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biggest issue ever!

MAY|JUNE 2011 YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM

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GREAT SUMMER PROGRAMS ››

Explore Central Washington

››

Kiddin’ Around

Moms dish on choosing local foods Hungry for fresh ideas?

Make a cute craft & snack inspired by the Hungry Caterpillar


May is Mental Health Month Yakima Valley System of Care will be celebrating Children’s Mental Health Awareness Day on May 7, 2011. Join us at Sarg Hubbard Park for the Family Field Day free community event from 1-4 p.m.

Yakima Valley System of Care

Bringing Families, Professionals and Community Resources together to promote Children’s Mental Health!

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MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


VOlUME 2 NUMBER 3

editor’s

NOTE

Published by Bristol Media PO Box 2683 Yakima, WA 98907 Publisher/Editor Sara Bristol 509.965.1686 sara@yakimabusybee.com Advertising Denise Fischer 509.969.2399 ads@yakimabusybee.com Contact Denise today to advertise! Layout/Graphics Paul Murphy Be a part of Busybee! Local writers, photographers, experts and parents are invited to contribute. Please call to discuss. To subscribe visit www.yakimabusybee.com Busybee Magazine is published 6 times a year and distributed in Yakima County, Wash. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, in whole or part, without written permission of the publisher is prohibited. Opinions expressed by the writers or advertisers are not necessarily the opinions of the magazine or the publisher. Inclusion in the magazine does not constitute endorsement of information, products or services.

cover kids Brave little Cassidy and Casey SmithApperson, of Yakima, got friendly with the hens at Baron Farms for our cover photo shoot. PhOtO BY KIRA BARON

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

SARA BRISTOL BUSYBEE IS GROWING this spring! Thanks to the amazing support of both advertisers and contributors, this issue (our fifth) is the biggest yet — over 40 percent more pages than the last issue. Isn’t that exciting? I’m thrilled to be able to bring you more all-local content and activities. Like Us: facebook.com/yakimabusybee.com In fact, Busybee is taking steps Friend Me: facebook.com/yakima.mama to actually help bring you — by organizing, not just publicizing — more educational family activities. First up, the BUSYBEE SNEEZE & WHEEZE FAIR will be from 3-5 p.m. May 19 in the auditorium at Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center. Sponsored by the hospital, this free, family-oriented asthma and allergy event is a great opportunity to learn about potential triggers and the right way to use an inhaler, have your little ones take a free screening test and talk with medical experts. There will also be fun activities and prizes for the kids! The second program that I’ve been working on is called EXPLORE CENTRAL WASHINGTON. A joint effort of the Yakima Valley Museum, Yakama Nation Museum and Busybee, this summer field trip program will take us on kid-oriented tours of museums and noteworthy sites throughout the region. From Toppenish to Vantage, we have 15 activities planned that will allow kids and parents alike to learn more about our region’s people and places. (For more, see the pull-out section on pages 25-28.) I haven’t been to many of these places myself, so I’m excited for the excuse to get out and explore the Valley with my family this summer. Hope to see you around!

sara@yakimabusybee.com 509-965-1686 P.S. If your business is interested in advertising in the magazine, please call Denise Fischer at 509-969-2399 for more information.

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a look

INSIDE LORE

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25

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features >> 7 lOCAVORE Yakima moms

Lorrie Smith and Erin Malland share their love for local foods.

in every issue 12 PlAY WIth YOUR FOOD 3 editor’s note 6 contributors 35 fyi 38 storytimes 39 daily planner 50 reading for sanity

Move over macaroni! Muffin tins are making lunch better than ever.

13 CAtERPIllAR COllAGE Inspired by Eric Carle, kids of just about any age can make our easy colorful critters.

SUMMER PlANNER

32 15

CAMP GUIDE Stop summer boredom! We’ve got 10 pages packed with overnight camps, day camps and vacation Bible schools.

25 ECW Explore Central Washington with this new family field trip program.

29 KIDDIN’ AROUND Get

active with fun outdoor events.

32

BREAthE EASIER Learn how to help kids who may suffer from asthma or allergies.

34

MEDItAtION A mom shares her solution to staying focused on her family. 4

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


PLAY & LEARN

The original flag, designed in 1776,

FUN featured 13 stars arranged in a FACT circle to represent the 13 colonies.

popu?iz q

Flag Day

In Hon or of Sponsored by

The Law Office Of wiLLiam LLiam D. PickeTT

June 14, 2011 Nicknames for the flag include

FUN Old Glory, the Stars and Stripes FACT and the Star-Spangled Banner.

Become an American patriot!

1. Who is credited with sewing the first flag?

See yourself as the face of American icons Uncle Sam and Betsy Ross with this simple magnetic photo frame project. Magnetic sticker sheets are available at the craft store for about $2. Or, just cut out the figures below and use them to frame your school photo.

2. How many stars are on the modern U.S. flag? 3. Does the U.S. flag have more red stripes or more white stripes?

What you need:

4. The stars should always be displayed on the left. True or false? 5. What is the name of our national anthem?

Uncle Sam

• Colored pencils • Scissors • Cutting blade • One 5x8-inch magnetic sheet with sticker adhesive (or glue stick) • A photo of yourself

What to do: 1. Use colored pencils to color the characters below. 2. Cut out around the frames. 3. Apply the cut-out images to magnetic sheeting with sticker adhesive (or glue stick) and trim the edges with scissors, if needed. 4. Ask an adult to cut out the blank face using a cutting blade to create a hole for your photo. 5. Find a photo of yourself (walletsized school photos work great!) and hang it on the fridge. Try different photos for funny results!

Betsy Ross

POP QUIZ ANSWERS: 1. Betsy Ross 2. 50 stars, representing the 50 states 3. Red. There are 7 red stripes and 6 white stripes. 4. True. Whether the flag is displayed vertically or horizontally, the stars should always be on the upper left. 5. The Star-Spangled Banner


■ contributors

<< KIRA BARON is a Yakima Valley wedding photographer, kirabaron.com. She loves North Town Coffee, reading, gardening, Zumba and (of course) taking pictures. Kira and husband Cameron are expecting their first child in mid-September.

>> MINDY OJA is a local blogger for the book review blog Reading For Sanity. Despite her somewhat exhausting job as a stay-athome mother of three, if given the choice to nap or read, she would choose read every time. Why? She reads for sanity. << ARIANNE CABBAGE is someone’s mommy 4x over, occasionally moonlights as a nurse and loves to write. When she isn’t transporting kids to free events all over Yakima, Arianne can usually be found doing the dishes, or more likely, tapping away at her computer. >> KELLY ALLAN is a busy mom and photographer. When she’s not chasing around her two children (Delaney, 5, and Grady, 2), she’s busy shooting newborn and children’s portraits for her photo biz, 7 Safaris Photography & Design, www.7safaris.com.

we love it when you share Do you have a fabulous story idea or local event that we should know about? Are you a writer, photographer or artist who would like to contribute? We’d love to hear from you! Please contact Busybee Editor Sara Bristol at (509) 965-1686 or sara@yakimabusybee.com. 6

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


local foods

lorrie Smith and husband Stefan Apperson with their children Cassidy, 6, and Casey, 2, pose for a family photo at Baron Farms where they like to buy eggs. PhOtO BY KIRA BARON

local foods just taste better • by Lorrie Smith •

When I was growing up in the ‘70s, my parents were locavores long before the word existed. We always had a garden in the backyard. We lived in the Willamette Valley in Oregon, where we were lucky enough to be able to visit u-pick and regular farms for berries of all kinds, as well as peaches, tomatoes, corn…. My mom canned and froze a lot of fruits and veggies and made her own jam. We ate plenty of processed foods, mind you, but I learned early on that a tomato from the garden is far superior to a tomato from the grocery store. Eventually we moved to Eastern Oregon, where things don’t grow as well (although my parents did and still do grow a few vegetables every year). I was in high school and then college and didn’t think too much about what I ate. In the YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

late ‘80s, attending college in Corvallis, Oregon, I first ate at Nearly Normals, a vegetarian restaurant that uses as much local produce as possible. One thing that still stands out to me from my first meals there is the lettuce – it was AMAZING. So much more flavorful than a salad from grocery store lettuce! I was also working in a small local bakery where the owner brought in produce from her own garden. One morning she filled the sink with basil and told me to make pesto. The volume

of basil was overwhelming, but the pesto was delicious. At the bakery, our eggs came from a nearby farm and coffee from a local roaster. As time went on, I discovered the food co-op in town. They carry local produce whenever possible and spotlight other local products. Eventually I started visiting the local farmers’ market every week. The carrots, cauliflower, tomatoes, peppers, and everything else were so tasty I would make an entire meal out of them. I had never been a big fan of veggies, but here I was practically living on them. No wonder – the versions grown by our local farmers were so much tastier than those grown far away and delivered long distances in a truck. I moved to Yakima with my husband-tobe in 2000, and one of the first things >> 7


■ local foods

On a practical level, of course not everything I buy is local... I don’t go without vegetables all winter just because I can’t buy them locally and/or I didn’t preserve them in the summer.

PhOtO BY KIRA BARON << CONtINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

we searched out was the farmers’ market. More peppers than I had ever seen, eggplants, tomatoes, amazing summer squash….the list goes on. We planted a few tomatoes behind our rented duplex, until we eventually bought a house and claimed a corner of the backyard for a garden. We have a chest freezer that we fill with berries and vegetables, and a pantry with plenty of room for canned tomatoes, peaches, jam, pickled asparagus…. whatever we have time for each summer. We have two kids now (Casey, 2, and Cassidy, almost 6) and they traipse around with us to the farmers’ market each weekend in the summer, to the blueberry field to pick berries, to the farm to get eggs (and see the chickens, of course). They dig in the dirt and help poke seeds into the

ground in the spring, and in exchange they get to savor cherry tomatoes still warm from the sun in August. I like to think they’re learning to experience their food, not just eat it. On a practical level, of course not everything I buy is local. Until someone figures out how to grow coffee, chocolate, and bananas here, they’re going to come from other countries. I don’t go without vegetables all winter just because I can’t buy them locally and/or I didn’t preserve them in the summer. Sometimes, when no one seems to have fresh eggs, I’m busy learning how to make pancakes without eggs. Other times, I buy them at the store because it’s Christmas and I have cookies to bake. I have to explain to my kids why I’m not

buying those peaches in the grocery store in January (but when we get those first juicy peaches in July, it’s like a gift). Most of our produce in the summer comes from the farmers’ market or from our garden, and when I buy other products I try to choose things that are local, or at least regional. There are a lot of reasons I think it’s a good idea to eat as locally as possible, as much as possible – supporting our local economy, reducing the amount of fuel used to get my food to me, knowing just where my food was grown. But the biggest thing to me is the taste. Local foods just taste better. I love food, and I love to eat, and I want my food to be as delicious as possible. I hope to pass this on to my kids. ■

The Valley’s best seafood and specialty foods!

Celebrating 38 Years

Deli Made

• Smoked Salmon Cheesecake • Ceviche • Hummus • Caesar Salad Dressing 8

Local Products

• Tieton Farm & Creamery • Pretzels • Pacific Trader’s Coffee • Tillen Farms • Fresh Pasta MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


local foods

My evolution with food | by Erin Malland

I

n the locavore movement, I am a fellow player and by no means a coach. I do not track the exact miles my food travels to reach my table, but I have respect and admiration for people who do. You have probably seen me in the drive-thru or putting a few processed foods in my shopping cart. I aim to practice what I preach, but confess I don’t always meet my own expectations. Growing up on the move, our family table included a menu and server as often as it did our own wares. My dad managed restaurants most of my life so Mom, my brother Matt and I regularly visited Dad to share a family meal wherever he worked at the time. With two local restaurants in the family today, we keep that tradition alive and kicking. My husband Chris is a partner in the Yakima Sports Center and my parents own 901 Pasta. We’ve certainly done our share of supporting other locally-owned restaurants as well. (Chris and I signed our marriage license at McGuire’s Pub.) Now that Chris and I are parents, we also want our son Donovan to grow up with family meals prepared at home using fresh, natural and local ingredients. From our backyard we see horses and vineyards. We hear the crows of a rooster and

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

cries of peacocks with cherry guns booming seasonally in now-distant orchards. Though the orchards that once surrounded our home have been replaced by paint-bynumber housing developments, we still enjoy a hint of country life. Last year we expanded our garden from a few tomato and pepper plants to leafy greens, onions, zucchini, fennel, artichokes and more. The soups, sauces, sandwiches and salads we prepared using our own crops tasted better than anything we could have ordered off a menu. While living as a vegetarian college student and professional in Oregon I learned a great deal about where our food comes from. I returned to our agriculturally abundant Yakima Valley nearly 10 years ago. Just days prior to moving back, I volunteered to experience a red meat reintroduction ceremony hosted by my YMCA camp friends, The Rooster and Spider, with steak and eggs at 6 a.m. in a truck stop diner. I had started craving meat after many years of vegetarian satisfaction. Having considered several influential factors, including a misperception that living in Yakima as a vegetarian would be far more difficult than it was in Ashland or Portland, I resolved to accept a Flexitarian lifestyle. In a tribute to many years of committing to a vegetarian diet, I vowed to leave certain animals off my plate for the rest

of my life and learn all that I could about product sourcing. My perspective on consumer power and product sourcing has evolved over the years. I realize it is entirely reasonable to practice a vegan or vegetarian lifestyle in Yakima. While I’ve since had a few three- to six-month stints as a vegetarian or vegan, I currently choose to include beef, pork, turkey and seafood in my diet throughout the week. Sustainable Sundays and Meatless Mondays are other movements we try to adhere to on a weekly basis. Heirloom Cattle Company in White Swan humanely raises 100-percent natural, organic, native grass-fed beef. We use their ground beef in spaghetti sauce, lasagna, tacos and burritos in addition to cooking various cuts of meat for stews and soups, roasts and sandwiches. Combining HCC beef with eggs from Baron Farms and Tieton Farm & Creamery cheeses with Ricorganics produce or our own garden crops creates a recipe for mouthwatering success in an effort to support our local economy, the environment and our health. I became active in the development effort for Yakima Food Cooperative in January CONtINUED ON NEXt PAGE >>

9


■ local foods

Where’s the beef? ChRIS AND DONOVAN MAllAND PICKING tOMAtOES FROM thE GARDEN

<< CONtINUED FROM PREVIOUS PAGE

2010. I was thrilled to meet other members of our community with similar interests in sourcing local, natural, organic and humanely-raised foods from producers who implemented ethical and sustainable farming practices. Co-op volunteers are closing in on the ability to provide Yakima residents with such products beyond the constraints of a seasonal farmers market and limited supplies at grocery stores. Scoot. Crawl. Walk. Run. Each new endeavor reflects our first movements in life. Baby steps make their mark. We may fall down, hang out for a bit to take a look around, then get back up to take another step. Living a locavore lifestyle doesn’t require an all-or-nothing approach. It’s a practice. Make the best choices you can as often as you can, considering your time and resources. ■

local farms offer more than produce Do you want to support local farmers? Is the quality of your food important to you? Lacking the funds or freezer space to invest in a bulk purchase? Looking for an alternate source of omega-3 fatty acids? If you answered ‘yes’ to any of the above questions, you might consider supporting local beef and dairy farms that sell in small quantities. Busybee has done some of the footwork for you, and this is what we’ve found. BARON FARMS, located off of I-82 at 2971 W. Wapato Road in Wapato, offers grassfed beef, pastured pork and eggs. The beef is grass-fed, dry-aged and follows organic protocols. There are a variety of packages and individual cuts of beef or pork available through internet order, farm pick-up or at the Yakima Farmer’s Market. Eggs are available at the farm or the Yakima Farmer’s Market. For more information on the farm’s philosophy and methods, visit baronfarms. com. Site visits are encouraged and can be arranged by calling the Baron family at 509952-7038.

HEIRLOOM CATTLE COMPANY, located at 3500 Island Road in White Swan, is another producer of grass-fed, dry-aged beef. The ranch specializes in 25-pound boxes designed to fit in an above-the-fridge freezer. Beef packages and more information about the farm are available via their website at hcc-grassfed-beef.com; or, call owners Dan and Sara Peplow at 509-848-2021. PRIDE & JOY DAIRY, located at 2145 Liberty Road in Granger, offers grass-fed beef and lamb and claims the distinction of being the only location in the area to offer organic raw milk. Options to pick up from the farm directly or at drop-off locations throughout Washington are available. To find a drop-off group near you, visit prideandjoydairy.com and look under the tab labeled “find and buy.” Eggs are available at the farm. Visitors are welcome to see the farm’s cows and working border collies. For more farm fun, rent a cabin that sleeps 4-8 people ($85). Pride & Joy’s biggest selling point, according to owner Allen Voortman, was the recent conversion of a vegan to their dairy and meat products: “At first, we just had him on our milk, but now we have him eating eggs and beef.”

— Arianne Cabbage

Erin Malland is a board member of the Yakima Food Cooperative. For more information, visit yakimafoodcooperative.com.

Summer Bridge

Spac e limit is e d!

A preschool program intended to help children retain knowledge and skills over the summer. $135 Open to any preschooler (ages 3½ to 5) who has Meets 1:00-3:30 p.m. at least one year of prior preschool experience.

Monday through Thursday, July 11th - Aug. 5th

entir for the e pro gram !

WestPres Christian Preschool

6015 Summitview • 966-1900 • www.westpress.org 10

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


Children’s gardening workshops

ND ISAAC A

ELIJAH

SAUER

The look of

Success

YAKIMA COUNtY MAStER GARDENERS will teach kids how to plant seeds and keep a gardening journal at a free workshop Saturday, May 28. The workshop will begin at 10 a.m. at the demonstration garden at Ahtanum Youth Activities Park, 1000 Ahtanum Road in Union Gap. Participants will be eligible to enter a journaling contest at a follow-up workshop on Aug. 13. For more, call the Master Gardeners at 509-574-1600.

– If school grades have your child feeling more stress than success, we have the affordable solution! – Individualized Tutoring

– Diagnostic Skills Assessment to pinpoint your child’s needs. – Proven Results backed by a Guarantee of Success.

thE YAKIMA AREA ARBOREtUM will host a workshop series to introducing children to the joys of gardening and nature. The workshops will meet from 10 a.m. to noon Wednesdays, June 15-July 20. Cost is $20 per student for the six-week series. classes are limited to 20 students. Classes are available for two age groups (grades K-3 and 4-6), with both classes meeting simultaneously. Pre-register in person at the arboretum, 1401 Arboretum Drive, Yakima (entrance across from K-Mart, Nob Hill Boulevard and SR 22). For more information, visit ahtrees.org or call 509-248-7337. Here are a few more upcoming classes at the arboretum:

Reading • Writing • Math Study Skills • SAT/GED Prep Homework Edge Support Grades Pre K - 12 & Adult Call for a FREE Consultation Receive $35 OFF Test Financing Available. Limited Time Offer. Other Restrictions Apply. Offer Good at Yakima Location Only.

HOLLY STEWART

509.469.2544

1517 summitview, ste. 100 Yakima

Basic Backyard Composting | This free class for adults will get you ready to start composting. Meets 10 a.m. to noon May 14. Limited to 30 students; registration required. To register, contact Mikal Heintz with Yakima County Solid Waste at 509-574-2456. Organic Tonics for Home & Garden | Discover alternatives to toxic home and garden chemicals at this class for adults. Meets 7-9 p.m. Thursday, June 16. Cost is $15 for members, $18 non-members. Worm Composting for Kids | Billed as “the total worm composting package for second graders and up,” this class meets from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 22. Cost is $20 for members, $25 non-members; limited to 15 students. YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

Call Avail Learning today and discover the look of success in your child’s smile.

509.735.2132

1408 n. Louisiana st. kennewick

SAMANTHA POPLASKI fORmeRLY knOwn As

www.availlearning.com 11


■ snack time

Feeling hungry? Build a heathly snack inspired by Eric Carle’s The Very Hungry Caterpillar, who ate through one apple, two pears, three plums... and a whole lot of everything else including salami, cheese, chocolate cake and the pages of the book before he got a tummy ache. We poked holes through these snacks with a straw. Photos by kelly allan 12

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


snack time

Play with your food Like so many things found online, I’m not exactly sure how I stumbled across muffin tin meals. But I know crazy cuteness when I see it. And there it was: Muffin Tin Mom, a blog featuring dozens of outrageously creative snacks and lunches served in muffin tins. Filled with slices of fruits and veggies, crackers, cheese cubes and all kinds of tiny treats, could it be possible that muffin tins have finally found life beyond cupcakes? I clicked through page after page, jumping from blog to blog written by these muffin tin mommies who participate in a weekly “blog carnival” called Muffin Tin

Monday where they all post pictures of their latest creations. There were circustheme lunches and all-green meals, and some really (really!) fabulous Halloween ideas. But, the site says, themes aren’t a requirement; muffin tins are great for dishing up leftovers, too! What’s the purpose? Breaking up the lunchtime routine with manageable portions and introducing kids to new foods in a fun, interesting way. According to the site’s FAQ section, “It’s a win for you: They eat. It’s a win for them: It’s fun.” — Sara Bristol

CREATURE FEATURE — the crab is made from an apple, pretzel sticks, marshmallows and chocolate chips. We split a hot dog lengthwise into eight legs before boiling it to create an octopus. Blue yogurt, shells & cheese, pistachios on a thin layer of brown sugar (sand) and gold fish crackers round out this meal. YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

Get inspired! THEME IDEAS: Animals • ABCs • Children’s Books • Shapes • Circus • Beach • holidays • Seasons • Colors • Rainbow • Movies • World Cuisine • Breakfast for Dinner • Disney Characters • Numbers • Songs • Clean the Fridge

FILL THOSE TINS: Smokies • Animal Crackers • Yogurt • Mandarin Oranges • Nuts • Applesauce • Mini Marshmallows • Celery Sticks • Dipping Sauces • Banana Slices • Cereal • Peas • Pretzels • Grapes • little Smokies • Berries • Popcorn • Raisins • • Cookies • Olives • trail Mix • Jello Cups • Carrot Sticks • Apples & Peanut Butter • Chocolate Chips • Pasta • Boiled Eggs 13


■ craft time

Caterpillar collage

Children’s book author and illustrator Eric Carle’s distinctive art is created by using layers of hand-painted tissue papers to create a collage. Using brightly colored tissue paper, kids can make their own collage artwork inspired by Carle’s classic caterpillar. WHAT YOU NEED: white cardstock, scissors, colored tissue paper, Mod Podge decoupage glue, foam brush WHAT TO DO STEP 1 — Cut or rip colored tissue paper into small circles, triangles or other desired shapes. For younger kids, parents may want to cut shapes in advance. For same-size pieces, stack as many as 10 sheets of paper and cut at the same time.

DELANEY ALLAN PhOtO BY KEllY AllAN

STEP 2 — With a foam brush, spread a thin layer of glue on white paper. (We used Mod Podge, but Elmer’s should work too. Add a few drops of water if your paste is too thick.)

ASPYN LEADON

>> TAKE CARE not to rub too much

glue on the tissue paper. Paint just enough to apply the glue without overdoing it, or the paper will rip and smear.

STEP 3 — Place the first layer of tissue paper on the gluey paper. Gently smooth any wrinkles. STEP 4 — Paint another layer of glue on top of your image and add another layer of paper. Repeat until your design is complete. Idea: Layering up several shades of the same color helps give your collage dimension and character.

Giddy Up!

Pony Parties and Petting Zoo, LLC

Birthday Parties • Day Care Field Trips

Pony Rides • Petting Zoo • Cart Rides • Hay Rides

Sherrie Murphy Selah, Wash.

14

(509) 494-9860

giddyupponies@fairpoint.net

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


overnightcamps

Cabins, campfires and canoes Camp Dudley | Canoeing, crafts and

day hikes are on the itinerary at the Yakima Family YMCA’s 13-acre camp on Clear Lake, near White Pass. A variety of sessions offered for kids ages 5-17. Weekly themes include Dr. Seuss, The Mystery of Clear Lake and Adventure Camp. Cost: $305-$435; multi-week discounts and scholarships available. Autism Family Camp, June 24-26. Mini-session for ages 5-10, July 6-8; $150-$180. Family Camp, Sept. 2-4; $210-$240 for a family of four. For more information, contact Camp Director Matt Rusch at 509-972-5271. yakimaymca.org

Camp Wahoo | Campers ages 9-16

learn to care for their own trail horse and cook on a Dutch oven at this residential horse camp in the Teanaway River Valley near Cle Elum. All-girls and coed sessions offered. Multiple week-long sessions, June 26-Sept. 2. Cost: $850-$1,025; sibling discount. An open house will be from 2-4 p.m. July 3. For more information, call 509674-9554 or 888-235-0111. campwahoo.com

Ekone Summer Camp | Located on

a horse ranch outside of Goldendale,

this camp owned by the Sacred Earth Foundation aims to help campers build relationships with nature and horses. Multiple sessions are offered for ages 8-18. Cost: $700-$1,050. A 25th anniversary celebration and open house will be from 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. May 14. For more information, call 509-773-6800. ekone.org

Ghormley Meadow Christian Camp |

This faith-based camp owned by Yakima’s First Presbyterian Church specializes in the traditional summer camp experience, including archery, cabins and campfires. Age-specific co-ed sessions offered for students entering grades 2-12. Adventure camps offered for grades 6-12. Multiple week-long sessions, June 12-Aug. 5. Cost: $170-$390, varies by session; scholarships available. Located near Rimrock Lake. For more information, contact Joel Whitehead at 509-672-4311. ghormleymeadow.org

Lazy F | Tubing and horse rides are among the outdoor activities offered at this faith-based camp affiliated with the United Methodist Church. Located in the Manastash Canyon near Ellensburg, this

traditional summer camp is open to grades 2-12. Minisession for grades 2-4 and Grand Camp for kids and grandparents will be July 5-7, $140-$200. Multiple age-specific sessions offered, including discovery and wrangler camp for teens. Cost: $140-$575, varies by session and sliding scale. For more information, call 509-962-2780. lazyfcamp.org

Rodeo Bible Camp | A ministry of

the Klickitat Valley Chapter of Fellowship of Christian Cowboys, this camp blends Biblical teaching and rodeo instruction. Senior camp for ages 15-18, July 17-20. Junior camp for ages 10-14, July 22-24. A rodeo will be held on the last day. No experience is necessary. Campers must bring their own horse if needed. Camp is held at the Kittitas County Fairgrounds in Goldendale. For more information, contact Kristi Siebert at 509-250-0684. goldendalerodeobiblecamp.com

Kids love our summer camp! Fun for grades 2-12

ts oun Disc inging r b for iends! fr

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

• Swimming Pool • Arts and Crafts • Camp Store • Campfire • Horseback Riding AND LOTS MORE!!!

Dates and pricing available at www.ghormleymeadow.org

509-672-4311 15


GENERAL DAY CAMPS Carroll’s Summer Day Camp | Meets

7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, June 13-Aug. 26. All-day program includes weekly field trips, crafts, science and other theme activities. Entering first grade through age 12. Meets at Englewood Christian Church, 511 44th Ave., Yakima. Cost: $130 per week, includes lunch and snacks; family discount available. Preregistration required. Contact Carroll Children’s Center, 509-965-7104.

GymKids Preschool Camps | Meets

9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday; four weekly sessions offered. Sports Week: June 20-24. Old MacDonald’s Farm: July 18-22. Summer Camp-out: Aug. 1-5. Beach Party: Aug. 15-19. Cost: $100 per session; includes field trips, gymnastics and snack. Selah GymKids, 709 North Park Centre, Selah; 509-698-5437.

GymKids Summer Kids Club | Meets 6:45 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, June 13Aug. 25. Grades K-4. Cost: $125 per week; includes field trips, gym time and snack. Full-day child care available for preschoolers as well; inquire for pricing. Selah GymKids, 709 North Park Centre, Selah; 509-6985437.

ARTS& CRAFTS Summer Adventure Day Camp |

Meets 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. weekdays, June 20-Aug. 19. Entering kindergarten through fifth grade. Cost: $30 per week, $20 for each additional child. Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima; westpress.org. Contact Lisa Willey, 509-966-1900.

Become a Knight Camp | Meets 9:30 a.m. to noon July 11-15. Teacher: Tina-Marie Lasha. Ages 7-11. Create your own costume to become a knight in shining armor. Cost: $100 member, $125 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Learning Tree Summer Camp | All-day

Book & Art Camp | Meets 9 a.m. to noon

program meets weekdays, June 13-Sept. 2. Ages 6-12. Field trips, art, science and more. Full-day child care available for infants and preschoolers; inquire for details. The Learning Tree Children’s Center, 3609 Tacoma St., Union Gap; thelearningtree-uniongap.com; 509-574-5755.

YMCA Summer Day Camp | Meets 7 a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays, June 13-Aug. 19. Ages 5-12. Field trips, swimming, games, sports, crafts. Cost: $135 per week for YMCA family members, $145 per week for YMCA members, $165 per week for program participants. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; Mikeal Doyle, 509972-5251.

Monday through Thursday; five weekly sessions offered. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $65 per session. Sunflower Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

• “The Little Prince,” July 25-28. Create a planet to care for like the Little Prince. • “Hope for the Flowers,” Aug. 1-4. Study caterpillars and butterflies and make butterfly wings. • “The Giving Tree,” Aug. 8-11. Study trees and make a Giving Tree. • “The Lorax,” Aug. 15-18. Make a Truffula Tree and talk with the Lorax. • “Where the Wild Things Are,” Aug. 2225. Roar with our own Wild Things.

Ellensburg Community School of the Arts | Meets 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday

through Friday. Five one-week sessions: Destination Road Trip for ages 7-14, June 27-July 1. Printmaking — All About Color and Texture for ages 7-14, July 11-15. Drawing and Painting for ages 8-14, July 18-22. Three-D Art for ages 7-14, July 25-29. Ireland for ages 6-14, Aug. 22-26. Gallery One, 408 N. Pearl St., Ellensburg; gallery-one.org; 509-925-2670.

Kinetic Sculpture | Meets 9 a.m. to noon Tuesday through Friday, June 28-July 1. Ages 5 and up. Learn about movement and balance and create a unique kinetic sculpture. Cost: $65; pre-registration required. 16

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


daycamps

Red Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

Our Animal Parade Camp (including kids with special needs) | Meets 9:30

a.m. to noon Monday through Friday, July 25-29. Teacher: Elizabeth Freitag. Designed for kids with special needs; all kids ages 5-11 welcome. Discover the elements of art including color, value and texture by exploring favorite animals. Animal parade on Friday. Cost: $100 member, $125 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Our Outdoor Art Festival (including kids with special needs) | Meets 1-3:30

p.m. July 25-29. Teacher: Elizabeth Freitag. Designed for kids with special needs; all kids ages 12-19 welcome. Discover the elements of color, value and texture. Cost: $100 member, $125 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Painting with Plants | Meets 9 a.m. to

noon Tuesday through Friday, July 19-22. Ages 5 and up. Create paints from plants, fruits and vegetables and use them to cre-

ate original art. Cost: $65; pre-registration required. Red Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

$65. Red Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

Rockets Take 2 | Meets 9 a.m. to noon

noon Tuesday through Friday, June 21-24. Ages 5 and up. Use different printing techniques to create Pop Art. Cost: $65; pre-registration required. Red Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

July 12-15. Ages 5 and up. Continue space exploration while designing and building simple rockets and space stations. Cost: $65; pre-registration required. Red Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-4692766.

Princess for a Week Camp | Meets

Teen Art Camp | Meets 1:30-3:30 p.m.

Pop Art and Popcorn | Meets 9 a.m. to

1-3:30 p.m. July 11-15. Teacher: Tina-Marie Lasha. Ages 7-11. Discover Renaissance artwork and create your own fantasy world. Cost: $100 member, $125 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Robot Riot Camp | Meets 1-3:30 p.m.

July 18-22. Teacher: Alyssa Skiles. Ages 7-11. Create a robot out of recycled objects. Cost: $100 member, $125 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Rockets Take 1 | Meets 9 a.m. to noon July 5-8. Ages 5 and up. Create a mixed media galaxy, rockets and launchers. Cost:

Monday through Thursday; nine weekly sessions, June 20-Aug. 18. Themed art camp for ages 10 and up at Sunflower Art Studios, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766. Cost is $65 per session: Basic Drawing, June 20-23 or Aug. 1-4. Still Life Drawing, June 27-30 or Aug. 8-11. Color Study, July 4-7 or Aug. 15-18. Watercolor Paint, July 11-14. 3D Art: July 18-21 or July 25-28.

Where Will Your Imagination Take You? | Meets 9:30 a.m. to noon July 5-8.

Teacher: Tina-Marie Lasha. Ages 6-8. Explore straw painting, printmaking and 3D paintings. Cost: $80 member, $105 nonmember. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

summer DAnce cAmps • Ages 5-8: princess & cArtoon DAnce cAmp • July 12-14 or Aug. 2-4 9 am-noon t/w/th • $85 per DAncer

• Ages 9-11: pop stAr DAnce cAmp •

6-wee

k sum sessio mer n July th 12 Aug. th18

July 12-14 or Aug. 2-4 1-4 pm t/w/th • $85 per DAncer

• Ages 12 & up: hip hop & grooVe DAnce cAmp • July 19-21 or Aug. 9-11 9 am-3 pm t/w/th • $135 per DAncer

509-698-DANC (3262)

A e BBD Visit th tore s e c DAn r ll you for A Ar e w e DAnc ! neeDs

11 E. First Ave. Suite 3&4 - Selah, WA (behind the Selah Post Office) • bbda-selah.com • email: bbdaselah@live.com YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

17


CoMotion WHERE DANCE IS A FUN AND EDUCATIONAL EXPERIENCE !

SU M M E R DANCE & DA NC E CA M PS! GYMNASTICS

11th Avenue Ballet School | 1014 S.

EXCITING THEmED CAmPS ages 3-5 & 6-9

• Prima Ballerina

EACHIS WEEKING! • Hip Hop EXCIT • Justin Bieber

• Princess Camp • Jazz

INTENSE DANCE WORKSHOPS ages 9-12 & 13+

ON TRA LY TEAC INED HER S

• Intermediate • Advanced • Hip Hop • Tap • Jazz • Modern • Ballet Only Comotion offers Professional Style Workshops! LL SMA SS A L C ES SIZ

DON’T WAIT! SAvE yOuR ClASS & TImE TODAy!

DIRECTED BY

Mindie Chervany Bachelor of Fine Arts in Dance & Choreography

966-0676 40th & Summitview, Suite 20 Westpark Shopping Center

18

11th Ave., Yakima; 509-457-6791.

SUMMER BALLET/ART: Ages 3-7 meet from 10-11:45, ages 6-7 meet noon to 2 p.m. Imaginative, pre-ballet dance class, snack and art related to the weekly theme. Cost: $69 per session. • Jewels, June 20-23: Dance the romance of emerald, the fire of ruby, and the imperial grandeur of the diamond. • Vietnamese Water Theatre, July 11-14: Storytelling through water puppets and ancient Cham dance. • Jamberry, July 18-21: Classical pre-ballet with a traditional Swedish Maypole dance. • Le Corsair, Aug. 1-4: A classical ballet of pirates and high adventure. SUMMER BALLET/ART for ages 8 and up: Meets 4:15-6:45 p.m. • Jewels, June 20-30: Dance the romance of emerald, the fire of ruby, and the imperial grandeur of the diamond to the music of Fauré, Stravinsky and Tchaikovsky. Cost: $140. • Vietnamese Water Theatre, July 11-14: Storytelling through water puppets and ancient Cham dance. Cost: $85. • Flamenco, July 18-21: Learn the rhythm, footwork, castanets and curves of this beautiful Latin dance. Cost: $76. • Le Corsair, Aug. 1-4: A classical ballet of pirates and high adventure. Cost: $76.

Broadway Bound Dance Academy |11 E. First Ave. #4, Selah; bbda-selah.com;

509-698-3262.

SIX-WEEK SUMMER SESSION dance classes, July 12-Aug. 18; call for details. PRINCESS & CARTOON DANCE CAMP: Meets 9 a.m to noon July 12-14 or Aug. 2-4. Ages 5-8. Cost is $85. POP STAR DANCE CAMP: Meets 1-4 p.m. July 12-14 or Aug 2-4. Ages 9-11. Cost is $85. HIP HOP & GROOVE DANCE CAMP: 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. July 19-21 or Aug 9-11. Ages 12 and up. Cost is $135.

CoMotion Dance Center for the Arts | 4001 Summitview Ave. Suite 20, Yakima; 509966-0676. Nine-week SUMMER SESSION classes ballet/tap combo classes for dancers ages 3-5 and 6-8, and a class just for boys ages 5-10; call for details. THEME CAMPS for ages 6-9 meet 3-4:30 p.m. Monday through Thursday. Cost is $68 per session. Themes: Hip Hop (June 1316 or July 18-21), Justin Bieber (June 20-23 or Aug. 15-18), Prima Ballerina (June 27-30 or Aug. 8-11), Jazz (July 11-14 or Aug. 1-4), Princess Camp (July 25-28). INTERMEDIATE AND ADVANCED intensive dance camps meet Monday through Thursday. Intermediate camps meet 4:306:30 p.m.; advanced camps meet 6:30-8:30 p.m. Cost is $68 per session. Themes: Hip Hop (June 13-16 or Aug. 15-18), Tap (June 20-23 or Aug. 8-11), Modern (June 27-30 or July 25-28), Jazz (July 11-14 or Aug. 1-4), Ballet (July 18-21).

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


Sunsational Summer Sign-ups ALLDA CAR Y E

KIDS CLUB

PRESCHOOL 3-5 YEARS $470/month REGISTRATION Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. - 6 p.m. STARTS MAY 2ND • Gymnastics • Water Play • 2 Daily Snacks SUMMER GYMNASTICS SESSION DATES Melody Lane Dance Academy | 2610

May 31-June 24 • June 27-July 22 July 25-Aug. 19

W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

K - 4TH GRADE Monday-Friday 6:45 a.m. - 6 p.m.

$125/week

• Field Trips • Water Park • Selah Pool • Gym Time • Theme Activities • Outside Play

PRESCHOOL SUMMER PROGRAMS AGES 3-5 YEARS

PRINCESS MUSIC, THEATER, DANCE CAMPS meet at 10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m. Ages 3-5. Cost is $65 per session. Cinderella Week: July 5-9 (Tuesday-Saturday). Sleeping Beauty Week: July 18-22. Little Mermaid Week: Aug. 1-5. Tangled: July 1115 or July 25-29. Find more Melody Lane camps in the Music & Band and Drama & Theater sections.

• Crafts • Fun Theme Activities • Outside Play

Monday-Friday 9 a.m. - 1 p.m. • Fun Field Trips • Gymnastics • Snacks • Outside Play • Crafts

Call us at

$100/week THE DAY ME CAM PS!

Sports: June 20-24 Old MacDonald’s Farm: July 18-22 Summer Campout: August 1-5 Beach Party: August 15-19

698-KIDS (5437) to reserve a spot for your child

Selah GymKids | 709 North Park Centre, Selah; selahgymkids.com; 509-698-5437.

SUMMER GYMNASTICS CLASSES, full day child care for preschoolers through fourth grade. THEMED PRESCHOOL CAMPS include gymnastics, field trips and snacks. Camps meet 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Monday through Friday; four weekly sessions offered. Sports Week: June 20-24. Old MacDonald’s Farm: July 18-22. Summer Camp-out: Aug. 1-5. Beach Party: Aug. 15-19. Cost: $100 per session.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

19


DRAMA & THEATER Acting for Film, TV and Radio | Meets

9:30 a.m. to noon Aug. 1-5. Teacher: Michael Liddicoat. Ages 12-18. The things you do on stage may be wrong for your film career. Learn how every acting job is different. Cost: $50 member, $55 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Asperger/Autism Theatre Pilot Program | Meets 5:30-6:20 p.m. June 20-24. A

theater class designed to teach social skills to kids ages 5-12 with Asperger Syndrome. Cost is $65. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

“Beauty and the Beast” Musical Theater Week | Meets 10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-

6:20 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, July 5-9. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $85. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

Eisenhower Summer Drama Camp |

Meets 9 a.m. to noon June 13-17. Ages 6-13 (grouped by age). Learn acting, dancing, singing, improvisation, set design and costuming in a fun, supportive atmosphere. A performance for parents and friends will be at 11:30 a.m. June 17. Cost: $68, includes

20

a T-shirt and daily snack. Held in the Ike Little Theatre at Eisenhower High School, Yakima. Call Stephanie Wilson at 509-8337676 to register; space is limited.

“Hairspray” Musical Theater Week |

Meets 10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m. Aug. 8-12. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $85. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

Improv Camp | Meets 9:30 a.m. to noon July 18-22. Teacher: Michael Liddicoat. Ages 7-12. Turn a hairbrush into a microphone or a sword. Learn the art of improvisation. Cost: $50 member, $55 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930. Makeup Effects Camp | Meets 9:30

a.m. to noon June 27-July 1. Teacher: Michael Liddicoat. Ages 10-14. Have you ever wanted to be a zombie? Learn how to create cool effects using makeup. Cost: $50 member, $55 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Shakespeare for Elementary and Middle School Students | Meets 9:30 a.m. to

noon Monday through Friday, Aug. 8-19.

Teacher: Terry Cooper. Ages 9-13. Learn to decipher Elizabethan language and appreciate the complexity of Shakespeare’s characters and themes. Lots of stage time. Cost: $125 member, $150 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Shakespeare for Elementary and Middle School Students | Meets 1-3:30

p.m. Monday through Friday, Aug. 8-19. Teacher: Terry Cooper. Ages 14-18. Learn to decipher Elizabethan language and appreciate the complexity of Shakespeare’s characters and themes. Lots of stage time. Cost: $125 member, $150 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Stage Combat Camp | Meets 9:30 a.m.

to noon June 20-24. Teacher: Michael Liddicoat. Ages 8-12. Learn to punch, kick, stomp and slap your way to success on the stage. Cost: $50 member, $55 non-member. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Twisted Fairy Tale Theater | Meets 10-

10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m. July 11-15. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $85. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


MUSIC & BAND Adventures in Music Kindermusik Camp | Meets Tuesday through Friday,

May 31-June 3. Four 45-minute sessions offered daily. Parents with children ages 0-7. Explore rhythm and movement at this “ABC Music & Me — Splash” camp. Cost: $55, includes CD, activity book and beach ball. Reserve space by May 13; call Patty Oliver, 509-594-7111. Meets at Shiloh Christian Center, 112 N. Pierce Ave., Yakima.

“American Idol” Vocal Workshop |

Meets 10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m. July 25-29. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $65. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

Orchestra

Camp:

Intermediate

|

Meets 8:15-10:15 a.m. Monday through Friday, June 13-24. Teacher: Christy Baisinger. Open to middle school students with at least one year of playing experience. Cost: $125 member, $150 non-member. Bring your own violin, viola, cello or string bass. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Orchestra Camp: Advanced | Meets 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday, June 13-24. Teacher: Christy Baisinger. Open to middle school students with at least one year of playing experience. Cost: $125 member, $150 non-member. Bring your own violin, viola, cello or string bass. Allied Arts, 5000 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima; alliedartsyakima.org; 509-966-0930.

Pop Star Hip Hop Dance Week| Meets

10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m. Aug. 8-12. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $65. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509248-9623.

Sing & Dance Like Disney’s “Shake It Up”| Meets 10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m.

July 18-22. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $65. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

Sing & Dance Like Justin Bieber |

Meets 10-10:50 a.m. or 5:30-6:20 p.m. Aug. 1-5. Ages 6 and up. Cost is $65. Melody Lane Academy, 2610 W. Nob Hill Blvd. Suite A, Yakima; melodylaneacademy.com; 509-248-9623.

Summer Pia no “Boot Camp” Jump start your child’s musical potential! Classes begin June 20th contact:

LaSarah Montgomery (509) 453-5199 YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

21


vacation vacationbibleschool

Church is getting wild this summer

L

ooks like PandaMania is the big theme of this summer’s Vacation Bible School lineup. At least three Yakima churches will use the pre-packaged theme featuring a pack of fun-loving pandas as well as a crew of other creatures. The program is “designed to connect kids to God, create change in their hearts and give them opportunities to share God’s love with others,” according to Group, the same publishing company behind last year’s popular theme, “High Seas Expedition.” Group’s programs are known for especially catchy songs, and PandaMania’s no exception, according to Susie Woodin, assistant director of children’s ministries at Yakima’s First Presbyterian Church. “Already singing it in my sleep,” she told Busybee in March. First Presbyterian, Mountainview Christian Fellowship and Westpark United Methodist Church will each host PandaMania VBS this summer. Selah Covenant Church will offer another Group program called “Hometown Nazareth,” which teaches kids to stand up for their faith among people who doubt. Here’s a week-by-week list of upcoming VBS day camps. Updates will be posted at yakimabusybee.com.

>>

22

A QUICK REMINDER Preregistration is always appreciated, and children should be toilet-trained. Also, most programs will collect a daily offering, so send your kids with a few coins (or more) in their pockets.

WEEK OF JUNE 19-25 Hometown Nazareth: Where Jesus Was a Kid | 10 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday,

June 20-24. Open to kids ages 4-11. No cost. SELAH COVENANT CHURCH, 560 McGonagle Road, Selah; selahcov.com. Contact Jewell Nelson, 509697-4095.

Narnia: Through the Wardrobe | 6:30-

8:30 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, June 19-23. Leave the world behind and enter a different time and place as you enter into a relationship with Jesus. Open to children entering kindergarten through sixth grade. No cost; offering collected for a mission project. WILEY HEIGHTS COVENANT CHURCH, 12504 Gilbert Road, Yakima; wileyheightscovenant.org. Contact Sherrin Melcher, 509-966-2383.

Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; weekly sessions, June 20-Aug. 19. Open to kids entering kindergarten through fifth grade. Cost: $30 per week, $20 for each additional child. Attend one week or more. WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima; westpress. org. Contact Lisa Willey, 509-966-1900. West Side Soccer Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:15 p.m. Monday through Friday, June 20-24. A soccer skills camp with Christian coaches and Bible messages, open to kids who have completed kindergarten through fifth grade. Cost: $70 if registered by June 5 or $80 from June 6-20; includes a T-shirt. Registration forms are available online or at the church office. WEST

Splish Splash Day Camp |

9 a.m. to noon Monday through Friday, June 20-24. Open to kids ages 3 years through sixth grade. Cost: $15 per camper; $10 if you preregister by June 6. CENTRAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, 1604 W. Yakima Ave., Yakima; clcyakima.org. Contact Nathan, 509-575-6490.

PandaMania: Where God Is Wild About You | 8:45 a.m. to noon Monday

through Friday, June 20-24. This wild celebration of God’s unconditional love is open to ages 4 years (by June 1) through fifth grade. Cost: $25 per family; $20 for first-time families. Free child care and 3-year-old VBS program for children of VBS volunteers. FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH OF YAKIMA, 9 S. Eighth Ave., Yakima; fpcyakima.com. Contact Susie Woodin, 248-7940 ext. 110.

PandaMania: Where God Is Wild About You | 6-8 p.m. Monday through Friday, June 20-

24. This wild VBS program is gonna be a bamboo blast! Open to children ages 3 years through fifth grade. No cost. MOUNTAINVIEW CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP, corner of 72nd and Summitview avenues, Yakima; contact Tabitha Darwood, 509972-3723.

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


Summer

Adventure Day Camp

Open to kids entering K through 5th grade

June 20 - August 19

Monday through Friday

9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Join us fo lunch not included

one we r all sum ek or mer!

$30/week for one child $20/week for each additional child $10 non-refundable registration fee SIDE CHURCH, 6901 Summitview Ave., Yakima; westsidechurch.info; 509-965-2800.

WEEK OF JUNE 26-JULY 2 Jonah and the Whale | 9-11:30 a.m. Monday

through Friday, June 27-July 1. Open to children age 4 through fifth grade. Cost: $10. A family BBQ will be provided after Friday’s session. HOLY FAMILY PARISH, 5313 Tieton Drive, Yakima. Contact Rose Meyer, 509-966-0788.

Faith Mountain | 6-8:15 p.m. Sunday through Thursday, June 26-30. Open to children age 3 through entering sixth grade. No cost; offering collected. SHILOH CHRISTIAN CENTER, 112 N. Pierce Ave., Yakima; Patty Oliver, 509-594-7111.

Bible Story Time • Crafts • Music Drama • Science • Snack • Games & Water Wednesdays! Westminster Presbyterian Church 6015 Summitview Ave. • Yakima

966-1900

Find more information & register at www.westpress.org

SonSurf Beach Bash | 5-8 p.m.

Sunday through Thursday, June 2630. Open to children ages 3 through sixth grade. Program begins with a light dinner. No cost. CHRIST LUTHERAN CHURCH, 5606 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima. Contact Lori Murphy, 509-895-9037.

Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >>

BOOMER is the star character of PandaMania, the big theme for this year’s VBS lineup. GRAPHICS COURTESY OF GROUP PUBLISHING

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

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WEEK OF JULY 3-9 Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

WEEK OF JULY 10-16 Splish Splash Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 3

p.m. Monday through Friday, July 11-15. Open to kids entering kindergarten through sixth grade. Kindergarteners go home at noon. No cost; lunch provided. MOUNT OLIVE LUTHERAN CHURCH, 7809 Tieton Drive, Yakima; mountoliveyakima.org; 509-966-2190.

Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

WEEK OF JULY 17-23 Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

WEEK OF JULY 25-30 Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to

12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

>>

EVENING CAMPS are offered by a number of churches and at least one, Redeemer Evangelical Lutheran in Yakima, will host an evening program for the whole family.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH VBS 2010

WEEK OF JULY 31-AUG. 6 Mega Sports Camp: The Great Comeback | 6-9 p.m. Monday through Friday,

Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

One-of-a-Kind Zoo | 5:30-8:30 p.m. Sunday

Sun Valley VBS | 9-11:30 a.m. Monday through Friday, Aug. 1-5. Open to children entering kindergarten through fifth grade. Cost: $5 per family. SUN VALLEY CHURCH, 2002 E. Mead Ave., Yakima; sunvalleychurch.net; call 509-965-6800.

Aug. 1-5. Open to children entering first through fifth grade. Cost is $40 per camper. MEMORIAL BIBLE CHURCH, 111 Old Stage Way, Yakima; Chris Kinman, 509-966-6500. through Thursday, July 31-Aug. 4. A program for the whole family. Supper served at 5:30 p.m. No cost. REDEEMER EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN CHURCH, 10203 W. Tieton Drive, Yakima; redeemeryakima.org; call 509-248-6919.

PandaMania: Where God Is Wild About You | 9-11:30 a.m. Monday through Thursday,

Aug. 1-4. Open to kids age 4 through fifth grade. Cost: $10 donation. WESTPARK UNITED METHODIST CHURCH, 3902 Summitview Ave., Yakima; diversityexcels.org. Contact Michelle at 9661632.

Summ e r ThE LEArnIng TrEE C a mp Children’s Center & Kids Club

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• Certified & Experienced Staff • Over 15 Years’ Experience • Secured Building

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• Children 6 weeks to 12 years • Preschool • Before/After School

W a tc h u s g r o w !

WEEK OF AUG. 7-13 Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

WEEK OF AUG. 14-20 Summer Adventure Day Camp | 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Monday through Friday; see “Week of June 19-25” above for details.

TWO FACILITIES

Children’s Center 3609 Tacoma St. Union Gap 509-574-5755 Kids Club 607 S. 36th Ave. Yakima 509-469-5437

www.thelearningtree-uniongap.com 24

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


pu

ll- 4-p ou ag ts e ec tio

e r o l p ExCentral n o t g n i h s a W n

What is this? Explore Central Washington is a gister once How does it work? Re y Museu m to be with the Ya kima Va lle o or all of the eli gible to go on one, tw the su mmer. field trips throu ghout fer red. However, Pre-registration is pre any tou r. A you may reg ister before vided on the reg istration for m is pro next pa ge. reg istration fee There’s a $5 one-time 0 per fam ily. per ch ild, capped at $2 required. All Pa rent pa rticipation is you’l l need to activities are free, but portation and provide your ow n tra ns encou raged. water. Sa ck lunches are

a.m. at the site, Tours wi ll beg in at 10 . If you need un less otherw ise noted s or caravan to reg ister, get direction Ya kima Va lley to the site, meet at the trip wi ll be two Museu m at 9 a.m. Ea ch erw ise noted. hours lon g un less oth clothi ng and Please wear appropriate — NO sanda ls or footwear for wa lki ng flip flops! Sorry, NO pets!

new summer field trip program designed to get kids and parents excited about our region’s history, natural resources and diverse cultures. Through a series of 14 field trips that reach from Toppenish to Vantage, we’ll discover the people and places that make our corner of the world unique.

Join the adventure! See

petrified trees, a prehistoric mammoth tusk and a bald eagle. Hop aboard a trolley, step inside a teepee and ride on a locomotive caboose. Learn an old-fashioned way to make butter and explore modern technologies for harnessing wind energy. Listen to traditional Native American legends, gaze at the stars and see a rare wildflower that grows only here, in Central Washington. Explore!

see Turn the page to ading where we’re he

Questions?

Call Kathy at 248-0747 or Sara at 965-1686 Presented by

YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

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Yakima Valley Museum

S elah Cliffs Trail

CWU Plan etarium Yakama Kittitas Nation County Museum Museum

Central Gilbert Train WA Ag House Museum m eu s u M Yakima Trolleys Wild Hornsteer Energy Ce

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go Ginkrified Pet est For Ahtanum Mission

Raptor House

a Pa jam Party

MAY | JUNE 2011 â&#x20AC;˘ YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


the schedule Explore Central Washington YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM — Yakima — 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, June 21. We start our journey with an especially-for-families tour of the Yakima Valley Museum, located at 2105 Tieton Drive in Yakima. See a mammoth tusk, learn about the Valley’s Japanese pioneers and see what happened locally when Mount St. Helens erupted in 1980. Then spend some time in the hands-on Children’s Underground. After your visit, consider stopping for an ice cream cone at the Museum Soda Fountain or have a picnic in Franklin Park.

registration form

CLIP THIS FORM AND PRE-REGISTER BY MAIL OR BRING TO: YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM 2105 TIETON DRIVE YAKIMA, WA 98902 ALSO, PROGRAM REGISTRATION WILL BE AVAILABLE AT THE MUSEUM AT 9 A.M. ON THE DAY OF EACH EVENT. THERE IS A ONE-TIME REGISTRATION FEE OF $5 FOR EACH CHILD PARTICIPANT, CAPPED AT $20 PER FAMILY. ACTIVITIES ARE FREE. ADULT PARTICIPATION AND YOUR OWN TRANSPORTATION IS REQUIRED. (PLEASE PRINT CLEARLY) DATE: CHILD’S NAME, AGE:

SELAH CLIFFS INTERPRETIVE TRAIL — North of Selah — 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, June 25. We’ll take a short, stroller-accessible hike in the Yakima River Canyon to seek out the rare basalt daisy and see an historic wild horse round-up corral. Wear long pants and good walking shoes (no sandals or flip flops); bring water, sunscreen, hats and binoculars. If you’d like to bring a sack lunch, there are tables at the site. The trailhead is located at an unmarked parking lot across from Sundown M Ranch on State Route 821; meet at YVM at 9 a.m. if you prefer to caravan to the site.

PARENT’S NAME:

CWU PLANETARIUM — Yakima — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Wednesday, July 6 at the Yakima Valley Museum. Learn about stars and constellations during a 30-minute celestial presentation inside a portable planetarium. Shows begin at 10:15 a.m., 11 a.m., 11:45 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 1:15 p.m. The 11 a.m. show will be tailored for kids under 6, the 1:15 p.m. show for ages 10 and up.

CITY ST ZIP

KITTITAS COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM — Ellensburg — 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, July 12. Can you find all the artifacts in our scavenger hunt? We’ll take a guided tour and participate in a fun scavenger hunt at this museum located at 114 E. Third Ave. in downtown Ellensburg. YAKAMA NATION MUSEUM — Toppenish — 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, July 14. Learn about the Yakama people at this one-of-a-kind museum featuring dynamic displays of traditional clothing, tools and a teepee. Listen to storytellers share native legends in the oral tradition. Located in the cultural center on Spiel-yi Loop, off Highway 97 one mile north of Toppenish. More

on next page

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

EMAIL: MAILING ADDRESS:

HELP US OUT WITH A HEAD COUNT! PLEASE MARK THE EVENTS YOU ARE INTERESTE D IN ATTENDING:

■ YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM SELAH CLIFFS ■ INT ERPRETIVE TRAIL ■ CWU PLANETARIUM ■ GINKGO PETRIFIED FOREST KITTITAS COUNTY ■ HIS TORICAL MUSEUM YAK AMA NATION MUSEUM ■ AHT ■ ANUM MISSION CENTRAL WASHINGTON ■ AGR ICULTURAL MUSEUM BUT TER MAKING AND ■ VICTOR IAN GAMES NOR THE RN ■ MUSEUM PACIFIC TRAIN ■ YAKIMA VALLEY TROLLEYS ■ RAPTOR HOUSE WILD HORSE RENEWABLE ■ ENE RGY CENTER PAJ AMA ■ MUSEUM PARTY AT THE

registration

GINKGO PETRIFIED FOREST — Vantage — 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Saturday, July 9. Explore one of the most unusual fossil forests in the world, located on the Columbia River an hour’s drive northeast of Yakima. We’ll take a geology hike with eastern Washington geologist Jack Powell and visit the interpretive center at Ginkgo Petrified Forest State Park. Tour highlights include petrified trees and Wanapum petroglyphs. Wear long pants and appropriate footwear for walking (no sandals or flip flops), sunscreen and a hat; bring binoculars, water and a sack lunch. The tour starts at 10:30 a.m. at the interpretive center: From I-90, take exit 136 north through Vantage one mile. Meet at YVM at 9 a.m. if you prefer to caravan to the park.

PHONE:

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AHTANUM MISSION — West of Yakima — 10 a.m. to noon Saturday, July 23. Visit the hand-hewed log church and rectory built on the land of Chief Kamiakin. Can we still find his garden? We’ll have a scavenger hunt in the 13-acre park, located at 17740 Ahtanum Road, 10 miles west of the Yakima airport. Wear appropriate footwear for walking (no sandals or flip flops); bring water, sunscreen, hats, binoculars and a sack lunch. CENTRAL WASHINGTON AGRICULTURAL MUSEUM — Union Gap — 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, July 26. Take a wagon ride, step into a replica 1908 homestead, and see lots of farm artifacts at this museum dedicated to the Valley’s agrarian roots. Located at 4508 Main St. at the south end of Union Gap. Wear appropriate footwear for walking (no sandals or flip flops); bring sunscreen, hat and water. If you’d like a sack lunch, there are tables at Fullbright Park next to the museum. BUTTER MAKING AND VICTORIAN GAMES — Yakima — 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. Wednesday, July 27. Learn how to make butter and play Victorian games. We’ll tour the H.M. Gilbert Homeplace, a furnished living history museum located at 2109 W. Yakima Ave., Yakima. NORTHERN PACIFIC TRAIN MUSEUM — Toppenish — 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, July 28. Tour a steam engine, take a caboose ride and try your hand at the pump car during this visit to the historic depot museum located at 10 S. Asotin Ave. in downtown Toppenish. After your visit, take a self-guided tour of downtown murals. If you’d like to bring a sack lunch, there’s a park just outside the museum. YAKIMA VALLEY TROLLEYS— Yakima — 10 a.m. to noon Tuesday, Aug. 2. Step back in time and take a ride on one of Yakima’s historic trolleys and visit the trolley barn museum at S. Third Avenue and W. Pine Street in Yakima. RAPTOR HOUSE — East Selah — 10 a.m. to noon Thursday, Aug. 4. Learn about birds of prey and the important role they play in our environment. Up-close encounters and flight demonstration at this rehabilitation facility off East Selah Road at 40 Wise Acre Road. Please wear appropriate footwear for walking (no sandals or flip flops), sunscreen, hat and bring water. WILD HORSE RENEWABLE ENERGY CENTER — East of Ellensburg — 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. Tuesday, Aug. 9. Learn about renewable energy while touring this first-of-its-kind interpretive center located at 25901 Vantage Highway, 16 miles east of Ellensburg. We’ll look inside the tower of a wind turbine and see solar panels. Bring appropriate footwear for walking (no sandals or flip flops), sunscreen, hats and water. If you’d like sack lunch, tables are available. Meet at YVM at 9 a.m. if you prefer to caravan to the site. PAJAMA PARTY AT THE MUSEUM — Yakima — 7-9:30 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 20. To celebrate a fun summer of discovery, we’ll have an evening pajama party at the Yakima Valley Museum. Watch for details!

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MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


play outside

&PLAY Go outside

GO OUTSIDE AND PLAY. That’s the philosophy behind Kiddin’ Around, a summer-long activity program that promotes healthy, active lifestyles in an effort to help combat childhood obesity. The program offers more than two dozen fun, mostly free events — from tennis lessons to trail walks to a batting clinic with the Yakima Bears — that encourage kids and their families to enjoy the sun and get some exercise. Oh, and did we mention that kids can earn prizes? After participating in three individual or group activities, kids become eligible for prizes including swim and bowling passes. How cool! Kiddin’ Around kicked off April 23 with the Yakima Kids’ Fish-In, but there’s plenty more fun to come in the days ahead and you’re welcome to join at any time. In addition to the scheduled activities, participants can earn points toward prizes for walking or biking the Yakima Greenway as well as walking dogs at the Humane Society. See the Individual Activities section at right for details. Family Field Day, the program’s signature event, will be May 7 at Yakima’s

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

KYLE POLAGE

INDIVIDUAL ACTIVITIES NOTE: Participate in these individual activities on your own schedule to earn points towards prizes in the Kiddin’ Around summer program.

TECHIN’ & TREKKIN’ | Available 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Yakima Greenway office; call 509-453-8280 to reserve a GPS. Check out a GPS unit and record your mileage as you bike or walk the Greenway. PHOTO SCAVENGER HUNT | Available

9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Monday through Friday at the Yakima Greenway. Free; call 509-453-8280 to reserve camera and scavenger list. Use a digital camera to snap photos as you walk the Greenway.

JUNIOR GAP2GAP

Sarg Hubbard Park. Featuring more than 20 activity stations scattered throughout the park, Family Field Day is one of the Valley’s best annual events for kids. More than 900 kids attended last year. Kiddin’ Around is organized by the Yakima Greenway Foundation, headquartered at Sarg Hubbard Park next to the eastside WalMart at 111 S. 18th St., Yakima; yakimagreenway.org; 509-4538280.

WALKIN’ THE DOG | Available 11 a.m. to

3:30 p.m. Monday through Friday and 12-3:30 p.m. Saturdays and Sundays at the Humane Society. Check out a dog and go for a walk. Adult participation required. Free. Hosted by Humane Society of Central Washington, 509457-6854.

GROUP EVENTS are on the next page >>

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&play Go outside

KIDDIN’ AROUND GROUP EVENTS

FAMILY FIELD DAY | 1-4 p.m. Saturday, May

ZUMBATOMIC | 12:30-1:30 p.m. Saturday,

HIKIN’ AROUND | 9-11 a.m. Saturday, May 14. Guided hike through Cowiche Canyon. Free. Pre-register at 509-453-8280 by 5/12. Bring hiking shoes & water. Meet at the Weikel Road parking lot; visit cowichecanyon.org for directions. Hosted by Cowiche Canyon Conservancy.

SELAH CLIFFS TRAIL WALK | 9 a.m. Saturday,

7. Free family festival at Sarg Hubbard Park featuring 20 activities including an obstacle course, kayaking, ball toss and healthy snack tasting. Hosted by CWU Dietetic Interns, FitKids USA and Yakima Greenway.

RUNNIN’/WALKIN’ AROUND | Friday, May 20. Registration opens at 5 p.m. Walk/ Run begins at 6 p.m. Kids and adults welcome. Self-paced one-mile event at Sarg Hubbard Park. Free; receive a ribbon, water and snacks at the finish line. Pre-register at 509-453-8280 by 5/18. Hosted by Yakima Hard Core Runners Club. JUNIOR GAP2GAP | 7:30 a.m. to noon

Saturday, June 4. Kids ages 6-14 can compete in a relay (run, bike, rollerblade, paddle, obstacle course) at Sarg Hubbard Park. Entry is $17 per person; priority registration deadline is May 25. 509-453-8280 or www.yakimagreenway.org/g2g

TENNIS FREE-4-ALL | 12:30-4 p.m. Sunday,

June 5. Registration at 12:30 pm. Group lessons and drills for all ages and abilities. “Quickstart Tennis” lessons for ages 5-12. Free; no equipment required. Exhibition match at 12:30 pm. Mini-tournament at end. Hosted by Yakima Community Tennis Association at Kissel Park, S. 32nd and Mead avenues, Yakima.

TUMBLIN’ AROUND | 6-7:30 p.m. Friday, June 10. Ages 3-11 can tackle an obstacle course, learn gymnastics and play in Kids Castle. Free; preregister at gymnasticsplus.net or 509-453-8126. Gymnastics Plus, 2121 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima.

BOULDER CAVE EXCURSION | 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 11. Take a ranger-guided tour of Boulder Cave/Wenatchee National Forest. Limited to 40 participants; children under 10 must be accompanied by a parent. Free; transportation provided from Yakima. Bring lunch, hiking shoes and warm clothing. Preregister by 6/4 with the Yakima Police Athletic League, 509-575-6180. PHOTO SCAVENGER HUNT | 6-7:30 p.m.

Saturday, June 11. Use a digital camera to snap photos when you find the objects at Yakima’s Sarg Hubbard Park. Free; limited number of cameras available to borrow, or bring your own. Pre-register by 6/9 at 509-453-8280.

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June 18. All ages invited to enjoy movement and exercise to Latin and world music at Sarg Hubbard Park on the Yakima Greenway. Free. Hosted by Yakima Family YMCA. For info, call 509-972-5276.

June 25. Register at Yakima Valley Museum and receive field journal; $5 registration fee for the Explore Central Washington program. Meet 10 a.m. at Selah Cliffs Natural Area Preserve Trail Head for a short-guided walk to see the rare basalt daisy and historic wild horse round-up bin. Long pants and walking shoes required (no flip flops), bring sunscreen, hat, binoculars, water and sack lunch. Hosted by Yakima Valley Museum; pre-register at 509-248-0747.

GEOCACHING AT THE GREENWAY | 2-3

p.m. Wednesday, June 29 Learn how to geocache and explore at the Yakima Greenway. Free; limited to 20 kids. Call 509-453-8280 to preregister by 6/27.

GOING FOR A BIRD HUNT | 9-11 a.m.

Saturday, July 9 at Yakima Area Arboretum. Search for and identify birds that live in our trees, swim in our lakes and hide in our shrubs. Bring water and walking shoes. Led by guides from Yakima Audubon Society, hosted by Yakima Area Arboretum. For info, 509-248-7337.

KICKiN’ AROUND | 1-2:30 p.m. Sunday, July 10 at Yakima’s Chesterley Park, 40th Avenue and River Road. A free event for beginners to learn the basic fundamentals of soccer. Hosted by Yakima Parks & Recreation. Pre-register at 575-6020 by 7/6. TUMBLIN’ AROUND | 6-7:30 p.m. Friday, July

15. Ages 3-11 can tackle an obstacle course, learn gymnastics moves and play in Kids Castle. Free; pre-register at gymnasticsplus.net or call 509453-8126. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program. Gymnastics Plus, 2121 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima.

SPLASHIN’ AROUND | 1-4 p.m. Saturday, July 16. Free swimming at Yakima’s Franklin Pool, 21st Avenue and Tieton Drive. Hosted by Yakima Parks & Recreation. For information, call the pool at 509-575-6035. YPAL SPORTS CLINIC | 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, July 23. Try boxing, wrestling, ping pong, foosball and pool skills presented by staff and coaches at the Yakima Police Athletic League, 602 N. Fourth St., Yakima. Lunch: $1.50. Pre-register at 509-575-6180 by 7/16. Limit 60 kids. MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


play outside

Q A

FAMILY FIELD DAY HOPPIN’ & RUNNIN’ IN MILLER PARK |

6-8 p.m. Wednesday, July 27. Join in family fun activities including an obstacle course, jump rope and the water play fountain at Miller Park, N. Fourth and E streets, Yakima. Hosted by Ready by Five & Yakima Neighborhood Health Services. For info, call 509-454-2493 or 509-853-1105.

EASTER EGG HUNT FOR A HEALTHY YOU | 9-10 a.m. Saturday, July 30. Run, walk, laugh

and explore the Greenway while looking for Easter eggs at Sarg Hubbard Park on the Yakima Greenway. Pre-register at 509-453-8280 by 7/28.

NO SPOOF BULLY PROOF NITE & MARTIAL ARTS MOVIE | 7:30-10 p.m. Saturday, Aug.

6. Learn anti-bully strategies at Sarg Hubbard Park. Stay and watch an action movie. Hosted by Pro-ACTION Family Martial Arts, Yakima Parks & Recreation and Yakima Greenway. For info, 509-453-8280.

YAKIMA BEARS BASEBALL CLINIC | 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 13 at Yakima County Stadium. Kids rotate through skill stations led by professional players. Autograph session. Free; bring gloves, other equipment provided. Preregister at 509-453-8280 by 8/6. TUMBLIN’ AROUND | 9 a.m. to 10 a.m.

Saturday, Aug. 20. Ages 3-11 can tackle and obstacle course, learn gymnastics moves and play in Kids Castle. Free; pre-register at gymnasticsplus.net or call 509-453-8126. Gymnastics Plus, 2121 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima.

YAKIMA HOT SHOTS 3-ON-3 TOURNEY |

9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday, Aug. 27 and 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Sunday, Aug. 28. First graders through adults can compete in this 3-on-3 street tourney in downtown Yakima. Hosted by Yakima Valley Sports Commission and Yakima Parks & Recreation. Pre-register at 509-575-6020 or www. hotshots3on3.com. YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

Now that nice weather has returned, I want to take my kids outside to play. With all the different levels of SPF at the market, which one is appropriate and how often should I be applying it to my child?

Sunscreen and sunblock are essential for you and your kids if you spend any time outside. Sun protection factor, also known as SPF, refers to a rating for sunscreens. The number indicates how well the product blocks or screens out the sun’s harmful burning rays. It tells you how long it would take your skin to burn if you weren’t wearing any protection at all compared to skin protected with the product.

HEALTH

Buzz Tie Wei, MD, PhD, is a physician with Family Medicine of Yakima. Dr. Wei is currently accepting new patients.

An SPF of 30 or greater is recommended to protect your child. Since no sunscreen lasts all day, you’ll need to re-apply it every two hours. Products made specifically for children don’t differ much from those made for adults. Here’s what you want to look for: • Broad-spectrum UVA and UVB protection. • Water-resistant or waterproof even if your kids aren’t planning to swim. They tend to sweat a lot when they play outside. • Hypoallergenic and fragrance free, especially if your child has sensitive skin. You can get additional sun protection from clothing made with fabric that provides ultraviolet protection and lip balms with sunscreen. If your child is under the age of 6 months, here’s a word of caution about using sunscreen: It’s usually not recommended for them because there is no study or test done with children this young. It’s better to keep babies in the shade or make sure they’re wearing protective clothing. The following organizations also provide reliable health information: National Library of Medicine, available in Spanish: www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/sunexposure.html Center for Disease Control and Prevention www.cdc.gov/cancer/skin/chooseyourcover 31


healthy kids

Help kids breathe easier

Know when to get your child tested By Debra Yergen As a parent, nothing hurts more than seeing your kids struggle. And if you have a family history of asthma or allergies, you know exactly what it’s like when little ones can’t breathe. For some, the first sign is that a child is repeatedly getting sick. It’s not uncommon for a runny nose to turn into a respiratory issue because a lot of kids with asthma have symptoms that start out as sinus drainage. “Children readily spread viruses among themselves at daycare and school, so there really isn’t a reason to panic and run to your pediatrician the first time a cold leads to chest congestion,” said Tom Utigard, Director of Respiratory Care Services at Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center. “But if you notice a pattern, that your child seems to catch every cold that comes along, and if their symptoms are prolonged, you would definitely want to talk to your pediatrician or family doctor about getting an evaluation started,” he said. Just a cold or an early warning? Sometimes a cold is just that, but sometimes it’s an early warning sign of asthma or chest congestion resulting from asthma. One difference parents can watch for is that a child who catches a common cold may or may not later experience chest tightness, whereas kids who have asthma will experience regular cold symptoms that consistently and inevitably lead to chest tightness or spasm. The challenge comes in knowing when it’s time to get your child tested. “If you’re noticing your child battling recurrent respiratory infections, bronchitis, cough, congestion, wheezing or repeated shortness of breath, it’s a good time to talk to your child’s doctor,” said Utigard. 32

He said another sign for many families comes when the child is old enough to participate in organized sports. Kids who suffer from asthma or allergies may complain of feeling tired or short of breath or they may struggle to keep up with the other kids. If you notice this happens seasonally, like the spring and fall, you may want to schedule a wellness check. Parents of younger children under the age of 5 may hear their doctor use the term “reactive airway disease” instead of asthma or allergies. This term is used when asthma is suspected, since the child needs to be at a certain level of comprehension for a complete testing panel to take place to confirm the disease. Triggers in the environment Both allergies and asthma can be triggered by environmental exposures. Some kids experience one of these conditions, while others experience sensitivities of both allergies and asthma together. While every child is unique, there are a handful of common triggers that affect the majority of kids with asthma, allergies or both, including: pets, mold, strong fragrances or odors, dust mites, pollen and cigarette smoke. Allergy testing can reveal if a child has a specific sensitivity to food, pets, or other environmental triggers. What can parents do? Utigard has a five-step program that he gives his patients once they are diagnosed with restrictive airway conditions: • Observe and note patterns in your child’s health. • Remove potential trigger sources. • Report to your physician. • Follow any medical advice you receive. • Be prepared to make lifestyle changes.

“Your kids can probably live with whatever triggers exist in your environment, but at what cost?” Utigard asks. Failing to make lifestyle changes can quickly lead to an increase in doctor visits, increased episodes of breathing difficulty and higher daily medication levels. “It can be difficult to make a lifestyle adjustment like giving up a smoking habit or making an inside pet an outside pet, but parents make tough choices every day,” said Utigard, who suffers with asthma himself and has children with early signs of reactive airway disease. On May 19, Utigard and his team will participate in the Busybee Sneeze & Wheeze Fair where they will perform simple breathing tests for asthma and provide a questionnaire to help parents identify possible triggers and signs you can share with your family doctor. “Once your child is diagnosed with asthma or allergies, it’s extremely important to use the medication your doctor orders as prescribed, to prevent episodes and lessen symptoms that can lead to a full-blown asthma attack. Following a consistent medical plan will decrease the frequency and sensitivity to the things that can cause an asthma attack,” Utigard said. He added that it’s important to have an asthma action plan to use when your child has symptoms. Your physician should be able to provide one, or you can see a certified asthma educator to discuss a plan for your child. ■ MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


e z e e h W & e z e e n S Fair the

Sponsored by

3-5 p.m. Thursday

May 19

th

A Free Asthma & Allergy Event for Families

Bring the Kids! Free Spiromentry Testing Games & Prizes! • Refreshments Ask the Experts Please join us for a fun

and educational afternoon

3-5 p.m. Thursday, May 19 in the auditorium at Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center 110 S. Ninth Ave., Yakima

yakimabusybee.com YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

yakimaregional.com 33


■ mommy time

Meditation:

My solution to busy parenthood

by Kristin Dodge Life as a busy parent can get hurried and stressful, especially when you throw work, PTA, house projects, and whatever else into the mix. For me, it’s important that I have routines that help me stay healthy as well as present and in the moment with my 6-year-old son Tyler — because I know he will grow up fast and I want to soak up every moment! Working meditation into my life helps me handle issues more calmly and wisely, be less distracted, and importantly, enjoy the little things in life. I believe meditation also helps me to be physically healthier, and it just so happens that this belief is widely supported by research. (I looked into it recently.) What is meditation? As Western meditation teacher Jon Kabat-Zinn says, “Meditation is simplicity itself.” Meditation is mere-

Try it out! Yakima mom Kristin Dodge will lead a free, four-week outdoor meditation series this summer at Randall Park and Cowiche Canyon in Yakima. The group will meet from 8:30-9:30 a.m. on four consecutive Wednesdays, July 20-Aug. 10. Kristin will give a brief introduction before leading the group in three ways to meditate: Group Meditation, Dyad Meditation (with partners) and Walking Meditation. To sign up, email Kristin at kristindodge8@gmail.com. 34

ly quieting down enough so that you can get in touch with your center, or your spirit, and be a silent observer to the thoughts and feelings of your mind and ego. This may require letting difficult emotions come into your awareness (emotions that have been suppressed in the past) and letting yourself feel them, and then you will experience the calm peace from within. I have studied this and experienced it many times! Breathing deeply helps you find your centered place. Accepting all as it is in this moment is important. If you feel space and peace, you are there. Meditation helps me to be less distracted because when I meditate, I become aligned with the present moment. For example, when I meditate on a walk, I notice and take in all that I see and hear: the wind in the trees, filtered sunlight peaking through the clouds, green grass. It is then much easier to be present and in the moment for the rest of the day, when I’m spending time with Tyler or accomplishing tasks. Also, when I meditate it gives me a chance to become aware of any feelings of stress, frustration, sadness, etc., so I’m not carrying these feelings around, ready to be triggered at any moment. Once I bring these emotions into my awareness and let myself feel them, they actually dissolve, and I then experience the calm from within and parent from a place of inner wisdom and strength. Finally, there is no doubt that meditation has beneficial effects on one’s physical

health; when I researched this topic I found evidence supporting the positive effects of meditation practice in the treatment of a wide spectrum of health issues, including headaches, high blood pressure, coronary artery disease, chronic pain, cancer, obesity and over-all effectiveness of the immune system. How do I work meditation into my life? At least once a week, and preferably more often, I take a nice 30- or 40-minute walk by myself. I also strive to meditate as I’m sitting up in my bed for 10 minutes before I go to sleep and 10 minutes when I wake each morning. (I combine meditation with prayer). However, sometimes I’m too sleepy; the great thing about meditation, though, is that it can be done for five minutes, or even just one. Sometimes I take a few minutes to walk around the block, or I might sit quietly at my desk at work for a moment. I even focus on returning to my “true self” as I sit at a traffic light! Meditation has helped me work through hurtful experiences from my past and continues to help me be present and at my best each day. I feel healthy, happy and in the moment with my family — so much so that I wish to share my secret with others! ■ Kristin Dodge was a school teacher for eight years, then became a stay-at-home mom, and is currently substitute teaching, writing on the topic of meditation and training to be a Spiritual Life Coach with the Holistic Learning Center. MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


news & notes

| fyi ■

You’reInvited to the

T

Ball

he Z Center Stage Theater perform Rodgers and Ham Company in May will “Cinderella,” complete with merstein’s classic musical and a pumpkin that turns in ball gowns, full-scale waltzing to a carriage. (How will th do that?) ey

Evening performances begin at 7 p.m. May 13

-14 and 19-21. A 1:30 p.m. matinee on M ay 21 wi ll be followed by a free ice cream social. A dm iss ion is $5 fo r sta ndard seating and $7.50 for premiu m se at in g. Order tickets online at www.ZCenterSta ge .c om or ca ll 509-8295565. Performances will be in th Performing Arts Center, 16 e Zillah High School 02 Second Ave., Zillah. ote that this version of the cla the Disney version. Howev ssic fairy tale differs from the 1997 made-for-TV mov er, you may recognize it from and Whitney Houston as heie starring Brandy as Cinderella r Fairy Godmother.

N

Prenatal Yoga

Expecting? Memorial’s Community Education is offering prenatal yoga classes this spring led by Gina Ord, a bilingual occupational therapist and certified yoga instructor. Yoga can help expectant mothers decrease tension and common pregnancy discomforts including backache and fatigue, improve strength and flexibility, prepare for birth, or help stay in shape for healthy pregnancy. The class meets 6-7 p.m. Wednesdays, May 25-June 29, at The Springs, 302 S. 10th Ave., Yakima. Cost is $20 for the fiveweek session; mats and blankets are provided. Limited scholarships available. Space is limited and registration is required; call Lori Gibbons at 509-248-7322.

Kids’ Yoga

Would your kids like to try yoga? Gina Ord will lead a kids’ yoga class from 10:30-11:15 a.m. May 14 and 28. The drop-in classes for ages 4-8 introduces yoga basics in a fun, non-competitive environment. Parents are encouraged to participate. Wear comfortable clothes and bring water. The cost is $13 per family. Classes will be held at Ord’s studio, Yakima Yoga, which shares an entrance with Carousel Restaurant at 25 N. Front St. For more, visit yakimayoga.com or call 509-225-0650.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

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■ fyi | news & notes

celebrate

Cinco de

Mayo DID YOU KNOW? Here in the U.S., Cinco de Mayo is often mistaken for Mexico’s Independence Day, but it actually commemorates the 1862 Battle of Puebla in which an outnumbered Mexican militia defeated the invading French army. Mexico’s Independence Day, El Grito, is Sept. 16.

THE YAKIMA VALLEY hosts large Cinco de Mayo festivals in both Sunnyside and Yakima. In fact, each bills itself at the state’s largest Cinco celebration, and both are growing every year. In either city, you can’t go wrong with authentic Mexican food, lively Tejano bands and parades featuring dancing horses, folklorico dancers and tricked-out cars. Sunnyside’s three-day event takes place downtown May 6-8.. For more information, call the Sunnyside Chamber at 509-837-5939. Yakima’s 10th annual Fiesta Grande will take place May 7-8 on Yakima Avenue between First and Third streets. A parade starts at 1 p.m. Sunday. For more information, call the Hispanic Chamber at 509-4532050.

b R hJ WHAT’S YOUR FAVORITE LOCAL TORTILLERIA OR MEXICAN BAKERY?

CARRIE OSORIO: Blue Sky Market in Toppenish and International Market in Wapato have great tortillas!

L g T V R

TRACEY McMURRAY: Blue Sky Market in Toppenish! DENISE FISCHER: Blue Sky for sure!!!

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JESSICA EVERT: Does my parents’ house count? lol my mom makes the absolute best tortillas :) for mexican bread we love La Petunia in Yakima. Yum

JENNIFER SANDOVAL: for pan (bread) the best place is La Morenita off of Walnut and for tortillas La Nacional off of 1st.... SHANNON JONES: Blue Sky tortillas are the BOMB!

AMBER HANSON: The jalapeno cheese bread at the one on the corner of Fair and Nob Hill is awesome!

N

BLUE SKY MARKET, 116 Chehalis Ave., Toppenish LA MORENITA BAKERY, 117 E. Walnut St.,Yakima LA NACIONAL, 506 S. First St., Yakima LA PETUNIA BAKERY, 1402 S. Fair Ave., Yakima INTERNATIONAL MARKET, 512 W. First St., Wapato

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adopt a grandparent YAKIMA MOMS/DADS: Are you looking for a volunteer opportunity you can do with your kids? Do you like working with senior citizens? Bring your kids to have a playdate with residents of the Living Care Nursing Home. The Grandtime volunteer program brings kids and seniors together to play musical instruments, parachute and balloon games, crafts and snacks. The group meets from 10:15-11 a.m. first and third Mondays. For more information, contact Joanne Johnston at 509-965-5272.

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


news & notes

| fyi ■

Which way to the market? FARMERS’ MARKETS are a great one-stop shop for fresh local produce — typically picked that morning — as well as eggs, meats and baked goods. Most markets also offer nursery plants, cut flowers and handcrafted items such as soap and jewelry. Admission is free, and there’s typically live entertainment and lots of tasty concessions. Some markets, including those in Yakima and Selah, offer special activities for kids. Hit the ATM on your way as many vendors are cashonly, and don’t forget to bring your reusable shopping bags and/or a wagon.

Kittitas County Farmers Market | 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. Saturdays, May through October. Located on Fourth Avenue between Pearl and Pine streets, downtown Ellensburg. kcfarmersmarket.com Prosser Farmers’ Market | 8 a.m. to noon Saturdays, May through October. Located in Prosser City Park at Seventh Street and Sommers Avenue. prosserfarmersmarket.com Selah’s Wednesday Market | 5-8 p.m. Wednesdays, June 15 through September. Kids Korner educational activities each week. Located behind King’s Row, 210 S. First St. 509-480-2844 Tieton’s Farmers Mercado | 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. alternate Saturdays: July 9 and 23; Aug. 6, 20 and 27; Sept. 3 and 17; and Oct. 1 in Tieton Square Park. Yakima Farmers’ Market | 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Sundays, May 8 through October. Kids’ Day on the third Sunday of each month features the ArtsVan, animals and other children’s activities. Located in front of the Capitol Theatre at.Third Street and Yakima Avenue. yakimafarmersmarket.org

DO YOU STRUGGLE with getting

your child to pose for photos? 7 Safaris Photography is hosting photo playdates at Yakima area parks to capture your child’s adorable smile. Photographer Kelly Allan will spend 10-15 minutes with each child and send you a disk with at least 10 digital images, both posed and candid, within two weeks of the playdate. The cost is $40; sign up and prepayment is required. Sessions will be from 9-11 a.m. Thursday, May 19 at West Valley Park and 9-11 a.m. Monday, July 18 at Randall Park. (Insider tip: Selected photos from the May 19 session will be published in the next issue of Busybee!) For more information, visit 7safaris.com or call 509-949-7606.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

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■ daily planner

storytimes BILINGUAL STORY HOUR for

children up to age 5, organized by Catholic Family & Child Service and Ready By Five. Meets from 10-11 a.m. May 11 and 25 and June 8 and 22 in the Children’s Underground at the Yakima Valley Museum, 2105 Tieton Drive, Yakima; 509965-7100 ext. 1019.

BORDERS, 1700 E. Washington Ave., Union Gap; 509-248-4018. Story time, 9:30 a.m. Mondays and 11 a.m. Saturdays. Family Game Night, 6 p.m. Tuesdays. Chess Club, 5 p.m. Thursdays. “The Throne of Fire” release party for ages 8-12, 2 p.m. May 7; call to RSVP.

Summer Reading “One World, Many Stories” is the theme of this year’s Summer Reading Program at Yakima Valley Libraries. Branch libraries will host kickoff events with games and crafts June 6-11. Check the schedule on this page for times and dates. Program registration begins June 1; visit any branch or www.yvl.org to sign up. Then start reading on June 13 to earn prizes for every five days that you read for at least 20 minutes. Adults can participate, too.

INKLINGS BOOKSHOP, located at

Chalet Place, 56th and Summitview Ave., Yakima; 509-965-5830. Toddler story time, 10 a.m. Tuesdays.

YAKAMA NATION LIBRARY, located in the Yakama Nation Museum & Cultural Center, Spiel-yi Loop, Toppenish; 509-865-2800 ext. 6. Coyote Tales Legends storytelling, 10 a.m. and 4 p.m. May 12, 26 and June 8. YAKIMA VALLEY LIBRARIES

NOTE: Find an updated calendar of library events at yvl.org. BUENA, 801 Buena Road; 509-865-3390. Summer Reading Kickoff, 4-6 p.m. June 9. GRANGER, 508 Sunnyside Ave.; 509-8541446. Summer Reading Kickoff, 2:30-4:30 p.m. June 8. HARRAH, 21 E. Pioneer; 509-848-3458. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 7. MABTON, 415 B St.; 509-894-4128. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 6. MOXEE, 255 W. Seattle; 509-575-8854. Kito Manga Teen Club, 4 p.m. Tuesdays through May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 4-6 p.m. June 6. NACHES, 303 Naches Ave.; 509-6532005. Preschool Storytime, 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays in May. Kid Zone activities for school-age children, 4 p.m.Thursdays through June 9. Summer Reading Kickoff, 4-6 p.m. June 9. SELAH, 106 S. Second St.; 509-698-7345. Baby Lapsit, 11:15 a.m. Wednesdays through May. Preschool Storytime, 10 a.m. Mondays and Thursdays, 1:30 p.m. Wednesdays through May. Teen Tuesday, 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays in May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3-5 p.m. June 8.

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SOUTHEAST YAKIMA, 1211 S. Seventh St.; 509-576-0723. Kids’Club activities for ages 10-12, 3:30 p.m. Fridays in May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3:30-5 p.m. June 10. SUMMITVIEW, 5709 Summitview Ave., Yakima; 509-966-7070. Baby Lapsit, 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays in May. Preschool Storytime, 11 a.m. Wednesdays in May. SUNNYSIDE, 621 Grant, Sunnyside; 509837-3234. Baby Lapsit, 11 a.m. Thursdays in May. Preschool Story Time, 10 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. Fridays in May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 4-6 p.m. June 9. TERRACE HEIGHTS, 4011 Commonwealth Drive, Yakima; 509-4575319. Preschool Storytime, 10:30 a.m. Thursdays in May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 4-6 p.m. June 8. TOPPENISH, 1 S. Elm St.; 509-865-3600. Preschool Storytime, 11 a.m. Thursdays in May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3-5 p.m. June 7. UNION GAP, 3104 S. First St.; 509-4524252. Preschool Storytime, 1 p.m. Tuesdays in May. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3-5 p.m. June 10. WAPATO, 119 E. Third St.; 509-877-2882 Summer Reading Kickoff, 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 10. WHITE SWAN, 391 First St.; 509-874-2060. Summer Reading Kickoff, 2:30-4:30 p.m. June 6. YAKIMA, 102 N. Third St.; 509-4528541. Baby Lapsit, 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays in May. Preschool Storytime, 10:30 a.m. Thursdays in May. Hora de Cuentos para Preescolares/Spanish Preschool Storytime, 2 p.m. Saturdays in May. Teen Yaki-Manga Anime/Manga Club, 4:30 p.m. Thursdays in May. Anime Saturday, teens ages 13-18 invited to watch anime at 1 p.m. May 21. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3-5 p.m. June 7. ZILLAH, 109 Seventh St.; 509-829-6707. Summer Reading Kickoff, 3-5 p.m. June 8. MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


daily planner

dailyplanner TUESDAY, MAY 3

SATURDAY, MAY 7

MOMSNEXT — 7 p.m. Open to all mothers with

12TH ANNUAL GET INTIMATE WITH THE SHRUB-STEPPE — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Learn about

children in grades K-6. Enjoy dessert and time with other moms. Free; no childcare. West Side Church, 6901 Summitview Ave., Yakima; Tera, 509-972-3001.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 4 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

THURSDAY, MAY 5 THE VISION AND LEARNING LINK — 7

p.m. Workshop for parents or teachers. Learn how vision therapy can help students who are struggling with school and reading. Presented by Dr. S. Thomas Copeland at Washington Vision Therapy Center, 3909 Creekside Loop, Suite 150, Yakima. Free; call 509-654-9256 to register.

FRIDAY, MAY 6

the geology, native plants and animals of Central Washington through expert-led field trips and activities at Helen McCabe State Park, located in the Yakima River Canyon at Thrall Road (take I-82 Exit 3), three miles south of Ellensburg. Free event; donations accepted. 509-962-1654; kittitasee.net

HOME DEPOT KIDS WORKSHOP — 9 a.m.

to noon. Drop-in wood crafts for ages 5-12. The Home Depot, 2115 S. First St., Yakima; 509-4523016.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. One-hour educational workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg. 10TH ANNUAL FIESTA GRANDE — 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Celebrate Cinco de Mayo in downtown Yakima. Live entertainment, talent show, food and craft vendors. Parade at noon Sunday. Hispanic Chamber, 509-453-2050. yakimahispanicchamber. com

FIRST PRES MOPS — 9-11:15 a.m. Mothers of

Preschoolers. Special tables for Spanish speakers and grandmothers raising grandchildren. Supervision for home-schooled children. First Presbyterian Church, 9 S. Eighth Ave., Yakima; Julie, 509-307-4887.

LOWE’S BUILD & GROW CLINIC — 10 a.m. Reservations recommended. Free building workshop for children and parents. Today’s project: Heart flower vase. Lowe’s, 2500 Rudkin Road, Union Gap; 509-248-3032. lowesbuildandgrow.com

FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m.

OLD STEEL CAR CLUB SHOW — 10 a.m. to 4

Recreational swim with special rates: $1 adult, 50¢ youth. Lions Pool, 509 W. Pine St., Yakima; 509-575-6046.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

A NOTE ABOUT THE CALENDAR Readers asked if there was a way we could make special events stand out from those that repeat on a regular basis. Absolutely! While Busybee remains committed to providing a thorough daily calendar, we’ve highlighted events that occur less often than once a month, as well as recurring events that are new to our calendar, so they won’t get lost in the crowd. Hope this makes planning your day a little easier!

p.m. Central Washington Agricultural Museum, 4508 Main St., Union Gap; 509-457-8735.

MAY 7 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >>

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■ daily planner YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117. FAMILY FIELD DAY — 1-4 p.m. Free family

festival at Sarg Hubbard Park featuring 20 activities including an obstacle course, kayaking, ball toss and healthy snack tasting. Hosted by CWU Dietetic Interns, FitKids USA and Yakima Greenway. A Kiddin’ Around activity.

FAITH NIGHT — 6:30-8 p.m. first Saturdays.

BRAYDON BYRNE, 13 MONTHS

ALIE MAE POWELL

MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion

group for moms with infants under 1 year. Meets at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Community Education in the Nob Hill Plaza, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-575-8484.

ITTY BITTY ART — 1:30-3:30 p.m. Drop-in studio time for parents and kids ages 5 and under. Cost is $5. Red Art & Sunflower Studio, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

Faith and exercise class hosted by Yakima Athletic Club, 2501 Racquet Lane, Yakima. Opening prayer, 20-minute devotional, then hour-long Bodyflow class for adults (yoga/Pilates/tai chi), kids’ exercise class (ages 6-12) and child care for ages 5 and under. Free.

TUESDAY, MAY 10

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. Games,

LA LECHE LEAGUE — 6 p.m. Support for

SUNDAY, MAY 8

WEDNESDAY, MAY 11

MOTHERS’ DAY — We hope all you mommies

MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

swimming, skits and other activities for youth ages 7-15. Free. Sign-in required. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; yakimaymca.org; Doug Berndt, 509-972-5269.

have a really great day!

YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2

p.m. It’s opening day at the market! Shop for fresh produce, crafts and specialty products in front of the Capitol Theatre, Third Street and Yakima Avenue; yakimafarmersmarket.org.

10TH ANNUAL FIESTA GRANDE — 10 a.m.

TEEN MOPS — 4:15-5:30 p.m. Open to teen

mothers through age 21. Meets at Stanton Academy Alternative School, 901 W. Whitman St., Yakima; call Holli, 453-4206.

pregnant and breast-feeding mothers. Children welcome. Call for meeting location, immediate nursing help or questions: Katy, 509-248-2610, or Denita, 509-388-6866.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

CREATIVE FAMILIES PLAY & LEARN GROUP. 6-8 p.m. Free learning activities for parents and children, birth to 5 years. Ready by Five, 414 N. Third St., Yakima; David, 853-2052.

to 7 p.m. Celebrate Cinco de Mayo in downtown Yakima. Charro Parade at noon featuring dancing horses, mariachis, ballet folklorico dancers. Dancing horse show at 12:30 p.m. Car Hop at 3 p.m. Live entertainment, food and vendors. Hispanic Chamber, 509-453-2050. yakimahispanicchamber.com

MOUNTAINVIEW MOPS — 6-7:30 p.m. Mothers of Preschoolers. Mountainview Christian Fellowship, 7105 Alpine Way, Yakima; Tabitha, 509-972-3723.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2

FRIDAY, MAY 13

p.m. See May 7.

MONDAY, MAY 9 WEST SIDE MOPS — 9-11 a.m. Mothers of Preschoolers. West Side Church, 6901 Summitview Ave., Yakima; Christy, 509-457-2888.

GYMKIDS FUN FRIDAY — 6-9 p.m. Drop off

kids ages 3-10 for open gym, games and pizza. Cost: $20 first child, $18 siblings. Reservations not necessary. Selah GymKids, 709 North Park Centre, Selah; 509-698-5437.

ATTENTION FAMILIES! Let’s take some time to

EmbraceAcceptUnify

Bring Your Voice To The Table Because It Counts! Yakima Valley System of Care empowers youth and families to use their Voices! We create an opportunity of equality among Youth, Families and Providers in these systems: • School Services

• Mental Health Services

• Foster/Kinship Care

• Juvenile Justice

• Chemical Dependency

• Developmental Disability Services

Go to www.YakimaValleySOC.org 40

Questions? Please call the Yakima Valley System of Care staff at 574-2977. MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


daily planner

ages 7-15. Free. Sign-in required. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; yakimaymca. org; Doug Berndt, 509-972-5269.

FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m.

Recreational swim with special rates: $1 adult, 50¢ youth. Lions Pool, 509 W. Pine St., Yakima; 509-575-6046.

HIKIN’ AROUND — 9-11 a.m. Guided hike

through Cowiche Canyon. Free; part of the Kiddin’ Around program. Pre-register at 509-453-8280 by 5/12. Bring hiking shoes & water. Meet at the Weikel Road parking lot; visit cowichecanyon. org for directions. Hosted by Cowiche Canyon Conservancy.

ZILLAH’S COMMUNITY DAYS CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION — Beginning at 12:30 p.m.,

activities at Zillah’s downtown Stewart Park include Toddler Trot and Diaper Dash contests, sack race, egg toss, Ugliest Dog and Chug-A-Mug of Root Beer contests and more. Breakfast in the Park, 6-11 a.m.10K Fun Run at 8 a.m. Parade at 11 a.m. Details at www.cityofzillah.us, or call Clayton at 509-740-7451.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. One-hour educational workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg. GYMKIDS SATURDAY PLAYDATE — 10-11:30

a.m. Open gym, zip line and popcorn for children ages 1-5 with their parents. Cost: $10. Selah GymKids, 709 North Park Centre, Selah; 509-6985437.

KIDS’ YOGA — 10:30-11:15 a.m. Drop-in

workshop for kids ages 4-8 introduces yoga basics in a fun, non-competitive environment. Wear comfortable clothes and bring water. Cost: $13 per family. Arrive 10 minutes early for first session. Yakima Yoga, 25 N. Front St., Suite 4, Yakima; 509225-0650; yakimayoga.com

YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s

Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. Games,

YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street and Yakima Avenue, Yakima. WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. See May 14.

MONDAY, MAY 16 MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion

group for moms with infants under 1 year. Meets at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Community Education in the Nob Hill Plaza, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-575-8484.

ITTY BITTY ART — 1:30-3:30 p.m. Drop-in studio time for parents and kids ages 5 and under. Cost is $5. Red Art & Sunflower Studio, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

TUESDAY, MAY 17 VISION AND POOR PERFORMANCE IN SCHOOL — 7 p.m. Workshop for parents or

teachers. Learn how vision therapy can help students who are struggling with school and reading. Presented by Dr. Benjamin C. Winters at Washington Vision Therapy Center, 3909 Creekside Loop, Suite 150, Yakima. Free; call 509654-9256 to register.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 18 FFA LAWN TRACTOR PULL COMPETITION — 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Central Washington

Agricultural Museum, 4508 Main St., Union Gap. Watch high school FFA students compete to see whose lawn tractor can pull the most weight the farthest. For information, 509-833-4311.

MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m. Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509-

MAY 18 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >>

WestPres Christian Preschool Preparing Preschoolers to:

• Love God • Serve Others • Excel in Kindergarten

ELI BERKHEIMER

SUNDAY, MAY 15

SATURDAY, MAY 14

swimming, skits and other activities for youth

Find out more about our:

• Classes for 3, 4 and 5 year olds • Lunch Bunch after-school program • Electives, including Music & Dance

LANDON McDONALD

ration Reg ist e n fo r now op 11! Fall 20

6015 Summitview • 966-1900 • www.westpress.org

Train a child in the way he should go, and when he is old he will not turn from it. – Proverbs 22:5-7 YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

41


■ daily planner CADE AND COLE PAULLIN

MEMORIAL BIBLE MOPS — 9-11:30 a.m. Mothers of Preschoolers. Memorial Bible Church, 111 Old Stage Way, Gleed; Mandy, 509-966-7442. ITTY BITTY ART — 10 a.m. to noon. Drop-in studio time for parents and kids ages 5 and under. Cost is $5. Red Art & Sunflower Studio, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766. SELAH COMMUNITY DAYS — 5-8 p.m. Potato

Feed at the Selah Civic Center. Carnival opens at 4 p.m. at Lince Field. Live entertainment, 6-11 p.m. at Wixson Park. selahdays.org

RUNNIN’/WALKIN’ AROUND — Registration

at 5 p.m., Walk/Run begins at 6 p.m. Kids and adults welcome in this self-paced 1-mile event at Sarg Hubbard Park on the Yakima Greenway. Free; part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program. Receive a ribbon, water and snacks at the finish line. Pre-register at 509-453-8280 by 5/18. Hosted by Yakima Hard Core Runners Club.

FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m.

Recreational swim with special rates: $1 adult, 50¢ youth. Lions Pool, 509 W. Pine St., Yakima; 509-575-6046.

SATURDAY, MAY 21 SELAH COMMUNITY DAYS — 6-10 a.m. 966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

MOMS CLUB OF YAKIMA — 9:30-11 a.m.

Stay-at-home moms and kids meet at Central Lutheran Church, 1603 W. Yakima Ave., Yakima. momsclubofyakima@gmail.com

THURSDAY, MAY 19 BUSYBEE SNEEZE & WHEEZE FAIR — 3-5

p.m. Free family event to learn about asthma and allergies. All ages welcome. Kid’s activities and prizes. Located in the auditorium at Yakima Regional Medical & Cardiac Center, 110 S. 9th Ave., Yakima. yakimabusybee.com

SELAH COMMUNITY DAYS — 4:30-8 p.m.

Hobo Feed, stew and hot dogs at the Selah Civic Center. Carnival opens at 5 p.m. at Lince Field. selahdays.org

FRIDAY, MAY 20

CADEN ROWE, AGE 1

NILE VALLEY MOPS — 8:45-11:15 a.m. Mothers of Preschoolers. Nile Valley Community Church, 60 Bedrock Lane, Naches; 509-658-2904. FIRST PRES MOPS — 9-11:15 a.m. Mothers of

Preschoolers. Special tables for Spanish speakers and grandmothers raising grandchildren. Supervision for home-schooled children. First Presbyterian Church, 9 S. Eighth Ave., Yakima; Julie, 509-307-4887.

42

Pancake Breakfast at the Selah Civic Center. Downtown parade at 10 a.m. Carnival opens at 11 a.m. at Lince Field. Food booths, crafts, games and live entertainment begin at noon at Wixson Park. Gong Show at 6 p.m. Fireworks at 9:30 p.m. selahdays.org

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. One-hour educational workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg. YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117. MARYHILL FAMILY FUN DAY — Founders’ Day: Drive the historic Maryhill Loops Road (free) featuring eight hairpin curves, 11 a.m. to 2 p.m. At the museum, explore painting with maps as canvas, 1-4 p.m. Youth 18 and under free with paid adult on Family Fun days. In a chateau overlooking the Columbia River, the museum collection includes Rodin sculptures, jewels from a Romanian queen and ancient petroglyphs. EyeSEE Activity Room hands-on activities for kids. General admission: $9 adults, $8 seniors, $3 students 7-16, children 6 and under free; or $25 family (two adults and related children). Cafe, gift shop and picnic areas. Maryhill Museum of Art, south of Goldendale on State Route 14; maryhillmuseum.org; 509-773-3733. SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. Games, swimming, skits and other activities for youth ages 7-15. Free. Sign-in required. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; yakimaymca. org; Doug Berndt, 509-972-5269.

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


YOUR CANYON FOR A DAY — 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. The highway through the Yakima River Canyon will be closed to thru traffic so you can enjoy a bike ride with gentle grades, perfect for the whole family. 35-mile round trip; turn around whenever you like. Registration fee is $35 per person or $60 per family (2 adults plus children under 18 years). Proceeds benefit Yakima County Crime Stoppers. For registration or information, visit www.crimestoppersyakco.org. YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street and Yakima Avenue, Yakima. SELAH COMMUNITY DAYS — Food booths,

crafts, games and live entertainment, 11 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. at Wixson Park. Carnival opens at noon. selahdays.org

Wesley Preschool Serving the community for over 30 years!

‘‘

SUNDAY, MAY 22

‘‘

Nurturing your child’s mind, body and spirit by providing an education based in academic preparation and Christian values.

r enrollm. ent! Open fo up now for 2011-2 012 Sign

Classes available for 3 year olds, 4 year olds and Barely 5/Pre-K. rAm,

stAy-n-plAy.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2

Ask About our extended dAy prog

MONDAY, MAY 23

Registration forms and more information available at:

Wesley United Methodist Church 14 N. 48th Avenue, Yakima

www.wesleyofyakima.org

966-2370

p.m. See May 21.

WEST SIDE MOPS — 9-11 a.m. Mothers of

Preschoolers. West Side Church, 6901 Summitview Ave., Yakima; Christy, 509-457-2888.

MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion

group for moms with infants under 1 year. Meets at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Community Education in the Nob Hill Plaza, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-575-8484.

ITTY BITTY ART — 1:30-3:30 p.m. Drop-in studio time for parents and kids ages 5 and under. Cost is $5. Red Art & Sunflower Studio, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

TUESDAY, MAY 24 TEEN MOPS — 4:15-5:30 p.m. Open to teen

mothers through age 21. Meets at Stanton Academy Alternative School, 901 W. Whitman St., Yakima; call Holli, 453-4206.

WEDNESDAY, MAY 25 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

CREATIVE FAMILIES PLAY & LEARN GROUP — 6-8 p.m. Free learning activities for parents and

children, birth to 5 years. Ready by Five, 414 N. Third St., Yakima; David, 853-2052.

MOUNTAINVIEW MOPS — 6-7:30 p.m.

Mothers of Preschoolers. Mountainview Christian Fellowship, 7105 Alpine Way, Yakima; Tabitha, 509-972-3723.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

9 am to 2 pm Sundays May 8th thru Oct. 30th Breakfast served 8:30-10 am

Located on S. 3rd Street off Yakima Ave. in front of the Capitol Theatre Kids’ Day the 3rd Sunday of each month Allied Arts ArtsVan, Country Bunch 4H Club animals & other children’s activites! Presented By

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■ daily planner FRIDAY, MAY 27 FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m.

Recreational swim with special rates: $1 adult, 50¢ youth. Lions Pool, 509 W. Pine St., Yakima; 509-575-6046.

WONDERS OF LIGHT — 7 p.m. From starlight to sunlight, candlelight to neon, light is part of our everyday lives. This free storytelling and song program by Nancy Stewart and MaryLee Sunseri is designed to help students learn about natural and artificial light. Yakima Valley Museum, 2105 Tieton Drive, Yakima; 509-248-0747; yakimavalleymuseum.org.

SATURDAY, MAY 28 RAPTOR HOUSE — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See birds of prey up close as well as flight demonstrations and center tours. Cost: $5 per person. Raptor House Rehabilitation Center, 40 Wise Acre Road, off E. Selah Road; 509-248-5925.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and 10:45

a.m. One-hour educational workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg.

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic

trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org

and Yakima Avenue, Yakima.

LOWE’S BUILD & GROW CLINIC — 10 a.m. Reservations recommended. Free building workshop for children and parents. Today’s project: Biplane. Lowe’s, 2500 Rudkin Road, Union Gap; 509-248-3032. lowesbuildandgrow.com

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org

KIDS’ YOGA — 10:30-11:15 a.m. Drop-in workshop for kids ages 4-8 introduces yoga basics in a fun, non-competitive environment. Wear comfortable clothes and bring water. Cost: $13 per family. Arrive 10 minutes early for first session. Yakima Yoga, 25 N. Front St., Suite 4, Yakima; 509225-0650; yakimayoga.com

MONDAY, MAY 30

YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117. SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. Games, swimming, skits and other activities for youth ages 7-15. Free. Sign-in required. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; yakimaymca. org; Doug Berndt, 509-972-5269.

SUNDAY, MAY 29 YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. See May 28.

MEMORIAL DAY. TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 1 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

MOMS CLUB OF YAKIMA — 9:30-11 a.m.

Stay-at-home moms and kids meet at Central Lutheran Church, 1603 W. Yakima Ave., Yakima. momsclubofyakima@gmail.com

THURSDAY, JUNE 2 DOES YOUR CHILD HAVE A READING PROBLEM? — 7 p.m. Workshop for parents

or teachers. Learn how vision therapy can help students who are struggling with school and reading. Presented by Dr. S. Thomas Copeland at Washington Vision Therapy Center, 3909 Creekside Loop, Suite 150, Yakima. Free; call 509654-9256 to register.

FRIDAY, JUNE 3 FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m.

Recreational swim with special rates: $1 adult, 50¢ youth. Lions Pool, 509 W. Pine St., Yakima; 509-575-6046.

SATURDAY, JUNE 4 JUNIOR GAP2GAP — Kids ages 6-14 can

compete in a run-bike-rollerblade-paddle-obstacle course relay in Yakima’s Sarg Hubbard Park. Cheer on your favorite teams from 8:15 a.m. to noon. Entry fee is $17 per participant; priority registration deadline is May 25. Pre-register at 509453-8280 or www.yakimagreenway.org/g2g. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program.

HOME DEPOT KIDS WORKSHOP — 9 a.m.

to noon. Drop-in wood crafts for ages 5-12. The Home Depot, 2115 S. First St., Yakima; 509-4523016.

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MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


20TH ANNUAL TOPPENISH MURAL IN A DAY — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. See an entire mural come to life in a day. Food and craft vendors, car show. Downtown Toppenish. 509-865-3262

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. One-hour educational workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg. TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117. FAITH NIGHT — 6:30-8 p.m. first Saturdays.

Faith and exercise class hosted by Yakima Athletic Club, 2501 Racquet Lane, Yakima. Opening prayer, 20-minute devotional, then hour-long Bodyflow class for adults (yoga/Pilates/tai chi), kids’ exercise class (ages 6-12) and child care for ages 5 and under. Free.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. See May 28. WORLD’S TOUGHEST MONSTER TRUCK TOUR — 7:30 p.m. Saturday and 3 p.m. Sunday.

Six monster trucks including Bigfoot and kid-favorite Jurassic Attack compete in racing and freestyle at the Coca-Cola Grandstands at State Fair Park. Tickets: $10-$27; Family 4-Pack tickets are $15 each. Purchase tickets at the State Fair Park box office, 1301 S. Fair Ave., Yakima. yakimasundome.com

SUNDAY, JUNE 5 YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street and Yakima Avenue, Yakima. WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. See June 4.

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org TENNIS FREE-4-ALL — 12:30-4 p.m. Registration at 12:30 pm. Group lessons and drills for all ages and abilities. “Quickstart Tennis” lessons for ages 5-12. Free; no equipment required. Exhibition match at 12:30 pm. Mini-tournament at end. Hosted by Yakima Community Tennis Association at Kissel Park, S. 32nd and Mead avenues, Yakima. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program.

WORLD’S TOUGHEST MONSTER TRUCK TOUR — 3 p.m. See June 4.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

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■ daily planner ADDISON MATHEWS, 3

ADDISON, NATALEE AND GRACE FERNANDEZ

MONDAY, JUNE 6 MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion

group for moms with infants under 1 year. Meets at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Community Education in the Nob Hill Plaza, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-575-8484.

ITTY BITTY ART — 1:30-3:30 p.m. Drop-in studio time for parents and kids ages 5 and under. Cost is $5. Red Art & Sunflower Studio, 2522 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-469-2766.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 8 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

CREATIVE FAMILIES PLAY & LEARN GROUP.

provided from Yakima. Bring lunch, hiking shoes and warm clothing. Pre-register by 6/4 with the Yakima Police Athletic League, 509-575-6180. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program.

children). Cafe, gift shop and picnic areas. Maryhill Museum of Art, south of Goldendale on State Route 14; maryhillmuseum.org; 509-773-3733.

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic

Use a digital camera to snap photos when you find the key objects at Yakima’s Sarg Hubbard Park. Free; limited number of cameras available to borrow, or bring your own. Pre-register by 6/9 at 509-453-8280. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program, hosted by Yakima Greenway.

trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org

LOWE’S BUILD & GROW CLINIC — 10 a.m. Reservations recommended. Free building workshop for children and parents. Lowe’s, 2500 Rudkin Road, Union Gap; 509-248-3032. lowesbuildandgrow.com GYMKIDS SATURDAY PLAYDATE — 10-11:30

a.m. Open gym, zip line and popcorn for children ages 1-5 with their parents. Cost: $10. Selah GymKids, 709 North Park Centre; 509-698-5437.

PROSSER SPORTSFEST — 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

6-8 p.m. Free learning activities for parents and children, birth to 5 years. Ready by Five, 414 N. Third St., Yakima; David, 853-2052.

Saturday and Sunday. 3-on-3 hoops tournament in downtown Prosser and co-ed softball tournament. Register by June 7. Concessions available. Prosser Chamber, 509-786-3177. prosserchamber.org

FRIDAY, JUNE 10

YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s

TUMBLIN’ AROUND — 6-7:30 p.m. Ages 3-11

can tackle an obstacle course, learn gymnastics moves and play in Kids Castle. Free; pre-register at gymnasticsplus.net or call 509-453-8126. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program. Gymnastics Plus, 2121 W. Lincoln Ave., Yakima.

GYMKIDS FUN FRIDAY — 6-9 p.m. Drop off

kids ages 3-10 for open gym, games and pizza. Cost: $20 first child, $18 siblings. Reservations not necessary. Selah GymKids, 709 North Park Centre, Selah; 509-698-5437.

FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m. See June 3.

SATURDAY, JUNE 11 BOULDER CAVE EXCURSION — 8 a.m. to

2 p.m. Take a Ranger-guided tour of Boulder Cave/Wenatchee National Forest. Limited to 40 participants; children under 10 must be accompanied by a parent. Free; transportation

46

PHOTO SCAVENGER HUNT — 6-7:30 p.m.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. Games,

swimming, skits and other activities for youth ages 7-15. Free. Sign-in required. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; yakimaymca.org; Doug Berndt, 509-972-5269.

SUNDAY, JUNE 12 YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street and Yakima Avenue, Yakima.

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See June 11. PROSSER SPORTSFEST — 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. See June 11.

Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117.

BICKLETON CAROUSEL RIDES — See June 11.

BICKLETON CAROUSEL RIDES — Bickleton’s

‘WORLD FAMOUS’ LIPIZZANER STALLIONS — 2 p.m. Dancing white horses perform an equine

a tiny town (pop. 90) with an old carousel (circa 1905) that’s set up just once a year during the Alder Creek Pioneer Picnic and Rodeo. Rodeo starts at 1 p.m. Carousel rides: 50 cents. Rodeo admission: $8 adults, $4 children 6-12. Cleveland Park near Bickleton, about 38 miles southeast of Sunnyside. bickleton.org

MARYHILL FAMILY FUN DAY — 1-4 p.m.

Create a landscape with artist Margaret Burkhart using Japanese brushes on newsprint. Youth 18 and under free with paid adult on Family Fun days. In a chateau overlooking the Columbia River, the museum collection includes Rodin sculptures, jewels from a Romanian queen and ancient petroglyphs. EyeSEE Activity Room hands-on activities for kids. General admission: $9 adults, $8 seniors, $3 students 7-16, children 6 and under free; or $25 family (two adults and related

ballet at the Yakima SunDome. Tickets: $22/$26.50 adults, $12 seniors 60+ and children 3-12. Purchase at the State Fair Park box office, 1301 S. Fair Ave. yakimasundome.com; lipizzaner.com

MONDAY, JUNE 13 MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. See June 6.

TUESDAY, JUNE 14 FLAG DAY — See our Play & Learn activity page

on page 5 to make a fun flag-inspired photo frame.

LA LECHE LEAGUE — 6 p.m. Support for

pregnant and breast-feeding mothers. Call for meeting location, nursing help or questions: Katy, 509-248-2610, or Denita, 509-388-6866.

MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


WEDNESDAY, JUNE 15 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m. See June 8.

SELAH’S WEDNESDAY MARKET — 5-8 p.m. Local goods, handmade crafts, Kids Corner educational activities. Located behind King’s Row, S. First St., Selah; 509-698-7305.

o t n i g n S p r i D o oz ! y e k n o M

FRIDAY, JUNE 17 FESTIVAL OF FLOWERS — 12-4:30 p.m. Garden exhibits, antiques, children’s crafts, food vendors. Admission: $5 per person; children 12 and under are free. Proceeds benefit programs at Catholic Family & Child Service. Held on the CFCS Campus at 5301 Tieton Drive, Yakima.

Spring into Monkey Dooz for

FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m. See June 3.

$2

SATURDAY, JUNE 18 FESTIVAL OF FLOWERS — 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. See

June 17.

PROSSER SCOTTISH FEST AND HIGHLAND GAMES — 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. Celtic music, bag

pipes, Highland and Irish dancers, heavy athletic games, children’s activities, traditional food and entertainment, and the infamous anvil launch. Admission: $8 adults, $5 children 5-12 and seniors. Port of Benton Wine and Food Park, take I-82 Exit 82. Prosser Chamber, 509-786-3177. prosserscottishfest.org

We a b o u t a re w i ld yo u r s t y le !!

off any cut or style!

Coupon expires June 30, 2011

A Unique Kids’ Hair Salon Located upstairs in Glenwood Square 5110 Tieton Drive, Yakima

Call 853-4247

9TH ANNUAL DACHSHUNDS ON PARADE — Wiener dogs are the star attraction at this

quirky annual event in downtown Ellenburg: 8:3010:30 a.m. breakfast and registration. 10:30 a.m. costume judging contest. 11 a.m. a “short” parade and poker run, followed by Dachshund races and stupid pet tricks at noon. Farmers Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. dachshundsonparade.com

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and

10:45 a.m. One-hour workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg. JUNE 18 CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE >>

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

47


■ daily planner TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Historic trolleys depart hourly from the car barn at S. Third Avneue and Pine St., Yakima. Cash only: $4 adults, $3 children 12 and under; children ride free on lap. 509-249-5962; yakimavalleytrolleys.org YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s

Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117.

ZUMBATOMIC — 12:30-1:30 p.m. All ages

invited to enjoy movement and exercise to Latin and world music at Sarg Hubbard Park on the Yakima Greenway. Free; part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program. Hosted by Yakima Family YMCA. For info, call 509-972-5276.

SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. See June 11.

description. Tuesdays: 10 a.m. to noon at Randall Park, 44th Avenue south of Nob Hill Boulevard, Yakima. 1-3 p.m. Southeast Yakima Community Center, S. Eighth and Arlington streets, Yakima.

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 22 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 20 for

description. Wednesdays: 10 a.m. to noon at Kissel Park, S. 32nd and Mead avenues, Yakima. 1-3 p.m. Tieton Park, downtown Tieton.

SELAH’S WEDNESDAY MARKET — 5-8 p.m. Local goods, handmade crafts, Kids Corner educational activities. Located behind King’s Row, S. First St., Selah; 509-698-7305. CREATIVE FAMILIES PLAY & LEARN GROUP — 6-8 p.m. Free learning activities for parents and

children, birth to 5 years. Ready by Five, 414 N. Third St., Yakima; David, 853-2052.

DANIEL, RILEY AND KORI WILCOX

SUNDAY, JUNE 19 FATHERS’ DAY — Tell Pop how much you love him! YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

YAKIMA BEARS — 7:05 p.m. vs. Spokane Indians. Bear Buck Wednesday: Pick up a $1 admission voucher at Bi-Mart. General admission: $6.50 adults, $5.50 children 3-12, ages 2 and under free. Yakima County Stadium at State Fair Park, Yakima; yakimabears.com.

Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street and Yakima Avenue, Yakima.

THURSDAY, JUNE 23

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See June 18.

description. Thursdays: 10 a.m. to noon at Chesterley Park, 40th Avenue and River Road, Yakima. 1-3 p.m. Milroy Park, N. 16th and Lincoln avenues, Yakima.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. See June 18.

MONDAY, JUNE 20 SUMMER ARTSVAN — Make free art in the park with the Allied Arts ArtsVan, alliedartsyakima.org. Morning and afternoon drop-in sessions available at different locations each weekday, June 20-July 29. Mondays: 10 a.m. to noon at Franklin Park, S. 21st Avenue and Tieton Drive, Yakima. 1-3 p.m. Miller Park, N. Fourth and E streets, Yakima.

SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 20 for

VISION AND POOR PERFORMANCE IN SCHOOL — 7 p.m. Workshop for parents or

teachers. Learn how vision therapy can help students who are struggling with school and reading. Presented by Dr. S. Thomas Copeland at Washington Vision Therapy Center, 3909 Creekside Loop, Suite 150, Yakima. Free; call 509-654-9256 to register.

group for moms with infants under 1 year. Meets at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Community Education in the Nob Hill Plaza, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-575-8484.

YAKIMA BEARS — 7:05 p.m. vs. Spokane Indians. Thirsty Thursday: $1 soda and juice. General admission: $6.50 adults, $5.50 children 3-12, ages 2 and under free. Yakima County Stadium at State Fair Park, Yakima; yakimabears. com.

TUESDAY, JUNE 21

FRIDAY, JUNE 24

ECW: YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM — 10 a.m.

SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 20 for

MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion

Take an especially-for-families guided tour of the Yakima Valley Museum, 2105 Tieton Drive, Yakima. Cost: $5 one-time registration fee for Explore Central Washington field trip program.

SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 20 for 48

description. Fridays: 10 a.m. to noon at Railroad Park, 10 N. Asotin Ave., Toppenish. 1-3 p.m. Lions Park on S. Camas Avenue, Wapato.

FUNKY FRIDAY NIGHT — 7-8:30 p.m.

Recreational swim with special rates: $1 adult, 50¢

youth. Lions Pool, 509 W. Pine St., Yakima; 509575-6046.

YAKIMA BEARS — 7:05 p.m. vs. Spokane Indians. Family Feast Friday: $1 hot dogs, popcorn, soda and ice cream. General admission: $6.50 adults, $5.50 children 3-12, ages 2 and under free. Yakima County Stadium at State Fair Park, Yakima; yakimabears.com.

SATURDAY, JUNE 25 ECW: SELAH CLIFFS TRAIL WALK — 9 a.m. registration at Yakima Valley Museum. Cost: $5 ECW registration. Meet 10 a.m. at Selah Cliffs Natural Area Preserve Trail Head for a short guided walk to see the rare Basalt daisy and historic wild horse round-up bin. Long pants and walking shoes required (no flip flops); recommended to bring sunscreen, hat, binoculars, water and sack lunch. Pre-register at 509-248-0747. A cross-over event for ECW and Kiddin’ Around. CHERRY FESTIVAL AT BILL’S BERRY FARM — 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Hay rides, kiddie train rides,

pony rides, petting zoo, live music, U-pick/we pick cherries, all-American food, warm cherry donuts. Free admission. Bill’s Berry Farm, 3674 N. County Line Road, Grandview; from I-82, take Exit 75, turn north and follow signs; 509-882-3200.

RAPTOR HOUSE — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See birds of prey up close as well as flight demonstrations and center tours. Cost: $5 per person. Raptor House Rehabilitation Center, 40 Wise Acre Road, off E. Selah Road; 509-248-5925.

WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 9:15 a.m. and 10:45 a.m. One-hour educational workshops featuring chimpanzees who use American Sign Language. Cost: $11 adults, $8.50 students; recommended for ages 6 and up. Call 509-963-2244 for reservations. Central Washington University, Ellensburg.

TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See June 18. LOWE’S BUILD & GROW CLINIC — 10 a.m. Reservations recommended. Free building workshop for children and parents. Lowe’s, 2500 Rudkin Road, Union Gap; 509-248-3032. lowesbuildandgrow.com DARIGOLD DAIRY FAIR DAY — 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. Fun contests include cow milking, ice cream eating and pig calling. Petting zoo, cheese samples and more. Free. Darigold Dairy Fair, 400 Alexander, Sunnyside; 509-837-4321. YU-GI-OH! TOURNAMENT — 12:30 p.m. Ron’s Coin & Book, 6 N. Third St., Yakima; 509-248-1117. SATURDAY NIGHT LIVE — 7-9:30 p.m. Games,

swimming, skits and other activities for youth ages 7-15. Free. Sign-in required. Yakima Family YMCA, 5 N. Naches Ave., Yakima; yakimaymca.org; Doug Berndt, 509-972-5269.

YAKIMA BEARS — 7:05 p.m. vs. Tri-City Dust Devils. General admission: $6.50 adults, $5.50 children 3-12, ages 2 and under free. Yakima MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


County Stadium at State Fair Park, Yakima; yakimabears.com.

SUNDAY, JUNE 26 YAKIMA FARMERS MARKET — 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. Fresh produce, crafts, food vendors. Third Street and Yakima Avenue, Yakima. TROLLEY RIDES — 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. See June 18. WEEKEND CHIMPOSIUM — 12:30 p.m. and 2 p.m. See June 25.

YAKIMA BEARS — 5:35 p.m. vs. Tri-City Dust Devils. General admission: $6.50 adults, $5.50 children 3-12, ages 2 and under free. Yakima County Stadium at State Fair Park, Yakima; yakimabears.com.

MONDAY, JUNE 27 SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 20.. MOM & BABY — 10 a.m. to noon. Discussion

group for moms with infants under 1 year. Meets at Yakima Valley Memorial Hospital’s Community Education in the Nob Hill Plaza, 2506 W. Nob Hill Blvd., Yakima; 509-575-8484.

YAKIMA BEARS — 7:05 p.m. vs. Tri-City Dust Devils. Kids Eat Free: Kids 12 and under can pick up a voucher at Fred Meyer for a free hot dog, chips and soda at Monday night games. General admission: $6.50 adults, $5.50 children 3-12, ages 2 and under free. Yakima County Stadium at State Fair Park, Yakima; yakimabears.com.

U-Pick Sweet Cherries: Late June – July Organic Blueberries: July

We do School Tours! Come to our FREE harvest festivals:

Cherry Festival

Bill’s

www.billsbe

June 25th, 2011 ∙ 9am-5pm

Blueberry Daze Festival July 2nd, 2011 ∙ 9am-5pm

Fun Farm Activities ∙ Pony Rides Petting Zoo ∙ 2 Kid’s Play Areas 3674 N County Line Road, Grandview Take Exit 75 from I-82 509-882-7810 ∙ Open Seasonally

www.billsberryfarm.com

TUESDAY, JUNE 28 SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 21

WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29 MOMMY CONNECTION — 9:15-11:30 a.m.

Faith-based mothers’ group includes activities with the kids, then just for moms. All ages welcome. For child care reservations, call 509966-1900. For more information, email katejoyt@ hotmail.com. Meets at Westminster Presbyterian Church, 6015 Summitview Ave., Yakima.

SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 22. GEO-CACHING AT THE GREENWAY — 2-3 p.m. Learn how to geo-cache and explore at the Yakima Greenway. Free; limited to 20 kids. Call 509-453-8280 to pre-register by 6/27. Part of the Kiddin’ Around summer program.

SELAH’S WEDNESDAY MARKET — 5-8 p.m. Local goods, handmade crafts, Kids Corner educational activities. Located behind King’s Row, S. First St., Selah; 509-698-7305.

THURSDAY, JUNE 30 SUMMER ARTSVAN — See June 23.

YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM • MAY | JUNE 2011

49


■ reading for sanity | by Mindy Oja

“This book is the story of the two love affairs that interrupted the trajectory of my life: one with farming—that dirty, concupiscent art—and the other with a complicated and exasperating farmer.” – Kristin Kimball, The Dirty Life

What is CSA? Community Supported Agriculture is one way for consumers to buy fresh, seasonal produce directly from a local farmer. CSAs sell subscriptions, or shares, in exchange for a weekly box of the latest crops. According to localharvest.org, CSAs allow consumers to reap the benefits of ultra fresh food, exposure to new vegetables and a relationship with their farmer. Your kids may be more willing to try food from “their” farm, even veggies they’ve never been known to eat. Interested in learning more? Here are a couple local CSAs: Heavenly Hills Harvest | Merritt Mitchell-Wajeeh, 762 South Emerald Road, Sunnyside; 509-840-5600 | heavenlyhillsharvest.com | Full and half shares offered. Carrots, potatoes, heirloom tomatoes, salad greens, squash, herbs and more. Pick up at the farm, the Prosser Farmers’ Market or Unitarian Universalist Church of Yakima. Parke Creek Farm | Eric and Bambi Miller, 1981 Parke Creek Road, Ellensburg; 509-968-9630 | parkecreekfarm. com | Full and half shares offered. Salad greens, broccoli, peas, squash, herbs, fresh-cut flowers and more. Pick up at the farm or at the farmers’ markets in Selah, Ellensburg or Roslyn. The farm also offers free-range chicken eggs, goat milk and pasture-raised pork.

☚ 50

K

ristin Kimball never imagined herself on a farm, slaughtering pigs, planting beets, and driving a team of horses. When a chance interview leads to few days of grueling farm work, Kristin falls in love — first, with a way of life, and then with Mark, a farmer who is equal parts eccentric, romantic and worldclass chef. Despite all good sense and the concerns of her family, Kristin moves to a ramshackle farm on 500 acres in upstate New York to cultivate a life of agricultural bliss with her soon-to-be husband. The Dirty Life follows Kristin’s transformation from a single freelance writer and devoted city slicker to that of a wife, mother and down-home farm girl. In a fit of idealism, Kristin and Mark embark on an agricultural venture that, given their lack of capital, equipment and expertise, has very little chance of success. Their goal is to grow and eat their own food – all of it – and to give their community the same opportunity by building a cooperative, CSA-like farm that will provide members with a year-round complete diet of organic fruit, vegetables, beef, chicken, pork, milk, eggs, butter, cheese, grain, dry beans, maple syrup and more. If that isn’t ambitious enough, they plan to do it all without chemical fertilizers or heavy-duty machinery. Mark is determined. Kristin is sure they are crazy. After endless days of what Kristin calls

BOOK REVIEW The Dirty Life by Kristin Kimball

“trying to hammer out this big, awkward thing, [and] bring it from theory into being,” a farm begins to emerge from the dust and the wilds. It hobbles at first, and then it runs, as each week more members arrive at the farm, boxes in hand, to pick up their increasingly unlimited supply of food. While it was thrilling to watch the Kimballs’ dream come true, it was Kristin’s description of the journey that I found most interesting – the successes, failures and frustrations of living a life both gloriously simple and tremendously difficult. Passionate and evocative, The Dirty Life had me at the prologue, with an irresistible blend of food, romance and farm life that continued throughout the book. I was absorbed in the particulars of cooperative farming, the author’s eloquent imagery and unexpected sense of humor. I savored every page of it. Whether you are in love with country living, looking for a little inspiration, or just longing for a good book, The Dirty Life won’t disappoint you. For questions, comments, or more reviews by Mindy Oja, visit readingforsanity.blogspot.com.

SAVE 30 PERCENT off your purchase of the recently released paperback edition of The Dirty Life when you bring this article to Inklings Bookshop. located at Chalet Place, 56th and Summitview, Yakima; 509-965-5830. MAY | JUNE 2011 • YAKIMABUSYBEE.COM


she can’t wait for the next issue of

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May/June 2011 Busybee  

Busybee is a fun and informative magazine for Yakima Valley parents. This issue features stories by moms about the locavore movement, local...