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Editor's Note Now is the time to dream. As we near the end of this hellscape we call the pandemic, we wanted to make space for the dreams, surreal thoughts entertained and meditations that have floated through our subconscious over the past year. For what has felt like forever, we've created new relationships with the homes we live in and the people around us. Even the way we think and create has changed. And when we recognized all of what's been lost, there was an opportunity to begin thinking about how things could be, whether that was dreams of peace and justice or of pink cats and floating eyeballs. With this collection of visual art and written works, we're asking you to get comfortable and let your mind wander. Indulge in this unreality we've been dealt with over the past year and create something new out of this mess. So without further ado, the Y'ALL ATL team gives you The Dream 'Zine.


Contributors A Zine By @Yallatl

Rebecca Rikard

@Cowfemme

Sanae Lahgazi-Alaou

@orangesunaa

KArina Calera

@karinaacaldera

Joshua Barkley

@jsbarkles

Patricia Hernandez

@Patl.sv

Abbie Argo

@Sedangogh

Ryan Holtzen

@ryanholtzen

Chrysta Avers

@Bobblezzz

Jake VanValkenburg

@alright.jake

Kami Green

@Looking.For.trouble


Rebecca Rikard


"Girls Support Girls"

Sanae Lahgazi-Alaoui


"Insomnia"

Karina Caldera


"In The Garden"

Joshua BArkley


"FRUTO DE A VIDA"

"this piece, represents me as the Mayan indigenous background heritage I have and the power of the love I have for my kids"

Patricia Hernandez


"Slurp"

Abbie Argo


"In a shirt that makes me feel like Brian Wilson” For the first time I understand Tile flooring. It’s the colors hanging over Big dull slabs of grey, Swirling the way water Falls down a throat And into the gut. Stone keeps your feet cold on purpose, Like In a toe-twitch dream, Waiting for the sun’s first fall To kiss you on the mouth And wake you with a jolt, Cheeks red or pink colors— Spilling over and over And onto the floor from the unbuttoned Curtains draped over my shoulders.

Ryan Holtzen


"A Welcome Stranger"

Chrysta Avers


"MLk has mercy in us"

Patricia Hernandez


Rebecca Rikard


A Conversation With Rebecca Rikard What has working as an artist been like for you in quarantine? Has it changed the way you approach your work or present it? "I DEFINITELY THINK BEING QUARANTINED CHANGED THE WAY I CREATE ART AND THE TYPE OF ART I MAKE. ESPECIALLY AT THE BEGINNING OF QUARANTINE, AS MANY CREATIVES HAVE TALKED ABOUT, THERE WAS A PRESSURE TO BE CONSTANTLY CREATING, AND AS SOMEONE WHO HAD RECENTLY GRADUATED COLLEGE, AND REALLY ONLY HAD SOCIAL MEDIA AS MY OUTLET FOR PRESENTING MY ART TO THE WORLD, THIS PRESSURE AFFECTED ME GREATLY. EVENTUALLY, I REALIZED THAT NOW WAS THE PERFECT TIME TO HAVE FUN WITH MY ART. FOR A LONG TIME, ESPECIALLY DURING COLLEGE, I FELT MY ART HAD TO BE SERIOUS AND MEANINGFUL TO ACTUALLY BE TAKEN SERIOUSLY, BUT MAKING ART LIKE THAT ALL THE TIME, BEARING YOUR SOUL SO PUBLICLY, CAN BE EMOTIONALLY DRAINING. I BEGAN TO MAKE ART ABOUT THE THINGS THAT I WAS CONSUMING DAILY, AND BROUGHT ME SOLACE WHILE I FELT SO TRAPPED INSIDE MY HOUSE, MUSIC AND MOVIES."


Your work has this bright, cartoonish and campy element that includes movie stars, rock stars and various characters from pop culture. How did you come around to where they would be the inspiration for your work? Or, what inspires you about these figures? "I have always been really inspired by pop culture. I was pretty sheltered as a kid and wasn’t really allowed to consume the media a lot of my peers were consuming. So, I grew up watching shows and movies from my parents’ childhoods: The Muppets, Peewee’s Playhouse, The Munsters, and Hanna Barbera cartoons, among many others. The colorful, campy characters from these shows and the worlds that they lived in really inspired me to start creating art and make my own stories when I was a child. As well, my dad was very into music and we would watch hours of music videos and performances from the 70s, 80s, and 90s together. Seeing people like David Bowie, Talking Heads, Beastie Boys, and Deee-lite create these videos that reminded me of the way I felt watching my favorite television shows, but condensed into a three minute video clip, I was amazed that these artists had that power. The rockstar has always been a character that I’ve been fascinated by. I think a lot of it comes from their ability to reinvent themselves from nothing into anything they want to be, no matter how strange and extravagant. The persona a musician creates becomes its own character, and turns into art itself. The concept of reinvention and becoming something or someone extraordinary is something that has inspired not only the art and characters I create, but my everyday life, especially as a person with autism, spending most of my life curating a persona for the world to see and understand."


About working as an artist with autism, does this shape your work or influence the way you approach art? "It has always been very hard for me to express myself and the things I am feeling in words. Art became a way to not only express the feelings I had difficulty understanding, but it allowed me to relate to people, something my autism really hinders my ability to do sometimes. I have made nearly all of my friends through making and loving art, and for that I am extremely grateful. As well, a lot of my art is fueled by a nearly obsessive passion, be it towards music or film, or just art in general. This passion that I once found embarrassing and set me apart from my peers that viewed me as “weird,” is what inspires me to create art."

Autism can be understood as an "invisible disability." What do you wish people would talk about when it comes to autism and/or living on the spectrum? "I think the biggest thing to understand about autism is that everyone on the spectrum experiences their autism in a completely different way. The way my autism affects my everyday life is going to be different than the way another autistic person is affected. This is why we usually refer to it as the “autism spectrum.” The best way to understand autistic people is to include them in conversations about disability and to listen to what they have to say about their own personal struggles in an neurotypical, able-bodied world, and I believe that could be said about all disabilities, invisible or otherwise."


"We're A Million Miles Away"

Abbie Argo


"The Dream Part 1"

Patricia Hernandez


"on playing baseball behind black curtains in some sort of dreamscape" SOME DUDE wears street clothes, whatever is comfortable, in a small room where all four walls are black stage curtains. On the floor is home plate, there is some graffiti on it. A backpack, water bottle, keys and phone are set in the corner of the small room. SOME DUDE is holding an aluminum baseball bat. The baseball bat is your typical fare — made of aluminum with skid marks and dents decorating it. SOME DUDE holds the baseball bat with some familiarity — they’ve done this before. Whatever this is. It is uncertain where the pitcher is, or even if there is a pitcher. All SOME DUDE knows is the ball is coming, sometime somewhere. Their eyes dart around looking at the black curtains that surround them. One baseball is thrown from the curtain in front of them and sails above their right shoulder. SOME DUDE steps back, swinging the bat late while the baseball hits the curtain behind them and falls. Another baseball is thrown, this time from the left. SOME DUDE reacts just in time to hit the ball. The ball hits the floor and bounces underneath the left curtain. Two baseballs are thrown — each coming head-on towards SOME DUDE. One hits the baseball bat, not the other way around, with a metallic PING and the other hits SOME DUDE in the left shoulder with a loud SMACK.


SOME DUDE I am not angry, but I do think it is funny. SOME DUDE picks up the bat again, then puts it back down and speaks. SOME DUDE I am not angry, but I do think it is funny how I move in baseball when it is my turn to bat. I keep on striking out, and yet I am never out but I am not quite in. I am at the seventh base because they keep on adding rules to the game and really I don’t care much to argue. The field keeps expanding and now there are a million ways to run home. The only constant here is the clock and we just lost an hour. Last time I played baseball I was so young. My skin itched from the uniform and my head was too small for the helmet. I wore green and grey. All I understood was to swing and hit and run. We played by a busy road and next to the field was a warehouse where all the road signs in our town were kept. In baseball, I only got my picture taken because I was a part of the team. I was smiling big and they photoshopped a crowd of fans behind me on the computer. I don’t remember winning, but I got a trophy for being there. I always won for showing up. My breath is gold and the plastic from the trophy was razor sharp. Today, I still don’t know too much about baseball. SOME DUDE picks up the bat again and hits it against the plate, knocking off dust. They pick the plate up and place it on the opposite end of the room. They are now facing where they began.


A baseball is thrown from behind them and hits them in the back. Another ball is thrown from the right and disappears into the curtain on the left. SOME DUDE practices their swing. Sound of the crowd roars in surround sound. Cheering, whooping and whistling. The smell of popcorn wafts in, and a bag of popcorn is spilled from behind the curtain facing SOME DUDE with pieces of popcorn rolling underneath the curtain and into the center of the room. SOME DUDE wacks the first one they see with the aluminum baseball bat. SOME DUDE When I was at first base with the artists, there was a baseball field nearby with an abandoned pink building nearby where I assume they sold refreshments. I used to go on regular walks back then, and the building was just full of broken metal chairs, empty chip bags and dirt. Nobody ever really played baseball in the baseball field there, except on some weekends. Mostly it was just the runners, dog walkers and smokers who were there. On July 4th and the month following, the grass was full of empty fireworks. Their names were outrageous — Gunsmoke, Disco Flasher, WhipperSnappers, Saturn Missile Battery, Triple Whistle Bottle Rocket with Report. There were fireworks every night for what felt like weeks. Empty liquor bottles lined the on ramp to the highway. Cops were always around. I’m always moving. SOME DUDE swings the baseball bat. From above, about one hundred baseballs are dumped into the room. At the end of each sentence, SOME DUDE swings the baseball as if they’re hitting a ball.


SOME DUDE I am not angry, but I do think it is funny how I move when it is my turn to bat. I trade my time and patience, I trade my smile and voice. I am still waiting on returns, still waiting on returns. I played baseball when I was young, and I haven’t played a game since. I don’t care to pay attention to the rules and I can’t commit. When I was in high school, I was drunk on bad readings of Beat poets. Longing for insecurity is a madman’s wish when you’re in the thick of it. We carry weight with our backs and I cannot remember a time I was not moving. I played baseball when I was so young, and now I am ready to go home. SOME DUDE swings the bat one last time and the curtains collapse around them. SOME DUDE picks up their backpack, water bottle, keys and phone, steps over the many baseballs and walks offstage.

JAke Van Valkenburg


"Dreamy descent"

Kami Greene


Profile for yallatl

Y'all ATL: The Dream 'Zine  

Now is the time to dream. As we near the end of this hellscape we call the pandemic, we wanted to make space for the dreams, surreal though...

Y'all ATL: The Dream 'Zine  

Now is the time to dream. As we near the end of this hellscape we call the pandemic, we wanted to make space for the dreams, surreal though...

Profile for yallatl
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