Daulton Buchanan and two Shelby players look for the wayward football during the Cougar’s first round playoff game at Shelby. The Golden Lions defeated the Cougars 58-8.

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 7

Buy Yancey County News at Mitchell-Yancey Habitat for Humanity Restore 563 Oak Ave., Spruce Pine and Habitat keeps half of the money! Open Tues – Fri, 9-5; Sat 9-2

Tax office says letter doesn’t target artists

From the front The letter to business owners begins by defining what must be listed on the tax abstract. “What is business personal property?” the letter asks. It is “all property used in connection with the operation and production of income that has not been classified as real.” Homemade bread, Some artists say they have been told desserts and that definition means they must list specials every day! things like toilet paper, and Cook said Breakfast some long-time artists have belongings 7-11 a.m. Mon.-Sat. in the studio that aren’t ‘used’ in Lunch connection with production but may 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. M-Fri. still have value. “They’re supposed (11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Sat.) to count everything,” Cook said. For Now open for dinner painters, is that “every brush? Some Wednesday, Thursday, artists have ‘sentimental’ brushes” that Fri. & Sat. 5-9 p.m. aren’t used but are kept for emotional Entertainment reasons, she said. Wednesday 7-9 p.m.

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Kids who read the newspaper get better grades in school!

Artists also fear they may be singled out for the tax because they take part in events like the bi-annual gallery tour. J e ff B o o n e , t h e c o u n t y t a x administrator/assessor, said the list of businesses was provided to the county by the N.C. Department of Revenue. “Every year, counties receive from the North Carolina Dept. of Revenue lists of businesses that report sales and use” and corporation or incorporation, Boone wrote in an email to the newspaper. “This is for counties to verify that they have all businesses listed that report to North Carolina.” In August 2011, the county commission signed a contract with Tax Management Associates of Charlotte to perform a program verifying the accuracy and completeness of business

personal property listings forms filed with the county tax administrator. At the time, county leaders said business personal property tax listings are a self-assessed tax in Yancey County, “and therefore must be examined periodically to ensure equity and uniformity in the tax base.” But this week Boone said the tax letter that has been mailed out “is not part of the TMA contract.” Cook said artists of crafters who are confused about the letter they received from the tax office can visit the tax office to discuss the issue, or “you can come and talk with us. We’ve talked to the people at the tax office. We’ve talked to our accountant. We can share what we’ve learned.”


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Nov. 21, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

Kids do odd things. Usually it is not a problem The mother of a 4-year-old boy shared an interesting story with me the other day. At age 2, her son began chewing meat to the point where it became liquid, but would not swallow. The parents became worried and began attempting various means of persuading him to swallow. Nothing worked, which increased the parents’ anxiety and, likewise, the energy they put into the swallowing project. Finally, the mother read a book of mine in which I describe a technique I developed called “The Doctor.” It’s actually a modification of an approach to children developed by Milton Ericson, an outlier psychiatrist whose offbeat, creative work has never been given its due in the mental health community. Full disclosure: Whenever, in this column, I have written about this technique, mental health professionals have complained that it may well cause children to be anxious about real doctors. To that, I can only say that over the perhaps 20 years that I’ve disseminated this recommendation concerning various problems involving young children, not one parent has ever reported that a child developed doctor anxiety. Furthermore, the “cure” rate of childhood fears, anxieties, and even major behavior problems has been remarkable. The method involves simply telling the child in question that The Doctor has said that the problem, whatever it is, is due to lack of sleep. Therefore, until the problem has

Living

with

children

likelihood the child would have become afflicted with a disorder of some sort - sensory integration disorder, perhaps. When a problem becomes a disorder, it is rarely, if ever, cured in a day. The second point is that the mother now realizes her anxiety was one reason - perhaps THE reason - why the problem worsened over a two-year period. When children develop problems, they need parents who are authoritative, not anxious. Anxiety and authority are incompatible. The former cancels the latter. The third point is that the mother’s anxiety reflected the now-ubiquitous tendency of parents to “think psychologically” about problems that arise in or with their kids. This sort of thinking prevents problem-solving - not sometimes, but always - because the question “Why is this happening?” prevents a parent from focusing on what to do about it. The “Why?” question induces what I call “disciplinary paralysis.” The fourth point is that we seem to have forgotten that children do odd things sometimes. These odd things do not necessarily indicate a problem. Sometimes, odd is nothing more than odd.

completely disappeared for a certain period of time, or on any day that the problem occurs, the child must go to bed immediately after the evening meal. Other privileges can also be made part of a package of consequences, but early bedtime usually does it. Concerning the meat-chewing 4-year-old, the parents told him, “We visited with a doctor today and told him that you chew meat and won’t swallow it. He told us that this happens when a child isn’t getting enough sleep. He told us that when you chew meat and won’t swallow it, that you have to go to bed right after supper.” That evening, the child had to go to bed right after supper. From that point on, he has chewed and swallowed, chewed and swallowed, chewed and swallowed. No problem since. Family psychologist John Rosemond There are four points to the story, the first answers parents’ questions on his web site at of which is that if the parents’ had consulted a mental health professional, there is some www.rosemond.com.

Schools begin track program for boys in 4th and 5th grades Boys on the Track in Burnsville to the other volunteer coaches is an after-school, extra-curricular making this happen – Ron Wyant, program for 4th and 5th grade Steve Grindstaff, Cleve Fox and boys that receive physical exercise Chris Sutherland.” (running/training), intentional Graham Children’s Health instruction (teaching of life skills), Services was excited to get and selfless service (giving back involved in this great program as to our community). The program well. “The boys will all run in the is based on the belief that every Burnsville Fit Families 5K this boy needs mentoring, confidence, spring, along with the Girls on success and skills. the Run program from Burnsville “We created this program in Elementary School” said Jodi response to the success we’ve seen Antinori, Instructional Coach, with the Girls on the Run program” Burnsville Elementary School said Shane Cassida, Program and Graham Children’s Health Creator and K-12Week Curriculum/ Services Board Member. of 11/18/13 - 11/24/13 Federal Programs Director, Yancey There are currently 30 boys County Schools. “Special thanks enrolled in the program with at

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Edited by Margie E. Burke

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least 10 on a waiting list. There has been a lot of excitement and enthusiasm at the school about BOTIB. “It’s exciting to get this kind of a response. We’ve partnered with the MAGIC after school program to provide healthy snacks and transportation. This

has been a wonderful school and community collaboration” said Cassida. To make a donation or get involved with the BOTIB program, call Graham Children’s Health Services at 682-7899 or email gchs@trhd.dst.nc.us.

Fire continues in Linville Gorge Firefighters were making progress on containment lines for the Table Rock wildfire in the Linville Gorge, officials said. Recent rains have slowed progression of the fire, but concerns still exist over a section of uncontained line along the southern fire flank. Crews continue to improve contingency lines along Forest Road 118 and the US Forest Service property line. There is still a large area of unburned fuels between the active fire and those lines. A concern is that fuels in those areas could reignite uncontained portions of the current fireline perimeter. The strategy is to monitor fire progression and ensure resources are in place if the fire moves south. Infrared aerial photos will be taken this morning to look for hot spots along the firelines. Patrols did notice an increase in heat Monday as the winds picked up and fuels began to dry out. Work will continue on structure protection within the Outward Bound Camp. Crews working with the camp will reduce fuels around buildings and eliminate fire hazards. North Carolina Forest Service personnel are assisting with land owner contacts

and providing advice on how to improve defensible space. Fire size remains the same Tuesday, with 2,275 acres burned to date and 40 percent containment. No additional structures are threatened and no additional injuries or accidents to report. There are 193 personnel working on the fire and the Type 3 Incident Management Team will transition with the Type 2 Team throughout the day. The cause of the fire is still under investigation. However, fire investigators would appreciate talking with the group who were camping at Table Rock Picnic Area last Monday, Veteran’s Day. Investigators believe this group has information that would aid in the investigation. A reward may be offered for substantial information regarding this investigation and persons should contact Law Enforcement Officer Jason Crisp at 828-442-2470 or the Grandfather Ranger District at 828-652-2144. For information on the latest road and trail closures, visit the National Forests in North Carolina website. Visitors should check the website before planning a trip to the gorge.


CLASSIFIEDS

nov. 21, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 9

CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS • CALL 691-0806 TO RUN YOUR CLASSIFIED! $5 FOR 50 WORDS

LAND FOR SALE

LAND FOR SALE BY OWNER: Fish, Swim, and Tube along beautiful section of native trout waters (Cane River)! 6.6 Acres (more/less) offering over 900 ft frontage along the river & easy access from state paved road (197 South). Flat meadow gently rises from river to ideal building sites! Take a look today! $85,000 FIRM! Call 828-284-0705 for more information. SOUTH TOE LAND FOR SALE 5.5 acres off Colberts Creek Road. Creek frontage, borders N a t i o n a l F o r e s t , p r i v a c y, mixture of lush rhododendron, pines and hardwoods, level to moderate grade, south/southeast exposure, garden spot, view of Black Mountains, beautiful rock formation, active springs with spring boxes and pipe, and close

proximity to South Toe River and Carolina Hemlock Recreation Area. At least 3-4 potential house sites. Transferable septic permit already obtained. Electric close by. We are selling in order to buy a larger parcel (10-15 acres) and will consider land swap option. Asking price: $84,900. We would love to answer any questions you have or meet with you to show you this beautiful property. Contact Lisa at 828-208-1221.

FOR RENT

House For Rent: 16 minutes south of Burnsville off Hwy. 197. Catttail Creek Rd. $675/month plus utilities, deposit, pet deposit. Approx. 900 square ft. 3 bdrm., 1 bath, laundry room, small yard, kitchen/dining/living room is one room. Small stove. Beautiful area. email:

Lena Rachel Weisman Personal Massage Therapist

Come in for a soothing massage! Improve flexibility, circulation and posture! 828-284-6149 for appointment

Visit these

fine establishments for the Yancey County News Guy’s General Store • Poplar Grove • Appalachian Java • B&B Convenience Store • Mountain Energy • Felicity’s Closet • Outside at Ingles • Cruz Thru • Whitson’s General Store • Effler’s Store • Westall Grocery • Riverside Grocery • Habitat in Spruce Pine • Price’s Creek Store • Stamey’s in Spruce Pine

Towing Service with Rollback Truck!

I Buy Junk Vehicles! Pay Fair Price Will Pick Up Vehicle

828-208-7522

828-675-0809

ronm2u@hotmail.com 828 551 9775 FOR RENT - Pensacola Rd, 3 bed/2bath home, close in for rent $875.00/ mo. No Pets, No tobacco products. Background check & security deposit required. Available soon. CATTAIL PEAK REALTY INC. 828284-2968. House For Rent in town, 3 BDRM, 2 Bath, 2 story house, large BM, Fireplace, Central Cooling/Heating Pump, Garage, Decks, Balconies/ Patio, Fully

ITEMS OR SALE SERVICES

The Weekly Crossword ACROSS 1 Hyperactive 8 Geyser output 13 Medicinal mass 14 Timeout spot 16 Colony-crashing creature 17 Big name in flatware 18 Double-crosser 19 In the neighborhood 21 Dainty drink 22 Type of drum 24 In a group of 25 Clear a hurdle 26 Make, as a salary 27 Washer cycle 28 Montana mining city 29 ___ corde (music) 31 Contributing component 33 Ham it up 37 Assassins 38 Like candlelit dinners 40 Wright wing? 41 Morgan's "Unforgiven" costar 42 Unit of force 44 Wight or Skye 48 Small clue 49 Carp kin 50 Toned down 51 Polished off 52 Plowed land 54 Cleaning need 55 Look-alike 57 Raymond Burr role 59 Museum guide 60 Carved toggle from Japan 61 Down-and-out 62 Reacted to a pun, perhaps DOWN 1 Beethoven piece

caring staff. Grants available. For information please call 828-682-1556 Free Manure – Will load. Clear Creek Ranch. 6754510 Roof Leak? Call Brad at Tip Top Roofing, 25 years+ experience. Residential, commercial roof repair and maintenance, roof coatings, gutter repair, roof inspection. References. 682-3451 Sewing alterations. Call 208-3999.

Fenced, Appliances with stove insert, large master Washer/Dryer. $900/Month. bath with private bath , 2nd No pets preferred. Call bedroom with private bath, (828) 682-7499 . w/d hook up in basement. HOUSE FOR RENT - Deck overlooking pond. In Country private - Brick town (Burnsville) in small rancher of three bedrooms, apt complex consisting of 1 bath. Living, dining, 5 units. Oil hot air furnace. kitchen, utility. Carport. Rent $550. 865-306-0111. of 11/18/13 - 11/24/13 Garden Week space. NO pets. $600 month. Owner-broker Boxwoods for Sale. $10 828-678-3400 For rent in town Burnsville each. 828.208.0406. large one bedroom apt. lots of cabinets, first floor $400 per month. $100 security Adult day care - Heritage and 1st 30 days free with 6 Adult Day Retreat located mo. lease. Call for details. just west of Burnsville offers low cost affordable quality 865-306-0111. House for rent, kitchen day care for your loved one with lots of cabinets & giving you the opportunity bar, DR, large living room to take care of yourself with fireplace and wood and things you need to do without worry. Qualified/

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828-231-9352 www.maytimecomposting.com

by Margie E. Burke

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MAYtime

Compost & Garden Soil Topsoil Worm Castings

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Copyright 2013 by The Puzzle Syndicate

2 Club for miniature golf 3 Pub fare 4 Shower area 5 One of the Jackson 5 6 Glacial mass 7 Type of tile 8 Take to task 9 Singer Orlando 10 Poetic palindrome 11 Licorice-like cordial 12 Dispute middleman 13 Analyze grammar 15 Tupac, Nas, et. al. 20 Brit's floor coverings 23 Contest hopeful 25 TV's "Elementary" actress 27 Religious faction 28 Jezebel's false god 30 Sound off 32 Hightail it

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Fruit farm Free will High standing Kind of pool Going by bike More within reach 45 X, to a bowler 46 Like old-time gasoline

47 Finishes the lawn 49 One way to play 50 Smart society 52 Watch over 53 Type of guy 56 ___ whiz! 58 Work on a tan

Answer to Last Week's Crossword A R M O L E A G A G I L A L E E L M S L I E F A N T O B A C O E V E N T I N T A T I T A L N O V E G R O T

R E D U E R E L Y S S F R A T I A R A S T I U T N U P N O T R E S S E A T I C S L T Y T O

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B P E I S E T B O I N D E

K A T E D N D E L A A D D I N P I T D O I L A M U S E Z E S T S U S R H A N D E N U N M I C A T I L L O N I E S G E N U E A R E S T


10 nov. 21, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS

The leaves are on the ground, so mulch them America’s waste disposal sites are filling up. Landfills across the nation are being closed at an alarming rate. yet the volume of waste our society produces continues to increase. Twenty percent of the solid waste placed in landfills consists of yard and garden wastes such as leaves and grass clippings. Many states, including North Carolina, are banning these wastes from landfills. One step we can take toward solving our waste disposal problems is to make use of lawn and garden wastes instead of dumping them. Through the process of composting, these organic wastes can be recycled to produce a natural material that can be used in gardens, landscapes, and flower beds. When mixed with soil, compost increases the organic matter content, improves the physical properties of the soil, and supplies essential nutrients, enhancing the soil’s ability to support plant growth. Compost can also be applied to the soil surface to conserve moisture, control weeds, reduce erosion, improve appearance, and keep the soil from gaining or losing heat too rapidly. One way to dispose of yard and garden wastes is to haul them to municipal or county composting facilities. Many homeowners, however, find it more convenient and economical to compost these materials in their own backyards. In either case, the finished compost can be mixed with soil or used as a mulch for gardens, landscape beds, or lawns.

Why Compost?

Gardeners have used compost for centuries. Composting is an efficient method of breaking down organic materials into an end product that is beneficial to soil and plants. Adding yard and garden wastes directly to the soil without first composting them has some undesirable effects. For example, if large quantities of uncomposted leaves are incorporated into the soil, the microbes that work to decompose the leaves will compete with plant roots for soil nitrogen. This competition can result in nitrogen deficiency and poor plant growth. Increased populations of the microbes can also deplete most of the organic matter in the soil, leaving the soil with less structure than before. When materials such as leaves and grass clippings are composted, however, a microbial process converts them to a more usable organic material. Adding composted material reduces the competition for nitrogen. Composted material is also much easier to handle and mix with soil than uncomposted material because of its finer texture. Furthermore, improvement of the soil’s physical properties — such as increased infiltration, better drainage, and greater water holding capacity — usually occurs more rapidly when composted materials are added. Decomposition of organic material in a compost pile depends on

lime converts ammonium nitrogen to ammonia gas, removing nitrogen from the pile. Although adding lime may hasten decomposition, the loss of nitrogen from the pile often offsets the benefits. Lime is not necessary for degradation of most yard wastes. Finished compost is usually alkaline (with a pH between 7.1 and 7.5) without the addition of lime. In many areas, the water used to moisten the compost pile is alkaline and may also help to raise the pH (reduce the acidity) of the compost. If large quantities of pine needles, pine bark, or vegetable and fruit wastes are composted, additional lime may be necessary to reduce acidity.

Materials for Composting

maintaining the activity of decomposer microbes. Any factor that slows or halts the growth of these microbes also slows the composting process. Efficient decomposition occurs when aeration and moisture are adequate, when the particles of waste material are small, and when the proper amounts of fertilizer and lime are added. AERATION Microbes require oxygen to decompose organic wastes efficiently. Some decomposition will occur in the absence of oxygen (that is, under anaerobic conditions); however, the process is slow and foul odors may develop. Because of the odor problem, composting without oxygen is not recommended in residential areas unless the process is conducted in a fully closed system (such as the plastic bag method described later under “Composting Structures”). Mixing the pile once or twice a month will provide the necessary oxygen and significantly hasten the composting process. A pile that is not mixed may take three to four times longer to produce useful compost. A well-mixed compost pile also reaches higher temperatures, helping to destroy weed seeds and disease-causing organisms (pathogens). MOISTURE Adequate moisture is essential for microbial activity. Materials in a dry compost pile will not decompose efficiently. If rainfall is limited, the pile must be watered periodically to maintain a steady decomposition rate. Enough water should be added to completely moisten the pile, but overwatering should be avoided. Excessive moisture can lead to anaerobic conditions, slowing down the degradation process and causing foul odors. The pile should be watered enough that it is damp but does not remain soggy. Approximately 50 to 55 percent moisture on a weight basis is a good starting point. The compost is within the right moisture range if a few drops of water can be squeezed from a handful of material. If no water can be squeezed out, the materials are too dry. If water gushes out, they

are too wet. PARTICLE SIZE The smaller the organic waste, the faster the compost will be ready to use. Smaller particles have much more surface area for a given volume and thus are more rapidly broken down by microbes. Materials can be shredded before they are added to the pile. Shredding is essential if brush or sticks are to be composted. In addition to speeding up the composting process, shredding reduces the volume of the compost pile. A low-cost method of reducing the size of fallen tree leaves is to mow the lawn before raking it or to run the lawn mower over leaf piles after raking. Raked piles should be checked to ensure that they do not contain sticks or rocks that could cause injury during mowing. If the mower has an appropriate bag attachment, the shredded leaves can be collected directly. FERTILIZER AND LIME Microbial activity is affected by the ratio of carbon to nitrogen in the organic waste. Because microbes require a certain amount of nitrogen to live and grow, a shortage of nitrogen slows the composting process considerably. Materials high in carbon but low in nitrogen, such as straw or sawdust, decompose very slowly unless nitrogen fertilizer is added. Although tree leaves are higher in nitrogen than straw or sawdust, they still decompose more rapidly when nitrogen fertilizer or wastes that are high in nitrogen are added. Grass clippings are generally high in nitrogen; when mixed properly with leaves, they speed decomposition. Poultry litter, manure, or blood meal can be used as organic sources of nitrogen. Otherwise, a fertilizer with a high nitrogen analysis (10 to 30 percent) should be used. Other nutrients such as phosphorus and potassium are usually present in adequate amounts. During the initial stages of decomposition, organic acids are produced and the acidity (pH) of the compost drops. At one time it was believed that adding small amounts of lime in the early stages would maintain and enhance microbial activity during this period. However,

Many organic materials are suitable for composting. Yard wastes such as leaves, grass clippings, straw, and nonwoody plant trimmings can be composted. Leaves are the dominant organic waste in most backyard compost piles. Grass clippings can be composted; however, with proper lawn management, clippings do not need to be removed from the lawn. If allowed to remain, they will decay and release nutrients, reducing the need for fertilizer. If clippings are used, they should be mixed with other yard wastes; otherwise they may compact and restrict airflow. Branches and twigs greater than 1/4 inch in diameter should be put through a shredder or chipper first. Kitchen wastes such as vegetable scraps, coffee grounds, and eggshells may also be added. Sawdust may be added in moderate amounts if additional nitrogen is applied. Approximately 1 pound of actual nitrogen (6 cups of ammonium nitrate) is required per hundred pounds of dry sawdust. Wood ashes serve as a lime source; if used, they should be added only in small amounts (no more than 1 cup per bushel or 10 pounds per ton of compost). Excessive amounts result in loss of nitrogen from the pile. However, wood ashes do contribute high levels of potassium to the compost. Crushed clam or oyster shells, eggshells, and bone meal also tend to reduce the acidity of composts. Ordinary black-and-white newspaper can be composted; however, the nitrogen content is low, slowing the decomposition rate. If paper is composted, it should make up no more than 10 percent of the total weight of the material in the compost pile. It is better to take newspapers to a community recycling center. Other organic materials that can be used to add nutrients to the pile include blood and bone meal, livestock manure, prunings from nonwoody plants, vegetable and flower garden refuse, fruit and vegetable scraps from the kitchen, hay, straw, and lake plants. Livestock manure and poultry litter can be added to provide nitrogen. About 100 pounds of poultry litter provides 1.8 pounds of nitrogen. Next week: Materials to avoid in a compost pile.


nov. 21, 2013

• yANCEY cOUNTY nEWS 11

What’s to eat at the elementary schools? Friday, Nov 22

Monday, Nov 25

Tues, Nov 26

Wed, Nov 27

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza WG Cereal WG Toast Peaches Juice/Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Applesauce Milk

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Spaghetti/Roll Sunbutter S’wich Salad/Broccoli Pears/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hamburger Steak Roll/Chix Taco Salad Tossed Salad/Refried Beans/Baked Apples Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hot Dog/Baked Ham/Mac&Cheese Cornbread/Sunbutter S’wich/Baked Beans Slaw/Pears Cherry Crisp Milk

Lunch Pizza Stix w/Marin Ham&Cheese S’wich/ Sunbutter S’wich/Corn Sweet Potato Puffs Peaches/Cranberry Crunch/ Milk

Thurs, Nov 28

Friday, Nov 29

Giving Thanks today, for all of our many blessings filled with Love, Laughter, Family and Community Happy Thanksgiving from the Yancey County News

Food for thought for middle school Friday, Nov 21

Monday, Nov 25

Tuesday, Nov 26

Wed, Nov 27

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza WG Cereal WG Toast Peaches Juice/Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Applesauce Milk

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Spaghetti/Roll Tossed Salad Broccoli Pears/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hamburger Steak Roll/Chix Taco Salad Tossed Salad/Refried Beans/Baked Apples Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hot Dog/Baked Ham/Mac&Cheese Cornbread Baked Beans Slaw/Pears Cherry Crisp Milk

Lunch Pizza Stix w/Marin Ham&Cheese S’wich/Corn Sweet Potato Puffs Peaches/Cranberry Crunch/ Milk

Thurs, Nov 28

Friday, Nov 29

Giving Thanks today for all of our many blessings filled with Love, Laughter, Family and Community Happy Thanksgiving from the Yancey County News

Chowing down at Mountain Heritage Friday, Nov 22

Monday, Nov 25

Tuesday, Nov 26

Wed, Nov 27

Breakfast Breakfast Pizza WG Cereal WG Toast Peaches Juice/Milk

Breakfast Chix Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Fruit Cocktail Milk

Breakfast Sausage Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Pineapple Bits Milk

Breakfast Ham Biscuit WG Cereal WG Toast/Juice Applesauce Milk

Lunch Pepperoni Pizza Spaghetti/Roll Chix Fillet S’wich Tossed Salad Broccoli Pears/Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hamburger Steak Roll/Chix Taco Salad Chix Tenders Tossed Salad/Refried Beans/Baked Apples Fruit Cocktail Milk

Lunch Hot Dog/Baked Ham/Mac&Cheese Chix Quesadilla Cornbread Baked Beans Slaw/Pears Cherry Crisp Milk

Lunch Pizza Stix w/Marin Ham&Cheese S’wich Corn Sweet Potato Puffs Peaches/Cranberry Crunch/ Milk

Santa Claus is Comin ‘ To Town Friday, December 6 , at 6 pm- 8 pm Burnsville Town Center Sponsor By: Yancey County / Burnsville Chamber of Commerce

Thurs, Nov 28

Friday, Nov 29

Giving Thanks today for all of our many blessings filled with Love, Laughter, Family and Community Happy Thanksgiving from the Yancey County News

Teachers, do you want another way to show how great your students shine? Then send the news of their success to this newspaper, your local newspaper! Send news and photographs to Jonathan@ yanceycountynews.com


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Yancey county News Nov. 21  

Yancey County has one independent newspaper. This is it. Yancey County has one newspaper dedicated to the concept of giving residents a voic...