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January 2017 . Issue 6.1

FREE

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Steamboat Springs Hayden Oak Creek Yampa

Beau Mills on a KTM Snow Bike


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January 2017

Valley Voice

OPEN Monday - Saturday 4pm-2am

NIGHT SKIING & RIDING

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CPL Dec 2016 + + + +

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JUST BECAUSE THE DAYLIGHT ENDS, Same text with all the liquors and beers and wines Make it+ festive + + + with + + + some + + +Christmas + + + + +bullshit. + + + +

DOESN’T MEAN THE FUN DOES.

+ + V, + Inc The

+ + Lincoln + 924 Ave + + +734-4357 (970) +

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Percentage of all proceeds goes to benefit local veterans

Tuesday: League Night Wednesday: 8 Ball Tournament Thursday: 9 Ball Tournament -

6:30 6:30 6:30

Happy hour specials 4-6 and 10-12

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DATES & HOURS* ADD: 12/15-12/19 Thurs-Mon 5:30-8:30pm

You place for all your Holiday Spirits

12/22-1/2 Nightly 5:30-8:30pm 1/5-2/16** Thurs-Mon 5:30-8:30pm 2/17-3/27 Thurs-Mon 6:00-9:00pm *Hours of operation subject to change. **Closed February 5, 2017 (Super Bowl Sunday)

Start Your 2017 with Options!

The Umbrella Bar is the best spot to watch the night action on the slopes. Sip on specialty libations and stay warm during night skiing and riding.

Unbelievable Selection. Unbelievable Specials!

Stop in Gondola Joe’s and grab a quick bite to eat or warm up with a hot beverage. Open during night skiing and riding. Located in gondola square.

FOR DETAILS OR TO PURCHASE TICKETS, VISIT THE MAIN TICKET OFFICE AT THE BASE AREA, GO ONLINE TO STEAMBOAT.COM/NIGHTSKIING OR CALL 877.783.2628

Open: Mon - Sat: 9am -11pm Sunday: 10:30am -7pm

A m p d s t a a i p

T t o

D b t p

S w b

Over 200 Beers Over 700 wines Over 200 Liquors On sale every day!

Unbelievablein Selection. Come andUnbelievable SAVE!Specials!

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

A v

www.cplsteamboat.com For special offers, like us on Facebook!

Located next to City Market P in Central Park Plaza, T Steamboat Springs.

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Valley Voice

January 2017

Circulation 7000

Rants...

Contents How to “Con-a-Fir” Part One

Limitations… Page 4

By Karen Vail

Page 5

By Scott L. Ford

Sandy Wisecup: Growing up on Trout Creek

Page 6

By Ellen & Paul Bonnifield

Page 7

Page 8

Raves...

Page 9

Willpower…

I Don’t Want to Be Your Hero By Lyn Wheaton

Matt Scharf

Business Manager: Scott Ford Event Calendar: Nina Rogers boobula57@yahoo.com Sales: Paulie Anderson paulie@yampavalleyvoice.com Web: Callie M. Anderson info@bittywebs.com

Christmas Came Early By Scott L. Ford

The Light Always Changes

Advertisers assume full responsibility for the entire content and subject matter of their ads. In the event of error or omission in the advertisement, the publisher’s sole responsibility shall be to publish the advertisement at a later date. Advertisements and articles are accepted and published upon the representation that the author, agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The author, agency, and/ or advertiser will indemnify and save Valley Voice, LLC harmless from all claims and legal action resulting from the contents of the articles or advertisements including claims or suits resulting from libel, defamation, plagiarism, rights to privacy and copyright infringements.

Too much of a good thing…

Choice… Dual sport days…

Are You even Ready to Start Dating?

Page 11

By Mr. Helpful, MD

Warm feet…

Raising Wild: Dispatches from the Wilderness Page 12

Getting the ski legs back…

By Jenna Meierbilbo

News from the Chief of the Chief

Page 17

By Scott Parker

First Friday Artwalk

Page 21

Say What?...

Page 22

The LA Bourgeois

Thy Will Be Done

Page 23

By Lorre Buss

Page 24

By Monica Yeager

MTBE and the EPA

Page 25

By Fred Robison

Your Monthly Message

The right charger for the right device… Making it when you think you won’t…

By Wina Procyzyn

I Resolve Joy

Support when you need it…

Page 18

By Nina Rogers

A Sobering Look at Alcohol

Official Fine Print

Page 10

By The Wandering Rose

Calendar of Events Valley Voice is published monthly and distributed on the last Wednesday of each month. Please address letters, questions, comments or concerns to: Valley Voice, LLC, P.O. Box 770743 or come by and see us at 1125 Lincoln Ave, Unit 2C, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477. Paulie Anderson: 970-846-8953. Matt Scharf: 970-846-3801. Scott Ford: 970-819-9630. Website www.yampavalleyvoice.com. Subscription rate is $35 per year (12 issues). All content © 2016 Valley Voice, L.L.C. No portion of the contents of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher.

Being alone when you need somebody…

By Dagny McKinley

Art Director:

Pets eating your presents…

Too much excitement…

Winter Tracks

Paulie Anderson

Frozen plow lines… The patch of ice under fresh powder…

The Diary of a Newbie

Publisher:

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Page 26

By Chelsea Yepello Yampa Valley Voice

Comics Page 27

“It’s an honor… sorry… I’m shaking your hand too long.” “You see more friends at City Market on Christmas Eve than you see at your Christmas party.” “I’m such a last minute shopper that they blink the lights an extra time to get me out.” “I’d rather be a tough nerd than a tough jock with a weak mind.” “There is no powder clause for a plow driver, so I don’t want to hear it.”

http://www.yampavalleyvoice.com/

“May I put you on hold? I like to watch the line blink.”

The views and opinions expressed reflect the views and opinions of the authors and may not necessarily reflect the views and opinion of the editor, staff or advertisers in Steamboat’s Valley Voice.

“All I know is that whenever I think I know something, I find out someone else knew it before me.”

Direct all correspondence, articles, editorials or advertisements to the address below. The author’s signature and phone number must accompany letters to the editor. Names will be withheld upon request (at the discretion of the publisher).

“I have to quit eating the fortune cookies when I get chinese

Subscription rate is a donation of 35 measly dollars per year. However, if you wish to send more because you know we desperately need your money, don’t be shy, send us all you can!

Advertisers rates vary by size, call 970-846-8953 and we’ll come visit you.

Please make checks payable to: Valley Voice, LLC Thank you for your support!

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1125 Lincoln Ave. Unit 2C • Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

Strength and growth come only through continuous effort and struggle. -Napoleon Hill


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January 2017

Valley Voice

‘Boat Almanac

How to “Con-a-Fir” Part One By Karen Vail take up to two years to develop. Look for a small prickly ball indicating the first year’s cone. Another distinctive characteristic of lodgepole pine is the collection of female cones along the stems. Most conifers drop their cones each year, but the lodgepole retains its cones throughout its lifetime. Rocky Mountain lodgepole produce a unique cone; the serrotinous cone. Serrotinous cones look like normal woody female cones, but they remain closed on the tree. What are they waiting for? Well, read on and you will find out!

Get it? Conifer? Well, I won’t be conning any firs in this article, but I will endeavor to enlighten you about our beloved conifers. Because conifers are such integral parts of our landscapes I think they deserve more than one article. This month will cover the “pines” and next month the “non-pines”. Are you scratching your head about that term, conifer? Simply put, these are trees and shrubs bearing cones and (mostly) evergreen needle-like or scale-like leaves. Throughout the world conifers are important sources of lumber, resins and food. This newspaper you are reading probably came from a conifer. Here in Northwest Colorado most of our upper montane and subalpine ecosystems are covered in coniferous forests that offer food and shelter for wildlife, and climate control for these areas. These articles will concentrate on our local conifer species: the pines (lodgepole and limber), Engelmann spruce, subalpine fir and Douglas fir. Our junipers (Rocky Mountain and common juniper) will not be covered here. Let’s start with the pines. Lodgepole pine is one of the most widely distributed of the New World pines extending from Alaska and the Yukon Territory south to California, then east to the Rocky Mountains and the Black Hills of South Dakota. Our variety in Northwest Colorado is the Rocky Mountain lodgepole, Pinus contorta ssp. latifolia, and is distinctive from those in the Pacific Northwest and north to Alaska. Lodgepole pine’s common name comes from the slender, straight trunks of young stands that served as perfect poles for teepees (lodges) of the Native Americans. From a distance, the olive-green foliage of lodgepole pine is a distinct contrast to the dark greens of Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir. A closer look reveals greenish yellow needles, slightly twisted, in bundles of two where they are attached to the stem. Each tree has separate male and female cones. Male cones, clustered at the tips of the lower branches, are small, cylindrical and soft and produce the copious yellow plumes of spring pollen. Female cones are woody, yellowish brown in color with spiraling series of bracts, each with a curved spine at the tip, and produce long winged seeds tucked amongst the bracts to be released on the wind as the cones open. Good seed crops are produced every one to three years. Female cones

Lodgepole pine thrives on destruction. Wherever catastrophic fires, insect invasions, or logging have destroyed large areas of the previous forest cover lodgepole pine regenerates vigorously, producing a homogenous, evenaged forest (sometimes called “dog hair” stands because of their density). Have you hiked recently in the Zirkels or Flat Tops where the 2002 fires raged? The emerging lodgepole (and aspen, another pioneer species) forest is an encouraging ray of hope. The seedlings likely came from serrotinous cones opened by intense heat from the fires that melted the resins gluing the bracts together. As these stands grow they will look like a tree farm; even-aged and single story forests of homogenous lodgepole pines. These stands are dense and the negligible amount of light penetrating to the lower branches causes them to die creating an impenetrable network of dead branches. Add to the low light levels, the thick layer of highly acidic needles collecting on the forest floor and the sucking away of nutrients by the young trees, and this stage of the forest might seem pretty stark. Soon the forest begins to thin itself as the weakest trees die, adding to the nutrient base in the soil. The canopy thins letting light, moisture and nutrients through, and an understory of highly adapted plants starts taking hold. Growing in these dark, acidic, low nutrient conditions requires plants that are very opportunistic in their strategies for survival. It is best if you do not need to photosynthesize, as you may rarely see the sun, and gaining nutrients from other plants or dead things is an advantage. Two groups of plants, saprophytes and parasites, fill this niche with aplomb. Saprophytes contain no chlorophyll and get their nutrients from dead organic matter. Coralroot orchids (Corallorhiza spp.) and many kinds of fungi are common saprophytes in lodgepole forests. Pull up a bit of duff from the forest floor and it will undoubtedly be criss-crossed with a white lacey substance. This mycelia is the body of the fungus, waiting for perfect conditions to thrust up chanterelles, and other mushrooms. If the mycelia were not constantly breaking down organic matter we would be miles thick in dead plants, rotting carcasses and doo doo. Thank you fungi!! The parasites in the lodgepole forest are actors in a perfect Steven King plot. These plants suck the nutrients from other living plants, usually to the host’s detriment. Dwarf mistletoe (Arceuthobium spp.) and pinedrops (Pterospora andromeda) are two conifer parasites. Pinedrops feeds off conifer roots and is a strange looking maroon spike (lacking chlorophyll) up to 3 feet tall with drooping round flowers and a unique and beautiful lacey winged seed. Dwarf mistletoe doesn’t look like a plant at all; the leaves, branches and root system are so simplified that they are easy to overlook. The reduced leaves are able to photosynthesize minimally and have

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

a greenish tinge to them, but the majority of the plant is found under the lodgepole’s bark. Here the modified “roots” grow into the plumbing work of the host tree sucking up water and nutrients. Come late summer, the mistletoe reproduces through a bizarre seed dispersal process. The small seeds are held individually on pedestals and when fully ripe a chemical process takes place in the seed capsule generating a small amount of heat (a process called thermogenesis) that plays a key role in an explosive discharge of the seed (Rolena A.J. deBruyn, Mark Paetkau, Kelly A. Ross, David V. Godfrey & Cynthia Ross Friedman. Thermogenesis-triggered seed dispersal in dwarf mistletoe). The explosively released seeds can travel 88 feet per second for distances up to 50 feet. They have hit me in the face and they hurt! The seeds are coated in viscous goo that adheres to wherever it lands (face included!). If it lands on a tree branch it will grow new modified roots into the host and begin the process anew.

Limber pine. These are magical, majestic trees of skylines and rocky ridges. Northwest Colorado has no limber pine forests, but scattered populations in the toughest climates nature can throw their way. I have found collections in Fish Creek Canyon, Rabbit Ears Pass area and patches in the Zirkels, always on wind-swept, rocky barren slopes. Limber pine (Pinus flexilis) are usually less than 30 feet tall, broad-crowned and craggy in appearance. Branches appear tufted or bristly from the density of needles encircling the branch in clusters of five. Young branches and trees are silvery and smooth, and older trees become scaly and deeply furrowed. You can almost tie the younger branches in knots they are so flexible; limber pine lives up to its name. Like lodgepole pine, the male cones are small and insignificant, the female cones large and woody, elongated with smooth bracts (no bristles like lodgepoles). Limber pine, along with the Rocky Mountain bristlecone, are the longest-lived trees in the Southern Rockies. In central Colorado researchers have found several trees that average between 1,000 and a maximum of 1,700 years of age! Slow and steady wins this trees race. Limber pine are not fast growing trees and for the harsh sites they occupy this is an advantage. Wouldn’t you expect to find the oldest trees growing under optimal conditions? Not limber pines. The healthiest and oldest trees are found in the harshest areas, producing extremely narrow growth rings, meaning denser wood that is more stable in high winds and droughts and less prone to fungal, bacterial and insect attacks. Their wood is also highly resinous. Other adaptations to their tough environment include ultra-flexible branches that don’t break in high winds, the ability to retain functional needles for many years (in contrast to the lodgepole, which might retain functional needs for up to three years), and a deep taproot allowing younger plants to securely anchor themselves to rocky ridges to begin their long-lived journey. Their winged seeds are a food source for Clark’s nutcrackers, red crossbills and other seed eaters of the subalpine. Much of this information is from Audrey Delella Benedict’s outstanding book “The Naturalist’s Guide to the Southern Rockies”. Enjoy your backcountry outings in our splendid coniferous forests. See you on the trails.


Valley Voice

January 2017

5

Economics

The Diary of a Newbie By Scott L. Ford

(This is not an original story. I was sent this 10+ Christmas’ ago by an old friend. I laughed so hard I couldn’t get rid of it so I saved it to share. Merry Christmas Season to everyone! Enjoy!) Diary of a Newbie’s First Winter in Steamboat Springs December 9: We woke to a beautiful blanket of crystal white snow covering every inch of the landscape. What a fantastic sight! Can there be a lovelier place in the whole world? Moving here was the best idea I’ve ever had. I shoveled snow for the first time in years and felt like a boy again. I did both our driveway and the sidewalks. This afternoon the snowplow came along and covered up the sidewalks and closed in the driveway, so I got to shovel again! What a perfect life. December 12: The sun has melted much of our lovely snow. Such a disappointment. My neighbor tells me not to worry, we’ll definitely have a white Christmas. No snow on Christmas would be awful! Bob says we’ll have so much snow by the end of winter, that I’ll never want to see snow again. l don’t think that’s possible. Bob is such a nice man I’m glad he’s our neighbor. December 14: Snow, lovely snow! 8” last night. The temperature dropped to -20. The cold makes everything sparkle so. The wind took my breath away, but I warmed up by shoveling the driveway and sidewalks. This is the life! The snowplow came back this afternoon and buried everything again. l didn’t realize I would have to do quite this much shoveling, but I’ll certainly get back in shape this way. I wish l wouldn’t huff and puff so. December 15: 20 inches forecast. Sold my van and bought a 4x4 Blazer. Bought snow tires for the wife’s car and 2 extra shovels. Stocked the freezer. The wife wants a wood stove in case the electricity goes out. I think that’s silly. We aren’t in Alaska, after all. December 16: Snowed again this this morning. Fell on my butt on the in the driveway shoveling snow. Hurt like hell. The wife laughed for an hour, which I think was very cruel.

December 17: Still way below freezing. Roads are too icy to go anywhere. Electricity was off for 5 hours. I had to pile the blankets on to stay warm. Nothing to do but stare at the wife and try not to irritate her. Guess I should’ve bought a wood stove, but won’t admit it to her. God I hate it when she’s right. I can’t believe I’m slowly freezing to death in my own living room. December 20: Electricity’s back on, but had another 14” of stupid snow last night. More shoveling. Took all day. That stupid snowplow came by twice. Tried to find a neighbor kid to shovel, but they said they’re too busy playing hockey. I think they’re lying. Called the only hardware store around to see about buying a snow blower and they’re out. Might have another shipment in May. I think they’re lying. Bob says I have to shovel or the city will have it done and bill me. I think he’s lying. December 22: Bob was right about a white Christmas because 13 more inches of the white stuff fell today, and it’s so cold it probably won’t melt till August. Took me 45 minutes to get all dressed up to go out to shovel and then I had to use the restroom. By the time I got undressed, went and dressed again. I was too tired to shovel. Tried to hire Bob who has a plow on his truck for the rest of the winter; but he says he’s too busy. I think the jerk is lying. December 23: Only 2” of snow today. And it warmed up to zero. The wife wanted me to decorate the front of the house this morning. What is she, nuts? Why didn’t she tell me to do that a month ago? She says she did, but I think she’s lying. December 24: 6” today. Snow packed down hard by snowplow, l broke the shovel. Thought I was having a heart attack. If I ever catch the jerk who drives that snowplow, I’ll drag him through the snow by his hair. I know he hides around the corner and waits for me to finish shoveling and then he comes down the street at about 100 miles an hour and throws snow all over where I’ve just been! Tonight the wife wanted me to sing Christmas carols with her and open our presents, but I was busy watching for that stupid snowplow.

Have a safe and happy New Year. Don’t Drink and Drive!

December 25: Merry Christmas. 20 more inches of that slop again tonight. Snowed in. The idea of shoveling makes my blood boil. God I hate the snow! Then the snowplow driver came by asking for a donation and I hit him over the head with my shovel. The wife says I have a bad attitude. I think she’s an idiot. If I have to watch “It’s a Wonderful Life” one more time, I’m going to kill her. December 26: Still snowed in. Why the hell did I ever move here? It was all HER idea. She’s really getting on my nerves. December 28: Warmed up to 30 below and the pipes froze. Still snowed in. THAT WOMAN is driving me crazy!!!!! December 29: 10 more inches. Bob says I have to shovel the roof or it could cave in. That’s the silliest thing I ever heard. Shovel a roof! How dumb does he think I am? December 30: Roof caved in just before 4 AM. The snow plow driver is suing me. The wife went home to her mother. 9” predicted. December 31: Set fire to what’s left of the house. No more shoveling. January 8: I feel so good. I just love those little white pills they keep giving me. Why am I tied to the bed?

www.grandfutures.org

Without continual growth and progress, such words as improvement, achievement, and success have no meaning. -Benjamin Franklin


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January 2017

Valley Voice

Bonnifield Files

Sandy Wisecup: Growing up on Trout Creek By Ellen & Paul Bonnifield

Happy New Year from Paws and Claws! In Central Park Plaza

879-6092 Open late for New Year’s Eve! Torch Light Parade!

Breakfast: 8 am - 11 am Lunch: 11 am - 6 pm Happy Hour: 3 pm - 6 pm

In the decade and a half following World War II, a little girl, Sandy Long Wisecup, grew up along the banks of Trout Creek enjoying her paradise. She was the fourth child (born 1943) in a family of seven. Her father, John Long, owned a ranch where the Twenty Mile road crosses Trout Creek. Twenty Mile road to the right travels over Dobie Divide toward Hayden. The left road follows the stream to Apex Mine and Butler’s and Knott’s ranches.

When the Pinnacle Mine closed in 1950, the buildings of the company town were sold. Sandy’s dad purchased one of them and moved it to the ranch on Trout Creek. After pouring the foundation and before the house was placed on it, John installed a coal furnace. Sandy thought the furnace was still in the basement since there isn’t a practical way to get it out. A heavy grate in the floor placed directly above the furnace allowed heat to come straight up into the house. Sandy thought it was luxury to sit flat on that grate during cold nights.

Sandy’s first home was a three-room log house with a slab addition. Slabs were a waste product from several small sawmills operating nearby and available to anyone who hauled them off. The addition to the cabin, slabs nailed to studs, was a poor man’s way of making the house bigger. Cardboard boxes tacked on the inside and covered with wallpaper provided minimal insulation.

In the fall, the Minnesota Woolen Mill salesman Bart Steinbeck and his wife visited all the ranches along Trout Creek. Everyone welcomed those trunks full of blankets and woolen garments which were a pleasant change from their homemade flour sack shirts and dresses. The trunks were a shopping mall right in their living room. Sandy still uses blankets from the Minnesota Woolen Mills.

To conserve heat in the winter, the Longs closed all nonessential rooms. The house was heated with coal from the Apex Mine just up the creek a couple of miles, and wood. Recalling those cold mornings as a little girl, she waited until her mother got the fire in the heating stove going. Sandy then climbed on top of the stove until her bottom got so hot she had to get off.

As a little girl, Sandy and her younger brother Dusty walked all over the ranching community visiting neighbors. A kindhearted bachelor lived on Middle Creek. He was special because he always had hard candy to give them. He ate oatmeal for breakfast. Quaker Oats packed a bowl, cup or saucer in each box of oatmeal. These were treasured in every ranch home. After satisfying their need for candy, the two adventuring kids returned home with dishes for mom.

Her dad was a government trapper/hunter and was gone most of the winter. Mrs. Long, (Toots) was left to keep the ranch going. She, in turn, depended upon the kids to feed the chickens and pigs. Longs had several sows and raised many pigs. The ranch had only a few cows and horses. Like everyone else in the valley, the steady income came from milking cows and selling cream. John also had a small dryland farm in Foidel Canyon.

$4.00 house Bloody Marys from 8 am - 11 am (if the mid-mountain 5 am report says 6 inches or more)!

Unlike the towns, rural Routt County did not have dependable electricity until the REA arrived in the mid-1950s. Generally rural ranches depended upon oil or Coleman gas lamps, and a few, like Guido Rossi, had carbide lighting. John designed and built a diversion ditch in Trout Creek and installed a water generator. It was not a dependable system and only lit a couple of drop cord lamps, but it was an electrical system.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Sandy can remember getting only two spankings. One came in the spring when Trout Creek was running high. She and Dusty were pouting over something and decided to run away and hide. They refused to answer when called. A check with the neighbors revealed no clue to their whereabouts. Time passed and the kids didn’t come home. A search party was organized and started down through the willows along the creek bank. No kids were found. Over their pout, the kids came home and mother Toots, filled with worry about her children, expressed herself soundly and firmly across their bottoms. The second paddling came one morning when her dad called her and she pretended to be sleeping. After having her butt warmed, he told her that “pretending


Valley Voice

January 2017

Art in the ‘Boat to sleep when she wasn’t was the same as lying.” He would not allow any lying.

Winter Tracks By Dagny McKinley

Every year on July 1, the Long family made ice cream. To get ice to pack around the cylinder, the kids walked to the Blue Spruce Mine near the entrance of Little Trout Creek Canyon. Water draining into the mine in the spring collected and froze near the back. The kids went into the old abandoned mine until they reached the ice. No one had any fear of that mine or any other of the several old mines along the creek. The Ben Male Mine, later called the Big Mac Mine, dated from the 1890s.

Whether you are a local, a second homeowner or a visitor to Steamboat in the winter, one thing creates a common bond between us all: snow. How each of us gets out and explores may vary, but if you live in a ski town, embracing the long winters, the glittering snow and wide open spaces is essential. A celebration of how we engage with the snow is the theme for January’s ‘Winter Tracks’ show at the Steamboat Springs Art Depot, where skis, snowboards and snowshoes will be transformed into fine art.

As fall approached and currents ripened, the community organized picking parties in Foidel Canyon. People gathered wash tubs of currents to be made into jellies and syrups.

Many of you may remember Rebecca Bailey, one of the featured artists, whose ‘Powder Day’ skis exhibited last year. “Powder Day,’ a mosaic of blue, yellow and white hand-cut tile overlaid on skis captured why people move here. The skis were inspired by “a perfect day on the slopes with sunshine, a bluebird sky and deep powder! A few of her other designs reflect the essence of black diamond ski runs and vintage ski sweaters. Bailey also adds a special touch to each of her skis; she writes a positive message to the buyer on the skis underneath the tiles.

As part of the New Deal Relief programs, miners were encouraged to open wagon mines. Most of those started in Routt County were only one or two-man operations. Under the program, Carl Steele located a four-foot seam of excellent coal and opened the Apex Mine. The mine, although working only a small crew, operated until the 1980s. Adjacent to the mine was the Lower Trout Creek School. Unlike most ranchers, John Long didn’t have many horses and his children had to walk two miles to school. When the oldest son, Nelson, was big enough drive the Ford tractor, a box was fixed to the back and he drove everyone to school. Other kids rode miles to school. In the winter, the county roads did not have much traffic and the fresh plowed roads were ideal for sledding. Dobie Hill had a steep grade for more than a mile. Someone hauled the kids to the top while another person stayed at the bottom to stop any cars that came until all the sleds were safely down. Sandy said the old runner sleds got to going pretty fast for a six-year-old kid. Across the creek from the house was a double door barn and beyond that a long steep hill. The older boys, Nelson and Mike, used scoop shovels to pack a trail up the hillside. Then big and little kids climbed on a toboggan. They sailed off the hill at a very high rate of speed and through the two barn doors. They stopped just short of the stream. John and some other men skidded the old upper Trout Creek school house down to the Cross Roads (where the county road crosses the stream). The building became the Cross Roads Community Center. Many functions were held in the building, but the biggest and most enjoyable were the dances. That building kept beat with the music. On faster tunes the floor would bounce. Any dancer out of rhythm found the floor either too soon or too late. Delmar Coyner’s band played for many enjoyable dances. Time moved on; Sandy grew up; most of the ranchers moved away or died. The school closed and the community center became silent. For a short span of years, a little girl lived in paradise.

7

created since her earliest memories and we are thrilled she is still creating today. Ring in the New Year January 6th at the Art Depot for their First Friday celebration, ‘Winter Tracks,’ a celebration of snow, of recreation and of the arts; all the elements that make Steamboat Springs one of the most unique winter destinations to visit. For more information visit SteamboatArts.org.

Joining Bailey in January, among an array of noted artists, is Candice Jones who will be submitting a decorated snowboard in a multi media medium of glass, glitter and other found and created objects. The theme, ‘Winter Tracks’ was a natural with Jones whose main problem with the exhibition was settling on a vision. In the end, the natural flow of the snow and skis inspired her. That’s not really a surprise given that Jones discovered Steamboat on her way to Dinosaur National Park. After eleven days of camping and exploring, she fell for Steamboat and decided to stay. While she has an appreciation for every season, she has a definite soft spot for winter. “When I’m skiing or snow shoeing, I love the sparkles in the snow and the way the snow drapes and naturally decorates our environment,” said Jones. Jones was initially inspired as an artist by her 6th grade teacher, Mrs. Lynch. Jones took every art class available with her from 6th grade through high school. She later enrolled in a 2 year college for Advertising and Design with Printmaking as her love!! For Jones the most creative part of creating art is the creative process itself. “Even though I drive myself nutz with obtaining my 3rd eye impulse....(usually in the shower first thing in the morning) then I am transfixed on the creative process, gathering sketches, materials for the project and then immersing myself in the project itself. For 2 solid days I could not wait to get at the snow board.....it totally consumed me for two complete days............and that is what I love about the process. I wish I could do that every day!!” said Jones. Winter’s touch is apparent in artist Dona Steele’s work as well. Her old touring skis will be embellished with winter and the skis themselves as the theme. Her inspiration came from the ‘Backcountry Ball,’ which was held at the Depot. It was a kick-off to the winter and helped raise awareness for the backcountry. Decorated skis were a part of the fundraising effort. Steele has

Thank You for a great 2016! We look forward to growing with you for years to come. 2560 Copper Ridge Drive, Steamboat Springs, Colorado (970) 879-8577

Intellectual growth should commence at birth and cease only at death. -Albert Einstein


8

January 2017

Valley Voice

Routt County Disasters

I Don’t Want to Be Your Hero By Lyn Wheaton

Flight 2016 – bound for 2017, due to arrive in 264 hours, give or take. I wasn’t thrilled to be sitting in the Emergency Exit row. Whenever I fly, my first priority is to secure a bulkhead seat. It used to be fairly easy to obtain a seat in that section. Usually a call to the airline explaining the enormity of my phobias, and the possible consequences if they chose to ignore them -- would do the trick. But nowadays, no amount of whining and pleading is sufficient. You either have to pay a premium, or if you are flying on Southwest, trample all the other passengers to get to the bulkhead first. I’ve been tempted, on more than one occasion, to knock a few people down to get the seat I want. But now was not one of those times, my daughter was flying with me. I suppose we should be happy that we were allowed to purchase an upgrade enabling us to obtain this second best option. Seated with relative comfort in the Emergency Exit row, along with three other passengers that were lucky enough to acquire these slightly more spacious seats, we prepared for take off. Just before the official safety talk, a flight attendant came to our section and addressed the five of us. She held up the laminated instruction card and stated, “You have chosen these seats in the Emergency Exit row and with that comes responsibility. You must read the safety procedure card and be prepared in case of an emergency. If you do not wish to accept this obligation or feel you cannot, for any reason, perform this duty, you will have to move to a different seat.” When it was confirmed that none of us were giving up the seats, she initiated a swearing in ceremony. Before we started, she instructed us to individually confirm, with an audible yes, that we do, in fact, choose to accept the tremendous charge. She raised her right hand just like a Bailiff swearing in a witness to testify. This was serious. We were being strong-armed into taking an oath that must have been binding under some aviation law. The thing is, if we failed – no one would ever know anyway. I raised my right hand. I mulled this over in my head for a minute more. I didn’t exactly choose to take on the added responsibility of helping everyone on the plane escape in the event of a catastrophe. I paid extra to sit here. Even though I probably would do it anyway because that’s just the kind of person I am. But really, this was kind of a gyp, I paid extra and now I might have to work. Will I be compensated for making the airline look good when this thing goes down? Why are they leaving the plane in the hands of a bunch of amateurs anyway? They have no idea what we’ve been up to prior to boarding. Maybe I don’t want to save myself, let alone a bunch of strangers. Had the airline thought of that before they installed me as one of their First Responders? Apparently not, because there were no probing questions to qualify us and if I didn’t reply, I was going to lose this seat.

I wanted to stay here, so despite the extra thirty dollars I paid, I decided to be part of the rescue team. Semper Fi. We all raised our hands and answered with a resounding “Yes.” Satisfied she had secured the plane, if and when disaster struck, she left. This was a big deal; I was overcome with a sense of duty. The fate of the entire plane rested with the five of us and I was equal to the challenge. I had given my word and my sense of responsibility overtook me. I decided I better start reading that safety primer. Frantically, I started rummaging through the magazines, brochures, and not one, but two, barf bags in the back pocket of the seat in front of me. I couldn’t find the safety information card she held up during the oath and became concerned. How can we rescue a plane full of passengers with this kind of disorganization? I looked around at the seat pockets of the other four prospective heroes, my team. And was shocked to discover the dishonesty that surrounded me. No one else in our group was bothering to read the safety card prominently displayed in each of their seat pockets. The card was right smack in front of each of them, glaring in it’s calling, and they were ignoring it -- all four of them. This was so disturbing. I was caught between a rock and the safety door. I considered telling on them but it is very non-fraternal to turn on the members of your company. Besides, if the time came, they might decide a mutiny is in order. This whole thing could turn out very badly for me, not to mention the unsuspecting passengers on board this airliner. How could they be so reckless with their word? It wasn’t even five minutes ago we chimed, “yes!” in unison with our collective hands raised. One of my team members is doing a Sudoku puzzle. Those skills will be so handy when trying to force open that emergency exit and free us all from the loss of cabin pressure. Another is texting or doing something on an electronic device, which could be slightly more helpful in the event of our possible demise. If those thumbs were agile enough she could shoot off one last text and save us from the fate of rank speculation by CNN as to our whereabouts. The other two are staring like zombies out the window of the Emergency Exit door we are supposed to be learning to open, to prepare as an escape route for our fellow passengers. It looks like it’s up to me now. I reached over and lifted the safety card from the seat in front of my team member. A cursory glance at the pictogram told me I was in trouble. This was complicated stuff. Step-by-step, I studied the instructions. They looked like a less sophisticated version of those Egyptian Cave drawings. When I got to the part where we would have to open the door, panic set in. I am not mechanically inclined, at least not when it comes to opening and closing things -- either is my daughter, come to think of it.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Once, when she was in grade school we bought a music stand so she could play her electronic keyboard and when we got it home, we couldn’t figure out how to open it. No instructions came with it, probably because a monkey could have figured it out, but not us. After struggling with it for about an hour, we tossed it back in the car and went to the music store for assistance. The manager looked skeptical of us, like maybe we were punking him or something. He pulled the little metal cross stand open from the top and there it stood. No screws, no levers, no assembly, just pull it open and it’s ready to go. Sometimes, when you are really smart, simple things like this elude you because you are unable to see the basic simplicity in a design. That’s what we decided was our problem. But this time I didn’t think the problem was too simple. I worried we would never get that door open and everyone would die. I sure wish I didn’t have to bear this burden alone. It was time to rally the team. I looked over at the hapless group I was expected to save the plane with. Perplexed by their complete disregard for the promise we made, the sheer dishonesty shocked me, and the lack of follow through by way of any supervision from the airline alarmed me. The airline had the ability to pressure them into co-operating. They had these desirable seats with that tiny bit of extra legroom to use as chattel. Was I the only one who cared? Never wavering, I stepped up to be the leader and take control of the situation. I was on my own. I mentally prepared myself using some old visualization techniques. I pictured the mayhem that would ensue and saw myself as the calm heroine I knew I could be. My daughter said my one attribute is that I will lay my life on the line for anyone. I never hesitate to spring into action when I see a person in distress, so I imagine she’s feeling pretty secure in that I will save her first, despite her dereliction of duty. I can barely pull myself together to get to the grocery store but give me an injured or downed person and there will be no thought before I go into Savior mode. I perform best just on the edge of disaster, but if something small should upset my apple cart – I go to pieces. I’m not normal, I know this but then again, what hero is? I tried to engage the team without being too bossy. I turned to my daughter. She was the one texting. She was an intelligent businesswoman. She could probably figure this out. I showed her the instruction card and asked for clarification. She looked at it for a minute and shrugged. “It’s nice” I said, “that they make it like a comic strip, so it’s universally understood, but a little text would be helpful. I‘m having trouble understanding how we get the inflatable slide to operate. See… this picture isn’t making sense.” To her credit, she looked at it for a minute and then started laughing. “I have no idea” she said, “it looks like they skipped a step, this drawing is jacked up.” I agreed and decided to flag down the flight attendant for interpretation. At that point, my daughter disengaged.


Valley Voice

I hadn’t succeeded in rallying the team in any meaningful fashion. The other three members turned their backs when they saw we were looking at the card. I decided to take definitive action. I would go to the flight attendants cubby and pretend I needed coffee. While the attendant busied herself preparing the beverage, I would use the PA system to recruit some new teammates. I rehearsed it in my head so I didn’t make any mistakes: “Attention Passengers,” I would say, “There is no cause for alarm. You may or may not be aware that the safety procedures on this plane are nonexistent and this vessel is in grave jeopardy. I was put in charge of your safety along with four other people who have unfortunately turned out to be slackers of the worst sort.” As I made my way toward the stewardess station, abutting the cockpit, the plane started bouncing around. Oh great – we’re going down and the plane is not secure. I feel so lonely in this quest. I wobbled my way toward the front of the plane ricocheting off the seats. Taking the time along the way to introduce myself, I tried to learn a little about the poor suckers whose lives I held in my hands. I felt it prudent to ask if anyone had a DNR directive so that I wouldn’t waste any of my heroic measures on them. The flight attendant caught sight of me and became agitated. She signaled me to return to my seat. I was almost there I wasn’t going to turn back now. I had a mission to fulfill. With sudden force I was thrust to the right. When I recovered from the shock, I found myself at the coveted bulkhead seating area and noticed an empty seat. A jolt propelled me, in a surprisingly graceful manner, right into the vacant seat. I landed between a man with a dog and a handsome bohemian woman. The man cracked jokes, and the woman talked of her travels. They had no clue what was happening. Oblivious, they ordered a round of drinks. Shortly thereafter, a male flight attendant started singing show tunes. The whole flight was becoming very Titanicesque. I decided I would rather be here in the ballroom than preparing the lifeboats. I ordered a few shots and forgot all about my team. The plane was in their hands now. Sometimes, even a hero has to know when to throw in the towel. Such is life.

9

January 2017

Go Figure!?

Christmas Came Early By Scott L. Ford

Christmas came early for me this year. The 2015 Census data for Routt County and its communities was released last week. For a data geek, this is a present I can hardly wait to open and explore. This data provides a window into both demographics and the economy of Routt County. Below are some highlights: 1. The aggregate household income of Routt County in 2015 was about $803 million. This is money that collectively Routt County residents received from all sources. Sources of income such as wages/salary, selfemployment, social security/pensions, investments, etc. In 2014, the aggregate household income for Routt County on an inflation adjusted basis was about $775 million. This means that Routt County had a 3.5% growth in household income. Colorado saw income growth of 3.4% and Nationally, it was slightly over 1% 2. The distribution of this $803 million in aggregate household income is becoming increasingly skewed. In 2015, the top 20% of Routt County’s households had a 50.2% share of the aggregate income. In 2010, the top 20% had a 44.5% share. 3. The population in Routt County is officially “middle age.” The median age is now 40.1 years. So, if you are 40 years old in Routt County there are an equal number of folks from birth to death who are younger or older on either side of you. In 2015, the median age for Colorado was 36.3, and Nationally, it was 37.6. 4. The population increased by 254 folks. Populations grow for only two reasons: more people are born than die. This is call natural growth. Or, more people moved in than out. This is called migration. In 2015, natural growth was 104. (208 were born and 104 died.) Net migration was 150. Net migration continues to account for the majority of growth in Routt County.

The Pilot’s voice came over the PA system: As we prepare for the approach into the New Year, fasten your seatbelt, make sure your tray table and seat are in their upright position, take a moment to find the exits closest to you, and don’t worry about things you can’t control. Thank you for flying with us, and enjoy your stay.

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Growth is never by mere chance; it is the result of forces working together. -James Cash Penney


10

January 2017

Valley Voice

The Wandering Rose

The Light Always Changes With winter, the descent into darkness came upon the quaint town of Steamboat Springs. Nights filled more hours than day, and for many, there was a reconnection to the moon and the stars, to the clouds and the glitter falling from the sky. The land was put to bed with a blanket of snow to cover tender grasses and aspen shoots. Rainbows of flowers relinquished their vibrant colors to the barren, brown branches of oak, golden grasses soon to be buried, rock, snow and sky. The earth lay in slumber, replenishing reserves of nutrients and water for the spring and summer that lay ahead. Every day, Audrey Rose woke up grateful. She rose before the sun to spend time in a world not often traveled by others. In the earliest, most bitter hours of the

morning she could wander without seeing another soul. Her bare feet buried into the snow, her sparkly skirt caught a twinkle of the moon and cast sparkles of its own. Her nipples perked up at the cold while frost laced her eyelashes. Her companions of the morning were fir trees, whose branches were heavy with snow, needles feathered with hoarfrost, fox, moose and elk. With her body naked to the world she felt most alive. And when the line between dark and light arrived, she gave thanks for another day, thanks to be alive. The stillness of night and of winter always led Audrey Rose deep inside of herself. As the winter solstice approached she found herself remembering her family and her childhood. She spent the solstice alone, in silence, observing the falling of snowflakes, the movement of the lives around her and most importantly, the changing of light. While colder days would come, so too would come the light. Brightness would settle in around her. To celebrate the ascension from darkness into light, Audrey Rose always held a Saturnalia party where, like her, everything was backwards for seven days. The parties took place high on Rabbit Ears Pass, where an enormous bonfire burned, sending sparks up to the heavens. Men came dressed as women and women as men. Bosses served their employees and employees gave the orders for change. Dogs were treated as cats and cats as dogs. Birds settled to the ground

while the elk and moose took a turn at flying. Everyone was welcome. Wine flowed and for a while people understood what it was to be someone they were not. During the days people slept and at night they loved. They loved people they did not know, they loved themselves, and they were filled with hope and possibility as they careened toward the New Year. On the 27th of December, as the fire burned down and people woke from their reverie, ashes were scattered over the snow, darkness covering the light once more, fertilizing the land for next year’s growth. After the reckless abandon of Saturnalia, Audrey Rose returned to her cave. She set her intentions for the New Year. She wrote down the things she wanted to forget from the year before and buried them deep under the snow. She wrote about the things she was grateful for and hung those memories from the trees so the wind could carry their joy to others. And for the future, she wrote of her dreams and put them in a jar with soil and seeds so they would grow day by day. After the New Year had come and gone, her seeds sprouted with life. The light stayed by her side a little longer each day and the dark slowly disappeared.

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Bina and Crash relaxing in front of Coach’s Cove


Valley Voice

January 2017

11

Mister Helpful’s Dating Guide

Are you even Ready to Start Dating?

It’s all about your Happiness

By Mr. Helpful, M.D.

• It’s funnier to play “what’s that smell?” with someone who gets you.

Are you even Ready to Start Dating?

• Makes you look normal when you are walking around in public, while talking out loud.

(…again…?)

• Gets you out of the house that you don’t want to clean.

Well … are you?

• Keeps someone around to kill spiders and the like.

Of course you are. Everyone is ready to date. Well ok, not everyone, but let’s talk about YOU and see if you are ready to try dating for the first time in a while and get back in the Dating Gene Pool once again.

• Finally someone who can appreciate all the hard work you put into getting yourself into amazing shape and they might be a good kisser too.

But first this joking advice:

• It’s better to have someone you trust to help pick out clothes.

The Pros & Cons of getting back into Dating. (The best 20 of them anyway)

All that aside, “Are you ready to Date?” is a legit question. Some people are NOT ready to start Dating again.

Getting back into dating - The Cons:

Story Time:

• Are you nutz?!? Do you have any idea what kind of diseases are out there these days?

I met Sarah at a farmer’s market. She had a booth selling yoga clothes. Cute, tight fitting and lovely; the clothes were nice, too. When I approached her, she had that kind of smile that made me think she was grinding her brain grapes to figure out if I might be someone who she would want to date. We chatted, I gave her my number and a couple of days later we chatted more. Seems like we would hit it off with several important life choices in common: cats, yoga and being single. The basics.

• It’s less expensive to just live and die alone, but you do have to pay for your own funeral. • Whoever is still single in your age group are the “Leftovers” in the dating pool. Think hard about that group. • It’s just easier to not try. What’s on TV tonight? • After dating for so many years, I just don’t want to have to say it all again to a new group of strangers – over and over again. • I’m tired of meeting freaks and losers. • I don’t want to have any more kids. • I don’t want to have any kids around, regardless of how old they are.

• I won’t get my heart broken ever again. • It’s like paying for sex. Getting back into dating – The Pros: • It’s like not having to pay for sex. (sort of)

OR after a breakup, separation or divorce, our fun friends will say “Get back on that horse. Get out there and just have a Revenge F*@k.” Yes dear, these are our friends. They love us and just want us to be happy. But my encouragement is to be YOUR kind of happy, not theirs. And when you are ready connect with someone for all the right reasons. The list of Right Reasons can be found behind the smile of your favorite new next best friend; that person you are looking at in a yummy way. YOU will be ready to date when YOU are ready. It might be that you just wake up one day and think it. It might be that you meet someone who flipped that little switch in your heart or groin, and suddenly you think, “this is a good idea.” So do it. Be patient with yourself. When you are ready, and not a second sooner. Happy New Year to all and to all a good day.

Find Mister Helpful’s Dating Guide on Facebook, hit the LIKE button and read the expanded versions of this column and others. Next month – Holding hands does not lead to sex – Yes it’s a gateway drug, but it’s not a signed in blood contract making anyone submit to super happy naked funtime hour.

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• It’s always nice to have a warm someone in bed, you can push your cold butt checks up against.

There are folks in this world right now, who had been involved with someone they considered The LOVE of their LIFE… and then that person died. And some thoughtless jerk is hitting on them in the worst way right now. So they are not ready to Date. But some day … they will be. This takes time. When you are ready is when you are ready.

On the day of our Date, I got an email, lengthy and detailed about how she just wasn’t ready to start dating. She had finished up a messy divorce a few months earlier from a 17yr marriage. I wrote back that it would not be a problem and if she just wanted to sit, drink and talk to a new friend, I’d be game for being the nice guy with no romantic/sexual under or over tones. Even that was too much for her, she just wasn’t ready. No date, no problem.

• I don’t need a partner to raise my own kid. • I don’t want to move and I like where I live.

That not everyone will think that I’m the perfect man for them. It’s all about making a connection with someone. AND IF you my dear friend are not ready to have someone connect with you (in that or any kind of away) and you are still a bit bruised, hurt, pissed, confused, ashamed, bitter or whatever; you might NOT be ready to Date. So don’t.

P

Opening the New Year – talking to the folks who are just getting back into the dating scene after a long relationship has ended.

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Liberty, when it begins to take root, is a plant of rapid growth. -George Washington


12

January 2017

Valley Voice

Literary License

A Light in the Trailer

Raising Wild: Dispatches from a Home in the Wilderness

By Pat Curran, Hayden, Colorado 1. The winter wind moans Beneath a waning moon, And south of town, a single-wide Sinks deeper in the ground. I ride by every day Why I stopped, I can’t say. Well yeah, it’s Bill’s place An old friend from Santa Fe

By Jenna Meierbilbo

Raising Wild is nonfiction that reads like fiction. It’s a memoir that seems like a figment of its author’s imagination. Michael Branch describes the Great Basin Desert of Nevada with such fluidity that one almost feels like they’ve been transported to the vast plains of Tolkien’s Rohan or Gondor, except this place actually exists, and it’s within driving distance. Even the most routine activities become prose when written by Branch, and he manages to turn the natural movement of the desert into the articulate flow of words. By the end of Raising Wild, the reader is introduced to the author’s family, friends, and congregation, all the while feeling like they’ve become a part of all three. Anyone who worships in the mountains, or on the lake, or by the sea, or surrounded by the vastness of the world will find himself or herself completely consumed by the reverence with which Michael Branch views his landscape. Look no further, for here you have found a kindred soul. It begins with a short anecdote about Branch’s first daughter, Hannah, who becomes fixated on climbing a hill named Moonrise near the family home. Her father promises that the three of them, Hannah, Michael, and his youngest daughter Caroline, will all climb Moonrise on Hannah’s sixth birthday. Hannah spends the time leading up to the day of the journey preparing with a vigor that is unique to six year olds, and they all set out together when the day arrives, but climbing mountains isn’t easy for child, or a man with a toddler on his back. Before long our young heroine is questioning her resolve, but dad provides encouragement. They can keep going, but the mountain isn’t going anywhere any time soon, and they can come back another time. This seems to push Hannah on, and they all continue their climb to its beautiful conclusion. Raising Wild is peppered with moments like this, where the family draws its strength from each other, and whether through determination or stubbornness, maybe both, move on to successful ends. It is very clear throughout the entire novel that these are people who aim to not only live on the land, but also live with the land, whatever that means at the time. It they are watching fires burning over the edge of the horizon, build firebreaks. If rodents are destroying what you plant, build a fence (though to be fair, nature soundly defeats Branch in that story.) Learn about the landscape where you exist, and you will exist more peacefully. Branch writes about the land itself as if it was another member of his family, and perhaps it is. He is not shy about discussing the effects his home has had on him, nor does he shy away from wanting the desert and all of its harsh beauty and resilience to rub off on his daughters. More so though, he speaks of how his family, and humans in general, can have an effect on the land. Branch chronicles how he was an integral part of a citizens’ appeal to his city council trying to stop a land development that would destroy a large piece of pronghorn territory near his

2. Oh boy! Back then We were young guns Out there on the run Ropin’ steers and ramblin’ From Fort Worth to Pendleton. Later on, we lost touch Dammed if I remember much. They say he had a hard life Lost his ranch, Lost his wife.

home. He digs deep into the evolutionary history of the North American Pronghorn, and what makes them such a unique species, and then discusses how the westward expansion of the United States nearly wiped them from the planet. He waxes poetic on the Pleiades constellation, and how ancient civilizations had recorded seeing as many as fourteen stars in that figure, where as now we see only nine on a very clear night. These civilizations built monuments and told epic stories based on the positioning of this cluster of stars. What has light pollution done to our understanding of our place in the world? Michael Branch also introduces his reader to the influence of the high alpine zone, Lake Tahoe, and the Truckee River on the Great Basin area, and how he became a high alpine forest monitor to protect that land so he could have a greater influence on what happened in his home desert. Whether Branch is trying to save the trees, or prevent a fire from consuming his home, his point is always the same. Nature and humanity cannot exist separately; they must exist symbiotically, and draw strength from each other. Branch is poignant and funny. He is clear about his message whether is ranting about the stick’s induction into the Toy Hall of Fame, the evolutionary adaptations of desert wildlife, how he would like to map human experience, or his loathing of The Sound of Music. His adoration of is family is present in every page, and thus is his final point-we must leave this place better than we found it. Nature and culture are one in humanity, and you cannot choose nature over nurture or vice versa. These choices are so intimately connected that to ignore one is to abandon both. As humans we are in a unique position. We have the power to change everything about our world with a single choice, but we must consider the consequences of those choices. Do we want to live in a world where our children will no longer be able to run outside to see the seven sisters in the sky, or go on a road trip and witness an antelope running so speedily it appears to be flying? Will we allow ourselves to become so disconnected from the world, that we lose each other in the process? That is not inevitable…yet.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

3. Maybe he’s just dyin’ slow Dryin’ up and lettin’ go Like sage brush In a dry gulch But gawd damn and amen, This ain’t no way to treat a friend And I can’t comprehend The light in the trailer. Is it a dim bulb on a tight wire? Or, a lost soul catching fire? Think I’ll mosey down And say hello

Somewhere in New Mexico Photo by Ellen Scharf


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821 Lincoln Ave - schmiggitys.com at The Bo d e s is -M 1/5/17 ass 9 pm $5 r ibute G y t r Pa - 90's Tr le b m a water R - White 1/6/17 10 $ unk10 pm - Acid-F ir o h C Knuckle a 10 pm $10 hubby C 7 erican 1 / 7 1/ nd...Am a s s a r Soulg ountry/ Band - C ll a h s r a - Ben M 1/8/17 na 9 pm $5 a ountry Americ d Dirt C e R e s ou - Wheelh 1/9/17 9 pm $5 p 8 pm Hip-ho ver 21 $10 s t o o R o - Nappy 0:30 pm 1/12/17 1 Show $15 1 nts KLL Under 2 k prese 5 10 pm r o w t e own N lectronic). $ - Ghetd J/E 1/13/17 Bogtrotter (D & H T SM 10 pm er Band ce) $5 10 pm g a L is r -K Tran 1/14/17 oul & Boogie S y v a (He s 10 pm ommon REE 10 pm C lo a ff ) F - Bu 1/19/17 n Bluesoulfolk a ic r e m (Am tra 10 p Orches $10 10 pm h is h P - Dead ribute 1/21/17 l Dead/Phish t u pers (Gratef he Yaw $15 T / w e Orang Trio) 10 pm - Agent er 1/25/17 unk/Surf Pow P ( m s& 10 p an Chry y R / w t Ou - Cash'd 10 pm 1/26/17 gh Cuts $10 u m The Ro .N. 10 p & the U o c s a r F 10 pm - Andy 1/27/17 od Music) $15 (Feel Go 10 pm zy Bear 10 pm z u M 1/28/17 ctronica) $10 g 10 pm (Live Ele ing Pon 10 pm P g in y 5 ns Pla k) $1 - Pigeo elic Fun 1/29/17 ergy Psyched n (High-E e Night

in Danc t a L : s araoke Sunday K d n a B ys: Live a d n o M uesday T p e t S ys: 2Oh Schmiggity! Tuesda raoke a K : s y sda Wedne Schmappy Hour 7-9 Daily Steamboat's ONLY Happy Hour from 7-9 pm $1 1/2 Off the entire bar; Genesee Cans Schmiggity-ball Sliders and Cheese $3 1/2 pound 100% Angus Beef HotSchmac Dogs

Tickets online at schmiggitys.com or at All That. 821 Lincoln Ave - schmiggitys.com

January 2017

17

Smoke Signals

News from the Chief of the Chief By Scott Parker

Hello all and thank you for reading the 40th installment of Smoke Signals: News from The Chief of The Chief. A Happy New Year to ALL! Hard to believe that it is 2017 and this is my 40th time writing for the Valley Voice. Thank you Paulie and Matt for the opportunity to express my views in your amazing publication. Keep up the good work and I wish you both a prosperous New Year! The changing of the year…(while totally arbitrary as time is a man made abstraction) is a time for both reflection and one for looking ahead. So I shall do both below…in typical Chief of the Chief bullet point fashion. 2016 Highlights (in random order): • NAVIGATOR AWARD WINNING BUSINESS OF THE YEAR!!!! • Zabrecky, Armstrong, Capehart and Paul… in Steamboat is Magic! Festival 2.0 • An Evening With Cracker • Cannibal! The Musical • Scrooge’s Christmas • Live Western Melodrama • Love, Loss and What I Wore • THE CHIEF PLAYERS ARE AMAZING! • Jessie Burns and A Celtic Christmas • Small Town World • Kate Brady • Too many to list them all…these are just a few of the highlights 2017 has a lot of exciting events on tap! • MusicFest 2017….ALL 4 NIGHTS!! • WinterWonderGrass…2 NIGHTS!!! • Chief Players Weekend of One Acts, January 27th and 28th • Tongue in Chief Players IMPROV!!! Every Thursday in February • Songwriter Series: Jan 12th Lucy Kaplansky, Jan 20th Cheryl Wheeler, Feb 25th Moors and McCumber, and March 18th Rebecca Folsom • Live Western Melodrama returns this summer • Yampa Valley Boys St. Patricks Day Party • HAUNTED HOUSE IN OCTOBER!!! • Plus much much more!!! Please follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram or go to our website and sign up for our weekly email blast! Thank you for reading and see you at the Chief!!! Cheers, Scott

www.chieftheater.com 813 Lincoln Avenue 970-871-4791

January 5

Cody Canada and The Departed with Zac Wilkerson Doors @ 7pm Show @ 7:30pm Tickets: $30.

January 10

Winter Film Series

Tread of Pioneers Museum Presents:

PerryShow Mansfield @ 7pm FREE

January 12

Songwriter Series Presents:

Lucy Kaplansky Doors @ 6:30 pm Show @ 7pm

Tickets: $20.

January 13

Kim Hess Presents:

Following your Dreams to the Top of the World Talk begins @ 6:30 pm

January 27 & 28 The Chief Players Present:

A Weekend ofDoorsOne Acts @ 6:30 Show @ 7

Tickets: Tickets: Adults: $15$20. Students: $10 Growth is a spiral process, doubling back on itself, reassessing and regrouping. -Julia Margaret Cameron


18

January 2017

Valley Voice

Calendar of Events SUNDAY JANUARY 1

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 4

NFL Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents Community Sand Painting Noon to 7PM @ Library Hall Chakpurs (authentic sand painting tools and colored sand will be available for everyone to try this ancient Tibetan art form. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events

Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub Latin Dance Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com MONDAY JANUARY 2 Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline.teuscher@ gmail.com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Nia is a holistic, non-impact, aerobic dance workout to Beautiful, fun music. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY JANUARY 3 Bud Werner Memorial Library presents Community Sand Painting Noon – 7PM @ Library Hall Chakpurs (authentic sand painting tools) and colored sand will be available for everyone to try this ancient Tibetan art form. Children MUST be accompanied by an adult. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www.mountaintapbrewery.com Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4 (844) 955-1066 www.foundrytreatmentcenter.com Women Who Wine 6PM @ Sundance Studio Formed by women for women to learn more about local non-profits. www.steamboatchamber. com/community/womenwho-wine-jan Karaoke Night 10PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com THURSDAY JANUARY 5 MusicFest 2017 9AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Now in it 32nd year, this annual event features 8 bands and 40 live performances. For schedule and information http://themusicfest. com/home/ Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class.

To submit your events or calendar information e-mail: paulie@yampavalleyvoice.com Events may be edited for length or content. Calendar entries must be received by the 15th of each month. Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners MusicFest 2017 Welcome Party *Open to the public! 7PM @ The Chief Zac Wilkerson takes the stage at 7:30 followed by Cody Canada & The Departed Tickets $30 @ www.chieftheater.com Missed the Boat 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Party-grass $5. www.schmiggitys.com FRIDAY JANUARY 6 MusicFest 2017 9AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Now in it 32nd year, this annual event features 8 bands and 40 live performances. For schedule and information http://themusicfest. com/home/ Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@ springsips.com 970-846-5608 Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents Community Sand Painting Noon to 7PM @ Library Hall Chakpurs (authentic sand painting tools) and colored sand will be available for everyone to try this ancient Tibetan art form. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events

First Friday Art Walk 5PM @ Downtown Steamboat. Self-guided tour of local art galleries, museums and alternative venues. FREE.

Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com

Art Walk Reception “Winter Tracks” 5PM @ Art Depot An exhibition of embellished skis, snowboards and snowshoes on display through February. Also reception for Ryan Keating, winner of the Arts & Gallery Guide contest. Julia Dordoni works displayed in the Platform Gallery. FREE. www.steamboatarts.org

Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing. Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER

First Friday Art Walk @ Jace Romick Gallery 5PM @ The Chief FREE. www.chieftheater.com

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

The Paul Thorn Band 7PM @ Strings Music Pavilion. Paul Thorn plays his own brand of blues, country and Southern Rock www.stringsmusicfestival. com Whitewater Ramble – 90’s tribute 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Rocky Mountain Dance-grass $10 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com SATURDAY JANUARY 7 Giant Slalom 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Mountain Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Bolle Age Series Giant Slalom http://sswsc.org Moguls Competition 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Mountain Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Rocky Mountain Freestyle Moguls Competition on Voodoo. http://sswsc.org MusicFest 2017 9AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Now in it 32nd year, this annual event features 8 bands and 40 live performances. For schedule and information http://themusicfest. com/home/ Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register Yampatika Guided Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Registration required. $20 includes snowshoes. www.yampatika.org College Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM Chubby Knuckle Choir 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Acid-Funk-Soulgrass $10 @ ALL THAT or www.schmiggitys.com SUNDAY JANUARY 8 Giant Slalom 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Mountain Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Bolle Age Series Giant Slalom http://sswsc.org

Moguls Competition 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Mountain Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Rocky Mountain Freestyle Moguls Competition on Voodoo. http://sswsc.org MusicFest 2017 9AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Now in it 32nd year, this annual event features 8 bands and 40 live performances. For schedule and information http://themusicfest. com/home/ Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub Bud Werner Memorial Library presents Community Yoga Practice 10AM @ Library Hall Focusing on Seane Corn’s “Detox Flow Yoga” DVD. Bring your own mat & practice at your own pace. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events NFL Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM Ben Marshal Band 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Country/Americana $5. www.schmiggitys.com MONDAY JANUARY 9 MusicFest 2017 9AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Now in it 32nd year, this annual event features 8 bands and 40 live performances. For schedule and information http://themusicfest. com/home/ Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline.teuscher@ gmail.com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Nia is a holistic, non-impact, aerobic dance workout to Beautiful, fun music. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Bud Werner Memorial Library presents an Evening with Chris Dombrowski 6:30PM @ Library Hall Dubbed as “the fly fishing poet”, Dombrowski will talk about his new book “Body of Water: a sage, a seeker, and the world’s most alluring fish”. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events

Wheelhouse 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Americana/Bluegrass $5 www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY JANUARY 10 STARS All Mountain Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area This Adaptive Ski Camp combines instructor and volunteer training, adaptive ski clinics and a back-country powder cat trip. www.steamboatchamber. com/umbraco/www.steamboatstars.com MusicFest 2017 9AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Now in it 32nd year, this annual event features 8 bands and 40 live performances. For schedule and information http://themusicfest. com/home/ Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www. mountaintapbrewery.com

History Happy Hour 5:30PM @ Butcherknife Brewery Outlaws and Gunmen of Routt County. Free craft beer for all who attend! www. treadofpioneers.org Tread of Pioneers Winter Film Series presents: “A Divine Madness” 6:30PM @ The Chief Theater An original 1979 documentary about Perry Mansfield Performing Arts School & Camp. FREE (donations accepted). www.chieftheater.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “The Wolf OR-7 Expedition” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This International Wildlife featured film follows 6 adventurers as they retrace the route taken by a GPS collared wolf between Oregon and California. FREE. www. steamboatlibrary.org/events Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com WEDNESDAY JANUARY 11 STARS All Mountain Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area This Adaptive Ski Camp combines instructor and volunteer training, adaptive ski clinics and a back-coun-


Valley Voice

try powder cat trip. www.steamboatchamber. com/umbraco/www.steamboatstars.com Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Hitchens Brothers Jump Night 5PM @ Howelsen Hill Join the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club for Jump Night. www.sswsc.org Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4 Meets weekly. (844) 9551066 www.foundrytreatmentcenter.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents Free Foreign Film Series 6:30PM @ The Chief “Neither Heaven nor Earth” – this French drama pits a squad of French soldiers posted in Afghanistan against a supernatural menace. Steamboat’s French Club will gather at 6PM in The Black Box Lounge for conversational French, wine specials & potluck appetizers. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events

January 2017

Calendar of Events Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free

Preceded by Silent Auction At 6PM. $20/$15 Students and EOS Members @ ALL THAT or www.chieftheater. com

Springs Winter Sports Club snowboard athletes as they compete in a parallel slalom and parallel giant slalom race. www.sswsc.org

Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com

Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners

Ghetdown Network presents KLL Smith & Bogtrotter 10PM @ Schmiggity’s DJ/Electronic $5. www.schmiggitys.com

STARS All Mountain Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area This Adaptive Ski Camp combines instructor and volunteer training, adaptive ski clinics and a back-country powder cat trip. www.steamboatchamber. com/umbraco/www.steamboatstars.com

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com

Yampatika presents Moonlight Snowshoe Tour TBA @ Emerald Mountain $20 includes snowshoes – times vary. Registration required. www.yampatika.org The Chief Theater Songwriter Series presents Lucy Kaplansky 6:30PM @ The Chief Lucy Kaplansky returns to Steamboat for the first time since her appearance at Strings in 2010. $20 at ALL THAT or www.chieftheater. com Nappy Roots 8PM all-ages show – 10:30PM 21+ show @ Schmiggity’s Hip-hop $15 under 21 show/$10 +21 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com FRIDAY JANUARY 13

THURSDAY JANUARY 12

Cross Country Race 8AM @ Howelsen Hill Watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Rocky Mountain Nordic Cross Country Junior Nationals Qualifier. www.sswsc.org

STARS All Mountain Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area This Adaptive Ski Camp combines instructor and volunteer training, adaptive ski clinics and a back-country powder cat trip. www.steamboatchamber. com/umbraco/www.steamboatstars.com

STARS All Mountain Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area This Adaptive Ski Camp combines instructor and volunteer training, adaptive ski clinics and a back-country powder cat trip. www.steamboatchamber. com/umbraco/www.steamboatstars.com

Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class.

Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@springsips. com 970-846-5608

Karaoke Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER

19

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Kim Hess presents: Following Your Dreams to the Top of the World 6PM @ The Chief Kim Hess discusses her Mount Everest summit.

SATURDAY JANUARY 14 Snowboard Racing 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Come watch Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club snowboard athletes as they compete in a parallel slalom and parallel giant slalom race. www.sswsc.org Cross Country Race 8AM @ Howelsen Hill Watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Rocky Mountain Nordic Cross Country Junior Nationals Qualifier. www.sswsc.org STARS All Mountain Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area This Adaptive Ski Camp combines instructor and volunteer training, adaptive ski clinics and a back-country powder cat trip. www.steamboatchamber. com/umbraco/www.steamboatstars.com Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register Yampatika Guided Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Ages 12 and up. Registration required. $20 includes snowshoes. www.yampatika.org College Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM CU Buffoons 7PM @ Colorado Mountain College Emerald City Opera is proud to host the CU Buffoons. This comic show will entertain the entire family. http:// www.emeraldcityopera.org/ Kris Lager Band 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Heavy Soul & Boogie Trance $5. www.schmiggitys.com SUNDAY JANUARY 15 Snowboard Racing 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Come watch Steamboat

Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub NFL Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM Latin Dance Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Latin dance lessons followed by a night of open dancing FREE. www.schmiggitys. com MONDAY JANUARY 16 Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline. teuscher@gmail.com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Nia is a holistic, non-impact, aerobic dance workout to. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Cowboy Downhill Noon at Base of the Ski Area Annual Bud Light Cowboy Downhill Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Karaoke FREE. www.schmiggity’s.com TUESDAY JANUARY 17 Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www. mountaintapbrewery.com Moonlight Snowshoe Tour TBA @ Emerald Mountain Led by Yampatika. Ages 18 and up. $20 includes snowshoes. Registration required at www.yampatika.org

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 18

Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4 Meets weekly. (844) 9551066 www.foundrytreatmentcenter.com Poetry Slam 6PM @ Off the Beaten Path Share your original poetry with a supportive audience and compete to win a $10 Off the Beaten Path Gift card. FREE. www.steamboatbooks.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Meet David Moffat: a time-traveling history talk” 6:30PM @ Library Hall Presented in conjunction with the Tread of Pioneers Museum, this talk presents Northwest Colorado history through the eyes of the railroad tycoon, performed by storyteller David Naples. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Karaoke Night 9PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com THURSDAY JANUARY 19 Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class. Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola. FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER

Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Fire, Wildlife & Habitat: exploration of fire and its influence in the West” 6:30PM @ Library Hall Presented in conjunction with Yampatika and Routt-Medicine Bow National Forest this Program explores the history of fire in the US and how it is managed today. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events

Author Talk with Eugene Buchanan 7PM @ Off the Beaten Path The author of Comrades on the Colca will share stories behind the book. Books will be available for purchase and signing. FREE www.steamboatbooks.com Buffalo Commons 10PM @ Schmiggity’s American Bluesoulfolk FREE. www.schmiggitys. com FRIDAY JANUARY 20 STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area STARS cordially invites all recently Wounded Warriors to the annual 2 & ½ day ski camp. http://steamboatstars.com/ event/stars-stripes-heroescamp/

Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@springsips. com 970-846-5608 Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking Lot Led by a Yampatika Naturalist. Tour is moderately strenuous. FREE ($5 parking fee). Registration required www.yampatika.org Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com

Confidence is a plant of slow growth in an aged heart. -William Pitt


20

January 2017

Valley Voice

Calendar of Events Zolopht 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Funk/Rock/Reggae $5. www.schmiggitys.com SATURDAY JANUARY 21 STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area STARS cordially invites all recently Wounded Warriors to the annual 2 & ½ day ski camp. http://steamboatstars.com/event/starsstripes-heroes-camp/ Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register Emerald Mountain Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Led by Yampatika. Ages 12 and up. $20 includes snowshoes. Registration required at www.yampatika.org Art Workshop 10AM @ Art Depot This workshop will teach you how to make art out of old skis and snowboards. www.steamboatarts.org College Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM DeadPhish Orchestra 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Grateful Dead/Phish Tribute $10 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com SUNDAY JANUARY 22 STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area STARS cordially invites all recently Wounded Warriors to the annual 2 & ½ day ski camp. http://steamboatstars.com/event/starsstripes-heroes-camp/ Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub NFL Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM Latin Dance Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys. com

MONDAY JANUARY 23 STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp 9AM @ Base of the Ski Area STARS cordially invites all recently Wounded Warriors to the annual 2 & ½ day ski camp. http://steamboatstars.com/ event/stars-stripes-heroescamp/ Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline. teuscher@gmail.com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Nia is a holistic, non-impact, aerobic dance workout to. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “We are all Reguges: Lives and Livelihoods in Kakuma” 6:30PM @ Library Hall An evening with Jenny Spencer talking about the Kakuma Refugee Camp in northwest Kenya. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Sing your song with a live band! FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com

Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners

WEDNESDAY JANUARY 25

Cash’d Out w/Ryan Chrys & The Rough Cuts 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Johnny Cash Tribute $10@ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4 Meets weekly. (844) 9551066 www.foundrytreatmentcenter.com Bud Werner Library’s Free Foreign Film Series 6:30PM @ The Chief FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Agent Orange w/the Yawpers 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Punk/Surf Power Trio $15 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com THURSDAY JANUARY 26 Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class.

TUESDAY JANUARY 24

Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com

Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola. FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org

Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola. FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org

Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431

Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER

Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www. mountaintapbrewery.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “After Spring” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This feature documentary focuses on the Syrian refugee crisis now in its 6th year. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events

Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free French Club Happy Hour 5PM @ Off the Beaten Path Join the local French Club for a celebratory happy hour and discussion of all things French. www.steamboatbooks.com

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

FRIDAY JANUARY 27 Freeskiing Competition 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the IFSA Freeskiing Big Mountain Competition. www. sswsc.org Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@springsips. com 970-846-5608 Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking Lot Led by a Yampatika Naturalist. Tour is moderately strenuous. FREE ($5 parking fee). Registration required www.yampatika.org

SATURDAY JANUARY 28 Freeskiing Competition 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the IFSA Freeskiing Big Mountain Competition. www.sswsc.org

MONDAY JANUARY 30

Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool Contact sallytestrake@greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register

Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Nia is a holistic, non-impact, aerobic dance workout to. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608

Emerald Mountain Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Led by Yampatika. $20 includes snowshoes. Registration required at www. yampatika.org College Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM Muzzy Bear 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Electronica $10 @ ALL THAT or www.schmiggitys.com

The Chief Players present: A Weekend of One Acts 6:30PM @ The Chief Join the Chief Players for their 10th production – an eclectic mix of One Act Plays. Some adult content. $20 @ ALL THAT or www.chieftheater.com

Freeskiing Competition 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the IFSA Freeskiing Big Mountain Competition. www. sswsc.org

Andy Frasco & the U.N. 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Feel Good Music $15 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com

Pigeons Playing Ping-Pong 10PM @ Schmiggity’s High-energy Psychedelic Funk. $15 @ ALL THAT or www.schmiggitys.com

Cross Country Race 8AM @ Howelsen Hill Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Rocky Mountain Nordic Cross Country Junior Nationals Qualifier. www. sswsc.org

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-8469887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com

Dancing with the Stars 7:30PM @ Strings Music Pavilion Yampa Valley Bank presents this annual fundraiser for Northwest Rocky Mountain CASA for abused and neglected children. $50 includes light appetizers and a cash bar. Tickets @ ALL THAT and Yampa Valley Bank. http://rockymountaincasa.org/

is not to be missed! $20 @ ALL THAT or www.chiefttheater.com

SUNDAY JANUARY 29

Cross Country Race 8AM @ Howelsen Hill Come watch Winter Sports Club athletes compete in the Rocky Mountain Nordic Cross Country Junior Nationals Qualifier. www. sswsc.org Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub NFL Game Day 10AM @ Tap House Brunch, bloody Mary bar and bottomless mimosas Until 2PM The Chief Theater Songwriter Series presents: Cheryl Wheeler 6:30PM @ The Chief Part folk music concert, part stand-up comedy – this show

Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline. teuscher@gmail.com

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Landfill Harmonic” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This award winning documentary follows the Recycled Orchestra of Cateura, a children’s musical group from Paraguay that plays instruments made entirely out of trash. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events Live Band Karaoke 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Sing your favorite songs with a live band! FREE. www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY JANUARY 31 Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola. FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www. mountaintapbrewery.com Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com


Valley Voice

January 2017

First Friday Artwalk

HappyHours Last minute changes can and do occur - Mother Nature, illness, tour malfunction, whatever - the accuracy of this calendar is not guaranteed! 8th Street Steak House 9 PM - Close, Everyday Aurum Food & Wine 5 - 6 PM, Everyday Big House Burgers 4:20 - 6 PM, Mon-Sat., All Day, Sunday

McKnights Irish Pub 4 - 6 PM, Mon.- Fri. 11 AM – Noon, Sat.-Sun. Old Town Pub & Restaurant 3 - 6 PM, Everyday Rex’s American Grill & Bar 4:20 - 6 PM, Everyday

Cantina 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

Riggio’s Ristorante 5 - 6 PM, Mon- Sat.

Carl’s Tavern 4 - 6 PM, Everyday

Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

Circle R Bar 4 - 6 PM, Thurs. – Sat. Sunday Brunch Specials 10am - 2pm Cuginos Pizzeria & Italian Restaurant 4 - 6 PM, Mon. – Fri. Eureka 4 - 6 PM, Daily Karma Bar and Lounge 4 - 6 PM, Mon.- Sat.

Sake2u 4 - 6 PM, Mon - Fri. 3 - 6 PM, Sat.-Sun. Sambi Restaurant 5 - 6 PM, Everyday Schmiggity’s Bar 7 - 9 PM, Everyday Slopeside Grill 3 - 6 PM, Mon. – Fri.

January 6, 2017, 5 pm – 8 pm

ALTERNATIVE VENUES

ART GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS

CREEKSIDE CAFE 131 11th St., 879-4925 Kathleen Walsh is an award winning Colorado photographer who began her love of photography at art school in NY, NY. Kathleen was later awarded a mentorship by an internationally known photographer for National Geographic and Saveur Magazines. She has shown her photography in solo exhibitions throughout Colorado and Illinois. Her work hangs in private and corporate collections across the United States and Europe. Visit her website at www.katwalshphotography.com

GALLERY 89 1009 Lincoln Ave., 970-439-8196 JACE ROMICK GALLERY 813 Lincoln Ave. inside The Chief Theater 970-846-3877 Featuring local photographer Jace Romick’s photography capturing the American West and its lifestyle, paired with handcrafted artisanal frames to compliment his engaging photos. MANGELSEN-IMAGES OF NATURE 730 Lincoln Ave., 871-1822 PINE MOON FINE ART 117 9th Street, 970-879-2787 Pine Moon Fine Art. Featuring local artists showing Bronze and glass sculptures, Acrylic, Oil, Watercolor paintings, Graphite and Monotype works, Fiber art, Photography and Jewelry

STEAMBOAT SMOKEHOUSE 912 Lincoln Avenue, 879-7427 Courtney was raised in Colorado but artistically refined in Honolulu where she studied film photography at the University of Hawaii. She is currently based out of Steamboat and enjoys creating with analog photography in her home darkroom as well as digital photography. Courtney specializes in alternative photographic techniques including tin type, van dyke prints, and cyanotype prints. Courtney is the featured artist of Young Bloods Collective for the month of January. We hope you can join us for this exciting exhibit of work, it will be on display and for sale the entire month of January at the Steamboat Smokehouse for any inquires or to join Young Bloods Collective and find out more email, like, or follow us!

Tap House Sports Grill 4:30 - 6 PM, Mon. - Thur. 3:00 - 6:00 pm - Friday

Mahogany Ridge 4 - 5:30 PM, Everyday 9:30 -11 PM, Everyday

The Rusted Porch 2 - 6 PM, Everyday

STEAMBOAT SPRINGS CENTER FOR VISUAL ARTS 837 Lincoln Ave., 846-7062

Laundry 4:30 - 6 PM, Tues. - Sat.

Mambo Italiano 4 - 5:30 PM, Everyday Mazzolas’s 5 - 6 PM, Everyday

Sunpie’s Bistro 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

Truffle Pig 2:30 - 5:30 PM, Tues. - Sat. The V 4:00 - 6:00 and 10:00 - 12:00 Monday - Saturday

HARWIGS/LAPOGEE 911 Lincoln Ave., 879-1919 New Landscapes of local oil painter Adam Zabel. SKITOWN COMPUTING 1104 Lincoln Ave., 870-7984

Low Country 4:30 - 6:00 Daily

La Montana 4:30 - 6 PM, Daily

FHYSICAL ELEMENTS PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO 
9th and Oak 846-0828 Natalie Breitung - Orange Cloud Creative. Formally educated in design and photography from MCAD, Natalie captures the energy and wild west spirit of Steamboat in bright colorful canvases.

STEAMBOAT ART MUSEUM 807 Lincoln Ave., 870-1755 STEAMBOAT SPRINGS ARTS COUNCIL AT THE DEPOT 1001 13th St., 879-9008 Winter Tracks • An exhibition of embellished skis, snowboards and snowshoes. Light Bites, Wine and Music Reception for Arts & Gallery Guide Contest Winner Ryan Keating Julia Dordoni Platform Gallery Workshops: www. steamboatarts.org/workshops

Steamboat Smokehouse 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

21

W Gallery 115 9th Street, Lincoln Ave., 846-1783 WILD HORSE GALLERY 802 Lincoln Ave., 879-5515

URBANE 703 Lincoln Ave., Suite B101, 879-9169 Artwork by Kelly Koehler

There’s only one growth strategy: work hard. -William Hague


22

January 2017

Valley Voice

Here Knitty-Knitty

I Resolve Joy By LA Bourgeois

As most of you know, in October we moved across the country to be closer to our families and so Stephanie could have more oxygen. During that process, we pared down our possessions, preparing for an organized home. I walked away from books I knew I’d never finish, yarn I knew I’d never knit, all those old things I’d never use again.

myself as a professional writer and knitter during 2017.

However, while we ended our life of disorganized chaos, we also ended a life of seeing the faces of our friends on a regular basis. We walked away from that glorious sight of Mt. Warner from our front yard. We left the best neighbors in the world, ones who would plow the driveway when Steph was ill or watch the pets when we left town – even after Ty continued to pursue skunks!

As I write this, we’ve just settled the issue of where we will live and are beginning to dream of how we will remodel. My new home will have a perfect little organized studio/ office. We’re gifting the pets with a dog door to allow them out into the fenced yard whenever they wish. When we walk in the front door, the first thing we will see are our books in shelves lined throughout the living area.

I think the only thing that I didn’t end was my stress eating. Still keeping that up!

This year, instead of resolving to start something new, I resolve to be more open as I begin again and again. I resolve to face the excitement and trepidation with a joyful heart. I resolve to laugh when the fear bubbles inside of me (just like I do on roller coasters!) as I meet new people and try new things and confront this crazy new world.

Now that I’m here, beginnings pile upon each other like skeins of yarn in my stash. Each morning, I find another road to explore on my dog walk. A trip to the movies becomes an adventure as we wander down hallways to find the little artsy cinema. The gas station amazed me the other day when we got $.35 off each gallon of gas with our grocery store points from November. Thank you, Thanksgiving!

Usually, at this time of year, I am making resolutions. What will I begin? How can I begin it? I resolve to learn a new technique, begin knitting my holiday gifts sooner, find something new to explore. Endings are harder to find. I will lose the weight, toss out all of those old things I no longer need, finish off that book I started so long ago.

I am driving all over town and finding my bearings. Without my tall mountain, I can’t quite seem to get oriented. However, I can find the yarn shop, so my compass isn’t that far out of whack! And thank goodness for GPS directions. Otherwise, I’d never be headed in the right direction.

After all, even if/when the apocalypse occurs, everyone will always need socks and sweaters, especially in our parts of the world. The ability to make clothing out of a piece of string is useful in all sorts of situations. That’s what you call “job security.”

As the chaos whirls around me, I resolve to continue to delight and inspire through my words and my knitting. When you come to this paper and open the page to my column, you will find delightful stories of my knitting life. You will see the passion I feel for my creative expression. You will walk away from my pieces inspired and joyful. Well, at least I hope you will. I hope that inspiration moves you to spread joy, fully express your own creativity, and find your delight.

And maybe to pick up a pair of needles and do a little knitI cuddle in and knit and spend time with Stephanie and ting. my mother-in-law quite often. The knitting goes everywhere with me (as always). I’m finding that it simultaneJust saying – it’s a useful skill in the postapocolyptic ously gives me protection from meeting people (introvert world. that I am) and encourages knitters to chit-chat. The However, this year, endings and beginnings are jumbled search for inspiration andasthe solitude of the work brings together, making any such resolution seem silly. I findUse the November 2013 ad base. Increase font size on Red Text and change to: Keep up with the adventures of LA Bourgeois as she a quiet hope into my life, and the socks and cowls and hats myself looking up when people say down, left instead of negotiates through this coming year at housewyfe.com/ and mittens warm my family. My perserverance is beginright, east instead of west. I feel simultaneously blessed Fat Bikesning andtoaccessories in stock! the-diary. pay off and I’mare looking forward to working for and cursed.

Salsa, Borealis, Moots, 45Nrth, Surly.

The “LOCAL’S” choice for Personalized Health Care “Let us be lazy in everything, except in loving and drinking, except in being lazy.” Gotthold Ephraim Lessing

The Original Local’s Liquor Store On the corner of 40 and Hilltop Pkwy 10 to 10 Mon – Thurs 10 to Midnight Fri & Sat 11:30 to 7:30 Sundays

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Fat Bikes and accessories are in stock!

Winter toys, sleds and snow shovels. Coloring books and puzzles for those snow days. Scrapers and gloves. Oh, how about vitamins and immune boosters plus Flu Solutions!


Valley Voice

January 2017

23

The Heretic

Thy Will Be Done By Lorre Buss

“In the end, no matter what we do, God decides.” Tamera Alexander In her late thirties, Claire was unmarried and became pregnant. She had an abortion, only to discover the procedure had failed. Rather than try again, Claire decided to be the channel through which a particular soul entered the world. She now has a young son named Luke. Some believe Claire’s attempted abortion was wrong. They cheer the presence of Luke on the earth – as do I, for obviously, it was crucial that she birth this child. For what reason it was so important she be the channel, I don’t know. God communicated His plan, Claire heard and agreed, and Luke, as her son, is the result. Just as in the days of old (the Old Testament, that is), God speaks to each one of us on a daily basis. He guides and directs our steps, and things go better when we pay attention and heed His words – the words He speaks to us in private. The words no other can hear. Our Creator whispers softly to us in the secret chambers of our hearts. No other person can know how God is orchestrating our lives, or what He wants us to do in any situation. Yet, in the matter of abortion, some presume to know God’s will. Though the topic is virtually absent from scripture, we’re told it falls under other rules – rules said to be provided by God back when He supposedly threw up His hands in frustration and began to give humans the silent treatment. Google “biblical references to abortion,” and you’ll get lots of references to verses that speak of children, pregnancy, pregnant women being “ripped open,” and repeated references to the fact that God knew each of us before we were conceived or born. Of course He did. We are souls, not bodies. Our physical forms are merely the vehicles by which we maneuver through earthly life. A certain spiritual philosophy exhorts us to focus on what we want rather than on what we don’t, in order to move more easily in the desired direction. When we direct our energy to what we don’t want, we deplete the energy available to help us move forward down the path God lays out before us. We give the unwanted circumstance more power while denying the dreams given us by our Maker. Those opposed to abortion focus on what they don’t want and pray that God will make it go away. God knows making abortion illegal is not the same as making it nonexistent. It would only re-introduce a host of other issues.

I sometimes wonder what would happen if, rather than directing energy toward the undesired action, people would imagine and pray that every child on earth was safe, sheltered, adequately fed and cared for, and well loved by those around him or her. What if we visualized and asked that each person on earth had ample opportunity to use their God-given gifts and talents to pursue the dreams God gave them? I believe those who declare their opposition to abortion also expend time, energy and money to support this kind of utopia. But they’re sending a mixed message and hedging their bets. Maybe they fear the devil is running amok in the world. But in the book of Job, we learn that Satan takes direction from God, just like the rest of us do.

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(If it’s in stock, we’ve got it!)

The only Biblical reference to abortion is the lamentation of a man wishing his mother had aborted him, thereby preventing his worldly woes. In Genesis, we learn that Adam, an inert body formed of clay, gained life only when God breathed it into him. First breath does not occur in the womb. Sometimes, it doesn’t occur at all. We say “Thy will be done,” but often we presume to know what God’s will is. Typically, we assume it’s the same as our own. Perhaps inadvertently, then, our prayer becomes “my will be done,” as if we can order our Creator around.

2570 South Copper Frontage • 970•879•5717

God is not bound by human law; nor does He follow it. Instead, He whispers instructions directly into each of our hearts, and should we follow his directions, we’ll discover and enjoy the Grand Plan that He has designed for our own individual lives. God uses everything, even what we consider to be tragedy and missteps, for our good, whether or not others believe this to be true. In the case of Claire, God prevented one abortion. If so inclined, He could certainly prevent them all. But He doesn’t.

Beer of the Month:

Breckenridge

Next to ACE Hardware in Curve Plaza

970-879-7355

Thursday - Saturday: 10am - 11pm Sunday - Wednesday: 10am - 10pm

Truth, like gold, is to be obtained not by its growth, but by washing away from it all that is not gold. -Leo Tolstoy


24

January 2017

Valley Voice

New TURBO INTERNET PLANS From ZIRKEL Wireless

A Closer Look

A Sobering Look at Alcohol By Monica Yeager

Tis the season for imbibing, toasting, sharing, sipping, and swigging. No matter the method, alcohol, or more accurately, ethanol, ends up in the liver. The average adult can detoxify 7-14 grams of ethanol per hour, the average alcoholic beverage has 10-20 grams of ethanol. Whether a bottle of beer, a glass of wine, or one and a half ounces of vodka, they each have the same amount of ethanol. Ethanol, considered by the body to be a toxin, must be broken down and then excreted from the body.

970-871-8500 www.zirkelwireless.com Getting the shot no matter what is coming....

kpaproductions.com 970.734.4321

Ethanol, by itself, harms the liver by interfering with processes of metabolism. Oxygen, an essential component of metabolism, is diverted from breaking down fatty acids. With incomplete or no metabolism of fatty acids, fat globules accumulate in tissues. The more ethanol, the more fat globules. That’s where alcohol dehydrogenase, one of the awesome numbers of enzymes in the liver, comes in. First, the ethanol is converted to acetaldehyde, an organic compound even more toxic than ethanol and the likely source of hangovers. A different enzyme steps in and converts acetaldehyde to a nontoxic acetate. But during this metabolic process, molecules are produced that directly damage liver cells, leaving fewer liver cells left

HAPPY NEW YEAR TO OUR FUR AND HUMAN FRIENDS

Avoid the scary winter driving! We do house-calls for routine appointments with an advance appointment.

Yampa Valley Photographer’s Club image of the month was captured by Shawn Stoehr at the Bald Eagle Festival in Haines Alaska where there were over 2,000 Bald Eagles along the Chilkat River.

Cats have TOLD us that they would appreciate a house call for their preventive care.

Happy Pets! Happy People!

www.petkareclinic.com 102 Anglers Drive

970-879-5273 For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

to do the breaking down. The more ethanol, the fewer liver cells. A little holiday cheer probably is okay, but long term drinking or bingeing can cause alcoholic hepatitis, inflammation and destruction of liver tissue, or cirrhosis, scarring of the liver, so named from the Greek word for orange, the color of the skin of people so afflicted. But skin color is nothing compared to what is going on inside the body. When the liver quits working, it loses the ability to break down toxins and fatty acids, regulate blood sugar levels, make proteins essential for blood clotting, sustain immune system function, and balance body fluids. The liver becomes scarred, hardened, filled with fat, the legs and abdomen swell with fluid. Drugs and other toxins cannot be removed from the blood and accumulate in…the brain. Mental functioning is impaired and personality is altered. Restricted blood flow and enlarged veins can cause internal bleeding. There is increased risk of other diseases like diabetes and liver cancer. A diagnose of cirrhosis means a shortened life, with a 50 percent chance of death within 10 years. Here’s to happy holidays and a little restraint.


Valley Voice

January 2017

Energetically Speaking

MTBE and the EPA By Fred Robinson

Methyl Tertiary Butyl Ether was used as an oxygenate in our gasoline for a few years as a replacement for Tetraethyl Lead, which was added to gasoline to increase the octane number, or call it a measure for resistance to preignition, or pinging, from the engine. It turns out the lead was causing significant health problems and mental disorders. The EPA required the removal of lead over a period of time instead of immediately to help gasoline refiners with the transition. Refineries had to come up with other ways to raise octane and it turns out the other ways caused health problems, too. Acetone, Benzine, Toluene, and Xzylene are probably the worst for health and come from petroleum, but best at raising octane. The EPA allows their use and dictates the addition of an oxygenate to reduce unburned hydrocarbons, and vapor pressure modifiers. The oxygenate helps combustion of the new octane enhancers and vapor pressure modification may just be another unnecessary regulation. Now it gets interesting because the EPA created MTBE, financed its production and Mandated its use! The EPA likes MTBE because it will not mix with water. For years refineries have shipped different petroleum products through pipelines and isolated them by sending quantities of water between different products like gasoline, Diesel, heating oil, or jet fuel. The water was easy to separate at the blender or shipping facility because it just settled out when the fuel was put in tanks. All fifty states in the USA were required to use MTBE to reduce emissions of unburned hydrocarbons in our fuel. There was a problem however, the MTBE is such a small molecule it can migrate right through a steel tank and get into the soil around it, the water table, and eventually the atmosphere. The first try at repairing the problem was new fiberglass underground fuel tanks at all the gas stations in the USA. That was very expensive and put many small fuel providers out of business. Then California figured out that MTBE was possibly the worst Carcinogen they had ever found.

Right, EPA? I suspect many of the MTBE facilities are owned by friends of the EPA. It would be so easy to grow the corn or other plants like sorghum, beets or sugar cane in Mexico that can be turned into ethanol, but No, they are somehow convinced to use MTBE. Cellulosic Ethanol is coming on strong too, and is made from crop waste, grass, or wood. No food instead of fuel argument with Cellulosic Ethanol.

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Then, we also have Bad news. Remember how terrible Tetra Ethyl Lead is for our health and mental well being? We ARE Still using IT! Every Airplane you see in the sky that isn’t a jet is fueled by gasoline that has Lead in it, Lots of it! Aviation gas has to have enough lead to make it over 100 octane and it is spewed out over our heads every day. I have been a mechanic for well over 50 years and once upon a time had to do a lot of valve jobs. When lead was phased out of the gasoline supply we were told that automobile engines would burn their valves more frequently. Absolutely Untrue! When gasoline had lead in it, burned valves were very common. Since the removal of lead from gasoline I have seen TWO burned valves. My theory is the lead built up on the sealing surface of valves and held them open. When a valve closes its heat is absorbed by the valve seat. If it stays open it gets too hot and will burn.

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Let’s get back to Airplanes. They are using an incredibly toxic fuel that shortens the life of their valves. This time it is the FAA, not the EPA that is causing the problem. Ethanol blended with gasoline is an awesome fuel that has significant emission reductions, and performance advantages, along with being GOOD for the fuel system, but change with ANY of our government organizations can be measured against racing snails. intergalactici@aol.com

OK, let’s quit using it, RIGHT! California and other states had to Sue the EPA to let them quit using an incredibly toxic substance and it took years for that to happen. Then the states were required to stop using it one at a time over a couple of years so the manufacturers could recoup their investment.

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Along came Ethanol and it was realized it was an oxygenate and octane improver that reduced the need for the incredibly toxic octane enhancers like acetone, toluene, benzine, but it has to be added after the gasoline is shipped through a pipeline if water is used to isolate other products. Boo Hoo, and the oil companies had to buy the ethanol, that really upsets them. Well, after a few years of super low gasoline prices, many Ethanol distillers are going broke. Guess who is buying them? Oh, good guess, it is BIG OIL! One country is still requiring the use of MTBE in its large population cities: Mexico. We just can’t let all that toxic substance manufacturing capacity go to waste.

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Yepelloscopes

Your Monthly Message By Chelsea Yepello Hayden Branch

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Aries

750 Hospital Loop Craig, Colorado 81625 Phone: 970-824-9411 e-mail: info@tmhcraig.org

Taurus

April 20 - May 20

Gemini

May 20 - June 20

And you find yourself waiting... like those few precious weeks between winter and spring, while you stand in your doorway with your shoe laces untied, waiting for the next move or some type of sign.

Sunrise on the Elk River: A Meditation

You’re a brilliant light in an ever dimming world....Your worth every damn minute and can never forget that...Wow...Way to be the reason the world turns. Damn.

By Pat Curran, Hayden, Colorado In a meditative mood I settle-in beside the river Here darkling there sparkling, Churning down rocks and rills Purring through limpid pools Fine river music. Chest out, wings wide A speckled Osprey Cuts ‘cross the silken sky, Fanning the flames of dawn Charmed by the river song

Cancer

June 21 - July 22

There really is nothing left to do. The tar has seeped over everything making it impenetrable and cold inside. But hey, at least you found something to do with all those feathers.

Catching a thermal She sets her wings And is borne aloft A natural wonder at play Circling over the fields of hay Descending now She surveys her domain A banded river, blue and white Roaming through the emerald light Hovering briefly She cups her wings to the rising sun, A prayer of thanksgiving For the gift of flight, Signifying in a fleeting The world is filled With truth and meaning. Suddenly The graceful osprey plunges With flaming hungry eyes, And wings snapped back, Prowling above the runs and riffles, Aiming her talons like harpoons Screeching like a steaming pot, She splashes deep Savaging a rainbow trout.

March 21 - April 19

Your feeling of entitlement is starting to make you resentful and frankly is getting on your nerves. Before you begin to take your confusion and frustration out on the calm and kindness around you, realize that being annoyed and unhappy with the situation is something you’re going to have to understand from within.

Leo

July 23 - August 23

Eventually, you will realize that even though you spent a few good hours trying, you will not be able to catch chipmunks with dental floss and an old Cracker Jack box. But kudos on your determination.

Virgo

August 23 - September 22

Although you were invited to a costume party, you will not attend because you think it’s kids stuff and you are determined to make that very clear to all your friends. You explain that your maturity level exceeds dressing up like Batman or a giant banana and will never be caught dead slurping down a Jell-O shot. Bummer. Whats next Captain

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Jolted and forlorn My magic moment gone I dare to doubt The divine account Of how things came about Some would say The accidents of history, Rather than A designer with a masterplan. Are the source of human meaning?

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No Fun? Telling a group of kindergarteners that Santa doesn’t exist? Real sensitive.

Libra

September 23 - October 23

This fortnight you will be introduced to a new friend circle when you accidentally put a red sock in with your white load of laundry. Aww.. You sure do look pretty in pink.

Scorpio

October 24 - November 21

You’ll make it very clear to the world that you just can’t take it anymore by sitting down with your arms crossed and begin a silent protest. Unfortunately, you will be sitting on a bench on the side of the road, in turn making your valiant effort easily confused with just sitting and waiting for a bus. Oh well.

Sagittarius

November 22 - December 21

How would you feel if you personally found the cure for cancer but never got any sort of acknowledgment for it? Spiteful? Still proud? It’s funny how doing great things is never as good without getting recognized for it. Right?

Capricorn

December 22 - January 19

What’s the answer? Do your really want to know? Isn’t it more fun and enlightening guessing? Okay... if you must know... the answer is right under your shoe. Go ahead and look... There. Problem solved.

Aquarius

January 20 - February 18

Sometimes, the last stretch seems like the longest, but in reality, only seems longer because your goal is in your sight and you want to reach it more than ever. You have gotten this far, don’t let a little impatience make you miss the last hurdle because you’re staring at the finish line.

Pisces

February 19 - March 20

Are you excited? Well you should be. The most incredible thing in the world is about to happen... to... your neighbor... Sorry... The astrological signs got all mixed up.


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January 2017

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Valley Voice January 2017  

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