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News, reviews, feature guides and tutorials for all Yamaha home keyboard players

The bi-m monthly mag for...

YAMAHA K EYBOARD E NTHUSIASTS August - September 2015

NEW PSR-S

NEW REFACE

NEW CLAVINOVAS

An independent hobby club for Yamaha home keyboard enthusiasts - working in association with Yamaha Music Europe GmbH UK.


welcome Please send all correspondence for Yamaha Club Magazine to:

glyn madden Hello...

The YAMAHA Club Ltd. 59 Ennerdale Close Dronfield Woodhouse, Dronfield, Derbyshire, S18 8PL Tel: 01246 290454 E-m mail: info@yamaha-c club.co.uk Website: www.yamaha-c club.co.uk (Office hours: Mon/Fri 10am -1pm; 2pm - 4pm) The Yamaha Club Magazine is the official magazine for the Yamaha enthusiast and is available by annual subscription. Additional material is contributed by: Yamaha performers, teachers, technical staff, members and associates of the Yamaha Club. Our thanks to all who have contributed in any way to this issue of the magazine.

Our thanks to the management and staff of Yamaha Music Europ pe GmbH UK for their pport. continued interest and sup

Technical problems..? Don't Get Stuck...

Yamaha UK’s Technical Helpline

0844 811 1116 Monday - Friday 9.00am - 12.30pm ; 1.30pm - 4.30pm

(c) 2015 - YAMAHA Club Ltd. The Yamaha Club Magazine and its contents are the sole property of Yamaha Club Ltd. No part of the content may be reproduced without prior consent in writing. The views expressed by the contributors are not necessarily those held by the editor, and whilst every effort is made to ensure the accuracy of the material contained in the magazine, neither the publisher nor the editor can be held responsible (legally or otherwise).

What a packed issue we have this month. There are features showcasing new Clavinovas, new PSR-S S keyboards and we even stray across the border into the mysterious but exciting world of the synthesizer. Yes indeed, some very exciting new instruments are just starting to make their way into our shops and Yamaha’s Ian House is on hand to introduce the latest features and give an overview of the new models. Wrong phone number Apologies to TRX/Musicland for my mistake with their phone number. I heard from a few people that they’d had problems contacting Musicland’s Romford branch about the ‘Sounds Like’ software we reported on in June. For anyone who didn’t manage to get through the correct phone number should be 01708 737977. Richard Bower - CVP600 series We’re missing Richard Bower again for this issue but he assures us he will be back for the next. The good news for owners of touch-screen operated CVP600 series Clavinovas is that the system has been extended now to the new CVP-700 - so its place is assured in the magazine for the foreseeable future. Club weekend Bookings for Buxton are going well not surprising really because, aside from the event’s musical attractions, the place is such a tourist attraction. In this issue (pages 18/19) we’ve included a few ‘things to do’ based on the favourite experiences of visitors who have posted on Trip Advisor. Bear in mind, though that some may be seasonal so be sure to check the availability of any that catch your eye.

REFLECTIONS CD Price: £11.50 (inc. UK p/p) Also available for download from iTunes/Amazon Features: Yamaha D85 organ, ‘F’ series organ, ‘H’ series organ, ‘EL’ series organ, AR series organ, Tyros1, Tyros2, Tyros4 keyboards and Clavinova CVP digital piano. Plus... Nord C1 organ.

“The album features instruments from several generations of Yamaha organs, keyboards and Clavinovas - and also my ‘organ’ organ, a Nord C1, which produces some of the fabulous ‘Hammond’ type sounds you will hear.” Glyn Tracks include: 1) That’s What Friends Are For, 2) Fly Me To The Moon / One Note Samba, 3) The Windmills Of Your Mind / The Summer Knows, 4) Carioca / Falicidade, 5) I Won’t Last A Day Without You, 6) Going Out Of My Head, 7) Carillon, 8) Take The A-Train, 9) Die Moldau, 10) The Look Of Love, 11) The Marriage Of Figaro Overture, 12) 1941 March, 13) Nimrod, 14) Hotpoints, 15) ‘Til I Loved You, 16) La Chanson d’Orphee, 17) March from ‘A Little Suite’, 18) The Arrival Of The Queen Of Sheba, 19) Petite Valse Caprice, 20) I Made It Through The Rain.

we’ll send a magazine to your friends If you have a friend who would benefit from the Yamaha Club Magazine, we’ll be happy to send them a recent edition - free of charge to anywhere in the UK. Let us have their address details - we’ll take care of the rest...

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

£27 is all it costs for a full year’s UK membership. Telephone...... 01246 290454 (Office hours: Monday - Friday 10am-1pm ; 2pm-4pm) E-mail............. info@yamaha-club.co.uk Post................ Yamaha Club Ltd., 59 Ennerdale Close, Dronfield Woodhouse, Dronfield, Derbyshire, S18 8PL

Yamaha Club is happy to accept payment by most major credit / debit cards and PayPal.

August / September 2015

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contents workshops and tutorials 12

Penny Classics

Penny chooses a Wagner composition for the fourth in her series of popular classics.

14

Roger Hagarty’s Workshop Part 45: Roger guides us through the process of mixing style parts together to create a ‘new’ accompaniment.

20

All About Multi Pads

Phil Leader illustrates how easy it is to compile your own multi pad banks using the Multi Pad Edit feature.

24

Playing Songs with Style

John Denver’s ‘Leaving on a Jet Plane’ is the music choice for this month’s Easy Keyboard Library arrangement.

28

Guide To Reading Music

Part 4: “Are scales really necessary?” asks our resident teacher, Gill Eccles.

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reviews and features 6

Software Review

Leigh Wilbraham downloads the ‘Country Musician’ Premium Pack from www.yamahamusicsoft.com

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CVP-700 Series Clavinova

Ian House introduces the latest instruments in Yamaha’s CVP Clavinova range.

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Yamaha ‘Reface’

Glyn Madden is intrigued by some retro mini keyboards.

18

The Club Weekend

We announce the line-up for our 20th Anniversary get-together and suggest places to visit during your visit.

27

Music For You

Janet Dowsett’s music choice for August/September is ‘The Complete Keyboard Player - Great Standards’

29

On The Record

Michael Wooldridge has just released a new recording featuring Clavinova CVP-609 and Electone EL900.

30

New ‘PSR-S’ series

Ian House reveals the key features of a brand new series of mid-range keyboards - PSR-S670, PSR-S770 and PSR-S970

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24

regulars 5

Yamaha Club News

A round-up of news from in and around the Yamaha Club.

32

Notebook

A selection of your letters and emails to Yamaha Club.

35

Club Shop

Buy and sell on our classified ad’s page.

30

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

on-line

Why not visit our website and access our Members Area and On-lline Shop? 1. Go to our main website: www.yamaha-club.co.uk Don’t forget to check our ‘Home/News’ page for links to items associated with this edition of Yamaha Club Magazine

2. To access the Members Area select Members Area from the menu tabs at the top of the screen. 3. Enter the current password: STING

(effective from 1st August 2015. This password is case sensitive so enter it exactly as shown here.)

4. Click SUBMIT 5. Select a link to any of our archive or other password protected pages.

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Yamaha Club Magazine

Front cover: Clavinova CVP-709GP

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


yamaha club news Free Yamaha Club subscription for new Tyros5 owners to continue... Yamaha has confirmed its intention to continue the free one-year subscription offer with all new Tyros5 purchases. Many new owners, however, are not being made aware of the offer by shop staff - so if you do hear of anyone who has just bought, or is about to buy, a new Tyros5 please do pass the message on won’t you? We need to know 1) whether the Tyros5 is a 76 or 61 note instrument, 2) the date of purchase, 3) the shop where it was bought and, 4) the instrument’s serial number (which is on a plate on the bottom of the keyboard). The details can be emailed to us at info@yamaha-club.co.uk or phoned through on 01246 290454.

Wedding Day for James & Natalie

That’s all it takes to be signed up for a year’s supply of Yamaha Club Magazines. (It’s almost worth buying a Tyros5 just for that... don’t y’ think?)

On 4th July, as Americans celebrated Independence, our good friend and one-time Yamaha Club colleague James Woodcock firmly tied the knot with his long time girlfriend Natalie Blake. The couple looked blissfully happy in the summer sunshine as they posed for photographs before the reception in the beautiful grounds of Manor Hill House. I’m afraid the couple of snaps I took with my camera/phone won’t do justice to the forthcoming professional photographs but as we were at our publishing deadline I’ve included them here because I’m sure many of our readers will want to join me in sending James and Natalie our very best wishes for a long and happy life together.

Michel Voncken joins the line-up for our Club Weekend Yamaha keyboard star Michel Voncken is booked to appear at the Yamaha Club 20th Anniversary Weekend in Buxton. Michel was due to attend the event last year but unfortunately had to cancel at the last minute - so we’re delighted that Yamaha is flying him over to join our celebrations in October. This almost concludes the line-up of top artists and teachers and you can catch up with the latest news on pages 18/19. As we go to press there are still some places left but bookings are healthy for the Buxton venue and it seems our readers are keen to experience the delights of the Peak District. For more information and/or bookings please phone 01780 782093.

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

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software review Leigh Wilbraham...

Country Musician! Leigh downloads the latest Yamaha Premium Pack now available from www.yamahamusicsoft.com and compatible with Tyros4 & Tyros5 Download price £119.99 As Tyros owners will know, unlike other models in the range the specification of their instruments can be augmented with new sampled voices. In addition to the many soundpacks that producers like myself create Yamaha has its own Expansion Pack software collection that not only includes voices, but new styles and multi-pads too. The latest in this series to appear is Yamaha’s new ‘Country Musician’ pack.

always on my mind’’ into your internet search box. You’ll also find a direct link from the August news page of the Yamaha Club’s website. Note: Very good it is too - and it shows the string part Leigh overlays in a separate inset frame too. Well worth a viewing Glyn

The new pack provides you with all you need to produce fantastic Country & Western songs. There are ten accompaniment styles - and each one is superb! For those who enjoy gentle ballads there are two great new styles ‘ModCountryBld3’ and ‘TradCountryBld’. Both are perfect for songs such as Patsy Clines ‘Crazy’ and Elvis Presley's ‘Always On My Mind’. For the right hand melody I’d absolutely have to recommend a new voice called ‘Campfire Harp’ - which is a really great country harmonica. Leigh demonstrates the Campfire Harp. Inset: The string part being played separately.

Tyros has certain voices that have the real ‘Wow!” factor and, for me, this new harmonica voice is one of those. It works well with any song and, used in conjunction with the new ‘Country Waltz’ style from the pack, you have the perfect sound for the song ‘Moon River’.

Campfire Harp Top Tip

Campfire Harp voice (Voices - page 4)

I’ve recorded the Elvis Presley track and put it on You Tube so that you can hear the new harmonica and ballad style from the pack. You can listen to the track by typing ‘leigh wilbraham

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Select the Campfire Harp voice for the Right 1 voice part.

2

Then go into the MIXING CONSOLE and tab to the FILTER page. Increase the BRIGHTNESS and HARMONIC CONTENT just a little for a brighter sharper harmonica voice. This little tweak makes a world of difference.

3

Whilst you’re in the MIXING CONSOLE I’d recommend visiting the EFFECT page and increasing the REVERB level (for the harmonica part) to 42.

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


Voices in the pack The Country Musician pack has fifty voices spread over five pages - including; Banjo, Mandolin, Guitar, Jews Harp, Pedal Steel Guitar, Fiddles and much more.

You really do get every sound you need to create the perfect country and western sound and if you are a country music fan, then this pack is a must-have.

Country Musician Styles

Page 1

Page 2 The ten accompaniment styles in the Country Musician pack

Another Top Tip The ‘CountryVocals’ voice (page 5) has a wide range of Country phrases such as “Yee haa!” and many others. One way to use these voices is to record four of them into the multi pads. This way you can trigger them whilst playing the melody.

Page 3

Of course the pack comes with three ready-made multi pad sets that do include one of country phrases... but by recording your own different ones you can access more of these fun phrases.

Country Musician Multi Pads

To top that off there is also a really fun selection of Country spoken phrases by someone who sounds like Jed Clampett from the Beverley Hillbillies! The Country Musician pack also has three sets of multi pads Page 5

Registrations & Demos To complete the picture two banks of registrations are included, one with eight ‘ready to play’ settings covering Modern Country music and other with the same number of Traditional Country registrations. other so everything is ‘ready to play’ right from the outset. The two new Country Musician demonstration tracks let you hear the sounds, styles and multi pads as used in performance.

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

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new product feature

CVP-709GP Polished White

CVP-709GP Polished Ebony

Ian House introduces

The Clavinova CVP-709 Yamaha has been making pianos for over a century and, in the past few decades, the Yamaha Clavinova has become known world wide as the leading name in digital pianos. It's my pleasure to be able to introduce you to a brand new and incredibly exciting range of instruments from Yamaha - the CVP-700 series. The CVP-700 series Clavinova is fundamentally a fantastic piano - combined with the Style and Voice power we know and love from Tyros keyboards. There are three models in the range... the CVP-701, CVP-705 and CVP-709 and, at the time of writing, they have only just been announced! Today I'll be focusing on the top of the range CVP-709 - a remarkable instrument that I know both keyboard players and pianists are going to love. Although, at first glance, the CVP-709 looks very similar to it's predecessor, appearances can be deceiving! The CVP-709 has so many new things to explore. The Ultimate Digital Piano Before I take a look at some of the amazing keyboard features in the CVP-709 let's first discuss its piano ‘pedigree’. One of the first things you’ll notice when you sit and play the CVP-709 is the piano sound; rich, detailed and warm. It makes you want to keep playing! This is because of its new piano voicing captured from Yamaha's flagship concert grand piano: the CFX. The sound is made using an entire new type of Voice technology called VRM that recreates the detailed resonances you hear when you play a grand piano. The new Clavinova also has a brand new keyboard action, called NWX. Not only are the CVP-709’s wooden keys coated in a synthetic ivory finish, each one also has a unique weight which is heavier for the lower notes and gets lighter as you play higher up the keyboard. You can even feel a piano hammer being thrown when you play! It's called ‘escapement’ and it's one of those things you really need to experience for yourself. Yamaha has, however, done something truly revolutionary with this range of CVP Clavinovas. Not only do you have the sound of Yamaha's flagship CFX grand, you also get a Bösendorfer Imperial Grand Piano at your fingertips! This is another world class concert grand piano with a completely different character to the CFX. The Bösendorfer was one of the great Oscar Peterson's favourite instruments - and it's fantastic for everything from mellow classics to jazz.

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A room full of pianos!

Voices

When Yamaha launched the CVP-600 series the company wanted to give players a distraction-free area in which to play the piano. This was called ‘Piano Room’ and it became a hugely popular feature. Now, with the launch of the CVP-700 series, the Piano Room has received a considerable upgrade. Controlled entirely through the wide colour touch screen, Piano Room gives you access to a selection of both acoustic and electric pianos in a variety of different environments. In addition to this, however, you can now play alongside a band!

A quick browse through the Voice selection screens of the CVP-709 will be enough to show just how many new sounds there are compared to previous models. Even voices with names that you might recognise have in fact been re-made. The ‘Ambient Piano’ is one such example - now based on the new Bösendorfer piano sound. There are also many new Super Articulation 2 voices - the Classical and Jazz flutes are well worth a listen! The guitar section also receives a huge upgrade with many new voices and effects. Guitar sounds from Tyros5 are extremely prevalent - and these include the new ‘Shadowed Guitar’ voice that recreates the classic sound of Hank Marvin and the Shadows.

You have access to forty different bands on the CVP-709 that follow you as you play - they can even intelligently adjust their volume to suit your playing style! Just like a Style, you can choose from four different variations for the backing - and even record your performance. Piano Room is no longer restricted to ‘piano players’ either because now you can enable a split point and play the instrument in the style you feel most comfortable. Styles So far, we've spoken a lot about the considerable piano-based improvements in the CVP-709, but that is just the where the upgrades begin. Hundreds of accompaniment Styles are included, many of which are brand new! These sit alongside the favourites from the Tyros keyboards and previous models of Clavinova. I especially like that Yamaha has really started to focus on +Audio styles - where the drum and percussion parts are audio recordings of live rhythm performances. You really feel as though you're playing with a real drummer (as indeed you are) and the brand new Jazz and Latin styles are definitely worth a listen! As a Yamaha instrument a full compliment of One Touch Settings are matched up to each of the accompaniment styles - and these have been completely re-made. CVP-709 makes it very easy to see and choose one touch settings straight from the touch screen - a feature that also benefits the enhanced Music Finder which is quick and easy to use thanks to a full on-screen keyboard.

The Speakers On top of brand new styles and voices, clever new features and an all round upgrade to every aspect of the instrument, CVP-709 has many more surprises hidden away. The speaker system is completely new, with separate amplifiers for the bass, mid and treble. The piano also features new spruce speaker cones which are made from the same pulped wood used in Yamaha's acoustic piano sound boards. There is technology from Yamaha's hi-fi division too in the form of unique ‘twisted flare’ bass ports: gently twisted speaker ports that manipulate the air flow in the low frequencies leading to a bass that sounds more detailed and precise. As you can tell, there is so much new about CVP-709, and the range as a whole. So much so that I've only been able to scratch the surface in this brief introduction. The new models will start to arrive in Yamaha music stores across the country throughout the next few months and I highly recommend a visit to a Yamaha Dealer where you’ll be able to experience them for yourself. Those of you lucky enough to be attending this year's Yamaha Club weekend will get the opportunity to see the new instruments up-close and personal - and of course I'll be around to answer any questions you may have. Hopefully I'll see you there!

CVP-701 main features

CVP-701 Black

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

*

Keyboard: GH3X keyboard with synthetic ivory & ‘escapement’.

*

LCD: Colour LCD

*

Piano Samples: Yamaha CFX and Bösendorfer Imperial samples

*

Piano Room: Piano Room with Session mode

*

Voices: 777 high quality voices: 10 VRM, 49 S.Art!, organ flutes, 29 drum/SFX kits + 480 XG voices

*

Styles: 310 accompaniment styles and Style Creator

*

Customisable voices, effects and EQ

*

Vocal: Mic input

*

Recording: 16 track sequencer and audio recording Change tempo, key and cancel lead part from audio tracks XG, GS, GM, GM2 MIDI playback with Score & lyrics display, guide lamps, teaching features

*

Easy set-u up options (Registration Memory, OTS, Music Finder, Style Recommender)

*

Connectivity USB & wireless* connectivity to computers and iOS devices

*

SRP / Available Finish: Black Walnut..................... £2027 Polished Ebony................. £2338

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CVP-705 main features In addition to the features listed for the CVP-7 701 the CVP-7 705 has the following improvements and/or additions. *

Keyboard: CVP-705 now incorporates the new NWX Keyboard with synthetic ivory & ‘escapement’.

*

LCD: The colour LCD has a larger screen and is touch responsive.

*

Voices: There are now 984 high quality voices: 13 VRM, 114 S.Art! Organ Flutes, 33 Drum/SFX kits + 480 XG voices

*

Styles: The number of accompaniment styles is increased to 470.

*

Vocal: Mic input and Vocal Harmony feature is included.

*

Recording: 16-track Sequencer and WAV/MP3 audio recording.

*

Text display

*

Enhanced Music Finder.

*

Enhanced speaker system

*

SRP / Available Finish: Black Walnut..................... £3586 Polished Ebony................. £3898

CVP-705 Polished Ebony

CVP-709 main features In addition to the features listed for the CVP-7 701/-7 705 the CVP-7 709 has the following improvements and/or additions.

CVP-709 Polished Ebony

*

Keyboard: The CVP-709’s action includes Linear Graded Hammers and Counterweights for the most realistic piano feel.

*

LCD: Extra-large colour touch screen LCD

*

Voices: The number of high quality voices is increased to 1270: 13 VRM, 225 SA, 22 SA2, Organ Flutes, 37 Drum/SFX kits + 480 XG voices

*

Styles: CVP-709 has 600 Accompaniment Styles with Audio Styles and Style Creator

*

Pedals: The GP Response Damper Pedal responds accurately to pressure in the same way as on an acoustic piano.

*

Enhanced Speaker System With spruce cone & twisted flare bass subwoofer port.

*

SRP / Available Finish: Black Walnut..................................... £5840 Polished Ebony................................. £6231 Polished White.................................. £6543 CVP-709GP Polished Ebony............. £8882 CVP-709GP Polished White.............. £9350

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new product feature

reface Glyn Madden is intrigued by a range of retro mini keyboards that brings the legendary sound of four of Yamaha’s iconic keyboard instruments within the grasp of every home, studio, or gigging musician.

I have always been a sucker for keyboards with twiddly knobs and flicky switches (that’s ‘analogue’ control to those born in the digital era) so I was immediately hooked when I saw rave reviews of four (yes, four!) retro mini keyboards from Yamaha - each with a suggested retail price of just £347. The reface series is based around four legendary Yamaha keyboard ranges; The CS series for classic analogue synths, CP series for stage pianos, YC series for combo organs and and the DX series for digital FM synths. All four instruments share the same basic three-octave minikey design but each has its own unique character with styling, sound and internal content taken from its original ancestor. These won’t be for everyone but I’m sure some of our readers will absolutely love them. There are some great videos of the range on You Tube and I’ll add a link from the August ‘News’ page of our website - but you’ll find them yourself if you go to You Tube and search for ‘Yamaha Reface Keyboards In Action’.

Reface YC: Electric combo organ Combo Organ Sound Engine with five vintage organ waves and all the controls needed to play organ: Footage sliders, Percussion, Vibrato and Rotary speaker controls. The five organ Waves are:

H: American tonewheel organ V:

British transistor organ

F:

Italian transistor organ

A:

Japanese transistor organ

Y:

Yamaha YC-45D

Reface DX: FM synthesizer 4-o operator FM Sound Engine offers dynamic and expressive additive synthesis A new feature of this engine is continuously variable feedback on every operator allowing for a wide-range of sound creation. Two programmable effects blocks with seven effect types per block: The effect types are: VCM Touch Wah / VCM Flanger / VCM Phaser / Chorus / Delay / Reverb / Distortion.

Add character with two retro organ effects: Distortion and Reverb.

Multi-ttouch control interface gives direct access to four simultaneous parameters.

128-n note polyphony ensures dropout-ffree performance.

32 Voice memory locations allow storing and recalling favourite voices.

Reface CP: Electric piano

Reface CS: Analog synthesizer

Vintage Keyboard Sound Engine with six incredibly detailed vintage keyboard types. Each keyboard type matches a carefully chosen Drive and Tremolo setting to provide an incredibly musical pairing.

Each oscillator type has flexible LFO and ADSR routing plus unique ‘Texture’ and ‘Mod’ controls that work as follows:

The six keyboard types are:

Multi-ssaw: (Texture control adds sub-oscillator / Mod layers multiple sawtooth waves).

RdI

Early '70s tine electric piano

Pulse: (Texture changes pitch of 2nd square wave / Mod change pulse width)

RdII

Late '70s tine electric piano

Wr

Late '60s reed electric piano

Oscillator Sync: (Texture changes pitch and tone of OSC2 / Mod, sets pitch change amount).

Clv

70s struck string Clavinet

Ring Modulation: (Texture changes pitch of OSC1 / Mod, changes pitch of OSC2)

Toy

Toy piano

CP

Yamaha CP80 electric grand piano

Frequency Modulation: (Texture sets Modulation amount / Mod changes pitch of the Modulator).

Five stomp box-style effects with direct control. The effect types are Drive (adds harmonics and distortion) / Tremolo (Auto-Pan for Rd) or VCM Wah with adjustable depth and rate / Chorus with adjustable depth and speed / VCM Phaser with adjustable depth and speed / Digital or Analog-Type Delay with adjustable time and depth / Reverb with adjustable depth. 128-note polyphony ensures dropout-free performance.

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

Analog Physical Modelling Engine with multiple synthesis and oscillator types.

On-b board effects processor with five types add depth to your sound The effect types are: OFF (effect bypass,) Delay, VCM Phaser, VCM Chorus/Flanger and Distortion. 8-n note polyphony allows complex chords and pads or switch to mono Mode for fat synth bass or solo leads.

August / September 2015

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music workshop

Performer, teacher, arranger and composer Penny Weedon continues her series of popular classics. Part 4: ‘Lohengrin - Prelude to Act III’ by Richard Wagner When I was a wee babe, my father used to reliably empty the sitting room by putting on his records of Wilhelm Richard Wagner. My mother used to describe the music as “Those awful screaming women” but, as I was too young to get up and walk out, I was brought up on a diet of fairly undiluted Parsifal, The Flying Dutchman, Die Walküre, Tannhäuser, Rheingold, Meistersinger, Götterdömmerung and Tristan and Isolde. Today's piece is one I clearly remember as my favourite - Prelude to Act III from Lohengrin - which appealed to me because of the lovely harmonies and march-like tempo. I hope you enjoy it as much as I did, and it doesn't cause a mass exodus when you play it! Richard Wagner's 1848 opera is based on a character in German Arthurian literature. Lohengrin, a knight of the Holy Grail, is sent in a boat pulled by swans to rescue a maiden who can never ask his identity. His story is a version of the ‘Knight of the Swan’ legend - known from a variety of medieval sources. My recipe for Lohengrin There are lots of chords in this one, but these needn't present a problem if one adopts a stately tempo. I used the Proms March style on our Tyros5 with the tempo turned down to 100 beats per minute. For both the right and left hand parts I used classical pipe organ sounds. (Preset 6 in Tyros5’s ‘Concert Organ’ does nicely for the right hand with ‘Diapason’ for the left). The piece doesn't need an intro - and only the simplest of endings (I used ending 1). One can have some fun, however, and introduce variety by changing the MAIN VARIATIONS, and putting in some FILLS. I started with Variation A. Then, just before bar 9, I changed to Variation B, finally going to Variation C just before bar 17. You will notice that the chord stays on C for bar after bar at this point so you can use your left hand to press the Variation C at the start of bars 20 and 24. If you can fit in another press in bar 31 that will sound great too... and one final press before you use the ending button makes the finale a bit less 'sudden'. Chord chart (MIDI and MP3 file performances by Penny Weedon are available to subscribers from the Yamaha Club website)) A

5

3

Am

1

5

2

D7

4

2

1 1

12

2

1

5

2

Dm

4

G

4

Bb

2

5 4

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Yamaha Club Magazine

2

1

5

E

G7

1

C

5

3 1

4 2

1

4 3

E7

5

Gm

1

3

D

3 2

1

F

1

4

2

1

G#o (G#dim)

1

4 2

1

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


Lohengrin - Prelude to Act III Wagner arr. Penny Weedon

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

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general feature workshop

Part 45

Roger Hagarty of Roger’s Music, Nottingham, is back with a great workshop in which he shows us how to ‘Mix & Match’ parts to make a new accompaniment style. As I write it’s mid-summer, the sun is shining and Wimbledon is in full flow. Strawberries and fizz for tea... excellent! For my workshop this month I’m going to show you how to mix up the styles. How about making a ‘BossaCha’, a ‘Foxstep’ or ‘Quicktrot’... or even a ‘Country Funk’? Mixing styles is something you can do on CVP Clavinovas, Tyros and most of the mid-range Yamaha keyboards going back around 14 years. As I’ve mentioned before, styles (or ‘rhythms’ if you prefer) are comprised of up to eight different components. These are called ‘Rhythm 1’, ‘Rhythm 2’, ‘Bass’, ‘Chord 1’, ‘Chord 2’, ‘Pad’, ‘Phrase 1’ and ‘Phrase 2’.

The ‘Unplugged’ style (located in the POP&ROCK category uses only three parts throughout all four variations. Now we get to the clever bit... It’s possible to replace any part of a style with any part from any other style to create endless permutations. This is how it’s done... Roger’s Mix & Match 1

I start with a basic style. For this example I choose the ‘Organ Rumba’ style from the BALLROOM category. Then I select the MAIN D style variation (1).

2

Next I press the DIGITAL RECORDING or CREATOR button to the right of the screen (2) and select STYLE CREATOR from the display (fig.3).

These parts are not all necessarily playing at the same time. As an example, let's look at the MAIN A variation of the style ‘Pop Piano Ballad’. If I press the CHANNEL ON/OFF button you can see that only five parts of the style are selected (fig.1).

Fig.3: I select STYLE CREATOR from the display.

3

I now select the ASSEMBLY tab. This page shows all eight parts of the style - and each is set to ‘Organ Rumba’ (fig.4).

Fig.1: Five parts of the style are playing in the MAIN A style variation

If I now select MAIN D the display shows that seven parts are active in this style variation (fig.2).

Fig.2: Seven parts of the style are active when the MAIN D style variation is selected.

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Yamaha Club Magazine

Fig.4: All eight style parts are set to Organ Rumba

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2. The CREATOR button

3. Style START button

4. EXIT button

1. Style variation buttons

4

If I press the START button (3) in the STYLE CONTROL area of the panel a ‘C’ chord is automatically selected as the Organ Rumba style begins to play.

5

Next I press button C (fig.5) to highlight the BASS part in the ASSEMBLY page.

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

Note: You can see in fig.6 that the ‘Ballroom’ folder is edged in red - showing that this is the folder I’m currently using. 7

Fig.7: The styles inside the Latin folder are displayed on the screen.

Fig.5: Button C selects the BASS part of the style

6

Next I select the button adjacent to the ‘Latin’ folder to access the styles inside (fig.7).

8

Then I press the same (C) button again. This time I am taken to a page showing the style folders (fig.6).

I look for the style called ‘Happy Reggae’ and select this using the adjacent button (fig.8)...

A

F

A

F

B

G

B

G

C

H

C

H

D

I

D

I

E

J

E

J

Fig.6: The style folders

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Fig.8: The Happy Reggae style is the one I’m looking for.

August / September 2015

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9

Then I press EXIT (4) to return to the ASSEMBLY page where ‘Happy Reggae’ is now named as the bass part (fig.9). When I start the style playing again the ‘Organ Rumba’ style sounds pretty much as before... but now it has a reggae bass part.

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

Fig.11: The Rhythm2 part of the Cha Cha Cha style replaces the existing Organ Rumba rhythm.

12 Next I change the CHORD2 part accessing the style folders again - this time using button F adjacent to the CHORD2 part in the ASSEMBLY page (fig.12). Fig.9: The MAIN C bass variation from the Happy Reggae style is implanted in the bass part of the Organ Rumba style.

10 Highlighting MAIN C in the SECTION column under the screen (fig.9) indicates that I want the ‘Organ Rumba’ style to use the bass part from the MAIN C variation of the ‘Happy Reggae’ style.

Now I’’ve changed the bass from ‘Organ Rumba’’ to ‘Happy Reggae’’, let’’s go further and change more parts... 11 Button B is adjacent to the RHYTHM2 style part and, if I press this twice (first to highlight RHYTHM2 and second to display the style folders as before) I can access the ‘Ballroom’ folder and select the ‘Cha Cha Cha’ style (fig.10).

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

Fig.12: I use button F in the ASSEMBLY page to access the style folders again.

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

Fig.10: I select the Cha Cha CHa style from the Ballroom folder.

11 Then, as before, I press the EXIT button to return to the ASSEMBLY page(fig.11) where I can see that the RHYTHM2 part of the Cha Cha Cha style has been installed in the Organ Rumba style. 12 I chose the Cha Cha Cha MAIN A variation for the RHYTHM2 part - highlighting it in the SECTION column as before (fig.11).

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Yamaha Club Magazine

13 And, entering the ‘Country’ folder, I select ‘Easy Country’ from the styles contained inside (fig.13).

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

Fig.13: I choose the ‘Easy Country’ style to provide the CHORD 2 part of my style.

14 As before, I press EXIT to return to the ASSEMBLY page

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where the ‘Easy Country’ style has replaced ‘Organ Rumba’ as the CHORD 2 part (fig.14).

A

F

B

G

C

H

D

I

E

J

Fig.16: My newly edited style is displayed in the STYLE area of the MAIN display

Fig.14: The ‘Easy Country’ style is imported into the CHORD2 part in place of Organ Rumba

I could go on and change all the parts in the style - but I think we’ve probably done enough for the purpose of this workshop. Actually there is much more that I can do - because the Organ Rumba style, just like all the others, has Main A, Main B, Main C and Main D sections as well as Intros, Endings, Fill-ins and a Break... and so far we’ve only edited the Main D section. Lots to do!

As you can see, with so many styles available for your ‘Mix & Match’ creations, the combinations are endless. Don’t be frightened to experiment as much as you like. Your keyboard’s preset styles are locked into the instrument and can’t be damaged or lost. You can return to a new style (maybe to make further edits) by calling it up from the STYLE USER page at any time. This is what you do... 1

From the MAIN screen press the button adjacent to the STYLE area (fig.17).

Before we get involved in any of that, however, we should save the work we’ve completed so far.

Save the ‘new’ style 1

I press button J on the ASSEMBLY page adjacent to ‘SAVE’ - to be transported to the STYLE USER page (fig.15) which, as I’ve saved no styles previously, is blank.

Fig.17: Press the button adjacent to the STYLE area

2

Select the STYLE USER tab and then press the button adjacent to the new style’s name (e.g. RogerRumba).

Fig.15: The Style User page

2

3

Next I press SAVE at the bottom of the USER page (fig.15) to call up the familiar text area - where, using the character keys provided, I rename the style... changing it from ‘OrganRumba’ to ‘RogerRumba’. Much better! I exit to the MAIN display (fig.16) where my newly edited style is displayed.

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Fig.18: Then select the new style using the adjacent button

I hope you’ll have fun with this one - and don’t forget that you can call me if you need me at Roger’s Music on 07932 626585. See you next time - Roger

August / September 2015

17


yamaha club weekend The Yamaha Club Weekend 20th Anniversary Celebration Buxton, Derbyshire 16th - 19th October 2015

We do hope you’ll be joining us in Buxton to celebrate 20 years of The Yamaha Club. Here are some of the people you’re likely to meet... Phone 01780 782093 to book! Neil Blake

Glyn Madden

Neil will be known to Yamaha Club members for the software he has created for keyboards during the past twenty or so years via Style Disk Warehouse and Strawberry Music.

A former demonstrator for Yamaha UK Glyn has produced the Yamaha Club Magazine for fans of the Yamaha keyboard since 1995. He now enjoys being an ‘enthusiastic amateur’.

Janet Dowsett We couldn’t celebrate our twentieth year without Janet who has been, and who continues to be one of the key contributors to Yamaha Club Magazine. Originally a Yamaha UK concert artist and teacher Janet now examines for the London College of Music.

Steve & Jackie Marsden Steve and Jackie were a ‘team’ before marriage united them even more closely - Steve, an excellent player with a keen interest in the technology and Jackie, a music teacher and performer. Today Steve is the voice of Yamaha’s technical helpline. A very good man to know!

Gill Eccles Gill recently took over the music tuition pages in Yamaha Club Magazine. She teaches in primary and secondary schools throughout South Staffordshire, whilst still running a very active music practice that caters to pupils from beginner to the final year of degree level.

Tony Stace Wherever Tony plays he brings his unique ‘party’ atmosphere to the event - and we’ve been delighted to welcome him to many Yamaha Club events over the years. Our twentieth anniversary just wouldn’t be the same without him and the ‘vintage’ HX-1.

Ryan Edwards

Michel Voncken

Ryan’s name has been associated with the Yamaha Electone since he first appeared on the concert scene in the early 1990s and he is respected by amateur and professional players alike for the superb orchestral arrangements he performs on this instrument. David Harrild David is known throughout the country as the face of ‘TRX’ - the modular organ system that has developed around the keyboard industry. To festival goers, however, his infectiously happy music style has been well loved for many years on the UK concert scene. Ian House As Yamaha UK’s premier demonstrator Ian House must surely be one of the busiest musicians currently on the scene. Through an ongoing series of concerts and workshops his skillful performances on Yamaha keyboards have won him many fans.

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Yamaha Club Magazine

Known affectionately as ‘The Flying Dutchman’ (due to his frequent travels across the world on behalf of Yamaha) Michel joined Yamaha in 1997 and now gives concerts and demonstrations on the keyboard range on You Tube and throughout Europe. Daniel Watt In August 2014 joined the Yamaha UK demonstration team and now tours Europe with a Tyros5 TRX Organ System. He also performs regularly at festivals and in music shops throughout the UK as part of his commitment to Yamaha. Leigh Wilbraham Leigh is a musician and software producer who recently joined the Yamaha Club team as a regular contributor to the magazine. His software showcases have been very popular with our ‘weekend’ audiences and we’re looking forward to seeing him again in Buxton.

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Courtesy of ‘Trip Advisor’ and the Palace Hotel website, here are some local attractions you might like to visit. Most of those listed here are in the immediate vicinity of the hotel - but the last three are a little further afield... *

*

Buxton Opera House

Pavilion Gardens

If you arrive here when the visitor horde has subsided the walk to Solomon's Temple is quite a pleasant one, being for the most part a woodland excursion through Buxton Country Park, culminating in sweeping views over Buxton.” Solomon's Temple, also known as Grinlow Tower, is a Victorian Folly said to have been built to provide work for the locally unemployed. www.jimjarratt.co.uk/follies/page64.html *

Sight-seeing Tours

“An interesting trip with an entertaining driver. If you want to see as much of Buxton town as possible - at a leisurely pace and without using your shoe leather this is just for you. All the main attractions, a little bit of history and some giggles along the way. Worth the money."

*

Bakewell Village (12 miles) Set in an enviable location on the banks of the River Wye, with the river meandering gently through its centre, this beautiful old market town is in the heart of the Peak District - surrounded by stunning countryside views. And it would be a shame not to sample the famous Bakewell Pudding while you’re here.

Find out more about Discover Buxton and availability of tours at www.discoverbuxton.co.uk The Devonshire Dome Measuring over 150 feet in diameter, the Devonshire Dome is bigger than St. Paul’s Cathedral in London and is the largest unsupported dome in Europe. It was built in 1779 by John Carr of York for the 5th Duke of Devonshire and provided facilities for up to 120 horses and accommodation for the servants and ostlers of those staying in the The Crescent. The grade II listed building is open to visitors and houses a restaurant, cafe, modern hair and beauty salons and a wonderful commercial spa. Events and fairs are regularly held in the Dome.

Chatsworth House (16.5 miles) Home of the Duke and Duchess of Devonshire, the house is a treasure trove of beautiful antiques. On a warm summer’s day the gardens are the ideal place for a picnic - and, on the way back, why not stop off at the Chatsworth farm shop which is packed with high quality produce from the estate and local providers.

Discover Buxton offers you a journey through time as you explore the history, sights and sounds of Buxton.

*

Solomon's Temple

“The walk through Grin Woods to Solomon's Temple is perhaps one of the most popular walks in the Peak District. It is not, however, a walk I would recommend for a summer Sunday as it is, alas, a well beaten tourist track.

The Buxton Pavilion is a wonderful historic venue nestled within twenty-three acres of beautiful gardens. It is a natural hub for the many tourists that visit the town and, for those in need of a little sustenance after a stroll through the gardens, it offers a coffee bar, a Pavilion Café and a Mezzanine Art Café which boasts some of the best views of the gardens. *

*

“Pop into this treat of a building - even if it’s just the entrance - and take a look at the restored art work on the ceiling and the grand staircase - it’s wonderful. The staff are very welcoming if you want to pop inside and take a look.”

*

The National Tramway Museum, Crich (15 miles) The museum is situated within the Crich Tramway Village - a period village containing a pub, cafe, oldstyle sweetshop, and tram depots. Lots to do and see, and much more fun than you might think!

Find out more at www.devonshiredome.co.uk

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

19


multi pad workshop all about

Multi Pads with Phil Leader part 2

Phil Leader guides us further into the workings of the Multi Pads with a workshop that shows how we can compile our own customised banks of multi pads from the preset selection we all have in our keyboards...

Last time we looked at how you can use Multi Pads to add little refinements such as accents, arpeggios and even entire phrases to your performances on Tyros. As with any musical feature on a Yamaha product, the content is absolutely the key to your musical expression and enjoyment, and multi pads are no exception to this, having a vast library of ready-to use phrases on-board. Of course this resource shouldn't mean that you don't have a go at programming some for yourself - and we'll look at that in the final part of this series in the next issue. For now, let's look at the built in multi pads, which may just turn out to give you all you ever need. As a maker of musical instruments of almost any type, Yamaha has a tremendous reputation for quality, not only in construction, but also in musicality. In the case of Tyros, its musical quality is defined by 'content' - this being all of the different data that makes each feature work. Of course you need great technology such as the tone generator, the operating system, or even the physical keys... but, without content, none of those things would produce a squeak, let alone a piece of music. However great the feature, it's actually only as good as its musical content. The same is true of multi pads. Fortunately for us players, Tyros is not only a great piece of hardware. It has great content too - created by some of the world's best programmers. So, accepting that personal taste is, well, personal, you should find plenty among the 170 banks of preset pads in Tyros (Tyros4 in this case) to compliment your performance. I've often thought that, when we sit down to play a tune, we are in a sense a bit like a musical director. Of course we don't have the complication of writing the music scores, or booking musicians (thank goodness! I mean you know what musicians are like… they're usually kept in a pit!). But the similarity is that we think about the arrangement, the musical genre, the tempo, the harmonies, the registration, and other subtleties of performance such as expression. For a musical director to be good at arranging, they need to have a detailed knowledge of all the instruments in the ensemble for which they are writing... and how they sound

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Yamaha Club Magazine

together. In that sense it's a bit like a painter knowing his palette of colours and how they mix together. As Tyros players, it can only benefit our 'arrangement' to know as much as we can about the musical palette available to us... in this case, the musical content in Tyros. Each bank of multi pads is named for the musical genre it represents, so it's easy to explore what's on offer. To navigate through the pages of multi pad banks simply press the multi pads SELECT button (fig.1) and step through the page tabs at the bottom of the screen (fig.2).

Fig.1

Fig.2

You could make a mental note of what's available or, if you have the same goldfish like attention span that I have, a physical note is always helpful! Suffice to say the variety is immense. Exploring the pads can be quite educational as there are many banks that would fit into the 'World' music genre. Actually a lot of 'World' percussion related loops would fit many arrangements of standard tunes, so it's worth trying even the ones whose names don't immediate resonate with you. Tyros4’s 'Oriental 8' multi pad set has some nice loops which work well with Latin styles. Try, for example, the Beguine style with 'Oriental 8' pads 1 and 2. I'm not making any claims of authenticity with this, but as a musical result it sounds very nice. Have a listen to the short audio example named 'Oriental 8' that I’ve posted on the Yamaha Club’s web site. At first you'll hear the style without multi pad... then with pads 1 and 2 added in succession. I hope you'll agree it's a nice result, simple but effective. So much for exploring for yourself - and, of course, there is a lot of enjoyment in discovery as well as in actually playing but it would be great from time to time to get some inspiration for which pads to use. This is available in the form of the ‘One Touch Settings’ (fig.3).

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The OTS provides a registration for your chosen style and, although we usually think of this as the voice selections that you play, it actually includes many other settings with multi pads being one.

Fig.3

2

Then, at the bottom of the screen, I select COPY.

3

A prompt asks me to select the bank(s) I want to copy, so I can select ‘Oriental 8’ at this point or, as I’ve already highlighted it, I can just press OK (fig.6). Fig.6

Fig.4

Take the famous Tyros Bossa Nova style for example. Just touch OTS 1, or select OTS LINK (I always have that selected) and you'll find the ‘BossaVocal1’ multi pads bank has been selected for you (fig.4)

If you listen to the audio example named ‘Bossa’ on the Yamaha Club web site you'll hear how, by introducing a multi pad part of the way through the tune, you can give the arrangement a lift. As with any Yamaha feature, being able to adapt the factory content to your own needs is a key point of creativity. Whether or not you feel the need to do this really depends on you. Simply using the on-board content ‘as is’ is absolutely fine for many players and, for my own purposes, I find the onboard content so good that I seldom feel the need to change it - other than perhaps to make little tweaks to the balance, or to mute some style parts for specific songs.

4

Next I select a tab at the top of the screen for a user area such as USER or HD1.

5

And press PASTE at the bottom of the screen (fig.7). A copy of ‘Oriental 8’ is placed on the USER page. Fig.7

If you want to build multi pads into your performance in a more detailed way, however, you might want to compile your own multi pad banks - comprised of pads taken from different preset banks. You never actually ‘edit’ the on-board content of Tyros so there is no danger that you'll destroy any of the original factory settings. Instead, what you do is to make a copy of the onboard content... and then edit the copy. For my example, I’m going to create my own bank of multi pads by combining pad 1 and pad 2 from the ‘Oriental 8’ bank with pad 2 from the ‘BossaVocal1’ bank and pad 4 from ‘Cym&Chimes’ (for a nice wind chime pad). I'm using a Tyros4 but you’ll be able to do something similar whatever your Tyros model. First of all I’ll copy the whole ‘Oriental 8’ bank: 6

STEP A 1

As I am creating a new bank of compiled pads it's a good idea to rename this bank using the following procedure:

I select the 'Oriental 8' multi pad bank (fig.5).

With the MULTI PAD USER page still selected I press NAME at the bottom of the screen (fig.8). Fig.8

Fig.5

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August / September 2015

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8

Then I press the button adjacent to the ‘Oriental 8’ bank to highlight it... followed by OK at the bottom of the screen. I use the familiar mobile phone like text buttons to enter a new name for the bank. (First, I delete the whole ‘Oriental 8’ name by pressing and holding DELETE.) Once I’ve entered the new name I confirm with OK (fig.9).

Fig.12

Fig.9

I could even select a new Icon for the bank by pressing the ICON button during the naming process. There are a myriad options to choose from... (Fig.10)

2

Fig.10

Then I press DIRECT ACCESS (fig.13) followed by any of the multi pads (fig.14) to take me direct to the MULTI PAD EDIT page.

(Note: Be sure not to press the SELECT or STOP buttons, but actually one of the pads, or Direct Access will take you to the Multi Pad Record page - and forward in time to the next issue!) 3

Fig.13

Fig.14

Having arrived at the MULTI PAD EDIT page (fig.15) I select Multi Pad 2 in the screen . Fig.15

I now have a renamed version of ‘Oriental 8’ on the USER page... and this one I can change freely (fig.11). Fig.11

Next I’m going to copy the individual multi pads from 'BossaVocal 1' and 'Cym&Chimes' using the following procedure: STEP B 1

First I select the 'BossaVocal 1' multi pads bank (fig.12).

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Yamaha Club Magazine

4

And press COPY at the bottom of the screen.

5

Before pressing OK to confirm, and pressing EXIT.

This procedure will have stored Pad 2 of 'BossaVocal 1' in a temporary 'buffer memory', ready for you to paste it somewhere else. The next step is to select the 'somewhere else'! STEP C 1

I return to the MULTI PAD USER area (where I previously stored and renamed the bank I copied in Step A). Fig.16.

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Fig.16

Step D 1

I press the EXIT button - and a warning message appears telling me to save the data - so I confirm with YES (fig.19). Fig.19

2

Then I press DIRECT ACCESS followed by any multi pad

3

Next I select Multi Pad 3 in the screen (fig.17). Fig.17

2

Next I return to the MULTI PAD USER area (fig.20) where my renamed bank is stored... and I select it before pressing SAVE at the bottom of the screen and OK to confirm. Fig.20

4. And then press PASTE at the bottom of the screen. 5

An on-screen prompt warns me that the current pad is about to be replaced with 'BossaVocal1 2' - and asks if I want to continue. I confirm by pressing YES (fig.18). Fig.18

3

At the prompt I select YES because I am overwriting (actually updating) my existing file - so I don't need to set the name or icon again.

From here I just repeat the above procedure completely - but at STEP B item 1 I select the 'Cym&Chimes' bank and, at STEP B item 3, I select Multi Pad 4. Finally, at STEP C item 3, I press Multi Pad 4. This will have pasted a Wind Chime into Pad 4 of your compiled bank. Go through the 'Save' procedure again.

This pastes the 'BossaVocal 2' into Pad 3 of your newly compiled bank. At this stage the bank is still in a temporary memory area so, even though the total procedure isn’t complete I need to save it...

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Now you can try out your compiled bank and utilise it in your arrangements. Of course this is just an example, and a slightly extreme one‌ Pads 1 and 2 Repeat but without Chord Match (as they are percussion loops). Pad 3 Repeats, and Chord Matches, and Pad 4 is a single shot percussion sound. The compiled bank is available from the Yamaha Club Website for you to download and try. In the next and final installment, we'll programme Multi Pads in detail, editing the note data in preset ones, and creating some from scratch.

August / September 2015

23


easy music arranging

In this series Glyn Madden offers easy to follow, easy to play, arranger workshops based on song arrangements published in the ‘Easy Keyboard Library’. 7. Leaving On A Jet Plane

(EKL - Country Songs)

John Denver wrote this song in 1966 although it achieved greatest success three years later on a recording by Peter, Paul and Mary. The story goes that the song - under it’s original title “Babe, I Hate To Go” - was one of sixteen Denver paid to have pressed onto vinyl. He distributed the 250 copies to friends and family. Peter, Paul and Mary were so impressed with the song that they chose to record it themselves and released it on an album the following year. It didn't become a hit, however, until 1969 when they released it as a single.

STEP 1 - Select a style There are many styles that would suit this song but I chose to stay reasonably close to a recording I have of John Denver performing it - and opted for ‘70sCountryPop’ from the COUNTRY style category.

Fig.1

Melody voice

Style parts Style

Tempo

PAD (String) style part

As the intro comes to an end and the written tune begins I use Tyros5’s One Touch Setting (OTS) 1 - ‘Classical Flute’ - for the first melody voice in the arrangement. Here’s the registration for those who need to set it up manually...

STEP 2 - Set the tempo

Registration 1:

The default tempo for the style is 132bpm but this felt a little too fast to me so I slowed it to 125bpm for a more relaxed feel. Naturally you should choose a speed that you’re comfortable with - especially if you’re learning the notes at the same time. The good news is that there are only three chords in the Easy Keyboard Library arrangement - so I guess this is about as easy as it gets.

Right 1................. Classical Flute (Woodwind category) volume 100 Right 2................. Off Right 3................. Off Style.....................70sCountryPop (INTRO 2 - MAIN A) volume 80 Tempo..................125 bpm Style Part............. PAD off

STEP 3 - The Intro & 1st Verse The EKL arrangement doesn’t give an intro but I felt that it needed something to set the tone of the piece. On Tyros5 the INTRO 2 is eight bars long - with just a soft rhythm, bass and electric piano for the first four bars. It begins to resemble a ‘Carpenters’ track half way through though (when a string track is added to mix) so I pressed the CHANNEL ON/OFF button and switched the PAD (string) part off (fig.1).

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Yamaha Club Magazine

Classical Flute

OTS 1 (Tyros5)

If you’ve got into the habit of numbering the bars in your music start by giving the second bar (which begins with the lyric “bags are packed...”) number ‘9’. This is because the first two notes are actually played during the last (eighth)bar of the intro. At bar number 16 (lyric “but the...”) I selected the MAIN B variation - making sure that the OTS LINK button is switched OFF and the AUTO FILL in button is switched ON.

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page (fig.3) for you to select the STANDARD DUET harmony from the TYPE list.

At the same time I switched back on the PAD style part I’d taken out earlier - so the string part can be heard again. With so many things to do it’s easier to create a second registration... Registration 2:

Classical Flute

Fig.3

OTS 1 (Tyros5)

Right 1................. Classical Flute (Woodwind category) volume 100 Right 2................. Off Right 3................. Off Style.....................70sCountryPop (MAIN B) - volume 80 By pressing MAIN B so that it’s light is flashing as I stored the registration the fillin will be triggered automatically whenever I select the registration button. Tempo..................125 bpm Style Part............. PAD on This registration takes us to bar 24 (lyric “so...”) where I switched to the MAIN C variation. As before the melody voice doesn’t change - but now I play it an octave higher than written which gives it a different sound. Registration 3:

Classical Flute

OTS 1 (Tyros5)

Right 1................. Classical Flute (Woodwind category) volume 100 - played one octave higher than written. Right 2................. Off Right 3................. Off Style.....................70sCountryPop (MAIN C) - volume 80 I press MAIN C so that it’s light is flashing as I store the registration. Tempo..................125 bpm Style Part............. PAD on At bar 32 (lyric “cause I’m...”) I move along to the MAIN D style variation. This time I also select the corresponding OTS button 4 which, on my Tyros 5, gives a gentle brass mix (fig.2). Fig.2

Registration 4:

Brass Mix

OTS 4 (Tyros5)

Right 1................. Jazz Trumpet - volume 100 Right 2................. Warm Horns Section - volume 100 Right 3................. Flugel Horn - Volume 100 Harmony Standard Duet - setup as shown in fig.3 Style.....................70sCountryPop (MAIN D) - volume 80 I press MAIN D so that it’s light is flashing as I store the registration. Tempo..................125 bpm Style Part............. PAD on That’s it. Play through to the end and, as you reach the final chord of G, press ENDING 2 for a professional playout. Chords

(optional)

If you’d like to experiment with the chords I’ve used for this piece begin by numbering the bars in the Easy Keyboard Library arrangement as described earlier. Use the chord of G major for the intro - then, write these chords into the music score at the appropriate bar numbers. Bars 1 - 8: G [Intro 2] 9: G

Multi Pads

PAD (String) style part

Melody voices

I also add the HARMONY effect which, on my Tyros5, is already set to STANDARD DUET. If yours is not you can adjust it yourself by pressing DIRECT ACCESS followed by the HARMONY button. This will take you direct to the correct

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/

/

/

10: C

/

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/

11: G

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/

12: C

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13: G

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14: C

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15: D

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16: Am7 / D7 /

17: G

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18: C

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19: G

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20: C

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21: G / GM7/F# /

22: C/E / A/C# /

23: D7sus4 / / /

24: D7

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25: G

26: C

27: G

28: C

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29: G / GM7/F# /

30: C/E / A/C# /

31: D7sus4 / / /

32: D7

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33: G

34: C

35: G

36: C

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37: G

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38: C

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39: D7sus4 / / /

40: D7

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41: G

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42: C

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43: G

44: C

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45: G

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46: C

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47: D7sus4 [Fill]

48: D7

[Break]

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49 - 55: G [Ending 2]

As before an mp3 file is available for anyone who wants to hear my version. Please email for a copy to glyn@yamahaclub.co.uk and put ‘Jet Plane’ in the subject line.

August / September 2015

25


music selection

Music For You Selected by Janet Dowsett FLCM LLCM

The Complete Keyboard Player Great Standards (Wise Publications) Website price ÂŁ12.88 inc. UK p/p ; Yamaha Club Members price only ÂŁ11.78 inc UK p&p. (Save 10% on the price of the book itself!)

I am pleased to bring you news of a brand new book today in the very popular 'Complete Keyboard Player' series. This series has set the standard for keyboard publications over many years and are used by many players and teachers of keyboard. This new book has sixteen 'vintage' favourites. The arrangements are one-line treble clef melodies with chord symbols. At the start of each song there are chord diagrams showing you how to play all the left hand chords needed for that song. In addition, the melody line has helpful fingering suggestions. Lyrics, registration suggestions and tempos are given. These songs are not ridiculously easy to play, but neither are they desperately difficult. I've tried them out on several of my adult students in the last couple of weeks and they all really like the book. I reckon it's a winner!

There are 40 pages and 16 songs. Songlist: 'Almost Like Being In Love' (Frank Sinatra), 'Blue Moon' (Mel Torme), 'A Certain Smile' (Johnny Mathis), 'East Of The Sun (And West Of The Moon)' (Frank Sinatra), 'Georgia On My Mind' (Ray Charles), 'Goodnight Sweetheart' (Al Bowlly), 'I'm Beginning To See The Light' (Ella Fitzgerald), 'Lara's Theme (Somewhere My Love)' (Maurice Jarre), 'Moonlight Serenade' (Glenn Miller), 'Over The Rainbow' (Judy Garland), 'Pennies From Heaven' (Louis Armstrong), 'The Shadow Of Your Smile' (Tony Bennett), 'Singin' In The Rain' (Gene Kelly), 'Tulips From Amsterdam' (Max Bygraves), 'Under Paris Skies' (Andy Williams), 'Where Do You Got To (My Lovely)' (Peter Sarstedt).

TO ORDER: These books are available from Janet Dowsett at The Music People. *Books are subject to availability, and prices are subject to change. PLEASE ORDER DIRECT FROM THE MUSIC PEOPLE - NOT FROM THE YAMAHA CLUB. Send a cheque or postal order payable to The Music People for the price of the book including p&p, or telephone with your credit/debit card details or order on-line at www.themusicpeople.co.uk (Include your Club membership number after your surname to ensure that the discount is applied before posting. The discount will not show on your automated internet acknowledgment, but will show on your receipt after posting.) Normal website prices apply to books other than the special Yamaha Club Magazine offers.

The Music People, 9 Green End Close, Spencers Wood, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 1EH Tel/Fax: 0118 9887444; Email: jan@themusicpeople.co.uk

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

27


music theory

Part 4

The Ionian Mode

To play a scale or not to play a scale? That is the question... Over the years there has much debate over the learning and playing of scales. Many of us, I'm sure remember being drilled in endless scale playing at the start of each lesson with no reason given other than you had to learn them because you were told to. How many of us are now filled with dread when we hear mention of scales!? Because I’m a teacher, you’ll be waiting for me to say that I fully support the teaching of scales. Yes, I do... but not without purpose! And therein, I feel, lay the problems of the past and unfortunately even of the present. A scale is a pattern of notes that a composer chooses to write his piece of music in. In Western music a standard pattern of notes has evolved over the centuries - from what we now think of as the medieval ‘modes’ to our present day major and minor scales. If we look closely at music we love we’ll find that there are many other forms of scales. In fact ‘scales’ (if we must use that word) are used in all music cultures around the world. We started with what became known as medieval modes which are just all the white notes in order from the starting note to the same pitch an octave higher. The ‘Dorian’ mode, one of my favourites for composing, is shown below.

Note: The first eight modes were developed in the medieval era as a way to classify pre-existing Gregorian chants. In the medieval modes black notes weren’t used unless it was a transposed mode because black notes were considered to be a sign of the devil! The Dorian Mode

D

E

F

G

A

B

C

D

The next four modes were added in 1547 by Heinrich Glarean (also Glareanus), a Swiss music theorist, and this gave way to our modern system - especially via the Ionian mode which is C - D - E - F - G - A - B - C (i.e. C major).

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Yamaha Club Magazine

C

D

E

F

G

A

B

C

From this we developed the major scale formula on which, as any student of the piano will know, the composer Johann Sebastian Bach based his famous collection of 48 preludes and fugues called ‘The Well-tempered Clavier’. Why did he do this? You may well ask as, indeed, have I and many of my piano students. Musical instruments, such as the piano, were developing quickly at the time and the tuning was vastly improving - so J.S. Bach wanted to show that it was now possible to write music for the piano in every key over an octave range. In the 19th Century the twelvetone, or ‘twelve-note technique’ was devised by Austrian composer Arnold Schoenberg as a method of musical composition. The technique is a means of ensuring that all twelve notes of the chromatic scale are sounded as often as one another in a piece of music while preventing the emphasis of any one note so the music avoids being in a specific key.

Arnold d Scho enberg

I'm afraid to say you just can't get away from scales. They are the basic ingredients that form the sounds we so love to hear and play in our music. In folk music we have pentatonic scales which use five notes and from our major scales we have developed the blues scales that we hear in blues and jazz music. Knowing the scale(s) for your favourite pieces and being able to play them with each hand will train your fingers and help you to play the difficult passages with more ease. In the next article we will look at the Major scale formula and how to work them out. Until then, enjoy your playing and remember... Scales are there to help us!

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


new recordings

A new CD release from Michael Wooldridge Piano Magic Price: £11.75 inc. UK p/p Running time: 56:44 Available online from: www.michaelwooldridge.co.uk or from Yamaha Club Piano Magic is a brand new CD from popular organ world star Michael Wooldridge. It features Michael playing the fabulous Yamaha CVP-609 Clavinova digital piano accompanied by his Yamaha Electone EL-700 digital orchestral organ and Gareth Thompson on drums. Many of the items featured on the CD are taken from ‘Liberace Live from Las Vegas!’ - a tour that Michael co-produced with That's Entertainment Productions featuring the UK's number one piano entertainer, Bobby Crush, in the lead role. Other tracks are popular favourites from Michael's concert programmes. The CD was recorded in two stages, the first being when Michael and Gareth recorded the orchestral backings using the EL-700 organ and drums. Next Michael played the piano features over the top of the backings. Michael recorded four selected solo tracks using only the CVP-609 only - with the Clavinova's rhythmic accompaniment styles providing the backings just as when he plays this instrument live in concert. The result of all tracks combined is a thrilling mix of piano magic! Tracks include: 1) A Mexican Fiesta (medley): Espana Cani / Spanish Eyes / La Paloma / The Mexican Hat Dance 2) Moon River 3) Change Partners 4) The Beer Barrel Polka 5) Classical Favourites (medley): Tchaikovsky Piano Concerto No.1 / Autumn Concerto / Fantasie Impromptu / Laura / The Dream Of Olwen / The Warsaw Concerto

12) Besame Mucho 13) The Genius Of Gershwin (medley): The Rhapsody In Blue / Embraceable You / Swanee / The Man I Love / Liza / Fascinating Rhythm / I Got Rhythm / The Rhapsody In Blue 14) Mister Sandman

6) Sway 7) The Way We Were 8) Crazy Rhythm 9) Cavatina 10) Chopsticks 11) Misty

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

29


new product feature

PSR-S970

PSR-S970 / S770 & S670 with Ian House My work for Yamaha is increasingly taking me across the UK, throughout Europe and, recently, to Japan - and I’m able to see at first hand how well the PSR-S Series keyboards are received for their ease of use, portability and incredible sound quality. In recent years the ‘S’-Series has also been the vehicle for new Yamaha technologies - such as the Real Distortion effects and Audio Styles (seen first on the PSRS950). This trend of innovation has continued with the launch of the latest range of ‘S’ series keyboards because the PSR-S670, PSR-S770 and PSR-S970 are incredible! They look fantastic, they’re easier to use than ever before... and the sounds and styles need to be heard to be believed. Although I'll be mostly writing about the PSR-S970 today I feel that the PSR-S670 deserves an extra special mention because never before have I heard a keyboard sound this good at such an affordable price! It has a huge selection of styles and voices and these are combined with features such as registration memory, Music Finder, multi-pads and advanced recording features that are normally reserved for higher-end ‘S’ series and Tyros models. It really makes the PSR-S670 an ideal keyboard for anyone just starting in the wonderful world of music creation. PSR-S670

PSR-S770

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Yamaha Club Magazine

A new look Both PSR-S970 and PSR-S770 have a striking new look. Not only are they a stylish dark titanium colour but they both also have a brand new wide colour LCD screen which is a pleasure to use - especially coming from the previous S950 and S750. They run on an operating system very similar to that of the Tyros5 and the wide screen makes everything just that little bit easier to use. The fact that the ‘S’ series models have built in speakers has always been a huge attraction for players who are looking for a portable instrument - and the newly designed case gives plenty of room for the punchy sounding speaker system whilst keeping the weight down. The PSR-S970 only weighs 11.6kg!

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


Inspired by Tyros, plus much more... As you play the PSR-S970 you can immediately tell it shares a lineage with the Tyros keyboards. Indeed, it's packed full of Super Articulation voices - all of which are the same full highquality samples as in the flagship model. The guitar section is a particular favourite of mine - and it has the guitar amp model effects used in Tyros5 which gives every sound a new freshness and realism. Voices like ‘Shadowed Guitar’ and some fantastic new acoustic guitars respond so well when played in the simplest way. The ever popular Super Articulation ‘Saxophone’ voice sounds as though it's had quite an upgrade but, having said that, the same can be said for every voice on the keyboard! A welcome addition from Tyros is the sound of the ‘Boys Choir’ which, along with matching Freeplay styles such as ‘EtherealVoices’, sends shivers up my spine every time I use it! Real time control On the left hand side of each new ‘S’ series model are two control knobs. These are a very welcome addition - not only for those looking to make new and modern music but also for the more traditional home player as they give you quick and easy access to control over the balance between your right and left hand, the overall reverb level, and even the microphone effects in the new Vocal Harmony 2 system!

PSR-S670 main features *

Touch sensitive portable keyboard

*

Live Controllers, pitch bend and modulation wheels

*

LCD

*

AWM stereo sampled voices (416 voices/34 drum/SFX kits/480XG) 128 note polyphony

*

230 backing styles section and style creator

*

Easy set-u up options (Registration Memory, OTS, Music Finder, Style Recommender)

*

DJ styles

*

Arpeggiator

*

Customisable effects and EQ

*

16 track sequencer, audio recording (wav), audio playback (wav)

*

Multi-p pads including Audio Link

*

XG, GS, GM, GM2 MIDI playback with score, lyrics and text display, teaching features

*

32MB Voice and style expansion memory

*

USB & wireless* connectivity to computers and iOS devices

*

SRP: £531

PSR-S770 main features In addition to the features listed for the PSR-S S670 the PSR-S S770 has the following improvements and/or additions. *

Large colour LCD.

*

AWM stereo sampled voices. Increased to 830 voices/36 drum/SFX kits/480XG) and 67 S.Art! voices.

OTS and Music Finder

*

Increased to 360 backing styles section and style creator.

The new PSR-S series has been given a considerable upgrade in the One Touch Setting (OTS) section. Every single setting has been made, or re-made, entirely from scratch and you can really hear it! Of course this change is reflected in Music Finder which draws on the new OTS voicing for not only the original song list but also for all the new song titles that are included.

*

Mic/guitar input with effects.

*

16 track sequencer and audio recording (wav), Audio playback now in .wav & .mp3 format.

*

Change tempo, key and cancel lead part from audio tracks.

*

Increased to 160MB Voice and style expansion memory.

*

SRP: £819

Audio everywhere... The PSR-S950 was the first Yamaha keyboard to introduce Audio Styles. These are backing styles where the drums and percussion sounds are live recordings of drummers and percussionists playing - rather than the computer programmed patterns we normally work with. Of course, this has been carried forward into the PSR-S970 and the list of new styles is really impressive. There are lots of new ones to choose from in nearly every category with styles we know and love from Tyros5 and some brand new backings - especially in the Big Band and Jazz section where the live drummer really swings! See and hear them for yourself The new ‘S’ series keyboards really are worth taking a closer look at. I’ve only just scraped the surface in this brief introduction because, in addition to the huge numbers of new voices, styles and features you've read about above, there is much more to discover and enjoy. We will of course be presenting the new keyboards at the Yamaha Club weekend in Buxton where you will have the opportunity to play them for yourself.

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

PSR-S970 main features In addition to the features listed for the PSR-S S670 and PSR-S S770 the PSR-S S970 has the following improvements and/or additions. *

AWM stereo sampled voices. Increased to 989 voices/41 drum/SFX kits/480XG) and 131 S.Art! (Tyros5 quality) voices.

* Increased to 450 backing styles section and style creator with audio styles. *

Customisable effects with Virtual Circuit Modelling, Graphic User Interface and EQ.

*

Mic/guitar input with effects, Vocal Harmony2 with synth Vocoder.

*

Multi-p pads including Audio Link.

*

Increased to 512MB voice and style expansion memory, 128MB audio style expansion memory.

*

USB & wireless* connectivity to computers and iOS devices, RGB out.

*

SRP: £1442

August / September 2015

31


letters & emails

Notebook Yamaha Club members should send letters, e-mails etc. to the club office, marked ‘Notebook’ (Email: notebook@yamaha-club.co.uk). Please accept my apologies if your letter isn’t included - but I’ll try to print as many as possible in each issue. I’m afraid that I can’t reply individually to letters and emails about technical matters (as I’d get nothing else done during my day) - but Steve Marsden and the Technical Support team at Yamaha UK are always there to help (tel: 0844 811 1116).

Oh ‘eck... It’s BGT again Firstly may I say what a good read this magazine is! I read it from cover to cover - and then read it in sections again and again in case I missed something important. I was watching TV that evening when Tony Stace and Andrew Nix suddenly appeared on stage. My wife and I have seen Tony at the William Penney Theatre in Aldermaston. To quote you, “Tony Stace is a superbly skilful player and a terrific entertainer, as is Andrew Nix”. “We are going to be treated to some superb keyboard playing” I said to my wife - little knowing that in a matter of seconds Simon Cowell would buzz them both off the stage. All that time and effort wasted! I thought BGT was a variety show (you know - with the emphasis on variety) showcasing diversity of taste in entertainment across the whole musical spectrum. Oh! boy was I wrong. This show isn’t about what the Great British public want... it's all about what Simon Cowell wants. I've heard Pete Waterman of Stock, Aitken and Waterman fame say on TV that Simon Cowell is limited and only knows what Pete has taught him about the music business. As for Andrew’s T-shirt, there is a word missing... ‘totally’. It should read ‘I was totally XXXX'ed on BGT’. Never mind boys there are a lot of serious musical fans who will follow you both - look upon it as a nightmare! OK chaps a word of advice - keep taking the tablets. Glyn, I think you’re wise not to venture into BGT land. I still feel annoyed how badly treated they were! Henry Darkin, Swindon I’m with you all the way on this Henry. I realise that the organ / keyboard has been facing a bit of an ‘image’ problem in the

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Yamaha Club Magazine

last few years but any judgement made in just four seconds can’t possibly be based on talent (or lack of it). It can only be an instant reaction based purely on ignorance and blind prejudice. This is ridiculous at the best of times - but it’s made even more so because Mr. Cowell must know that keyboards play a major role in most studio recordings, WestEnd shows and, of course, his own ‘live’ show - the ‘X-Factor Tour’.

Contacts wanted in the West Midlands It has been a while since I have written to you so greetings from the beautiful West Midlands. I’m still playing keyboard, singing and, of course, I still tinker on the piano. From time to time I am also doing making some multi-track recordings via my iPad - using the ‘Garage Band’ app. Recently I’ve been doing entertaining elderly day groups here in Birmingham and this always goes down very well. I have also had a play on the piano at our lovely Black Country Living Museum near the nice district of Dudley and this has gone down very well. I am looking to meet like minded keyboard players from Birmingham, the Black Country and surrounding areas of the West Midlands with whom to share ideas, exchange files, learn from one another and, indeed, to make new friends with a common interest. I can be contacted via email bestrickie2@hotmail.com phone 0121 558 8386 or mobile 07729856600. Mr Rickie Chapple (W. Midlands)

Tutorial Videos Wanted I’m trying to find copies (original or otherwise) of two video tutorials featuring the Yamaha PSR-8000. The programmes were presented by Martin Harris. I'm happy to copy originals myself and return them if someone would be willing to loan them. Mr. Steve Potter (Crewe) Tel: 0979 115 0851

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


Finding the lost chord! I’ve recently bought a secondhand Tyros5 and I don’t know it’s something I’ve done, or if the keyboard has developed a fault, because every time I play a chord it sounds wrong and I’ve noticed that the display is showing every chord with a ‘/c’ after it. It didn’t do this when I first got it and I’ve tried switching the keyboard off and on again and loading some different registrations that I know work fine, but nothing is solving the problem. Please tell me I haven’t bought a dud... Catherine Greaves (Wrexham) I don’t think there’s anything for you to worry about. I do, however, think you’ve somehow changed the MIDI setting because this is what happens if the MIDI Pedal 1 template is used. This template is included in the specification for when the keyboard is used in conjunction with MIDI bass pedals. It’s an easy job to set things back to normal... 1. Press [FUNCTION] and select MIDI from the display. This will call up the MIDI page below.

3. Then press [EXIT] to take you out of the MIDI page.

Note: Pressing [DIRECT ACCESS] followed by [EXIT] will always return you to the instrument’s start-up ‘MAIN’ page.

E-Z Play Music In response to a letter in the June/July edition from Jeff Fussell I think I may be able to help. I have over twenty books - some two hundred songs in the EasyPlay format. If he would like to contact me please feel free to pass on my number. Bob Hargreaves (Leicestershire) Many thanks for your kind offer Bob. I’ve passed on your number, and that of another reader, Clive Ayres, who also offered to help.

About One Touch Settings Note: Make sure the PRESET tab is selected. 2. I think you’ll find that the ‘MIDI Pedal1’ setting will be highlighted as above. If so, all you need do is select the ‘All Parts’ setting instead.

C o f f e e T i m e Q u i z - No.44

The One Touch Settings (OTS) on Tyros models are very useful and convenient. When using Klaus-4-Tyros and Legends-4-Tyros software each of the eight Registration Memory buttons gives a different style. It’s true that the ‘Freeze’ function can be used to hold the style and step through the registrations. However, the OTS can also be used.

- by Beverley Coombes

A QUESTION OF SPORT: 1. Pot Black's theme 'Black & White Rag' was performed by which famous pianist? 2. The original theme for this sport was called Light and Tuneful. It made us want to put on our shorts and pour a Pimms. Spiffing! 3. The Ski Sunday theme was inspired by a piece by which classical composer? 4. Which well-k known operatic aria was used as the theme tune for the BBC's 1990 World Cup coverage in Italy? 5. The theme for this sport (when covered by the BBC) was Soul Limbo, a tune that instantly transported us to the Caribbean.

6. Which Rogers & Hammerstein show tune became the anthem for Liverpool FC? 7. Which band wrote the theme associated with Formula 1 (taken from a track called The Chain on their best-sselling album)? 8. The Horse of the Year Show theme is taken from a piece by which classical composer? 9. Ravel's Bolero was used in an Olympic medal-w winning performance in 1984 - in which sport? 10. The stirring theme originally written by Ron Goodwin for the 1966 film The Trap, is used for which annual sporting event?

Answers: 1. Winifred Atwell, 2. Tennis (Wimbledon), 3. Bach, 4. Nessun Dorma, 5. Test Cricket, 6. You'll Never Walk Alone, 7. Fleetwood Mac, 8. Mozart (Ein musikalischer Spaß), 9. Ice Dance, 10. London Marathon

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

August / September 2015

33


To do this, check that [OTS Link] is turned off, select a registration memory button... and then use the four OTS buttons (located on the right hand side of the keyboard). Obviously these are marked as One Touch Settings 1, 2, 3 and 4. This also works with the Tyros’ built-in styles. Each style has four suitable OTS already programmed. If you like the style variations (A, B, C and D) to change with the OTS [OTS Link] needs to be turned on again and the four Style Variation buttons (on the left of the keyboard) used instead. Maybe a little experimentation is in order so players can use which method suits their preference and playing requirements.

Turn to page 11 to find out which musical gems Janet has discovered for this issue.

Great service from Penny and Dots 2 Order Having been unsuccessful in my search for a written music score for James Last’s beautiful ‘Morning In Cornwall’, Penny Weedon has provided it via her Dots 2 Order service. Brilliant! She has also helped with Sky’s ‘Carillon’ - another lovely piece from one of your albums.

Trevor Bunce (Middlesborough)

She’s a clever girl that Penny Weedon... Her arrangements are excellent and her own compositions always fun to play. From the feedback I’m getting it seems that her Dots 2 Order service is hitting exactly the right note (sorry!) with our readers.

Tyros Rocks! After reading Janet Dowsett's review of ‘The Easy Rock Fake Book’ I couldn't wait to get a copy... It is great! Playing the music of Blue Oyster Cult on a Tyros5 is nearly as good as being at a concert.

Fans of Penny’s music workshops will find her latest popular classic arrangement on page 20.

I should point out for the benefit of some members that ‘Slow Ride’ (page 192) has nothing to do with the arrival of the 3-15 from Derby. It is, in fact, a composition by Dave Peverett (lead vocalist and rhythm guitarist of rock band Foghat) who sadly passed away a few years ago aged 57. By the way... I loved the view of Glyn's garden on the cover of the June edition of the club magazine. Paul Sims (Luton) Haha... Paul I only wish! Yes, there are some great songs in the Easy Rock Fake Book for the old rockers amongst us.

Brian Eaton (Bolton)

Contact wanted to share keyboard hobby Dennis Silver, a Tyros4 owner from Yeovil, Somerset, would like to make contact with other Tyros or 'S' series Yamaha keyboard owners in his local area. Data protection laws prevent us from passing on details from our database without permission - so if you think you might like to meet Dennis please contact him by phone on 01935 473226.

Fab headphones A few months ago I bought a pair of your Yamaha RH5M monitor headphones. They’re the best I’ve tried yet and I’d like to order another set for my home studio set-up. I’ve been using them a lot recently as I’ve been recording some CDs with my PSR-S950. They’re super comfortable and the sound is spot on. Thank you. Rob Fisher (Bucks.)

Notebook Please send your Notebook contributions to... By post to: Yamaha Club Ltd., 59 Ennerdale Close, Dronfield Woodhouse, Dronfield, Derbyshire, S18 8PL By e-mail to: notebook@yamaha-club.co.uk We regret that we are unable to answer letters and emails individually. I simply don’t have any staff to deal with this - but please do keep your email and letters coming as a selection is always chosen for the magazine and your views are often passed on to relevant departments within Yamaha UK for their information. Your contributions are greatly appreciated and I’m only sorry I can’t publish more.

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Yamaha Club Magazine

www.yamaha-club.co.uk


classifieds

The Club Shop Yamaha Club members advertise FREE - Non-m members £12 per entry Email: shop@yamaha-c club.co.uk

Keyboards Tyros4 - £1,850 o.n.o. R. Chapple (W.Midlands) 0121 558 8386 Mobile: 07729 856600 Email: bestrickie2@hotmail.com In mint condition with speakers, music stand and full instructions. Many MIDI files stored on the keyboard's hard drive. Buyer must collect. Tyros 5 (72 note keyboard) - £2,500 Mick Reeves (Cambs.) 01354 653063 mickreevesmodels@gmail.com As new - just a few months old. Only played a few times. I cannot spare time to play. C/w speakers, volume pedal and extras. Tyros5 (61 note keyboard) - £2150 Alex Payler (Kent) 01795 421251 Mobile: 07813 286299 Complete with MS-05 sub/speakers, manuals, cables and box. Just over a year old (still under guarantee) and in 'as new' condition. Lack of use forces sale. Pickup only from Kent, UK. Would consider P/X of a PSR-S950 plus cash.

Clavinovas Yamaha Clavinova CVP-3 305 - £750 o.n.o. Lin Tippey (North Yorks.) 01423 865946. 88 key graded hammer keyboard, 128 note polyphony, hundreds of voices and accompaniment styles, 16 track recording, direct Internet connection. Attractive dark rosewood cabinet with two 40W amplifiers / speakers and grand piano-style fallboard. This instrument is 10 years old but in truly excellent condition (cost £2950 new in 2005). Ideal for an improver wanting to upgrade. Includes full instruction manual, CD guide and piano stool. Buyer to collect – private seller in Knaresborough.

ENJOY A FREE SAMPLE OF ORGAN & KEYBOARD CAVALCADE The longest established & only monthly specialist organ magazine FREE! PACKED WITH TOP TUTORIALS FROM TOP NAMES Plus NEWS, VIEWS, REVIEWS, CONCERTS, CLASSIFIEDS AND A WHOLE HOST MORE!

STOP YOUR YOUR PEDALS PEDALS SLIDING ABOUT!

£19.99 inc. p/p From Yamaha Club

Stageworks Non-Slip Mats Pack of two mats

PHONE 01780 782093 ...AND WE WILL SEND YOU YOUR FREE SAMPLE TODAY NO CATCHES, NO STRINGS ATTACHED - JUST GOOD OLD-F FASHIONED SERVICE... READ AND ENJOY!

ORGAN & KEYBOARD CAVALCADE The No.1 Monthly Organ & Keyboard Paper Only £29.00 per year - delivered to your door

Miscellaneous Yamaha MS60 Powered Speakers - £190 Trevor Bunce (Teeside) 01642 452189 Mob: 07527 770883 2 x MS60s Home use only. In very good condition. Complete with 2x 4 metre gold jack leads and user manual. Cost over £1000. Yamaha 512 Mb Expansion Board - £55 John Strand (Middlesex) 07793 742001 FL512M board. Suitable for Tyros4 or Tyros5. Reason for sale? I got the bigger board. I can send by courier for extra £6 2 x Bose L1 Speaker Systems - £900 pair. Brian Turner (Northants.) 01536 483804 Two L1 Bose Compact Speaker Systems. Perfect Stereo Setup Cost £1900 new. For quick sale the pair £900.

(KC is not available on the shelves)

Yamaha Club Shop’s all-time ‘Top 10’ T h e t e n o v e r a l l m o s t p o p u l a r o n -ll i n e i t e m s a t y a m a h a -c club.net/shop at 18th March 2015 1) Regi-S Stick RS4 (Tyros4), 2) DVD Tutorial: Understanding Files & Folders, 3) DVD Tutorial: Getting Started Exploring Music Finder, 4) DVD Tutorial: Basic Sequencing - Recording with Song Creator, 5) Regi-S Stick RS3 (Tyros3), 6) DVD Tutorial: Tyros4 - Eileen Lowry, 7) Regi-S Stick Plus (Tyros-2 2), 8) DVD Tutorial: The Professional Touch Building a Performance, 9) Extension Music Desk Brackets, 10) Klaus-4 4-T Tyros (Tyros4/Tyros5)

www.yamaha-club.co.uk

Buy on-ll ine Don’t forget, our full range of software, tutorial and entertainment CD/DVDs and accessories is available on-lline at: www.yamaha-c club.net/shop

Please note: Due to the vulnerability of software data to damage and accidental corruption by previous owners we are no longer able to accept adverts for this kind of item.

August / September 2015

35


Yamaha Club Magazine (August/September 2015)  

The UK's leading magazine for Yamaha home keyboard enthusiasts.

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