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February 2017 . Issue 6.2

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Steamboat Springs Hayden Oak Creek Yampa

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February 2017

Valley Voice

Feeling a little foggy in 2017? Do you desperately need some laughter, music, dancing and fun, perhaps mixed with a drink or 10? We understand, so we’re back and ready to bring at least a few hours of Super Fun to your New Year.

By Todd Danielson

Need a Laugh? Need a Drink? Join Us. We Provide Both!

We plan on doing eight more ALL NEW shows in 2017, starting with SATURDAY, Feb. 4, at 8 p.m., at the lovely Chief Theater. But we need your support to keep it all going! Get online at chieftheater.com or walk over to All That and get your tickets now! See what Super Fun is all about!

Highlights from the amazing February lineup: • Super Fun Skit: Survival Through Kittens • Steamboat Dance Theater Preview Performances • Another Cabaret Classic • Tongue In Chief Improv • Jasmir Belly Dancers • Carolyn Berns Rocking the Fiddle • Karaoke Gong Show • More, More, More!!!

Karaoke Gong Show Back for 2017!

www.chieftheater.com 813 Lincoln Avenue 970-871-4791

Super Fun Steamboat Show Next Show:

Sat., Feb. 4, 2017 Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. Show Starts: 8:00 p.m.

Tickets:

Donation

(Your donation goes to the STD fund. The Save Todd Danielson fund. Donate now, find out later.)

“I Will Survive”

Ages 18+ Recommended (mature and sometimes immature content)

Winner gets $30 cash!

Back for 2017! Always with NEW material and guests!

www.facebook.com/SuperFunSteamboatShow Super Fun Sponsors: We couldn’t have a Super Fun Show, or afford this Super Fun Page in the awesome Valley Voice, without our sponsors.

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DISCLAIMER: The views expressed on this Super Fun Page are those of the Super Fun Steamboat Show and not necessarily shared by the Valley Voice and its management.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.


Valley Voice

February 2017

Circulation 7000

Rants...

Contents

Losing the callouses…

How to “Con-a-Fir” Part Two

Page 4

By Karen Vail

Page 5

By Scott L. Ford

Heroic Drama to Save the Isolated Empire

Page 6

By Ellen & Paul Bonnifield

Page 7

By Dagny McKinley

Ding Dong... Jesus Calling

Page 8

In Steamboat Springs, Boomers Rule

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By Lyn Wheaton

Business Manager:

Scott Ford

Event Calendar: Nina Rogers boobula57@yahoo.com Sales: Eric Kemper eric@yampavalleyvoice.com

Riding on the wind crust…

Raves... Regrowing the callouses…

Reality Page 10

When your neighbors hook you up with some day passes on a year that you didn’t get a pass…

By The Wandering Rose

February is Creative Romance Month

Page 11

By Mr. Helpful, MD

The Psyche of the Winter Driver

Page 12

News from the Chief of the Chief

Page 17

By Scott Parker

Calendar of Events

Page 18

By Nina Rogers

Page 21

By Wina Procyzyn

Changing Our Minds

Page 22

By Lorre Buss

I am a Sherlock

The views and opinions expressed reflect the views and opinions of the authors and may not necessarily reflect the views and opinion of the editor, staff or advertisers in Steamboat’s Valley Voice.

By Chelsea Yepello

Being ahead of schedule on your post-surgery rehab… Remembering the reading glasses…

Say What?... “I lead by the example of what not to do.”

Page 23

By Monica Yeager

By Tatiana L. Achcar-Szyba

Living in the snow globe...

Three trips to the salad bar…

First Friday Artwalk

Advertisers assume full responsibility for the entire content and subject matter of their ads. In the event of error or omission in the advertisement, the publisher’s sole responsibility shall be to publish the advertisement at a later date. Advertisements and articles are accepted and published upon the representation that the author, agency and/or advertiser is authorized to publish the entire contents and subject matter thereof. The author, agency, and/ or advertiser will indemnify and save Valley Voice, LLC harmless from all claims and legal action resulting from the contents of the articles or advertisements including claims or suits resulting from libel, defamation, plagiarism, rights to privacy and copyright infringements.

Getting a brand new sled!!! (With motor, of course.)

That unexpected check…

Your Brain on Jellyfish?

Official Fine Print

Floaters in beer…

By Scott L. Ford

By Mike Baran

Valley Voice is published monthly and distributed on the last Wednesday of each month. Please address letters, questions, comments or concerns to: Valley Voice, LLC, P.O. Box 770743 or come by and see us at 1125 Lincoln Ave, Unit 2C, Steamboat Springs, CO 80477. Or contact Matt Scharf: 970-846-3801. Scott Ford: 970-819-9630. Website www.yampavalleyvoice.com. Subscription rate is $35 per year (12 issues). All content © 2017 Valley Voice, L.L.C. No portion of the contents of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission from the Valley Voive.

Broken plastic bits…

Slush ruts...

Winter Carnival Sculptures are Back

Matt Scharf

January rain… Crust under powder…

The Status of the Middle Class

Publisher/Art Director:

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The Break Page 24 By LA Bourgeois

Three Subarus and a Porsche

Page 25

By Fred Robison

Your Monthly Message

Yampa Valley Voice

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Comics Page 27

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Youth is the gift of nature, but age is a work of art. – Stanislaw Jerzy Lec


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February 2017

Valley Voice

‘Boat Almanac

How to “Con-a-Fir” Part Two By Karen Vail of needles. If they are sharp and you do a little yelp as they stick you, you have met an Engelmann spruce. Soft, blunt-tipped needles are friendly and soft and belong to subalpine fir. Take a needle and try and roll it between your fingers. Flat needled firs are difficult to roll, square spruce are easy to roll. Put this all together in an easy mnemonic and you have “flat, friendly fir, and sharp, square spruce”. Spiffy! Now look up and examine the cones. Spruce cones are soft and papery and hang from the branches. Fir cones start the summer dark and resinous and drop their cone scales at the end of summer leaving the “candle” sticking up along the branches. Subalpine fir cones require two seasons to reach maturity. Their first season is microscopic, and they mature in their second season. Looking at a silhouette of each tree, spruce tend to be broadly conical whereas fir are more narrowly conical. It is usually very easy to pick out fir in a subalpine forest by locating these tall thin spires.

Last month we looked at the “pines”. This month we delve into the “non-pines”: spruce, fir and “false” fir (all to become crystal clear by the end). Our pines (lodgepole, limber and ponderosa) are characterized by having their needles in packets. Spruce and fir have needles coming singly off the stem. In our area we have Colorado blue spruce (Picea pungens), Engelmann spruce (Picea engelmannii), subalpine fir (Abies bifolia) and Douglasfir (Pseudotsuga menziesii). Our high elevation forests, those broad, cool swathes of dark green conifers reaching to the alpine, are home to Engelmann spruce and subalpine fir. Colorado blue spruce and Douglas-fir are scattered in select spots and will be covered toward the end of this article. The spruce-fir forests, lovingly named the snow forest, are large homogenous stands thriving in the cool and moist subalpine reaches from 9,000 to treeline where stunted and bizarrely sculpted spruce and fir eke out a living in the harsh alpine climate. Winters are long and cold, summers short and cool, annual precipitation is higher than lower elevations and comes mostly in the form of snowfall, and below freezing temperatures can occur at any month of the year. Winds are near constant at the higher elevations of the spruce-fir forests toward treeline. Walking through a spruce-fir forest in summer is cool and full of life. At first glance the trees might all look the same; green or bluish-green needles, cone shaped forms, brown cones. Take a close look at the bark. The Engelmann spruce has rough bark and is rich reddish brown in color. Subalpine fir has smooth almost silvery bark (which can fissure and become more scaly with age) with dark resin blisters dotting the trunk. Now take a close look at the needles, or rather a close “feel”. Gently pass your hand up the branch

The “snow forest” is well adapted to a life where the majority of a tree’s life is spent under snow. A conical shape and downward sloping branches help shed the large loads of snowfall and decrease wind damage. The higher in elevation you go the more tightly spired the tree shapes become. Often, as lower branches are held to the ground by snow, rooting takes place along the branches and a new tree grows from this area. Finding a large tree surrounded by a halo of young starts often indicates this adventitious rooting. Even though conifers retain their green needles through the winter, their metabolic activities are often shut down or very reduced. There is a fine balance between photosynthesis (making energy) and respiration (using energy) during the winter. At temperatures above 46F trees can become active, but the availability of water in frozen soils can be a limiting factor. Spruce and fir can have peak photosynthetic rates at temperatures much lower than for other coniferous species, and as the elevation increases these lower temperature threshholds allow conifers at timberline to begin photosynthesizing up to two months before they ever produce any new growth, storing valuable sugars in their tissues. The temperatures that conifer buds can endure are mind boggling. If the plant tissues have been adequately hardened off in the fall (a really interesting process that might be another article in the future!) through a slow lowering of air temperatures, Engelmann spruce buds can resist freezing damage down to -76F and lodgepole pine down to -112F!! Incredible! (James Halfpenny and Roy Ozanne, “Winter: An Ecological Handbook”) Another major winter hurdle for conifers is wind dessication. Have you noticed patches of orange needles on one side of a conifer in the spring? The wind has abraded the needle’s protective waxy cuticle formed in the fall. This opens the needle to water loss and freeze damage.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

The importance of spruce-fir forest health to the health of our mountain ecosystems cannot be underestimated. The thick, year-round canopy shades the ground providing a moist and cool understory. Multi-aged forests provide food and shelter for a wide variety of inhabitants. Snow storage in winter is a major source of summer water in our mountain streams as the snowpack slowly melts under the canopy and the huge forests are excellent carbon sinks. An increase in conifer deaths from bark beetles, fires and unknown causes has opened canopies, allowing more light in and increasing soil and air temperatures. This results in snow melting quicker, soils increasing in temperature and the drying soils and foliage encourages fires to rage through subalpine forests where before they were slowed by the moist understory. It was long thought that as climate change took hold in spruce-fir forests that they would begin a slow move up in elevation. They have begun the march into the alpine meadows, but a study just completed on Niwot Ridge at CU’s Mountain Research Station has found a hole in this theory. Heat lamps, raising the temperature by 1.5C to 4C over 10 years, were hung over plots of spruce-fir forests where Engelmann spruce and limber pine seeds were planted. They set up three plots with different environmental scenarios: control with no temperature or moisture change, an increase in temperature with no additional moisture, and an increase in temperature with additional water. They found that moisture was the limiting factor in all the plots. Trees can move up in elevation but precipitation will limit their success.

Douglas-fir has an identity problem. You see, this is not a “true” fir but a “false” fir. Poor thing! The history of where to place this oddball tree in scientific taxonomy was long and sinuous. Most botanists now separate out the Rocky Mountain Douglas-fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii var. glauca) from the Pacific coast Douglas-fir (Psuedotsuga menziesii var. menziesii). The genus is found only in western North America and the mountains of China, Japan and


Valley Voice

February 2017

Economics Common Sense of Our Dollars and Cents

The Status of the Middle Class in Steamboat By Scott L. Ford Taiwan. Preferring moist north facing slopes of lower elevations, Douglas-fir are not common in our area. Patchy forests are found in Spring Creek Canyon, on Howelsen Hill and a few other protected spots. In other areas they are found scattered through mixed forests, such as on Emerald Mountain and the Fish Creek area. Interestingly, in the Fish Creek drainage they are the contorted forms on the hot, dry rocky south-facing slopes. I use these easy ID tricks with Douglas-fir. From a distance Douglas-fir tend to have an open and airy conical form with slightly drooping branches. Look at the youngest branches and they are a bright silvery color and at the ends of the upper branches are the cutest conifer cones! These are papery cones hanging from the branches (remember, the other true fir, subalpine fir, has cones that stick straight up) with sharp bracts sticking out that look like the two hind feet and tail of a mouse that has been caught in the cone’s scales. There is a story there! The abbreviated version is that mouse was a little too greedy so the Great Spirit closed the cones upon the gluttonous mouse, trapping them in the cones forever with their little tail and hind feet sticking out.

Most Americans when asked if they are middle class will say, “Absolutely!” The term middle class is often used yet rarely defined. For example, what does middle class mean in the Steamboat Springs area? This is a pertinent question with all the discussion that is occurring about preserving and protecting the middle class in Steamboat.

You might have Colorado blue spruce adorning your landscape. We love their distinctive colors and shapes. In nature, don’t look for blue spruce on dry ridges; these are trees of riparian areas and other moist, protected areas in small colonies. That is maybe why they like your lawn so much, eh? From a distance, mature blue spruce have an almost disheveled appearance with ragged downcast branches when compared to the tidier and more compact form of Engelmann spruce. Blue spruce have very sharp square needles with a distinctive bluish cast (although many blue spruce lack the “blue” coating) with new growth having a bluer tinge. The papery cones are much larger the Engelmann spruce and the furrowed bark is grayish brown (compared with Engelmann’s reddish bark). Crosses between Engelmann spruce and Colorado blue spruce do occur in nature and are very difficult to identify.

I will define middle class in the Steamboat area in measurable economic terms. After reading this you will know in no uncertain terms if you are middle class. Whether or not you personally perceive yourself middle class is a topic far beyond the scope of this column.

Enjoy your conifer explorations! We’ll see you on the trails!

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If you had to place yourself by economic class, where would you be? Most definitions of middle class are intertwined with a host of socioeconomic characteristics. Socioeconomic class structure is imprecise because it can be as much about perception and comparison as it is about measurable metrics. When it comes to defining middle class, there are two ways: perception and metrics. The perception side of middle class is very odd to understand. According to a recent survey from Gallup, about 51 percent of Americans consider themselves middle or upper-middle class, while 48 percent consider themselves lower middle class. This simply means that only 1% consider themselves as either rich or poor. Does this perception match reality? Obviously not and likely never has.

Economists have struggled with a concise definition of middle class that can be objectively measured over time. The definition I like to use is one used by Pew Research Center. It defines middle class in terms of household income. Middle class encompasses all households between 60% and 200% of the area’s median household income. According to the US Census Bureau the median household income for the Steamboat area in 2015 was $67,577.

This means that for our discussion middle class is defined as an annual household income ranging between $40,546 and $135,154. Of the 6,764 households in the Steamboat area as of 2015 about 48% fell within this range of middle class incomes. In the Hayden area it was 59%; in the Oak Creek area it was 56%. The actual income breakdown by Routt County community is shown below: Knowing the above percentage is useful, but perhaps equally useful is understanding what trends are occurring in the middle class over time. Understanding this trend helps answer the question of whether the middle class is growing or shrinking in the Steamboat area. So, how is the middle class doing in Steamboat? The Steamboat area is experiencing a trend that is occurring nationally. This trend is referred to as the “Hollowing out of the Middle Class.” This hollowing out is a direct result of increasing economic inequality. More American households, including those in the Steamboat area, find themselves in either the upper or lower ends of the income spectrum. To put it simply, the extremes grow at the expense of the center. The reasons associated with this hollowing out of the middle class in the Steamboat area are likely more due to national/global socioeconomic influences than anything occurring locally. However, we need to be mindful of the power of the local economy to create low wage jobs. Simply put, not all jobs are equally valuable. We also need to be mindful that, as the percentage of below middle class households increases, so will the discussion about “affordable” housing and the demand that local government do something.

Percentage of Middle Class Households by Routt County Community for 2015 Number of Households Median Household Income Middle Class Income Range % Household in Middle Class Income Range

Hayden, CCD

Oak Creek, CCD

1,103 $ 57,216 $34,330 to $114,432

1,341 $ 66,513 $39,908 to $133,026

Steamboat, CCD 6,764 $ 67,577 $40,546 to $135,154

59%

56%

48%

Don’t Suffer a Broken Heart. Don’t Drink and Drive! Diversity: the art of thinking independently together. – Malcolm Forbes


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February 2017

Valley Voice

Bonnifield Files

The Heroic Drama to Save the Isolated Empire By Ellen & Paul Bonnifield

Gasping and near death, Denver Northwestern & Pacific RR opened the isolated empire, northwestern Colorado, to the outside world. Two years later, believing Edward Harriman, the most powerful man in American railroading, would supply the money necessary to tap the rich resources of the region, David H. Moffat met with him in New York. Deceived and depressed, Moffat returned to his hotel room where he died. The isolated empire’s dream, hope, and promise of success followed to the grave’s brink. Looking back a century, before massive snow removal, the fate of Grand, Routt, and Moffat counties depended upon two parallel rails spiked four feet six inches apart traveling through valleys, canyons, and mountain Parks. The greatest challenge was getting over the “Hill” from Vasquez (Winter Park) to Corona, “the top of the world” astride the continental divide, and down to Tolland. Corona, 11,660 feet, was the highest railroad community in the United States. Here, long snow sheds protected the railroad from winter’s hurricane winds and driven snow. When the sheds were filled with engines waiting for the rails to be cleared of recurring blockages, gas and smoke from locomotive stacks were a terrible test of human endurance. Burn scars on faces and arms were marks of pride and suffering endured by engineers and firemen overcome by polluted air falling against hot steam pipes. Some men died from the gas but no record was kept about them. The men who died were only a “small part” of the heroic drama necessary to keep the road to civilization open for the men and women pioneering northwestern Colorado.

Northwestern Colorado did not suffer alone; Moffat’s death nearly broke Colorado’s wealthy business and financial community. Denver First National Bank came close to failure. Sam Perry, William Evans, and Henry Porter, all key investors in northwestern Colorado, were on the verge of going broke. The Cary brothers, who operated a large ranch west of Hayden, did lose everything. The railroad itself was anemic with only 120 boxcars, 99 flatcars, 70 stock cars, 192 coal gondolas, and 6 refrigerator cars. However, it had one strong card: the Moffat Road owned 42 locomotives, ten of which were Mallets, the largest in the state. Shortly before Moffat’s death, Representative Gaines M. Allen on his own introduced a bill in the legislature to use public funds “to promote and increase the general prosperity of the state by constructing a tunnel under and through the base of James Peak . . . to be used for public and semi-private purposes.” The bill was dormant in committee until William Evans realized its potential. Evans was president of the Denver Tramway Company, an important stockholder in the First National Bank, and unquestioned ruler of the state’s Republican Party. He fully realized that Allen’s bill was a window of hope, and if successful, a door to saving the railroad. He took control of Allen’s bill and rewrote it. With his enormous political power, the bill easily cleared the legislature. Governor John Shafroth sat on it forcing a statewide vote where the bill went down to solid defeat. Although it failed to pass, time was allowed for investors to regroup and continue the struggle.

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

David H. Moffat With an impressive record of rescuing failing railroads, Newman Erb was selected to lead the Moffat Road. Erb promised to raise enough money to complete the line to Salt Lake City and construct a Front Range tunnel. Implementing his plan, he reorganized the railroad into the Denver & Salt Lake Railroad Company. To increase shipping, the line was extended to Craig. The expansion revealed one of Erb’s greatest failures. Erb promised to match fifty percent of construction costs provided Denver investors including Lawrence Phipps and Charles Boettcher raised a million dollars. Erb failed to produce his share leaving the local men to foot the entire cost. Erb’s largest source for investment was the English capitalist D. F. S. Pearson who sank with the Lusitania. Erb then attempted to get the City and County of Denver to construct a 4.6 mile tunnel under James Peak. The D&SL would pay approximately one third of the cost. Bill Evans engineered the bill through the City Council. Opponents quickly took the city to court where in due time the state Supreme Court ruled against the tunnel. The future of the isolated empire remained bleak. The real battle for survival was on the Hill. A two percent railroad grade is difficult. A four percent grade is possible but close to the outer limit. On a four percent grade going downhill, a speed in excess of 8 mph was considered an uncontrollable run-away. The Mallets


Valley Voice

lifted 1000 tons at twenty miles per hour on the two percent grade, but lifted only 490 tons on the steeper grade at a much lower rate of speed. From Tabernash to Toland (42 miles) a good freight run took sixteen hours. During the winter months (September to June at Corona), passenger trains carried several days of food and other supplies for use when blockaded. Snow blockades were common. In fact, travelers from the Yampa Valley expected several days’ if not weeks’ delay either going or coming home. Businessmen found it nearly impossible to maintain their inventory. Mail and express service was only tri-weekly, and “tri-” should be spelled “try-” weekly.

February 2017

Art in the ‘Boat

Winter Carnival Snow Sculptures Are Back! By Dagny McKinley

Winter Carnival royalty and there will be a scholarship prize for the winning Routt County High School team. While the prizes are a great incentive for friendly competition, the real prize is for each person who walks or drives down Lincoln Avenue and gets to experience art that will only live for that moment in time. Creativity in Steamboat has never been lacking and through the years the artists of Steamboat have taken their job seriously and created sculptures that remind us of our childhood, our dreams and the possibilities of what can be.

Derailments caused by ice buildup above the ball of the rail were common. On the continental divide where the rotary plow cut a narrow channel through deep drifts 12 to 15 feet high, it was extremely dangerous works hand picking the ice from the rails. Large crews of men (fifty or more) employed in extra-gangs removed the ice. Even this army was no match for the whims of winter above timberline. Run-aways were all too regular. The Mallets were new on the Hill when engine 201 broke loose on the 4 percent grade. The crew jumped to safety. Near Antelope, the 363,000-pound engine left the track slinging the coal tender, three freight cars, and the caboose across the landscape. The engine blocked traffic for several days. The railroad did not own a Big Hook, a wrecker. Eventually the wreckage was cleared by brute strength. Another wreck, the 207 engine with engineer Sid Kane and fireman Tom Conway rounded the curve below the Loop and derailed in a snow slide. Low on water, the engine crew began shoveling snow into the tank. Roadmaster Paul Paulson and a section crew arrived to help shovel. Nels Johnson and Pinky Lewis on the 200 engine were ordered to help re-rail the 207. They pulled in behind the crippled engine and began setting frogs (equipment used for re-railing). They carried one to the 207 and went back to the 200 for the second frog. Starting to return they found the 207 was gone. Another snow slide carried it several hundred feet down the mountain. Kane and Conway were inside the water tank and survived without serious injuries. Paulson and the section men perished. Later, the 210 engine helped a train to the top and was returning to Tabernash. Near Sunnyside she broke her drive rod and stripped her airlines destroying any air brakes. The crew jumped while at a low speed and was unhurt. On the Loop Curve, the 210 literally jumped nearly clearing the railroad grade on the lower step of the Loop. It bounced and rolled several hundred feet down the mountain to its grave where its broken body remained. The saga continues with many twists and turns. It is a little known but giant story of our rich past. See Part II

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Winter Carnival Snow Sculpture, circa 1946. Photo courtesy of Tread of Pioneers Museum. Winter Sports Club’s Winter Carnival celebration in Steamboat Springs is the oldest winter carnival west of the Mississippi. Winter Carnival has been held through drought years, blizzards and every type of weather in between. Each year locals and visitors look forward to experiencing traditions that go back a hundred years and include ski jumping, the lighted man, the marching band on skis and of course, the snow sculptures that are proudly displayed in front of businesses on Lincoln Avenue. The tradition of snow sculptures began in 1929 when the Junior High School Principal, Nettie Anderson, oversaw a display of sculptures by the town’s students in the forms of elephants, horses, cows, cats, igloos, snowmen and more. The display opened in temperatures of 50 below zero. Nonetheless, the sculptures were a hit and a tradition was born. Last year, however, there were no snow sculptures and Lincoln Avenue felt bare. There was something missing and the locals of Steamboat let their voices be heard that they wanted the sculptures back. Responding to the community, the Steamboat Springs Arts Council agreed to coordinate this year’s event through collaboration with Creative District members, Winter Sports Club, Mainstreet Steamboat, The City of Steamboat Springs and the Tread of Pioneers Museum. This year, sculptures will follow the theme, ‘Take Me to the Mountain.’ The competition will be open to any team of five people including businesses, non-profit organizations, families and more. To help inspire creativity and to help understand the challenges of carving snow, acclaimed sculptor, Sandy Graves, will offer three free classes that deal with design and practical applications. Community sculptures will be awarded a best of show ribbon by

In 1940, The Steamboat Pilot sponsored a giant snowman that greeted those entering and leaving town. The snowman was such a huge hit they built another one the following year. In 1945, post WWII, the carnival chose a military theme. In 1947, despite the severe lack of snow, one of the more memorable entries was The Old Woman in the Shoe. The following year, a larger than life skater, carved by members of the Beta Sigma Phi Sorority, took first place. That year there were also welcome skiers, a lighthouse, seal, bear, walrus and a penguin. In 1953 the display moved from Lincoln Avenue to the courthouse to preserve the sculptures for the following week when the National Jumping Meet was to take place. In 1955, a giant snow steamboat was built on the courthouse lawn. In 1956, to celebrate Steamboat’s numerous Olympians, an 18-ft snow sculpture of the Olympic seal was created, complete with color and flags displaying the names of Steamboat’s Olympic skiers. Members of the St. Paul’s Episcopal Church carved their church in miniature in 1959 and in 1985, first place went to a snow statue of two upside down people with skis on in front of Cove Restaurant. The themes for Winter Carnival have been as unique as the sculptures themselves. Some favorite themes include ‘Dreams from Ski Town USA’ (1958), ‘Rush to the Rockies’ (1959), ‘Olympic Preview’ (1960), ‘Snowflake Serenades’ (1967), ‘Happiness is Carnival’ (1974), ‘Windy Space Odyssey’ (1980), ‘Snow Rodeo’ (1987), ‘The Gay 90’s’ (1990), ‘Rockin’ the ‘Boat’ (1992), ‘Carnival Circus,’ (1994) and ‘Escape from Cabin Fever’ (2004). Throughout the years, Winter Carnival has included dog sled races, hot air balloon races, chariot races, pig chasing on skis and free turkeys to anyone who could catch them. But the events that have remained are the ones most beloved and we are proud to see snow sculptures continue year after year, just as we look forward to world record breaking ski jumping, the lighted man, skijoring races down Main Street, carnival queens and grand marshals!

*Research for this article came from The Steamboat Pilot & Today from the Winter Carnival collection at the Tread of Pioneers Museum.

A patriot must always be ready to defend his country against his government. – Edward Abbey


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February 2017

Valley Voice

Routt County Disasters

Ding Dong... Jesus Calling By Lyn Wheaton

“Now I lay me down to sleep I pray the Lord my soul to keep, if I should die before I wake I pray the Lord my soul to take.” This prayer my grandmother made us say at bedtime when I was little was my only exposure to religion and was kind of morbid out of the context of any religious training. As these things do, it got inside my head, took on a life of it’s own, and soon became an obsessive-compulsive ritual that enslaved me. At the end you would say: God Bless … mommy and daddy and anyone else that you wished to have God bestow protection upon. My grandmother would prompt me: “Did you remember so and so, and what about this one and that one?” So every night I added more people to the list and memorized it like a standardized test. It got so large that, in it’s heyday, it took me well over an hour to say it and started driving me crazy. I became guilt ridden if I forgot anyone and I couldn’t sleep without performing the lengthy recitation. Many times the damn thing took nearly the whole night. Eventually, I came to my senses and chopped it down to a more manageable size, and then weaned off it by saying it every other night, until finally I started smoking pot and forgot about it altogether. A while back there was a blurb in the blotter about a couple staying at a local motel. The woman claimed they were drawn to town because she had received a signal from God that a rancher in a cowboy hat had a job and a home for them. Much like this couple, I also receive frequent messages from the other realm. Whether these communications are authentic, or a figment of my imagination, has yet to be determined. Most recently, my communicants have come dressed as cleaning ladies and repairmen.

It is not surprising that much of the outreach comes from my mother. She first made contact with me through a psychic and when that proved successful, she did it again. I have since avoided psychics. I can see her on the other side, repeating her mantra, “It never hurts to ask,” as she hounds every medium she can track down. As much as I am eager to hear from my deceased loved ones, I simply cannot handle anymore accurate predictions about my bleak future. My avoidance of mediums has caused my mother, and anyone else from the spirit world that wants to reach me, to get a little more creative. In just one month I had three people all disguised as cleaning ladies try to convert me. The cleaning lady game is tricky enough without these added complications. One of the hardest things about moving is finding a new cleaning lady. I discovered after going through this process more than a few times, it takes an average of about nine cleaning ladies before you finally hit on a good one. The procession of cleaning ladies follows a predictable pattern. I look in the classifieds or get a reference, call them up and explain I’m looking for a deep clean every week. I’m very specific about this. I tell them because of my German mother I am extremely picky. They all want the money, so they swear they’ll do a thorough job. Next, I spend several hours straightening up before they come because everybody knows you don’t want your cleaning lady to waste time doing the day-to-day chores when she should be scrubbing baseboards. In your quest for a cleaning lady, you will likely experience one or all of the following problems: The surface cleaner that either lied about her intent to be

Laramore Barn

meticulous or just had an entirely different understanding of the meaning, the ones who were so traumatized by your grilling about not being a surface cleaner they fail to budget their time and only get one room done, or… they keep working into the night until you realize the cleaning job is going to cost you a thousand dollars. And you cut your losses. Because it pays pretty well, averaging about twenty-five dollars per hour, you will also get people who have never done it before. Ever. How do you know this? If you have to tell them to dust before they vacuum and mop that would usually be a good indication. Next! As you can imagine, once I find a good cleaning lady I am very loyal. Even then it is never a guarantee that satisfactory work will continue in perpetuity. I had one girl for over a year. She did a fabulous job and always did extras, until she started watching a new show on HGTV called Trading Spaces. This was one of the inaugural shows for do-it-yourselfers and it created a bonanza in the do-it-yourself home decorating craze. My cleaning lady, a dedicated fan, was overcome with the urge to rearrange the furniture. One day I came home, with mail in hand, plopped down where my couch used to be, and landed on the floor. When I recovered from the shock, I looked up to see my couch and all the furniture in the room had been displaced. That was it. She had crossed a line and was no longer interested in cleaning. I thought I’d seen it all – until I started trying to find a cleaning lady in Denver. Each cleaning lady came in looking official enough. When someone shows up with a mop and a bucket, after all, it’s usually safe to assume that they are there to clean. But we all know how assumptions tend to make an ass out of me. In the middle of what I would have to rate as less than a mediocre clean -- leaving me to suspect if this person really does this for a living – the supposed cleaning lady stops and asks me, point blank, if I go to church. Now I am thinking because this keeps happening lately that maybe I don’t look right. Maybe I have horns growing out of my head that I don’t see on the rare occasion I look in the mirror. Or maybe it’s my messy unbrushed hair that makes them suspect I’m devil worshipping. Suddenly everyone seems to be very concerned about my spiritual well-being and they are asking very personal questions. They definitely feel I need saving. I tell them, in no uncertain terms, I’m definitely a believer. I go out of my way to convince them I’m on their side, because I just wanna be myself and I really don’t want anyone trying to convert me to anything. As soon as I became hip to the cleaning lady ruse, the spiritual recruitment team threw me a curve ball. I purchased a sectional at Macys and after less than a year it started to fall apart. I called them up and they sent a tech to come look at it. After he examined the couch for a minute, he made a quick assessment and shifted gears. It was obvious that he didn’t care much about the state of my couch. “Do you read the bible?” he asked. What the H-E-double hockey sticks is going on around here? I gave him my stock answer but he insisted on lecturing me for well over an hour. A Jehovah’s Witness had infiltrated my home using Macy’s as a conduit. He told me that 144,000 people would be the anointed, and those

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.


Valley Voice

would be the only ones allowed to enter Heaven, while the rest of the masses will remain on earth. Well, this certainly provided an explanation regarding the tireless recruitment efforts of the Witnesses, but where was the hope for me? It made me wonder if it was like a lottery, or if I was expected to compete with him by going door to door. He left saying he would call me tomorrow. Naturally, I thought he was referring to the couch business. Fast forward to Sunday morning – when Jesus knocked again. Twice. I guess on Sundays – he rings twice. I mean after all, this is his day to shine. The first outreach came in the form of a text. It was from the Macy’s tech and it had links to bible studies. I wondered if he felt sorry for me, providing all this false hope when he knew I wasn’t getting in. I sat there staring at my coffee. Then the phone rang. It was a girl I met at a writer’s workshop. Out of the blue she asked if I wanted to go to Mile High with her, as if I knew what that was. The context of the call soon revealed it was a church, but not just any church, a MegaChurch. I declined. She responded by saying “Next week then.” I started to think that maybe both of my non-religious parents had arrived at the Pearly Gates only to discover they were wrong and were desperately trying to get a message to me. Although… The Army of the Faithful started the battle for my soul when I was young and my mother, always eager to get rid of us, allowed a neighborhood church lady to take me, along with my brother and sister, to the Lutheran Church. It wasn’t long before I was being shipped off to church camp for a week, at the tender age of six. I blocked out all of it, except the dreadful hike in the sweltering mugginess of the New Jersey summer, through miles and miles of blueberry bogs. When I complained about the heat, the counselor told me to think of how Jesus felt when he had to carry that Cross for me. I decided this was not something I’d be interested in, and started cutting Sunday School, taking the tithe money and going to the diner instead. What if I was already meant to be one of the anointed? What if I had the winning lottery ticket but was failing to cash it in? Maybe my signals were getting crossed. I went to yoga to clear my head. Yoga was going well until I looked up and saw a Jesus face in a pile of sweat on the yoga mat in front of me. A Jesus face! This was bordering on the absurd. Clearly, I was in the midst of a 5-alarm spiritual emergency. All this preoccupation with the afterlife has rendered me incapable of functioning in the here and now. I’m not sure what to do about it. I guess I’ll continue to assess the situation and make adjustments as I see fit. In the meantime -- God bless, Mommy and Daddy, Nanny and Bicky, Rudy and the Hermans, Rudy Meyer and Bruce, and everyone else up there that I love and miss. I hope I didn’t leave anyone out, and forgive me if I did. Amen.

February 2017

9

Go Figure!?

In Steamboat Springs Boomers Rule By Scott L. Ford

In America, there are six living generations, which are six distinct groups of people. As a generalization, each generation has different likes, dislikes, and attributes. They have had collective experiences as they aged and therefore have similar ideals. Why does the Steamboat Springs area seem so comfortable to Baby Boomers? The simple reason is that there are a lot of them here (me included). Locally, the Baby Boomers occupy 28% of the population, making them the dominate generation in the Steamboat area. Statewide in Colorado, Boomers make up 24% of the population. The dominate population segment statewide is a group called Generation Z ages 18 and younger.

Dr. Karen Nann and “Callaloo” (Callie)

We would like to welcome Dr. Karen Nann to our Pet Kare family!

Steamboat Springs Area Population Distributuion by Generation Greatest Generation: 85+

1%

Silent Generation : 70-84

5%

Boomers: 50-69

28%

Generation X: 35-49

22%

Millennials: 15-34

22%

Generation Z: 18 and younger

22%

Colorado Statewide Distributuion by Population by Generation Greatest Generation: 85+

2%

Silent Generation : 70-84

6%

Boomers: 50-69

24%

Generation X: 35-49

20%

Millennials: 15-34

22%

Generation Z: 18 and younger

26%

Come in and say Hi!

Dr. Karen is excited to start her career at the Pet Kare clinic and is focused on nutrition, dentistry, wellness and pain management including acupuncture. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder and then joined the Peace Corps serving two years in the West Indies. That experience encouraged her to become a certified veterinary technician, working in the Denver area for 6 years. Dr. Karen attended Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine and has just completed her clinical year at Colorado State University. She is a certified veterinary acupuncturist and enjoys working with cats, dogs and horses. When not working, Karen enjoys every outdoor activity possible. She is a yoga, spin and kickboxing instructor and you may see her teaching classes around Steamboat. In addition she is an avid skier, horseback rider, tennis player, runner, biker and loves a good hike on a beautiful blue bird day! She has one dog, Callaloo (Callie), who is her active sidekick. Dr. Karen is excited to see all of your furry friends for any of their health needs!

Happy Pets! Happy People!

Go Figure? is sponsored by Rocky Mountain Remedies Proudly supporting alternative modalities in medicine and media.

www.petkareclinic.com 102 Anglers Drive

970-879-5273

Mankind, when left to themselves, are unfit for their own government. – George Washington


10

February 2017

Valley Voice

The Wandering Rose

Reality 879.5929 905 Weiss Drive - across HWY 40 from the Holiday Inn

We Love Our Customers!

970 .879 .5717

2570 South Copper Frontage

Don’t miss stopping by the Diner for some local laughs! Breakfast served ALL DAY. Lunch and Dinner Specials Daily.

Open 7am – 9pm Daily

White winter, snow winter, cold winter, ice winter, days turn from blue to white, to grey to black, color disappears, everything small is swallowed by snow; bushes, forgotten berries, grasses, hopes. When the nights are long, the snow of the brain falls, falls, softly burying dreams, the joy of the child that once lived inside. And in those darkest days and darkest nights there are other ways to relive that excitement, that happiness of youth either stolen or lost as the years passed by. Sugar, sugar, sugar. Drugs, drugs, drugs. Shots, shots, shots. Up, up, up. Help me fly away above my life, above the despair that is reaching out for me, that is wrapped around my ankles, dragging me down and creeping into my heart. Audrey Rose saw these words written under people’s skin, saw it under her own skin at times, and she had to confess, sugar took that away. Drinking made her happy. She was too afraid to try drugs because she knew drugs would make her happy, maybe make her so happy that her perfectly perfect life wouldn’t seem so perfect anymore. She loved the explosion of energy, the creeping into the blood of the alcohol, the relaxation, the ability to shut down, black out and forget about life for a moment. For Audrey Rose it wasn’t her life she wanted to forget, she loved her life, she loved the beauty she had surrounded herself with, but it was the other stories she needed to forget for a while. It was the tragedies that so many other people in the world experienced that she wanted to believe couldn’t happen, wouldn’t happen anymore. When she drank, when she consumed a Coke, five donuts and a pint of ice cream, a buzz of energy of excitement of uncontrollable happiness took everything else away. The only problem was for every hill she climbed, for every flight she took there was always a landing. A crash. A need to sleep to, disappear from that feeling for a while. The only times she didn’t need anything was when she was alone, so far gone into the backcountry, where there were no traces of other people, where she could walk until her entire being was exhausted and her soul could be filled with the beauty of the world around her. But in winter, especially during the darkest, shortest days she didn’t often go far from her cave or far from town. She wanted release but she didn’t want to have to work for that release. So she went to the bar where it was warm and she could feel the heat and heartbeats of other people.

738 Lincoln Downtown Steamboat Springs www.johnnybgoodsdiner.com

870-8400

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

After a few shots she liked to walk around town and sneak into private parties and different office buildings to see how other people were living. She watched the conversations they had and the way their bodies moved and she held her arms around herself thinking about what their lives were like, what they had seen and felt and cried for and laughed for. At Haymaker, Strategic Design & Advertising was holding their holiday party. To thank their clients for being who they were, they each got a silver snowflake that reflected the world around them. On the edge of the party there was a line of people putting on goggles and moving awkwardly around the room. They all smiled when the goggles were on and Audrey Rose was immediately intrigued. Normally she would never make her presence known, she liked to be a shadow more than a sunbeam at night, but she put her name down and let the bartender pour her a glass of wine and maybe another shot while she waited.

When her number was called, Grant Johnson asked her where she wanted to go. “Where can I go?” she asked. “Just about anywhere,” he replied. “You can paint in a field of stars, stand on the edge of a rooftop in New York City, or I can take you to Mars.” She put the goggles on and instantly she was in another world. With her hand she painted a 3-D world she could step into, walk around, shrink or expand. She filled the sky with stars that twinkled around her and threw snow into the night and let it fall upon her. She let Grant take her to Mars, where she stood on the barren landscape and wondered why anyone thought that was a good place to live. She climbed rocks in Monument Valley, traveled around the world with Google Earth and walked through landscapes she might never see in her ‘real’ life. She even touched noses with an alien. This world that wasn’t a world, this virtual reality was almost as real as where she lived, but with one difference, she could get out of herself, the same way she could with drinking or sugar or sex. She could become small again, insignificant and she could see the wonders of the world revealed before her eyes. An hour passed in a flash and when she took the goggles off, she felt sober but alive. She felt as if she had been changed in some way. The possibilities of her childhood opened up before her once more. She could go anywhere. She could do anything. She could step out of herself and wrap herself in stars, she could erase the worlds she didn’t like and build ones she did. After she took off the glasses, she wondered which world was actually real, the one she had come from or the one she was stepping into. The boundaries of existence began to blur for her. She felt herself crave the adventure the goggles provided because there was no crash. There was only a different world to step into or out of again and again. The world she had known up until that point unraveled, unfolded, everything was possible, anything could happen. As she stepped back into the night she was changed. The night didn’t seem so dark, the days not so short. The springtime of her life was coming.


Valley Voice

February 2017

11

Mister Helpful’s Dating Guide

February is Creative Romance Month

It’s all about your Happiness

By Mr. Helpful, M.D.

Yes it’s true. So take a Date on a great Holiday Date and celebrate one of these. Yes Groundhog Day is in there as well as a few birthdays of folks we all know. National Freedom Day starts the month off on the 1st. Candlemas on the 2nd is celebrated by all true Christians, followed by the Day The Music Died, about that plane crash (look into the song American Pie for more details). Create A Vacuum Day and Thank A Mailman Day both share the 4th, so that’s a busy one. Of course National Weatherman’s Day is totally fun; right before Lame Duck Day on the 6th.

A strange full day will happen on the 7th with the beginning of the Olympics, Send A Card To A Friend Day AND Wave ALL Your Fingers At Your Neighbor Day. All on the same day – I KNOW!! But ya can’t rest up, cats and kittens, because Boy Scout Day and Kite Flying Day are right there to test yer metal. The 9th of the month is the dreaded Toothache Day; easily forgotten by the festive Umbrella Day and Clean Out Your Computer Day on the 10th. Next I suggest just combine the 11th & 12th holidays together for one big 48 hours of fun: Don’t Cry Over Spilled Milk, Make A Friend, White T-Shirt, Plum Pudding and Abraham Lincoln’s B-day all in one! Work with me here people. Think eof the marketing!!! h The 13th, whether on a Friday or not, should be crazy fun. Get a Different Name Day. Love it or hate it, it rocks. After that there’s another one I can’t remember, but National Gum Drop Day and Singles Awareness Day are on the 15th. However, Do A Grouch A Favor Day on the 16th is a great idea. Bring the Love my friends, you can do it. If you miss it, it’s easy to make up for it on Random Acts Of Kindness Day on the 17th, which also might be Presidents Day. Not sure how those two work together.

Rocketing to the front line of interest now will be National Chocolate Mint Day on the 19th. Please do yourself a favor and treat yourself and dear friends to some of the good stuff. Call ahead and let them know you are coming. It’s only fair. Of course this might mean nothing to someone preparing a full blown party for their mommy’s little favorite on the 20th, Love Your Pet Day. If you get invited to such a party, bring the appropriate treats. For giggles, get your fortune read on Card Reading Day before you bang out the next big celebration day on the 22nd: George Washington’s B-day, Walking the Dog, International World Thinking Day; all on the same Be Humble Day. Strangely enough International Dog Biscuit Appreciation Day comes the day after. But Tennis Day is also on the 23rd, so I guess it all works out for the dogs in a big way. Only one holiday each on the 24th & 25th – National Tortilla Chip Day and Pistol Patient Day; but the following two days are amazing. Carnival Day, National Pistachio Day, Tell a Fairy Tale Day, Polar Bear Day and No Brainer Day. The month of February traditionally ends on the 28th with Floral Design Day, Public Speaking Day and National Tooth Fairy Day. However some years, the Gregorian calendar plays a fun little trick and hands over an extra day. Leap Day is the funnest and stupidest day to ever be born on. For the rest of one’s life there is either joy or sorrow about birthdays.

a day of celebration, but a mind-set. For those who are already in love, the opportunities to push things over the top are at the ready. Go for it and make it magical. For those who want their newly found relationship to understand the depths of their hopes and dreams for a bigger brighter future, I say ya really want to make sure you’re doing the right thing. Getting it wrong is crazy super painful. But in the regular Dating World, VD is not a “good day for a First Date”. Not even for Dates 2 thru 5. The level of Expectation is so crazy super high very few can handle the stress, let alone survive it. Be up front with your Date. Too much too soon can ruin a great thing. So there you have it. Keep the pressure of life to a minimum and enjoy yourself and your date.

Find Mister Helpful’s Dating Guide on Facebook, hit the LIKE button and read the expanded versions of this column. Up next from Mr. Helpful – Sassy = Bitch. What to say and not to say in an Online dating Profile

So that’s it for celebrations in the month of February. Have fun and take your Date out for any one of these great days to goofily spend together. You didn’t think I was going to drone on and on about VD did you?!? A waste of time for me, my friends. VD is a not

Arnold Barn

d -

No man is good enough to govern another man without the other’s consent. – Abraham Lincoln


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February 2017

Valley Voice

Country Driving

The Psyche of the Winter Driver Uncovered By Mike Baran

(A telling from a person of little interest and zero scientific data) In the winter, our driving skills change to suit the conditions in our bubble. It becomes very apparent that we become very different from each other on how we choose to navigate our changing road conditions. As the lines painted on the roads begin to disappear, we start to see these personalities shine. There are so many different styles, but let’s take a look at a few of them for the sake of better understanding how to handle ourselves out there. These observations are made on rural roads usually south of the city (I imagine that these people exist elsewhere though!). “The First in Line” This personality is probably the one that does not evolve much throughout the seasons. The best way to identify a first in liner is to look in your rear view mirror. When you do this, you should be able to make out a person, as they tend to follow much closer than the recommended space required for an emergency stop. The expression observed is usually one of inconvenience or annoyance. They usually are also doing a slight weave to let you know they are going to pass you as soon as possible. In the winter, there are so many more areas to pass as there are no more solid yellow lines to hinder them. It is irrelevant how many more cars are in front of you, as they will work hard to get in front of all of them. Speed limits are irrelevant to the first in liner, so don’t think speeding up will appease them! “The Pace Car” We discuss this one next, as it is the counterpart to the first in liner. The pace car is just as described. This individual actually has the best idea of what speed should be driven. They tend to stay a little to the center to hinder passing. Acceleration down hills and in straightaways is necessary to make sure you understand this is where you can go faster. Turns tend to be very slow as this is safe and also they are a good place to teach those behind them that it is ok to go super slow…Its safe right? The pace car also helps the first in liner to warm his tires up just like racing! The weaving tends to be much more vigorous looking for that golden moment when the pace car is texting, changing the radio, or finally just gives up. But no worries! As they get passed, there’s usually a universal hand gesture to let you know where you stand. Please don’t confuse this gesture with a peace sign…

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

©

“Safer in the Center” The name describes it all… This personality is responsible for probably 80% or more of the people in the ditch. Unfortunately they are evasive to law enforcement who usually issues a failure to control a motor vehicle citation to the one in the ditch. Best counter move to this one is to stop, wait for them to pass, and then go! “The Tortoise” As taught to us as little children, the tortoises usually win the race. This individual generally does not break 30 mph anywhere! They are the leading cause of road rage in the winter as all of the above personalities experience them. These people, however, have some really endearing qualities. They are fully aware that they are grossly under the speed limit and tend to hug the side of the road to allow themselves to be passed. They generally have a nice wave and smile to counter-act all of the birdies flying their way. Often, they will duck into a turn, intersection, driveway or other wide area to allow the caravan built up behind them to pass. Something to remember about the tortoise… They are the most likely to make their destination consistently. Also, punctuality is a very strong trait here as the drive for them is generally double dry weather time. “The Authority” Yep…These individuals are actually best equipped for the roads. As they are so wise, condescension is the popular car talk. These people come up with clever names for other drivers and tend to critique all around them. They have been given the power of judgement to use how they see fit and can morph into any of the types above depending on conditions and the need to show how good at driving they are. They tend to have snow plows on their vehicles…Oh crap…It’s me isn’t it… Well, I did write this brain candy, so I guess it applies. The shoe fits…I’ll work on it! Twelve steps to recovery right? Last, but not least…”The Texan” Just kidding, GOD BLESS TEXAS! In the end, it seems most important to drive safe! All of us are so different, as our vehicles, which leads to so many different driving habits in bad weather. So… Let’s be courteous, patient, and leave a little early as we brave our rural roads.


Valley Voice

13

February 2017

Keep the Fire Alive!

Design Your Love Cocktail from our Great Selection!

NIGHT SKIING & RIDING

Unbelievable Selection. Unbelievable Specials!

Open: Mon - Sat: 9am -11pm Sunday: 10:30am -7pm

Over 200 Beers Over 700 wines Over 200 Liquors On sale every day!

Come in and SAVE!

Unbelievable Selection. Unbelievable Specials!

www.cplsteamboat.com For special offers, like us on Facebook!

Located next to City Market in Central Park Plaza, Steamboat Springs.

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JUST BECAUSE THE DAYLIGHT ENDS,

DOESN’T MEAN THE FUN DOES. DATES & HOURS*

12/15-12/19 Thurs-Mon 5:30-8:30pm

OPEN Monday - Saturday 4pm-2am

12/22-1/2 Nightly 5:30-8:30pm

1/5-2/16** Thurs-Mon 5:30-8:30pm 2/17-3/27 Thurs-Mon 6:00-9:00pm *Hours of operation subject to change. **Closed February 5, 2017 (Super Bowl Sunday) The Umbrella Bar is the best spot to watch the night action on the slopes. Sip on specialty libations and stay warm during night skiing and riding. Percentage of all proceeds goes to benefit local veterans

The V, Inc

924 Lincoln Ave (970) 734-4357

Tuesday: League Night Wednesday: 8 Ball Tournament Thursday: 9 Ball Tournament -

Happy hour specials 4-6 and 10-12

6:30 6:30 6:30

Stop in Gondola Joe’s and grab a quick bite to eat or warm up with a hot beverage. Open during night skiing and riding. Located in gondola square.

FOR DETAILS OR TO PURCHASE TICKETS, VISIT THE MAIN TICKET OFFICE AT THE BASE AREA, GO ONLINE TO STEAMBOAT.COM/NIGHTSKIING OR CALL 877.783.2628

Prayer does not change God, but it changes him who prays. – Soren Kierkegaard


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Buff Pass Fish Creek Res. Fish Creek Falls Ski Time Square

Map under construction

Dry Lake

Spring Creek Fish Creek Falls Rd.

Steamboat Blvd.

Valley Voice, LLC 1125 Lincoln Ave. Unit 2C Steamboat Springs, CO 80487

4

Burgess Creek

Rollingstone Golf Club

Fish Creek

E. Maple Street

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Map Disclaimer © 2015 Valley Voice, LLC. All rights reserved. NOT TO SCALE! No portion of this publication may be reproduced in any manner without the written permission of the publisher. The publisher does not guarantee the accuracy of this map.

Tamarack Drive

Amethyst Drive

Amethyst Drive

Hill Top Parkway

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RCR 36

Anglers Drive

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Strawberry Hot Springs

Old Town Hot Springs

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Missouri Ave.

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Howelsen Hill BMX Track

Ski Jumps

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Fart Park

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Rabbit Ears Pass Dumont Lake

Steamboat Gondy

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Knowls Mt. Werner Circle Eagle Ridge Dr.

Tennis Bubble

Meadows Parking

Casey’s Pond

Walton Creek

Central Park Drive

Mt. Werner Road

Whistler Road

Catamount

Pine Grove Road

Strings

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131 Haymaker Golf Core Trail

RCR 22

Yampa River

Fetcher Park

Stagecoach Res.

RCR 14

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Steamboat Cemetery

13

Animal Shelter Copper Ridge

Elk River Road

129 Downhill Drive

129

Shield Drive

Bob Adams Airport

Yampa River

RCR 33

Steamboat Golf Club

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16

February 2017

Valley Voice From the Kitchen and Sushi Bar

$5 California Roll / $6 Veggie, Spicy Tuna, Spicy Hamachi or Spicy Salmon Roll/ $7 Philly Roll / $9 Unagi Kyu Roll / $10 Steamboat Crunch or Las Vegas Roll Tuna/ $14 Tuna, Humachi or Salmon Poke $4 Edamame / $5 Waffle Fries / $6 Pork Pot Sticker / $6 Kobe Beef Hot Dog/ $3 Kobe Beef or Pork Tonkatsu Sliders / $8 Asian Dry Rub BBQ Ribs/ $8 “New” Chicken Wings (1lb of Traditional, Dry Rub, House BBQ, Creamy Wasabi or House Fire)

From the Bar

½ Price Well Drinks, House Red, House White $2 Bud Light $2.50 Kirin Draft $1 Off All Other Drafts $4 Pabst Blue Ribbon Tall Boys $6 Dulce Vida Silver Margarita $5 Large Hot Sake and $8 Who, Haze or Plum Hot Sake

609 Yampa 970.870.1019

Happy Hour Daily from 3:30 -5:30

www.sake2u.com

Share the Love with your Furry Valentine! ek? me of our Happy Hour information. Sandy Wisecup and Jill Andrews take a sled ride in Yampa.

thwhile

879-6092 In Central Park Plaza

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Artwork by Kelly Koehler

FEED ME!

Show Your Garden Some Love! Mention this ad and receive 20% off any item. 2560 Copper Ridge Drive, Steamboat Springs, Colorado (970) 879-8577 For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Steamboat Women’s March


Schmac and Cheese

Valley Voice

February 2017

Smoke Signals

821 Lincoln Ave - schmiggitys.com t Blanke hiskey FREE W – 2 / 2 m ay Thursd Hip-Hop - 10p ic n a g Or Ramble ewater 10pm - $10 it h W – /3 ss Friday 2 tn Dance-Gra M y k c Ro ek Funk Tr – 4 / 2 y Saturda pm - FREE 0 Funk - 1 ins ook Tw 0 h S – 9 / - $1 ay 2 Thursd lk Pop - 10pm o F ie Ind ricans ge Ame n a r t S /10 – $5 Friday 2 Roll - 10pm d n Rock a dren thy Chil il F – 1 y 2/1 5 Saturda unk - 10pm - $ F / e Danc eous 2 – Aqu 0pm - $5 1 / 2 y a ck - 1 Sund /Jam Ro n Stop Groove w/ Na’a 5 a d n a P nt - $1 16 – Gia eggae - 10pm / 2 y a d Thurs elic Roots/R d suckers Psyche / Super 0 DOS w t a e RE; $3 orton H – Rev H - 10pm - $25 P 7 1 / 2 i r k F illy/Pun Rockab sworth Holling PRE; $20 DOS le y K – - $15 y 2/18 Saturda ul/Funk - 10pm o Rock/S t ovemen 9 – Gro FREE 1 / 2 y a m– Sund ck - 10p Funk Ro ock – SandR 0pm – FREE 3 2 / 2 y 1 a Thursd -driven Rock ic Acoust

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Schmappy Hour 7-9 Daily Steamboat's ONLY Happy Hour from 7-9 pm 1/2 Off the entire bar; $3 1/2 pound 100% Angus Beef Hot Dogs Genesee Cans

News from the Chief of the Chief By Scott Parker

Hello all and thank you for reading the 41st installment of Smoke Signals: News from The Chief of the Chief. Happy February to all! So far it has been a pretty amazing winter. Tons of snow. Great skiing. Tons going on at the Chief. As I type this, the Chief Theater is remodeling our small theater into a Green Room/Multi Use Room! For those of you not familiar with the term “green room”, it is a place where performers hang out before the show. We are adding a bathroom, new lighting, a coffee bar, and it will look amazing!! Once again Fox Construction is doing the work, with help from Fred Grippa and Mid-West Electric and Kevin Fedewa of Fedewa custom works. Next time you are at the Chief, ask Ashley or myself to give you a tour! In February we have some amazing events (in random order)

813 Lincoln Avenue 970-871-4791

February 2,9,16 & 23

An Evening of Improv with the

Tongue in Chief Players Doors and Bar @ 6:30pm Show @ 7pm Tickets: $10. Donation goes to the Chief Players!

February 4 Super Fun Steamboat Show! Doors and Bar @ 7:30 pm Show @ 8pm

Tickets: See Website

February 18

• WinterWonderGrass

Backcountry Film Festival

• FOUR nights of Chief Players Improv

Doors and Bar @ 6:30 pm Show @ 7pm

• Backcountry Film Festival • The return of The Super Fun Steamboat Show

Tickets: See Website

February 24

• Free Foreign Film

WinterWonderGrass After Dark

• Winter Film Series • Moors and McCumber continue our Songwriter Series Please follow us on Facebook, Twitter or Instagram or go to our website and sign up for our weekly email blast! Thank you for reading and see you at the Chief!!! Cheers, Scott

www.chieftheater.com

Opening: Jay Romer & Friends Headline:

Head for the Hills Show @ 10 Tickets: See Website

February 25

Songwriter Series Presents:

Moors & McCumber Doors @ 6:30 pm Show @ 7pm Tickets: $15.

February 25

WinterWonderGrass After Dark

Opening: Dead Horses Headline:

$1

The Steep Canyon Raiders

Sliders Tickets online atSchmiggity-ball schmiggitys.com or at All That. Schmac and Cheese

Tickets: Tickets: Adults:See $15Website Students: $10

Show @ 10

Heaven is under our feet as well as over our heads. – Henry David Thoreau


18

February 2017

Valley Voice

Calendar of Events WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 1 Tread of Pioneers Museum Behind the Scenes Tour Noon @ Tread of Pioneers FREE. www.treadofpioneers. org Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Young Professionals Network Community Forum 5PM @ Tread of the Pioneers Museum. www.steamboatchamber.com/community/forums/ypn-community-forum Hitchens Brothers Jump Night 5PM @ Howelsen Hill Join the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club for Jump Night www.sswsc.org Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4. (844) 955-1066 www. foundrytreatmentcenter.com Women Who Wine 6PM @ Sundance Studio Formed by women for women to learn more about local non-profits www.steamboatchamber.com/community/ women-who-wine-jan

Groundhog Day Dinner 5PM @ Yampa Ladies Aid Hall Yampa-Egeria Historical Society presents a community dinner featuring all you can eat. Adults $6/Kids 5-11 $4/ Kids under 5 FREE. Receive 1 FREE Adult ticket with $30 or more cash purchase at Montgomery’s General Merchandise. Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners Poetry Reading 6PM @ Off the Beaten Path Local writers Lindsey Royce and Amber DeLay present an evening of poetry and shared words. Their books will be available for signing. www.steamboatbooks.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “The Age of Consequences” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This award-winning documentary investigates the impact of climate change. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/ events

THURSDAY FEBRUARY 2

The Tongue in Chief Players present An Evening of Improv 6:30PM @ The Chief Adult language and content. $10 donation @ the door.

Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class.

Whiskey Blanket w/Travelers Music and Ryland & Swoop 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Organic Hip-Hop. FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 3

Karaoke Night 9PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

Snow Play Workshop Noon @ Workman Park (5th & Yampa) Join the Steamboat Arts Council as they present this workshop on making sculptures with snow. FREE. www.steamboatarts.org Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER

To submit your events or calendar information e-mail: paulie@yampavalleyvoice.com Events may be edited for length or content. Calendar entries must be received by the 15th of each month.

Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free

Registration deadline for Marketing Your Book Successfully by Edith Lynn Hornik-Beer. 5PM @ CMC 970-870-4444 Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat. Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@ springsips.com 970-846-5608 Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking Lot. Led by a Yampatika Naturalist. Tour is moderately strenuous. FREE ($5 parking fee). Registration required www. yampatika.org Steamboat Theatrical Society Noon @ Arts Depot. Join theater enthusiasts to read and discuss theatrical works. FREE. Contact sstew@gmail. com for info.

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com First Friday Art Walk 5PM @ Downtown Steamboat. Self-guided tour of local art galleries, museums and alternative venues. FREE. New Paintings by Susan Schiesser 5PM @ K. Keifer’s West Elevation Gallery on 9th St. (between Lincoln and Oak) See new works by this popular local artist. FREE. Lost Steamboat Photograph Exhibit 5PM @ Creekside Café First Friday Artwalk kicks off this important exhibition of Tread of Pioneers Museum’s Collection of photographs. Collection will be on display through 04/30. FREE. www. treadofpioneers.org First Friday Art Walk @ Jace Romick Gallery 5PM @ The Chief FREE. www.chieftheater.com Art Walk Reception “Winter Tracks” 5PM @ Art Depot An exhibition of embellished skis, snowboards and snowshoes on display through February. Enjoy wine and appetizers. FREE. www. steamboatarts.org Steamboat Dance Theater and Steamboat African Dance & Drum Ensemble Master Class 6PM @ Library Hall Drumming master class with Vieux Traore from 6-7:30 Dance class with Djeneba Sako from 7:30-9 BYO drum. $15 cash or check @ door. Call Jennie 970-846-9695 for info. Strings Music Festival presents “The Mark of Zorro” 7PM @ The Strings Music Pavillion. The classic silent film starring Douglas Fairbanks is accompanied by the Mont Alto Motion Picture Orchestra. Tickets start at $15 @ stringsmusicfestival.com Whitewater Ramble – Jerry Garcia tribute 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Rocky Mountain Dance-grass $10 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

members includes materials. www.steamboatarts.org Latin Dance Night 7PM @ Schmiggitys FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 4

MONDAY FEBRUARY 6

Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool. Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register

Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline.teuscher@gmail. com

Yampatika Guided Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Ages 12 and up. Registration required. $20 includes snowshoes. www.yampatika.org Valentines & Tea 11:30AM @ Tread of the Pioneers Museum. Join this fun family event to learn how to make valentines. FREE. www. treadofpioneers.org Bud Werner Memorial Library’s 50th Birthday Party! 3PM @ Library Main Floor Join the celebration with stories, trivia, party favors, music, cake and coffee. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary. org/events Emerald City Opera presents “Speed Dating, Tonight!” 4:30PM & 8PM @ Depot Art Center This new version of Michael Ching’s production contains new and revised content. Seating is limited. $40 @ www.emeraldcityopera.com/ tickets or ALL THAT Steamboat Art Museum 10th Anniversary Gala 6PM @ Steamboat Art Museum. Join the Steamboat Art Museum for this fun event celebrating their 10th year! FREE. www.steamboatartmuseum.org Super Fun Steamboat Show 7:30PM @ The Chief All new original show each month – adult content $10 @ ALL THAT or www. chieftheater.com Funk Trek 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Funk FREE. www.schmiggitys.com SUNDAY FEBRUARY 5 Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub Glass Mosaic Workshop 2PM @ Depot Arts Center Learn how to create a glass mosaic window using glass cutting & shaping tools and Ages 15 and up, max 12 students. $75 Non-members/$60

Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Marketing Your Book Successfully 6PM @ CMC Edith Lynn Hornik-Beer’s seminar explores the many facets of marketing your book. Register @ CMC 970-8704444 Registration # ENG-901 Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Giraffe: Up High and Personal” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This International Wildlife film explores the African savannah and its unique and beautiful inhabitants, the giraffe. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary. org/events Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Audubon: John James Audubon and the Birds of America” 7:30PM @ Library Hall Second half of the Wildlife double feature documents Audubon and his passion for Birds and conservation. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary. org/events Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY FEBRUARY 7 Airline Partners Summit 8AM @ Steamboat Grand Join the Steamboat Ski Resort for the 18th Annual Airline Partners’ Summit. RSVP to 970-879-6111. Wildfire Procurement 8:30AM @ Citizen’s Hall (124 10th St.) Learn more about providing construction or facilities maintenance for wildfire firefighting efforts. For more info email kluft@fs.fed.us Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org

Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www.mountaintapbrewery.com History Happy Hour 5:30PM @ Butcherknife Brewery “The Death of Joseph Hahn and the History of Hahns Peak”. Free craft beer for all who attend! www.treadofpioneers.org Bud Werner Memorial Library presents An Evening with Scott Carney 6:30PM @ Library Hall. Author and investigative journalist talks about his new book, “What Doesn’t Kill Us”. FREE. www. steamboatlibrary.org/events Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 8 Winter Carnival – Ski for Free @ Howelsen Hill 9AM @ Howelsen Hill Show your 104th Winter Carnival Button @ Howelsen Lodge and receive a FREE lift ticket for the day. Limit 1 ticket per button per day. www.steamboatsprings.net Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4. (844) 955-1066 www. foundrytreatmentcenter.com

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents the Free Foreign Film Series. 6:30 @ The Chief “My King (Mon Roi)” Award winning French romance. French club meets at 6 before the film. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Karaoke Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com THURSDAY FEBRUARY 9 Winter Carnival – Ski for Free @ Howelsen Hill 9AM @ Howelsen Hill Show your 104th Winter Carnival Button @ Howelsen Lodge and receive a FREE lift ticket for the day. Limit 1 ticket per button per day. www.steamboatsprings.net


Valley Voice

Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class. Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners

February 2017

Calendar of Events Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat. Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@ springsips.com 970-846-5608 Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking Lot. Led by a Yampatika Naturalist. Tour is moderately strenuous. FREE ($5 parking fee). Registration required www. yampatika.org Steamboat Theatrical Society Noon @ Arts Depot Join theater enthusiasts to read and discuss theatrical works. FREE. Contact sstew@ gmail.com for info. Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Moonlight Snowshoe Tour TBA @ Emerald Mountain Led by Yampatika. Ages 18 and up. $20 includes snowshoes. Registration required at www.yampatika.org

Yampatika presents Moonlight Snowshoe Tour TBA @ Emerald Mountain $20 includes snowshoes – times vary. Registration required. www.yampatika.org

Strange Americans 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Rock. $5. www.schmiggitys. com

The Tongue in Chief Players present An Evening of Improv 6:30PM @ The Chief Adult language and content - anything can happen with Improv! $10 donation @ the door.

Winter Carnival – Ski for Free @ Howelsen Hill 9AM @ Howelsen Hill Show your 104th Winter Carnival Button @ Howelsen Lodge and receive a FREE lift ticket for the day. Limit 1 ticket per button per day. www.steamboatsprings.net

Shook Twins 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Indie Folk Pop $10 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com FRIDAY FEBRUARY 10 Coffee with Council 7:30AM @ Crawford Room @ Centennial Hall. Discuss issues of interest with council members. FREE. Coffee and light refreshments provided. www.steamboatsprings.net Winter Carnival – Ski for Free @ Howelsen Hill 9AM @ Howelsen Hill Show your 104th Winter Carnival Button @ Howelsen Lodge and receive a FREE lift ticket for the day. Limit 1 ticket per button per day. www.steamboatsprings.net STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp. 9AM @ Gondola Square STARS annual 2 ½ day ski camp. www.steamboatstars.com

19

SATURDAY FEBRUARY 11

STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp 9AM @ Gondola Square STARS annual 2 ½ day ski camp. www.steamboatstars. com Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register Yampatika Guided Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Ages 12 and up. Registration required. $20 includes snowshoes. www.yampatika.org Filthy Children 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Dance/Funk $5. www.schmiggitys.com SUNDAY FEBRUARY 12 Winter Carnival – Ski for Free @ Howelsen Hill

9AM @ Howelsen Hill Show your 104th Winter Carnival Button @ Howelsen Lodge and receive a FREE lift ticket for the day. Limit 1 ticket per button per day. www.steamboatsprings.net STARS & Stripes Heroes Camp 9AM @ Gondola Square STARS annual 2 ½ day ski camp. www.steamboatstars. com Diamond Hitch Brunch 9AM @ Steamboat Art Museum. Watch the Winter Carnival Diamond Hitch Parade from the 2nd floor of the Steamboat Art Museum. www. steamboatartmuseum.org Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub Aqueous 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Groove/Jam Rock $5 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com MONDAY FEBRUARY 13 Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline.teuscher@gmail. com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Fun, aerobic, non-impact workout. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Marketing Your Book Successfully 6PM @ CMC Edith Lynn Hornik-Beer’s seminar explores the many facets of marketing your book. Register @ CMC 970-8704444 Registration # ENG-901 Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Karaoke FREE. www.schmiggity’s.com TUESDAY FEBRUARY 14 Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www.mountaintapbrewery.com

Tread of Pioneers Winter Film Series 6:30PM @ The Chief “So You Think You Can Ski?” 1953 film by Dr. Frank Howard and clips from the Museums vintage ski film collection. FREE. Donations accepted. www.treadofpioneers.org Torchlight Parade 7PM @ Base of the Ski Mountain Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 15 USDA Grant Training 9AM @ Craig, CO USDA representatives give information about USDA grants www.steamboatchamber. com/community/usda-granttraining Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Hitchens Brothers Jump Night 5PM @ Howelsen Hill Join the Steamboat Springs Winter Sports Club for Jump Night. www.sswsc.org Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4. Meets weekly. (844) 955-1066 www.foundrytreatmentcenter.com Poetry Slam 6PM @ Off the Beaten Path Share original poetry and compete to win a $10 gift card www.steamboatbooks.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Ballads, with Love” 6:30PM @ Library Hall Local duo Tera Johnson and Neil Marchman sing romantic ballads – bring your honey and enjoy! FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Karaoke Night 9PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com THURSDAY FEBRUARY 16 USDA Grant Training 9AM @ Craig, CO USDA representatives give information about USDA grants www.steamboatchamber. com/community/usda-granttraining

Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class. Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners Impact 100 6:30PM @ TBD The Yampa Valley Community Foundation invites you to the 2nd Presentation Party for Season 11 of Impact 100. www.steamboatchamber.com/ community/impact-100-2 Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “The Barefoot Artist” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This documentary film tells the story of Lily Yeh, who is fueled by the belief that art is a human right and that artists can create a foundation for profound social change. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events The Tongue in Chief Players present An Evening of Improv 6:30PM @ The Chief Adult language and content - anything can happen with Improv! $10 donation @ the door.

FRIDAY FEBRUARY 17

Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat. A brief, inspirational teaching, meditation and all levels asana (movement). Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@ springsips.com 970-846-5608 Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking Lot. Led by a Yampatika Naturalist. Tour is moderately strenuous. FREE ($5 parking fee). Registration required www. yampatika.org Steamboat Theatrical Society Noon @ Arts Depot Join theater enthusiasts to read and discuss theatrical works. FREE. Contact sstew@gmail.com for info. A Taste of History Noon @ Tread of Pioneers Museum. This month’s talk focuses on how to use everyday ingredients to make essentials such as cough syrup, soap and more www. treadofpioneers.org Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Michael Martin Productions presents: “Monumental: Skiing Our National Parks 6:30PM @ The Chief Tickets $10 @ ALL THAT or www.chieftheater.com Steamboat Dance Theatre 7PM @ Steamboat Springs High School. SDT’s annual dance performance. www. steamboatdancetheatre.org Reverend Horton Heat w/ Supersuckers 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Rockabilly/Punk $25 presale or $30 door @ ALL THAT or www.schmiggitys.com SATURDAY FEBRUARY 18

Steamboat Dance Theatre 7PM @ Steamboat Springs High School. SDT’s annual dance performance. www. steamboatdancetheatre.org

Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @Old Town Hot Springs Pool. Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register

Giant Panda Guerilla Dub Squad w/Na’an Stop 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Psychedelic Roots/Reggae $15 @ ALL THAT or www. schmiggitys.com

Emerald Mountain Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Led by Yampatika. Ages 12 and up. $20 includes snowshoes. Registration required at www.yampatika.org

All religion, my friend, is evolved out of fraud, fear, greed, imagination, and poetry. – Edgar Allan Poe


20

February 2017

Valley Voice

Calendar of Events Yampatika presents The Backcountry Film Festival 2017. 6:30PM @ The Chief Tickets $20 at chieftheater. com or ALL THAT Steamboat Dance Theatre 7PM @ Steamboat Springs High School. SDT’s annual dance performance. www. steamboatdancetheatre.org Kyle Hollingsworth 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Rock/Soul/Funk. $15 presale $20 door @ ALL THAT or www.schmiggitys.com

Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery. Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 nonprofits You will support. www.mountaintapbrewery.com Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com

SUNDAY FEBRUARY 19

WEDNESDAY FEBRUARY 22

Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub

STARS Sunshine Kids 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area STARS brings back their Sunshine Kids program for the 12th consecutive year. www.steamboatstars.com

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents Community Yoga Practice. 10AM @ Library Hall. Focusing on Tias Little’s “River Flow” DVD. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Groovement 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Funk Rock. FREE. www. schmiggitys.com MONDAY FEBRUARY 20 Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline.teuscher@gmail. com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) Fun, aerobic, non-impact workout. For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Bud Werner Memorial Library presents an evening with Laura Pritchett 6:30PM @ Library Hall Author of “The Blue Hour” launches her new novel. Books available for sale And author signature courtesy of Off the Beaten Path. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Sing your song with a live band! FREE. www.schmiggitys.com TUESDAY FEBRUARY 21

Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970846-9887 or eva57gibbon@ gmail.com Moonlight Snowshoe 5PM @ Howelsen Hill Snowshoe by the light of the moon with Yampatika! Registration required. www.yampatika.org Newcomers in Recovery 5:30PM @ 1915 Alpine Plaza #C-4. Meets weekly. (844) 955-1066 www.foundrytreatmentcenter.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents an evening with Jordan Matter. 6:30PM @ Library Hall The photographer shares stories of his new collection, “Dancers After Dark”. Books available for signing and autographing courtesy Off the Beaten Path. FREE. www. steamboatlibrary.org/events Karaoke Night 9PM @ Schmiggity’s FREE. www.schmiggitys.com THURSDAY FEBRUARY 23 STARS Sunshine Kids 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area STARS brings back their Sunshine Kids program for the 12th consecutive year. www.steamboatstars.com

Business Outlook Breakfast 7:45AM @ Rex’s Bar and Grill Business leaders present updates followed by Q&A www.steamboatchamber.com

WinterWonderGrass Festival 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Resort This festival brings together authentic bluegrass music And Colorado craft beer. www.steamboat.com

Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org

Yoga for Parkinson’s Disease 11AM @ The Yoga Center of Steamboat. FREE. Please contact Jeanne at 846-3326 before attending first class.

Steamboat Springs Writers Group Noon @ Art Depot Meet with other writers and share your works. FREE. www.steamboatwriters.com Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Stein Tag 2PM @ Butcherknife Brewing Bring your own stein & we’ll fill it for the price of a pint. People’s choice “Best Stein” contest at 6-ish. 970-879-BEER Free Concert – Gypsy Moon 2:30 @ Gondola Square Author Talk 4PM @ Tread of Pioneers Museum. Chris Diamond talks about his 4 decades in the ski industry. www.treadofpioneers.org Kids Eat Free 4:30PM @ The Tap House Kids 12/under – Purchase 1 adult entrée get 1 kids’ entrée free Beer Run 5:30PM @ Twisted Trails A chance to get in a run and meet other runners Mardi Gras on the Mountain 5:30PM @ Steamboat Ski Area A mountain celebration of Mardi Gras. www.steamboat. com The Tongue in Chief Players present An Evening of Improv 6:30PM @ The Chief Adult language and content - anything can happen with Improv! $10 donation @ the door. SandRock 10PM @ Schmiggity’s Acoustic driven Rock FREE. www.schmiggitys.com FRIDAY FEBRUARY 24 STARS Sunshine Kids 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area STARS brings back their Sunshine Kids program for the 12th consecutive year. www.steamboatstars.com WinterWonderGrass Festival 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Resort This festival brings together authentic bluegrass music And Colorado craft beer. www.steamboat.com Awaken with Chopra Center Yoga 9:30AM @ Yoga Center of Steamboat. Chopra instructor Patty Zimmer. zimmer@ springsips.com 970-846-5608

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Uranium Mine Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Fish Creek Falls Parking Lot. Led by a Yampatika Naturalist. Tour is moderately strenuous. FREE ($5 parking fee). Registration required www. yampatika.org Steamboat Theatrical Society Noon @ Arts Depot Join theater enthusiasts to read and discuss theatrical works. FREE. Contact sstew@ gmail.com for info. Exercise for Parkinson’s 1:30PM @ United Methodist Church. To register, contact instructor Eva Gibbon 970-846-9887 or eva57gibbon@gmail.com Tread of Pioneers Museum Behind the Scenes Tour 4PM @ Tread of Pioneers Take a docent led tour of the museums behind-the-scenes collections. FREE. www. treadofpioneers.org Mardi Gras on the Mountain 5:30PM @ Steamboat Ski Area A mountain celebration of Mardi Gras. www.steamboat. com Grass After Dark – Brothers Comatose & Drunken Hearts 10PM @ Schmiggity’s WWG Night Show Limited Tickets @ the Door. www.schmiggitys.com SATURDAY FEBRUARY 25 STARS Sunshine Kids 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area STARS brings back their Sunshine Kids program for the 12th consecutive year. www.steamboatstars.com WinterWonderGrass Festival 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Resort This festival brings together authentic bluegrass music And Colorado craft beer. www.steamboat.com Aquatic Aerobic Classes 9AM @ Old Town Hot Springs Pool Contact sallytestrake@ greencourtpartners.com or 970-761-2381 to register Emerald Mountain Snowshoe Tour 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Led by Yampatika. Ages 12 and up. $20 includes snowshoes. Registration required at www.yampatika.org Free Concert – MarchFourth Marching Band 3PM @ Gondola Square

Mardi Gras on the Mountain 5:30PM @ Steamboat Ski Area. A mountain celebration of Mardi Gras. www.steamboat.com

Latin Dance Night 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Latin dance lessons followed by a night of Latin dancing FREE. www.schmiggitys.com

Songwriter Series Presents: Moors and McCumber 6:30PM @ The Chief Multi-instrumentalists James Moors and Kort McCumber bring their original music to the Chief. $15 @ ALL THAT or www.chieftheater.com

MONDAY FEBRUARY 27

Grass After Dark – The Kitchen Dwellers & Pickin’ on the Dead. 10PM @ Schmiggity’s WWG Night Show Limited Tickets @ the Door. www.schmiggitys.com SUNDAY FEBRUARY 26 STARS Sunshine Kids 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Area STARS brings back their Sunshine Kids program for the 12th consecutive year. www.steamboatstars.com WinterWonderGrass Festival 8AM @ Steamboat Ski Resort This festival brings together authentic bluegrass music And Colorado craft beer. www.steamboat.com Bud Werner Memorial Library presents 2017 Snow Drawing 9AM @ Carpenter Ranch Community inspired, landscape-scale work of art with the theme “Finding Peace in Nature”. Rendered by human feet in the snow @ Carpenter Ranch. Participants must bring their own snowshoes, snacks and water. RSVP to jlay@steamboatlibrary.org. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary.org/events Ski Free @ Howelsen Hill 10AM @ Howelsen Hill Enjoy a day of FREE fun @ Howelsen. Pick up your free ticket @ Howelsen Lodge Concession stand. Bud Werner Memorial Library is giving a FREE copy of the book, “Hotdogger” to every kid age 8 and up, and the City of Steamboat Springs will be serving FREE hot dogs to all kids in attendance! www.steamboatsprings.net/ ski Circle R Sunday Brunch 10AM @ Circle R Gastropub Mardi Gras on the Mountain 5:30PM @ Steamboat Ski Area. A mountain celebration of Mardi Gras. www.steamboat.com

Exercise for Parkinson’s 9AM @ United Methodist Church. Targets balance, cardio, strength, dexterity and agility. To register, contact instructor Jacqueline Teuscher @ 303-829-2869 or jacqueline.teuscher@gmail. com Nia Classes 10AM @ Yoga Lila Studio (1955 Bridge Lane) For info text/call Patty Zimmer (970)846-5608 Mardi Gras on the Mountain 5:30PM @ Steamboat Ski Area. A mountain celebration of Mardi Gras. www.steamboat.com Live Band Karaoke 9PM @ Schmiggity’s Sing your favorite songs with a live band! FREE. www. schmiggitys.com TUESDAY FEBRUARY 28 Yampatika – Ski with a Naturalist 1:30PM @ Top of the Gondola FREE (Lift ticket not included). www.yampatika.org Discount Wing Day 4:30PM @ The Tap House 970-879-2431 Token Tuesday 3:30PM @ Mountain Tap Brewery Receive a token for each craft brew purchased and chose which of 4 non-profits you will support. www.mountaintapbrewery.com Mardi Gras on the Mountain 5:30PM @ Steamboat Ski Area. A mountain celebration of Mardi Gras. www.steamboat.com

Bud Werner Memorial Library presents “Newtown” 6:30PM @ Library Hall This documentary film tells the story of the aftermath of the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting from the testimonies of families, teachers, Doctors and first responders. FREE. www.steamboatlibrary. org/events Two-step Tuesday 7PM @ Schmiggity’s Country dancing. FREE. Schmiggitys.com


Valley Voice

February 2017

HappyHours Last minute changes can and do occur - Mother Nature, illness, tour malfunction, whatever - the accuracy of this calendar is not guaranteed! 8th Street Steak House 9 PM - Close, Everyday Aurum Food & Wine 5 - 6 PM, Everyday Big House Burgers 4:20 - 6 PM, Mon-Sat., All Day, Sunday

McKnights Irish Pub 4 - 6 PM, Mon.- Fri. 11 AM – Noon, Sat.-Sun. Old Town Pub & Restaurant 3 - 6 PM, Everyday Rex’s American Grill & Bar 4:20 - 6 PM, Everyday

Cantina 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

Riggio’s Ristorante 5 - 6 PM, Mon- Sat.

Carl’s Tavern 4 - 6 PM, Everyday

Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

Circle R Bar 4 - 6 PM, Thurs. – Sat. Sunday Brunch Specials 10am - 2pm Cuginos Pizzeria & Italian Restaurant 4 - 6 PM, Mon. – Fri. Eureka 4 - 6 PM, Daily Karma Bar and Lounge 4 - 6 PM, Mon.- Sat. La Montana 4:30 - 6 PM, Daily Laundry 4:30 - 6 PM, Tues. - Sat.

Sake2u 4 - 6 PM, Mon - Fri. 3 - 6 PM, Sat.-Sun. Sambi Restaurant 5 - 6 PM, Everyday Schmiggity’s Bar 7 - 9 PM, Everyday Slopeside Grill 3 - 6 PM, Mon. – Fri. Steamboat Smokehouse 3 - 6 PM, Everyday Sunpie’s Bistro 3 - 6 PM, Everyday

Low Country 4:30 - 6:00 Daily

Tap House Sports Grill 4:30 - 6 PM, Mon. - Thur. 3:00 - 6:00 pm - Friday

Mahogany Ridge 4 - 5:30 PM, Everyday 9:30 -11 PM, Everyday

The Rusted Porch 2 - 6 PM, Everyday

Mambo Italiano 4 - 5:30 PM, Everyday Mazzolas’s 5 - 6 PM, Everyday

Truffle Pig 2:30 - 5:30 PM, Tues. - Sat. The V 4:00 - 6:00 and 10:00 - 12:00 Monday - Saturday

21

First Friday Artwalk February 3, 2017, 5 pm – 8 pm ART GALLERIES AND MUSEUMS GALLERY 89 1009 Lincoln Ave 970.439.8196 “STEEL LIFE” European Sculptor David Marshall’s unique sculptures which inspire deepen collector’s perspective on contemporary home design. JACE ROMICK GALLERY 813 Lincoln Ave 970.846.3877 Jace Romick’s photography capturing the American West and its lifestyle, paired with handcrafted artisanal frames to compliment his engaging photos. MANGELSEN-IMAGES OF NATURE 730 Lincoln Ave 970.871.1822 Legendary nature photographer Tomas D. Mangelsen has traveled throughout the natural world for over 40 years observing and photographing the Earth’s last great wild places. www.mangelsen.com PINE MOON FINE ART 117 9th St 970.879.2787 Pine Moon Fine Art. Featuring local artists showing bronze and glass sculptures, acrylic, oil, watercolor paintings, graphite and monotype works, fiber art, photography and jewelry STEAMBOAT ART MUSEUM 807 Lincoln Ave 970.870.1755 10th Anniversary Exhibit; celebrating the first decade of SAM; plus Cowboy Hard Hats by 20 artists. Local artists Jennifer Baker and Dan Rodus, are featured in the Museum Store. STEAMBOAT SPRINGS ARTS COUNCIL AT THE DEPOT 1001 13th St. 970.879.9008 Winter Tracks-exhibition of embellished skis, snowboards and horseshoes 
Light Bites, Wine and Music 
Reception for Arts & Gallery Guide Contest Winner Ryan Keating www.steamboatarts.org STEAMBOAT SPRINGS CENTER FOR VISUAL ARTS 837 Lincoln Ave 970.846.7062 Local art at its best: colorful, diverse and accomplished. Paintings, photography, mixed media. Meet Artwalk featured artist, Missy Borden. Complimentary wine. W Gallery 115 9th St 970.846.1783 Susan Schiesser- Working on exhibits in Maui and Steamboat, water is the theme. Snow and shadow directs the color palette to embrace water in its cold and mysterious journey. WILD HORSE GALLERY 802 Lincoln Ave 970.819.2850 Chula Beauregard: Best known for paintings of local scenes, she is

the Winter Carnival Poster artist and will be signing posters during Artwalk to benefit the Winter Sports Club. www.wildhorsegallery. com. ALTERNATIVE VENUES CREEKSIDE CAFE 131 11th St 970.879.4925 “Lost Steamboat”: A photographic exhibition by the Tread of Pioneers Museum of significant historic buildings lost over the years, reflecting local history, geology and distinct Northwest Colorado style. EMERALD MOUNTAIN SCHOOL 818 Oak 970.879.8081 Exhibition of student artwork at this downtown-based K-8 school that personalizes education for the whole child, developing strong creative skills with strong academics and where art and music are core subjects. FHYSICAL ELEMENTS PERSONAL TRAINING STUDIO 9th and Oak 970.846.0828 Local photographer Derek Guimond embodies adventure in daily life. His display of work aims to capture those moments of beauty in nature. HARWIGS/LAPOGEE 911 Lincoln Ave 970.879.1919 Jan Maret Willman: “Cosmos” a bold and intimate visual odyssey of paintings that perceive our universe in paint through eyes of the Hubble telescope. HOLY NAME CATHOLIC CHURCH 524 Oak St 970.879.0671 Unveiling the anticipated book, God’s Holy Mountain by Pastor Rev. Ernest Bayer, with local photography, spotlighting the St. John’s Bible. Beautiful calligraphy & artistic illumination of the Gospels. SKITOWN COMPUTING 1104 Lincoln Ave 970.870.7984 Tania H Coffey, Photography Capturing images of wildlife under a blanket of snow, to wild ones challenging the sports our town reveres. Images that come to life in ways you never imagined. STEAMBOAT SMOKEHOUSE 912 Lincoln Ave 970.879.7427 Young Bloods Featured Artist Kathleen Schlabach. creates mixed media abstract-fauvism and contemporary works. Smokehouse Gallery is curated by Young Bloods Collective. URBANE 703 Lincoln Ave 970.879.9169 URBANE presents Colorado Native Kevin Weinreich aka ‘SomedayK’. Kevin has over 21 years of sketchbook drawings that he has brought to life digitally.

Friday, ​Feb. 3 ​Steamboat Dance Theatre and the Steamboat African Dance & Drum Ensemble present master teachers Djeneba Sako and Vieux Traore from Mali, West Africa.

In the depth of winter I finally learned that there was in me an invincible summer. – Albert Camus


22

February 2017

Valley Voice

The Heretic

Changing Our Minds

“Let us be lazy in everything, except in loving and drinking, except in being lazy.” Gotthold Ephraim Lessing

By Lorre Buss The Original Local’s Liquor Store On the corner of 40 and Hilltop Pkwy 10 to 10 Mon – Thurs 10 to Midnight Fri & Sat 11:30 to 7:30 Sundays

Winter Service Specials Through February

Last summer, my friend Frances and I attended a Sunday service at a “New Thought” church. New Thought is based on cultivating beliefs and attitudes about the beneficence of God and our worthiness to enjoy it; kind of a Christian-based “power of positive thinking.” I was first introduced to this brand of spirituality several years ago by this very same friend. We enjoyed weekly meetings with a group who had a very light (and Light-filled) approach. The group still exists, but the leaders have changed. These days, both the message and the music are more earnest than joyful, and that congregation no longer meets our needs. On the Sunday in question, Frances was determined to check out a group that an acquaintance had recommended to her. We found our seats and sang and prayed about how God loves us and provides abundantly for all our needs. Afterwards, my companion expressed disgust. “It’s like brainwashing!!” she proclaimed.

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I understood her point. New Thought begins with the assumption that we need to reeducate ourselves to assume, look for and see the best. We can put a more favorable face on it and call it “developing an optimistic mind-set,” but the desired end result of regular and frequent affirmative prayer and statements is that our habitual thought patterns will be radically changed. There’s just one thing Frances didn’t stop to consider before sharing her derisive comment: She had already been propagandized.

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Trinkets, candy, cards, gifts and jewelry for your sweetie!

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Very young children exhibit a lightness of spirit, an abiding trust in God and the universe. When we observe them, we detect positive assumptions and expectations -- the very things with which New Thought seeks to A replace our old, pessimistic perspectives. b T Like many, Frances was raised in a negative, shaming religious tradition by a mother who never had one c good thing to say to her. Like all little ones, my friend f absorbed toxic ideas and energy. Her trusting love was transformed to the doom and gloom our culture teaches I b is “rational” and “practical.” Now that she’s grown, she spews cynicism on a routine basis, believing she’s t B spouting truth. p j Frances would like more miracles in her life. But miracles don’t happen when we’re focused on what ap- t pears to be. They happen when we’re open to possibili- a ties, which may well be why Jesus suggested we becomep i like little children. f It takes concerted and consistent effort (brainwash- p c ing?) to change one’s thinking. Like hoping to get to Carnegie Hall, we must practice, practice, practice. Iron-a ically, even though Frances has on occasion obtained i magical results from “the power of positive thinking,” s she rejects the evidence. She’s a much happier person when she’s on the light side of the line, yet she can’t S quite bring herself to make the effort to finally flip the t switch on her mental attitude. Instead, she complains s about perceived efforts at indoctrination and continues i to feel miserable, simply because she refuses to change d t her mind. a a p i

A s c g m c w B i r w t i

h


Valley Voice

February 2017

A Closer Look

Frugal Legal

By Monica Yeager

Not Sherlock Holmes, but kind of. I am the Self-Represented Litigant Coordinator (“SheRLoCk”) for Routt and Moffat Counties. I am here to help if someone is representing themselves in our court system.

23

I am a Sherlock Your Brain Tatiana L. Achcar-Szyba on Jellyfish?

Advertising that induces customers into thinking their brain function needs support reappears every so often. The latest incarnation claims, of all things, that jellyfish could be considered helpful to support healthy brain function, a sharper mind and clearer thinking.

I can help with:

It is not known if jellyfish themselves have healthier brain functions, sharper minds and clearer thinking than other water dwellers, but a company called Quincy Bioscience determined they could make money by promoting a product that contains a protein found in jellyfish. Well, not really the actual protein, but a synthetic version of the protein. The protein they picked, apparently for no other reason than it looks difficult to pronounce, is called apoaequorin, and is unremarkable in that the human body treats it just like the proteins found in other foods: it is destroyed in the digestion process and changed into amino acids that the body can readily use. The small amount of this particular amino acid along with the many amino acids circulating throughout the body are not noticed as anything special by the brain.

• Information about community resources and services such as pro bono legal services, unbundled legal services, legal aid programs, alternative dispute resolution services including mediation, and lawyer referral services;

So, apparently no jellyfish were harmed in the manufacture of this product, but consumers who are looking for something that may enhance their health in some fashion end up spending money for something that actually does not do what it claims and may actually cause them harm. But that is not the concern of producers and sellers of bogus products who follow a common alternative health scam of making money by selling a product to treat common conditions with an uncommon ingredient that no one else has thought of.

Advertising on television and product placement in stores like CVS, Walmart, and even small drugstores, commonly placed next to products that actually work, gives the false impression that this product is real medicine. However, a class-action suit has been brought charging that the product, listed as Prevagen, cannot work as advertised and the trials and studies Quincy Bioscience claims are false or non-existent. The FDA is investigating other claims the company is ignoring regarding adverse events including seizures, strokes, worsening symptoms of multiple sclerosis, chest pain, tremors and fainting. And the FTC has filed a complaint in the public’s interest.

http://www.casewatch.org/civil/quincy/complaint_2015.pdf http://www.fda.gov/ICECI/EnforcementActions/WarningLetters/2012/ucm324557. htm https://www.ftc.gov/news-events/press-releases/2017/01/ftc-new-york-state-charge-marketersprevagen-making-deceptive

• Information about court procedures and logistics, including filing, scheduling hearings, court rules, and terminology;

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• Forms and instructions. The fine print: I cannot provide legal advice. Because I am an employee of the court the information you provide to me is not privileged. I am not an investigator. But I have a lot of information to offer about the system and can help you find your way. I also am a member of the Access to Justice Committee of the Northwest Colorado Bar Association. The mission of this committee is to make it easier to access the judicial system. They sponsor an Ask a Lawyer Clinic on the second Thursday of each month. Anyone with a civil law issue may sign up for one of the available time slots to meet with an attorney for free. If you want to take advantage of this free clinic contact the clerk of court. Routt County: 879-5020 Moffat County: 8248254. The Access to Justice Committee also maintains a list of attorneys who are willing to offer services on an “unbundled” basis. Unbundled legal services are also known as limited scope representation and means that the client and attorney agree that the attorney will handle only certain defined tasks of a case. The attorney may coach, advise, draft, or provide other legal assistance, and the client only pays for the work done by the attorney. This is in contrast to the attorney handling an entire case from start to finish. As an example, a client and attorney may decide that the attorney will draft a settlement agreement, but the attorney will not enter an appearance in court, negotiate with the other side, or file any papers with the court. A list of attorneys that provide unbundled legal services in Routt or Moffat Counties can be found at the Northwest Colorado Bar Association’s Facebook page at facebook. com/NorthwestColoradoBarAssociation.

970-871-8500 www.zirkelwireless.com

Hayden Branch

101 N. 6th Street

970-276-9099

750 Hospital Loop Craig, Colorado 81625 Phone: 970-824-9411 e-mail: info@tmhcraig.org

To schedule an appointment with your Sherlock or discuss any of the services offered by the Access to Justice Committee, call me at Routt County: 879-5020 or Moffat County: 824-8254. Yo hablo español y tengo el gusto de programar citas individuales y presentaciones a la comunidad en este idioma. Ask a Lawyer Clinics - 2nd Wednesday of Every Month February 8, March 8, April 12, and May 10.

Patience in not simply the ability to wait – it’s how we behave while we’re waiting. – Joyce Meyer


24

February 2017

Valley Voice

Here Knitty-Knitty

The Break By LA Bourgeois

I was knitting through the pain and pretending it didn’t exist. Yes. I know it was wrong. Yes. I did it anyway. Yes. I regret it. Now, I am fully paying the price. After setting my knitting down on Monday night, I spent Tuesday trying to figure out a new activity. The most recent Vogue Knitting and my new swift and ball winder arrived. God was definitely taunting me.

Getting the shot no matter what is coming.... “You don’t knit because you are patient. You are patient because you knit.” - Stephanie Pearl-McPhee Everyone praises my patience. Sitting by a friend, figuring out the error in their sock, “You’re so patient.”

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Listening to someone explain their problem for the bajillionth time. “You’re so patient.” Working on six inches of plain knitting on my next sweater. “You’re so patient.” The thing you will notice about me whenever someone makes this remark is that I am always knitting. Even when I am untangling a ball of yarn, I am knitting it in my mind. Something about fiber soothes me. Allowing it to run through my fingers and create an actual object that I can use? I am completely placated.

Breakfast: 8 am - 11 am Lunch: 11 am - 6 pm Happy Hour: 3 pm - 6 pm

A few days ago, I had to set my knitting aside. My hands were not just hurting; they were burning. Each stitch caused a wave of pain. I knew I had to take a break. Only the threat of losing the ability to knit altogether allowed me to put the needles down. Now, the reason for this unfortunate turn of events has to do with my typing more than my knitting. For the past three months, I’ve been in an unusual environment. My mother-in-law created a darling little area for me to work, a small table looking out onto the front yard with a little wicker chair. I can watch the comings and goings of the neighbors. The sun rises directly in front of me, revealing the pinks and yellows of my new North Carolina sky. I watched the leaves turn brown and fall. I giggled at the silly play of the two small girls across the street. When the snow finally fell, I watched it cover our lane.

Enjoy the Torch Light Parade from our deck at 5:20pm Valentine’s Day

Unfortunately, the table is a little too tall and the chair is a little too short for me to comfortably type. I attempted to compensate by creating a little highchair out of pillows, but they squished flat under my – let’s call it generous behind. During December, the pain began. Multiple breaks during each knitting session became necessary. By mid-month,

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

I immediately set up the swift and ball winder and wound a ball of yarn that I’ve been dying to knit into socks for Stephanie. The strong but slender strand came together in a symphony of colors. I sat and gazed at it. My fingers jittered with anticipation. No! I quickly stuffed the skein into a nearby project bag and settled it safely in my pile of potential projects. I couldn’t let myself do it. I picked up the magazine and flipped through. Perusing the pictures, I fell in love with at least two and even found one from my newest client which sang out, “Haven’t you always wanted a sweater vest with an argyle motif?” Grrr. I threw the offensive publication down on the table and covered it with several books on writing. On day three, my productivity got derailed when a quick trip to sign one piece of paper turned into a four and a half hour odyssey of inactivity. I sulked like a child who hadn’t gotten a lollipop like EVERYONE ELSE DID! MOM!!! Grouchy and frustrated, I went to bed early and read about murder. Since my terrified family tiptoed around the beast from hell on day four, my experience improved. With several hours of work behind me, I happily allowed them to pry me out of the house for an evening with friends. A viewing of “La La Land” and dinner out completed my day and I felt like a champion of balance as I slid into my happy dreams. I spent day five sick in bed, sleeping. Quite the relief to my family, I’m sure. My safe day was number six. The resting pain had disappeared so I gave them one extra day of relief. The plan now becomes making sure that I’m doing my exercises and stretches before I begin knitting and only allowing myself to knit for short periods as I build my stamina back up. Patience will be the key. Thank goodness the knitting is back to help.

Follow the adventures of LA Bourgeois online at housewyfe.com or on Instagram @lahousewyfe.


Valley Voice

February 2017

25

Energetically Speaking

Three Subarus and a Porsche By Fred Robinson

We have gotten enough snow this year to test my old snow plow several times. Six feet in two weeks and it was twenty below for a few days. It is a 1970 Blazer that I have plowed with for 35 years. It started just great when it was 20 below and it has enough power to push the wet snow we got the other week. It has had E50 for fuel the whole winter, which is half Ethanol and half 91 octane gasoline. Trade publications say that fuel mix will destroy the engine. In reality it is good for engines and has much lower emissions from the exhaust. The power is much better than with just 91 octane gasoline too. Recently, the USDA released a report saying ethanol has a much lower carbon and smog forming content in exhaust emissions than gasoline. The United Staes Department of Agriculture also reported that overall carbon emissions created during growing and processing of ethanol are significantly better than the lifetime carbon emissions from gasoline. Literature claiming regular gas with 10% ethanol is bad for small engines may be true, but I have a seven year old Stihl chain saw that has had a blend of 25% ethanol mixed with 91 octane gasoline since sit was new. Now I have E50 which is 50% ethanol mixed with gasoline and used that in my saw all summer. It runs and starts better with E50 than it did with E25. It has had no repairs even after having fuel left in the tank all winter and then getting the same old fuel mix in the spring that was stored properly in an air tight container. Maybe the answer to problems associated

with ethanol in the gasoline is more Ethanol! Ethanol also helps prevent problems with moisture in the fuel because it absorbs water and will still burn. Water in gasoline settles to the bottom of the fuel tank a creates Formic Acid. Formic acid is what causes corrosion and eats metal. Iowa has had a record year for ethanol production and many stations have blender pumps that allow you to fill with several blends of ethanol such as E15, E30, E50, and E85. A lot of people have been using blends in vehicles that are not designated as Flex-Fuel and finding that performance is better and mileage is similar and often better. The same situation is also happening in South Dakota and Minnesota where a lot of ethanol is produced and blender pumps are available. In 2003 my Hummer was purchased specifically to be modified to use pure Hydrogen for fuel. The idea came to me when I saw a billboard with an ad for the new H2 Hummer while my son and I were traveling with Dennis Weaver on a cross country clean fuel road trip called the Drive to Survive. The caravan had a truck running on pure Biodiesel, a few Toyota and Honda Hybrids and a Toyota Tacoma my son Tai and I modified to run on CNG, compressed natural gas, and Hydrogen. Along the way we were introduced to Ethanol and started using it too. Other vehicles running on different fuels met up with us and came along. I wanted to build an H2 H2 Hummer because H2 is the abbreviation for Hydrogen in chemical equations.

The way we modified the Hummer started with a system to use CNG. We ordered an EPA approved system from Canda that was designed for a GM truck with the same engine and similar weight. At that time, the EPA would certify a specific vehicle to use CNG for fuel after they had done emission testing on that vehicle and found it to be within guidelines for gasoline emissions. They charged about $50,000 for the testing and if the vehicle passed, the EPA would award a certification for that kit on that vehicle only. Part of my plan was to get an EPA certification for the CNG system we installed and then sell kits to other Hummer owners. It took a few months to modify the fuel system to also run on hydrogen. During that time the EPA raised the certification price to test a vehicle for emissions from 50 to $250,000. So much for that idea. We have an old website that features a lot of Tai’s writing and stories from the media about what we were doing. www.IntergalacticHydrogen.com intergalactici@aol.com OK, about the story’s title. I have three old Subarus and a 911 for sale. The Subs are a 1989, 1990, and 1997 that all run great. The 911S needs a paint job.

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Patience in not simply the ability to wait – it’s how we behave while we’re waiting. – Joyce Meyer


26

February 2017

Stop in & experience why Golden Leaf is the #1 dispensary in the Valley!

Valley Voice

Yepelloscopes

Your Monthly Message By Chelsea Yepello Aries

March 21 - April 19

They say; “When life gives you lemons, you should make lemonade.” They never tell you what to do with the lemonade after that. Maybe they are just thirsty and selfish and are too lazy to make their own damn lemonade.

Taurus

April 20 - May 20

Scorpio

Gemini

Sagittarius

Cancer

May 20 - June 20

June 21 - July 22

The stars indicate that it is a good time to start finding romance and passion in your life. The stars also indicate that it is a good time to hire a lawyer for all the sexual harassment cases you are about to be a part of.

Leo

July 23 - August 23

Your book titled, “Even More Ways To Skin A Cat” will unfortunately not become a best seller but will gather a rather unusual and slightly disturbing fan base.

Virgo

www.GoldenLeaf.co

August 23 - September 22

You may not feel like anyone understands you and that you are alone in the world. This may be why you feel a welcome change when the bright lights beam you up and the little guys with the giant heads start doing tests on you to better understand the human race.

PEANUT BUTTER BREATH

September 23 - October 23

You are a warrior and are not afraid of the journey you will soon be traveling. The cozy past will always be there, but it is time to move forward and follow the horizon. So, put on that horned helmet you have stashed away in your closet and begin your march to the unknown.

Thanks to you, the local police and fire department will truly recognize their full potential. Some people may call you crazy, but you just want the people that serve and protect the community to be prepared for everything, including medically enhanced jungle apes. As the years pass, you feel regretful for the way you have treated people in your life and are thankful that they have forgiven you for your past actions. That being said, it should not allow other people to treat you poorly and be forgiven simply because you feel it’s some sort of karma. The saying, “treat people the way you want to be treated,” goes both ways.

Premium Recreational & Medical Marijuana Dispensary

Libra

October 24 - November 21

You wonder why you don’t have many friends. It may be because you have convinced yourself that everyone that is nice to you is actually trying to throw you off that they are a serial killer who wants to have your head on their wall as a trophy. November 22 - December 21

You will have a sad realization when your dog doesn’t necessarily want to be your best friend. Fido has gotten awfully close to your neighbor and it was rumored that they are going to Cabo together in the spring.

Capricorn

December 22 - January 19

You will finally swear off online dating when you finally meet your date and he turns out to be a four-foot, three hundred pound leper named George with a body odor problem and fewer teeth than fingers. You are totally put off, he lied on his profile, it said his name is Steve, not George. Geez.

Aquarius

January 20 - February 18

You always thought that taking a long road trip across the country would be the greatest adventure of your life, but it turns out that the line of cop cars chasing you to the state border is way more exciting.

Pisces

February 19 - March 20

Everyone likes different things, that’s why there is chocolate and vanilla ice-cream. So… people aren’t really that different, they just like one of two boring flavors of a frozen desert.

Cully Kistler

1755 Lincoln Avenue On the FREE Bus Route

970-870-2941 OPEN DAILY To be continued...

For those who live here and for those who wish they did.


Valley Voice

February 2017

OSO’s Adventures By Jeff Morehead

2017 Steamboat Springs City Council

By Matt Scharf You’re Welcome

Putting words in your mouth

Mike Lane Heather Sloop

Walter Magill

Scott Ford

Robin Crossan

Kathi Meyer

Jason Lacy Tony Connell

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February 2017

Valley Voice

CELEBRATE THE LUNAR NEW YEAR AT LIFE ESSENTIALS! V O T E D B E S T S PA 2 016

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Experience beauty secrets from Asia that date back thousands of years. These exotic ingredients are revered for their ability to brighten the complexion,boost circulation, restore suppleness and improve overall skin conditions and appearance. Our special products are formulated with Crushed Freshwater Pearls, Shiitake Mushrooms, Powdered Wasabe, Rice Bran Oil, Green Tea, Gotu Kola, Coconut Milk, Azuki Beans, Black Sesame Seeds, Bamboo Powder and Ginger Root.

60 MIN. CRUSHED PEARL SIGNATURE FACIAL - $175 A luxurious facial dating back to the days of the famed Geisha.. A sesame rice cleansing oil, detoxifying ginger and wasabi masque and shiitake mushroom with green tea anti-oxidant serum are just some of the special ingredients used in this beautiful facial treatment.

60 MIN. BAMBOO AND BLACK SESAME BODY SCRUB - $135 Breathe new life into your skin with an array of ancient Asian secrets. Crushed azuki beans, powdered bamboo and real shiitake mushrooms mingle with black sesame seeds and organic oils in this creamy scrub, designed to shed dry cells. We’ll also re-hydrate with a crushed pearl body creme.

90 MIN. ULTIMATE GINGER/WASABI BODY DETOX - $185 This is the ultimate body detoxification treatment. A step up from the Bamboo and Black Sesame Body Scrub, we will also masque your entire body with a Ginger/Wasabi masque to remove toxins from your body and cleanse your soul.  Your body will then be wrapped while the masque works it’s magic.

60 MIN. CHI BALANCING BODY RITUAL - $145 This treatment is meant for more of bringing your chi into balance with exfoliation for increased circulation, thai herbal compresses for relaxation, cupping for relief of stress and harmonious tones of singing bowls to calm the energy.  A nice add-on to a facial if you’re not into a full body massage.  

970-871-9543

4th and Lincoln MassageSteamboat.com For those who live here and for those who wish they did.

Profile for Paulie Anderson

Valley Voice February 2017  

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Valley Voice February 2017  

Steamboat Springs, Colorado

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