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The Development of Monsters Through Time


The Development of Monsters Through Time

Yaneli Aguiniga Mrs. Karen Redding English 1102 May 2, 2012


English 1102 Final Portfolio Title Table of Contents

Analytical Cover Letter .………………...……………………………………………...…….1 Quality Comparison……………………………………………………………………...…… Least Successful Paper (The original final draft submitted to me) ……………...……3 Most Successful Paper (The original final draft submitted to me)….……………...….7 “What’s the Difference?” Paragraphs ...………………………………………………12 Revision Samples……………………………………………………………...……………… Least Successful Paper (with mark-up) ……………………………...………….……14 Least Successful Paper (new final version) ……………………………………...…...18 Most Successful Paper (with mark-up) ……………………………...………….……22 Most Successful Paper (new final version) …………..……………...………….……27 Free Choice Essay (with mark-up) ……...…………………………...………….……32 Free Choice Essay (new final version) …….………………………...………….……35


April 30, 2012 Karen P. Redding, M.A. Assistant Professor of English Gainesville State College Oconee Campus 304 Oconee Classroom 1202 Bishop Farms Parkway Watkinsville, Georgia 30677 Dear Mrs. Redding, As the semester has come to an end and I look back to the writings I did in your class, I noticed that I have made big improvements in my writing. Before I was in your class, I considered myself to be an average writer. I knew there were things I needed to improve on so my writing could be even better, but overall I thought my writing was not that bad. In your class, I was able to learn about new ways to improve my writing and tips that will help me to form better papers. The comments you provided about my papers were very useful. They helped me identify the areas I need to work on and were helpful when it came to fixing those mistakes. I have gathered in this portfolio some of the writings I did this semester and reflect the progress I made in your class. When it comes to writing papers, I usually struggle with coming up with a good thesis statement. My thesis statements were sometimes vein or were not very interesting and needed to work on it to improve the quality of it. In your English class, I was able to improve in this area and use what you taught me to develop a good thesis statement. In my first paper, my thesis statement was: “In the articles “Monsters and the Moral Imagination” and “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings” the authors talk about people using their imagination, scary experiences one has faced before, or might face in the future, and nightmares to create a monster figure” (Aguiniga, paper 1). This thesis statement needed some work because it does not give a full understanding. There are ways this thesis can be rearranged to make it sound more interesting. It also includes words that should not be included in a paper. When it came to writing the next paper, I improved in this area and developed a well composed thesis. “Because No Country for Old Men is such an unconventional story, the Coen brothers use darkness and light in order to demonstrate that evil is ever evolving and unpredictable, while good is naive and methodical” (Aguiniga, paper 2). This shows the improvements I made because it sounds better and it reflects on what will be discussed in the paper. It provides good information that the wording of it is better than in my first thesis statement. I was also able to improve in the format and the style in which I wrote my papers and improve my grammar mistakes. My papers from the beginning showed weakness in the structure. It sometimes did not flow smoothly and had many grammatical errors in them. As I wrote more papers, I improved in these areas. I learned how to provide more supportive facts and examples to support my thesis and support what I am saying. I learned how to organize them better so they flowed more smoothly and could understand the papers better. My grammatical errors also improved and I know how to fix the simple mistakes I made on my first papers.


Thanks to the picky rules you showed me, they helped me to enhance my writing and apply them to my papers and make sure I did not included any of those mistakes. It is a great tool for checking yourself and making sure you papers are well written. My experience in your class was great. I enjoyed coming in and learning about ways to improve my writing. You gave useful advice and your comments were always useful for me because it helped me identify the areas I needed to work on. My improvements helped me to become a better writer and write better papers. At the beginning of the semester, my papers were not the best, but as the semester went along, I showed improvement and I am able to compose a much better paper using what I learned in your class. I was able to improve on my writing in so many ways and will continue to use what you taught me in the future when writing papers for other classes.

Sincerely,

Yaneli Aguiniga


Yaneli Aguiniga English 1102, Redding Paper 1 Final 1-30-2012 “Creating Monsters Using Our Imagination” Over time, the idea of monsters has grown and has ended up being a part of today’s society. There are different kinds of monsters that exist because we have allowed them to become apart of us and have even created some of those monsters. They tend to not only be thought of as scary creatures that are born being monsters, but also as human monsters and other objects. Everyone has their own thoughts and views of what a monster is. For some it may be a scary creature and for others it may be humans. We sometimes tend to create the monsters ourselves by using our mind and putting together our knowledge. Some of the monsters that exist today have emerged from people using their minds to create them themselves. In the articles “Monsters and the Moral Imagination” and “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings” the authors talk about people using their imagination, scary experiences one has faced before, or might face in the future, and nightmares to create a monster figure. Monsters are sometimes created from people’s imagination by putting together their thoughts and ideas to help guide and create their own image that ends up being known as a monster to everyone. Using our imagination allows us to go beyond and create new ideas of monster figures. When we use our imagination, we think of different characteristics that might characterize a monster and put those together. In the article “Monsters and the Moral Imagination” it stated that “a crucial but often-ignored aspect of Monsterology is the role those


beasties play in our moral imaginations” (Asma, 1). This shows that using our imagination plays a role in monsters because we tend to play around with it to create them ourselves. When we think of what a monster is, we sometimes tend to classify other items or even humans as monsters as well because they might share the same characteristics of what a typical monster looks like or acts. A typical monster for someone might be one that’s mean, scary, and harmful. Then if one encounters a person that’s mean all the time and seems to be harmful to them, then the person might classify them as a monster. They might also classify a person who has killed someone a monster because of the harm they have done and the scariness they cause. They also sometimes tend to emerge from scary experiences one has faced before or might face in the future. “Monsters can stand as symbols of human vulnerability and crisis and as such they play imaginative foils for thinking about our own response to menace” (Asma, 1). With Asma including this in his article, he was getting across that people sometimes tend to use their mind and imagination to create monsters from horrible situations faced. An example of how a monster can come from an experience faced could be a person that has been in a situation where they were being robbed. The robber could have been someone who was mean, frightful, and only wanted to do harm. The person being robbed would think of him as a monster because he acted just like a monster would. Another situation may be a person wanting to kill someone. The person is more than likely to interpret the person as a monster because in their mind they are a representation of a monster, someone who might try to kill others. Even if a person hasn’t been through a scary situation, they can think of situations like this and think of how the bad guys could be a monster. They can put themselves in these frightful situations and think of how they might respond to them and from that, they might classify the bad guy as a monster depending on the situation.


Nightmares can also be another way monsters have emerged. When one has nightmares, they may dream of scary things or might dream of monsters. Dreaming about monsters could lead to the possibility of bringing them to life. We use our imaginations to use our dreams as a tool for creating certain monsters. Some of the monsters known today have occurred from dreams people once had. In the article “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings,” it included examples of some famous monsters known today that came from dreams or nightmares. One example it included was Mary Shelley’s creation of Frankenstein, a monster that was created based on a dream that Mary Shelley once had. “Mary Shelley first dreamed of the creature at a time in her life fought with tragedies connected with childbirth” (Carroll, 20). She ended up taking this dream she had and used it to create a creature that represented her dream which came to be known as Frankenstein. This shows that monsters can also come from the minds dreams. We are able to use them to help form new versions of monsters. Monsters have emerged in many ways. A monster can not only be a creature that is born being a monster, but also a creature that we have created ourselves. By using our imagination, experiences, and nightmares, it allows us to create various types of monsters because we use our own views we have of them to help us create them. It also allows us to be creative and create monsters that don’t exist already. There are many forms of monsters and many different ways of creating them. People play an important role in their existence because of our perspective towards them and using what we know to create more and more of them.


Works Cited Asma, Stephen T. "Monsters and the Moral Imagination." Web Carroll. Noel. "Nightmare And The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology Of Fantastic Beings." The Anxious Subject: Nightmares and Daymares in Literature and Film. 91-105. Malibu: Undena, 1983. MLA International Bibliography. Web. 19 Jan. 2012.


Christopher Adkins Yaneli Aguiniga English 1102, Redding Film Analysis 2-27-12 Supremacy of darkness over light in No Country for Old Men “The crime you see now, it's hard to even take its measure” (No Country for Old Men ). This line spoken by Sheriff Ed Tom Bell in No Country for Old Men envelopes the stress and misunderstanding of the current evils by the law enforcement of the 1980’s. Arguably, the most famous and well known film directed by the Coen brothers, No Country for Old Men, is the unconventional story of the inability of good to stop evil. Because No Country for Old Men is such an unconventional story, the Coen brothers use darkness and light in order to demonstrate that evil is ever evolving and unpredictable, while good is naive and methodical. The Coen brothers used different amounts of light on characters to help viewers’ associate darkness with evil and light with good. The use of light on Anton Chigurh throughout the film portrays him as a dark and wicked character. The directors purposefully cast shadows on him and placed Chigurh in dark rooms with minimal light to help associate him with evil. The scene at the end of the movie when Anton is waiting for Carla Jean in the bedroom is a great example of the usage of light to show his darkness. When Carla Jean enters the room, Chigurh is sitting in a chair in the corner of the room with no light shining on his face or body, although there is light shining in through the window. Without knowing he was a ruthless murderer, it can be seen he is evil in some way.


On the other hand, the same scene where Anton Chigurh is cast as a dark character is used to contrast Carla Jean as an innocent and good character. Carla Jean’s face and body is well lit in this scene as opposed to Anton. By using different shades of light on the two characters in the same scene, the directors can better associate the difference between the two character’s moralities. Another example of the use of light on a good character is the use of light on Sheriff Ed Tom Bell in the closing scenes of the film. As the sheriff tells his dreams to his wife, his face is brightly lit by the natural light coming from the kitchen window. By the end of the film, the directors have already associated the use of light with good characters. Light can also be used to show a transition between behaving good or evil. In the scene when Llewellyn is sitting on the hotel bed waiting to attack Anton Chigurh, the light shown on Llewellyn’s face question whether he is a good or bad character. A shadow is used to cover half of Llewellyn’s face while the other half is well lit. By acknowledging the use of light on Anton and Carla Jean’s faces, the directors leave the moral position of Llewellyn up to the viewers. It is important for the directors to develop these affiliations early in order for the viewer to notice a change in use of light. After the directors have associated light with good and dark with evil, they break these associations in order to draw attention to the inability to predict or stop the evolution of evil. In order to show the advancement of Anton Chigurh, the directors have him commit crimes in daylight and well lit areas. For example, the scene when Anton Chigurh firsts demonstrates his captive bolt gun, he is standing in broad daylight on the side on the road. Later in the film, he blows up a truck in front of a pharmacy in broad daylight and walks away unnoticed. The uses of light in these scenes seem odd considering Anton is a criminal avoiding capture. The decision to use this technique also breaks the previously established association of evil equaling darkness. The purpose for breaking this association is to strongly convey the idea that evil is unpredictable;


so unpredictable that murder in broad daylight is acceptable. Later in the film, Sheriff Bell is told Anton has walked back into a crime scene in broad daylight. Although this scene is not showed in the film, it is important for the directors to include the words, broad daylight. This scene also contradicts the behavior of normal criminals and causes Sheriff Bell to question his methods for tracking Anton Chigurh. Bell knows Anton Chigurh is different and more advanced than other criminals. The Coen brothers try to draw attention to why Anton cannot be stopped through the use of contradictory lighting, suggesting the use of the same technique would prove favorable for Sheriff Bell. Instead of using contradictory light to break the association between darkness and evil, the directors reinforce that darkness is supreme over light and good by overpowering scenes with darkness. Sheriff Bell struggles throughout the film with not knowing how to stop Anton Chigurh. It is not until the end of the film that Sheriff Bell comes to terms with his inability to adapt to stopping the new evil. The directors use darkness and shadows to show the struggle of Sheriff Bell with coming to terms with his inadequacy. The scene when Sheriff Bell returns to Llewellyn’s murder shows the best picture of the stress of chasing Chigurh. Sheriff Bell is sitting on the bed with the wrinkles in his forehead and face clearly defined by the shadows. The directors use darkness to show stress which is important because it seems the darkness is stronger than light. The breaking point for Sheriff Bell comes a moment before in the same scene. As Sheriff Bell enters the hotel room, he is engulfed in darkness. He doesn’t see the shadow of Chigurh behind the door. At this point Bell sits on the bed as if he has given up. The directors use the engulfment of darkness to show the strength and overwhelming nature of evil. Although Sheriff Bell has finally caught up with Chigurh, he gives up and later retires. The use of darkness to show the weakness of good reinforces that evil is supreme.


Evil and good is shown to be related with the way light is represented. The different light techniques used in the film were used as a way of determining the good and the evil. Evil is usually seen as dark, scary and harmful while good is seen as the opposite. The dark light is a form of representing the scary and harmful parts throughout the film and a way of showing it is unpredictable. The bright light served as a symbol for representing the good and used to make the characters and scenes more calm, peaceful and innocent. By using the different types of lighting, it helps the film portray the difference between good and evil and show how they evolve.


Works Cited No Country for Old Men. Dir. Joel Coen. Prod. Joel Coen and Ethan Coen. Miramax. 2007. DVD.


What’s the Difference? Looking back at the most successful and least successful essays, I can see that the two papers are different. One of them is more developed and well thought through than the other one. They show the progress and the developments I made. For my least successful paper, I chose “Creating Monsters Using Our Imagination” and for my most successful paper, I chose “Supremacy of darkness over light in No Country for Old Men.” “Creating Monsters Using Our Imagination” was my least successful paper because of the writing style and because I feel like this was not one of the best papers I wrote. I did not feel the confidence that I had done a good job. It needed more work and can be improved in many ways. I struggled with developing this paper into a well written paper. Some sentences did not fit in well with the paper and was somewhat unorganized. Some of my ideas were not clear and were sometimes confusing. I had a hard at some points getting across what I wanted to say and felt like I was not explaining myself well. The thesis statement also needed some work. It served as a good beginning, but I know I can work on it and make it into a well developed thesis. This essay also lacked examples and did not show any supportive facts to help back up my statements. There was no evidence to support or relate back to the thesis. It also had many grammatical errors to be fixed and used words like “people” or “society” that should not be used in a paper because it does not make it look good. Overall, I found many mistakes using the picky rules that needed work and improvement. My most successful paper was “Supremacy of darkness over light in No Country for Old Men.” I consider this paper my most successful one because I was more confident in what I wrote and felt more successful than the first paper I wrote. The ideas in this paper were clearer


and could understand them easily. It included many examples and facts that supported my thesis and support what I was getting across. My thesis statement was well written. It explained what I was going to write about in the paper and the ideas of it were well thought out. I used the Picky Rules as a way to check my self and change any mistakes found. It helped me catch and fix the grammatical errors and enhance the writing style. The rules were useful to improve this paper. I was able to not include words that are not needed in a paper such as “people” or “society”. These two essays showed the difference between a well developed and not so well developed paper as well the improvements I made. The first essay needed some work with many aspects of it. I was able to work on those mistakes and fix them so my next paper was better written than the first. These papers show the progress I made and how I have grown as a writer. Now, I am able to write papers that are better than the ones I wrote before.


Yaneli Aguiniga English 1102, Redding Paper 1 Final 1-30-2012 “Creating Monsters Using Our Imagination”

Comment [GSC1]: Don’t need quotations

Over time, the idea of monsters has grown and has ended up being a part of today’s society. There are different kinds of monsters that exist because we have allowed them to

Comment [GSC2]: What society?

become apart of us and have even created some of those monsters. They tend to not only be thought of as scary creatures that are born being monsters, but also as human monsters and other objects. Everyone has their own thoughts and views of what a monster is. For some it may be a

Comment [GSC3]: What kind of other objects? Be more specific

scary creature and for others it may be humans. We sometimes tend to create the monsters

Comment [GSC4]: Who is we?

ourselves by using our mind and putting together our knowledge. Some of the monsters that exist

Comment [GSC5]: How so?

today have emerged from people using their minds to create them themselves. In the articles

Comment [GSC6]: Don’t use people.

“Monsters and the Moral Imagination” and “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings” the authors talk about people using their imagination, scary

Comment [GSC7]: Which authors? Provide their names

experiences one has faced before, or might face in the future, and nightmares to create a monster

Comment [GSC8]: Avoid using people

figure. Monsters are sometimes created from people’s imagination by putting together their

Comment [GSC9]: Don’t use people. It is not specific

thoughts and ideas to help guide and create their own image that ends up being known as a monster to everyone. Using our imagination allows us to go beyond and create new ideas of

Comment [GSC10]: Who is everyone refereeing to?

monster figures. When we use our imagination, we think of different characteristics that might

Comment [GSC11]: Beyond where?

characterize a monster and put those together. In the article “Monsters and the Moral Imagination” it stated that “a crucial but often-ignored aspect of Monsterology is the role those

Comment [GSC12]: What kind of monster figures? Comment [GSC13]: Be more specific? Comment [GSC14]: Who’s we?


beasties play in our moral imaginations” (Asma, 1). This shows that using our imagination plays

Comment [GSC15]: What is “this” referring to?

a role in monsters because we tend to play around with it to create them ourselves. When we think of what a monster is, we sometimes tend to classify other items or even humans as monsters as well because they might share the same characteristics of what a typical monster looks like or acts. A typical monster for someone might be one that’s mean, scary, and harmful. Then if one encounters a person that’s mean all the time and seems to be harmful to them, then

Comment [GSC16]: Avoid contractions

the person might classify them as a monster. They might also classify a person who has killed someone a monster because of the harm they have done and the scariness they cause. They also sometimes tend to emerge from scary experiences one has faced before or

Comment [GSC17]: Who is they? It is unclear

might face in the future. “Monsters can stand as symbols of human vulnerability and crisis and as such they play imaginative foils for thinking about our own response to menace” (Asma, 1). With Asma including this in his article, he was getting across that people sometimes tend to use

Comment [GSC18]: Specify what “this” is referring to

their mind and imagination to create monsters from horrible situations faced. An example of how a monster can come from an experience faced could be a person that has been in a situation where they were being robbed. The robber could have been someone who was mean, frightful,

Comment [GSC19]: Re word this sentence. It is a bit confusing

and only wanted to do harm. The person being robbed would think of him as a monster because he acted just like a monster would. Another situation may be a person wanting to kill someone. The person is more than likely to interpret the person as a monster because in their mind they are a representation of a monster, someone who might try to kill others. Even if a person hasn’t been through a scary situation, they can think of situations like this and think of how the bad guys could be a monster. They can put themselves in these frightful situations and think of how they might respond to them and from that, they might classify the bad guy as a monster depending on the situation.

Comment [GSC20]: Do not use contractions


Nightmares can also be another way monsters have emerged. When one has nightmares, they may dream of scary things or might dream of monsters. Dreaming about monsters could

Comment [GSC21]: Avoid. It is not making a clear statement

lead to the possibility of bringing them to life. We use our imaginations to use our dreams as a tool for creating certain monsters. Some of the monsters known today have occurred from

Comment [GSC22]: This sentence is confusing. Try rewording it

dreams people once had. In the article “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings,” it included examples of some famous monsters known today that came

Comment [GSC23]: What is this referring to?

from dreams or nightmares. One example it included was Mary Shelley’s creation of Frankenstein, a monster that was created based on a dream that Mary Shelley once had. “Mary Shelley first dreamed of the creature at a time in her life fought with tragedies connected with childbirth” (Carroll, 20). She ended up taking this dream she had and used it to create a creature that represented her dream which came to be known as Frankenstein. This shows that monsters can also come from the minds dreams. We are able to use them to help form new versions of

Comment [GSC24]: Be more specific

monsters. Monsters have emerged in many ways. A monster can not only be a creature that is born being a monster, but also a creature that we have created ourselves. By using our imagination,

Comment [GSC25]: Specify

experiences, and nightmares, it allows us to create various types of monsters because we use our

Comment [GSC26]: Who is us?

own views we have of them to help us create them. It also allows us to be creative and create monsters that don’t exist already. There are many forms of monsters and many different ways of

Comment [GSC27]: No contractions

creating them. People play an important role in their existence because of our perspective

Comment [GSC28]: Different word choice

towards them and using what we know to create more and more of them.

Comment [GSC29]: Specify


Works Cited Asma, Stephen T. "Monsters and the Moral Imagination." Web Carroll. Noel. "Nightmare And The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology Of Fantastic Beings." The Anxious Subject: Nightmares and Daymares in Literature and Film. 91-105. Malibu: Undena, 1983. MLA International Bibliography. Web. 19 Jan. 2012.


Yaneli Aguiniga English 1102, Redding Paper 1 Final 1-30-2012 Creating Monsters Using Our Imagination Over time, the idea of monsters has grown and has ended up being a part of the world and a part of the lives there exist. There are different kinds of monsters that exist because we have allowed them to become apart of us and have even created some of those monsters. They tend to not only be thought of as scary creatures that are born being monsters, but also as human monsters, scary events, or anything that is dangerous and scary in some way that causes harm. Everyone has their own thoughts and views of what a monster is. For some it may be a scary creature and for others it may be humans. Monsters are sometimes created from our mind and use it to put together the knowledge and everything we know about monsters in order to form a monster figure. Some of the monsters that exist today have emerged from the knowledge and imaginations of others. In the articles “Monsters and the Moral Imagination” and “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings” Stephen T. Asma talked about people using their imagination, scary experiences one has faced before, or might face in the future, and nightmares to create a monster figure. Monsters are sometimes created from imagination by putting together thoughts and ideas to help guide and create monster figures that end up being known only as a monster. Using our imagination allows us to go beyond the normal standards of a typical monster and explore new ideas for creating monster figures. When the imagination is used, different characteristics are thought of that might characterize a monster combine them. In the article “Monsters and the


Moral Imagination” it stated that “a crucial but often-ignored aspect of Monsterology is the role those beasties play in our moral imaginations” (Asma, 1). The article shows the significance of imagination and the role it plays with monsters because of the tendency of playing around with it to create them ourselves. When one thinks of what a monster is, monsters are usually classified based on whether it shares the same characteristics of what a monster typically is or looks like. A typical monster for someone might be one that’s mean, scary, and harmful. Then if one encounters a person that is mean all the time and seems to be harmful to them, then the person might classify them as a monster. They might also classify a person who has killed someone a monster because of the harm they have done and the scariness they cause. Monsters also sometimes tend to emerge from scary experiences one has faced before or might face in the future. “Monsters can stand as symbols of human vulnerability and crisis and as such they play imaginative foils for thinking about our own response to menace” (Asma, 1). With Asma including this quote in his article, he was getting across that people sometimes tend to use their mind and imagination to create monsters from horrible situations faced. An example of how a monster can come from an experience one has encountered is when someone has been in a situation where they were robbed. The robber was probably someone who was mean, frightful, and only wanted to do harm. The person who was getting robbed would think and categorize him as a monster because he acted just like a monster would. He showed the same characteristics as the typical monster. Another situation may be a person wanting to kill someone. The person is more than likely to interpret the person as a monster because in their mind they are a representation of a monster, someone who might try to kill others. Even if one has not been through a scary situation, they can think of situations like this and think of how the bad guys could be a monster. They can put themselves in these frightful situations and think of


how they might respond to them and from that, they might classify the bad guy as a monster depending on the situation. Nightmares can also be another way monsters have emerged. When one has nightmares, they may dream of scary things or dream about monsters. Dreaming about monsters could lead to the possibility of bringing them to life. We use our imagination and work with our dreams to create certain monsters. Some of the monsters known today have occurred from dreams people once had. In the article “Nightmare and The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology of Fantastic Beings,” it included examples of some famous monsters known today that came from dreams or nightmares. One example it included was Mary Shelley’s creation of Frankenstein, a monster that was created based on a dream that Mary Shelley once had. “Mary Shelley first dreamed of the creature at a time in her life fought with tragedies connected with childbirth” (Carroll, 20). She ended up taking this dream she had and used it to create a creature that represented her dream which came to be known as Frankenstein. This shows that monsters can also come from the minds dreams and are helpful for forming new versions of monsters. Monsters have emerged in many ways. A monster can not only be a creature that is born being a monster, but also a creature created from someone. By using the imagination, experiences, and nightmares, it forms various types of monsters because our own personal views are used that form them. It also allows new forms of monsters to exist that do not already exist and be creative when forming them. There are many forms of monsters and many different ways of creating them. The imagination plays an important role in the existence of monsters because of the perspective there exists towards them and using the knowledge to create more and more of them.


Works Cited Asma, Stephen T. "Monsters and the Moral Imagination." Web Carroll. Noel. "Nightmare And The Horror Film: The Symbolic Biology Of Fantastic Beings." The Anxious Subject: Nightmares and Daymares in Literature and Film. 91-105. Malibu: Undena, 1983. MLA International Bibliography. Web. 19 Jan. 2012.


Christopher Adkins Yaneli Aguiniga English 1102, Redding Film Analysis 2-27-12 Supremacy of darkness over light in No Country for Old Men

Comment [GSC1]: Capitalize the words in the title

“The crime you see now, it's hard to even take its measure” (No Country for Old Men ). This line spoken by Sheriff Ed Tom Bell in No Country for Old Men envelopes the stress and

Comment [GSC2]: Avoid using passive voice

misunderstanding of the current evils by the law enforcement of the 1980’s. Arguably, the most

Comment [GSC3]: No apostrophe needed

famous and well known film directed by the Coen brothers, No Country for Old Men, is the unconventional story of the inability of good to stop evil. Because No Country for Old Men is

Comment [GSC4]: Elaborate on what good and evil is

such an unconventional story, the Coen brothers use darkness and light in order to demonstrate that evil is ever evolving and unpredictable, while good is naive and methodical. The Coen brothers used different amounts of light on characters to help viewers’ associate darkness with evil and light with good. The use of light on Anton Chigurh throughout the film portrays him as a dark and wicked character. The directors purposefully cast shadows on him and placed Chigurh in dark rooms with minimal light to help associate him with evil. The scene at the end of the movie when Anton is waiting for Carla Jean in the bedroom is a great

Comment [GSC5]: Avoid using any form of “to be”. It’s used many times through out the paper

example of the usage of light to show his darkness. When Carla Jean enters the room, Chigurh is sitting in a chair in the corner of the room with no light shining on his face or body, although there is light shining in through the window. Without knowing he was a ruthless murderer, it can

Comment [GSC6]: With there being no light on him, what does it mean?

be seen he is evil in some way.

Comment [GSC7]: What ways? Maybe use different word choice


On the other hand, the same scene where Anton Chigurh is cast as a dark character is used to contrast Carla Jean as an innocent and good character. Carla Jean’s face and body is well lit in this scene as opposed to Anton. By using different shades of light on the two characters in

Comment [GSC8]: What does her being lit mean in specific?

the same scene, the directors can better associate the difference between the two character’s moralities. Another example of the use of light on a good character is the use of light on Sheriff Ed Tom Bell in the closing scenes of the film. As the sheriff tells his dreams to his wife, his face is brightly lit by the natural light coming from the kitchen window. By the end of the film, the

Comment [GSC9]: What does the bright light mean? What does it signify?

directors have already associated the use of light with good characters. Light can also be used to

Comment [GSC10]: Maybe start a new paragraph here

show a transition between behaving good or evil. In the scene when Llewellyn is sitting on the hotel bed waiting to attack Anton Chigurh, the light shown on Llewellyn’s face question whether he is a good or bad character. A shadow is used to cover half of Llewellyn’s face while the other half is well lit. By acknowledging the use of light on Anton and Carla Jean’s faces, the directors leave the moral position of Llewellyn up to the viewers. It is important for the directors to

Comment [GSC11]: Avoid

develop these affiliations early in order for the viewer to notice a change in use of light.

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After the directors have associated light with good and dark with evil, they break these associations in order to draw attention to the inability to predict or stop the evolution of evil. In order to show the advancement of Anton Chigurh, the directors have him commit crimes in daylight and well lit areas. For example, the scene when Anton Chigurh firsts demonstrates his captive bolt gun, he is standing in broad daylight on the side on the road. Later in the film, he blows up a truck in front of a pharmacy in broad daylight and walks away unnoticed. The uses of light in these scenes seem odd considering Anton is a criminal avoiding capture. The decision to use this technique also breaks the previously established association of evil equaling darkness. The purpose for breaking this association is to strongly convey the idea that evil is unpredictable;


so unpredictable that murder in broad daylight is acceptable. Later in the film, Sheriff Bell is told

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Anton has walked back into a crime scene in broad daylight. Although this scene is not showed

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in the film, it is important for the directors to include the words, broad daylight. This scene also contradicts the behavior of normal criminals and causes Sheriff Bell to question his methods for tracking Anton Chigurh. Bell knows Anton Chigurh is different and more advanced than other criminals. The Coen brothers try to draw attention to why Anton cannot be stopped through the

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use of contradictory lighting, suggesting the use of the same technique would prove favorable for

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Sheriff Bell. Instead of using contradictory light to break the association between darkness and evil, the directors reinforce that darkness is supreme over light and good by overpowering scenes with darkness. Sheriff Bell struggles throughout the film with not knowing how to stop Anton

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Chigurh. It is not until the end of the film that Sheriff Bell comes to terms with his inability to

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adapt to stopping the new evil. The directors use darkness and shadows to show the struggle of Sheriff Bell with coming to terms with his inadequacy. The scene when Sheriff Bell returns to Llewellyn’s murder shows the best picture of the stress of chasing Chigurh. Sheriff Bell is sitting on the bed with the wrinkles in his forehead and face clearly defined by the shadows. The directors use darkness to show stress which is important because it seems the darkness is stronger than light. The breaking point for Sheriff Bell comes a moment before in the same scene. As Sheriff Bell enters the hotel room, he is engulfed in darkness. He doesn’t see the shadow of Chigurh behind the door. At this point Bell sits on the bed as if he has given up. The directors use the engulfment of darkness to show the strength and overwhelming nature of evil. Although Sheriff Bell has finally caught up with Chigurh, he gives up and later retires. The use of darkness to show the weakness of good reinforces that evil is supreme.

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Evil and good is shown to be related with the way light is represented. The different light

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techniques used in the film were used as a way of determining the good and the evil. Evil is usually seen as dark, scary and harmful while good is seen as the opposite. The dark light is a form of representing the scary and harmful parts throughout the film and a way of showing it is unpredictable. The bright light served as a symbol for representing the good and used to make the characters and scenes more calm, peaceful and innocent. By using the different types of lighting, it helps the film portray the difference between good and evil and show how they

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evolve.

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.

Works Cited

No Country for Old Men. Dir. Joel Coen. Prod. Joel Coen and Ethan Coen. Miramax. 2007. DVD.


Christopher Adkins Yaneli Aguiniga English 1102, Redding Film Analysis 2-27-12 Supremacy of darkness over light in No Country for Old Men “The crime you see now, it's hard to even take its measure” (No Country for Old Men). Sheriff Ed Tom Bell said this line in No Country for Old Men and acts as a way to envelope the stress and misunderstanding of the current evils by the law enforcement of the 1980s. Arguably, the most famous and well known film directed by the Coen brothers, No Country for Old Men, is the unconventional story of the inability of good to stop evil. Good meaning kind, generous, and acting in ways that are considered to be normal and evil referring to harmful, devilish and performing abnormal actions. Because No Country for Old Men is such an unconventional story, the Coen brothers use darkness and light in order to demonstrate that evil is ever evolving and unpredictable, while good is naive and methodical. The Coen brothers used different amounts of light on characters to help viewers’ associate darkness with evil and light with good. The use of light on Anton Chigurh throughout the film portrays him as a dark and wicked character. The directors purposefully cast shadows on him and placed Chigurh in dark rooms with minimal light to help associate him with evil. A good example of the usage of light used to show his darkness is in the scene where Anton is waiting for Carla Jean in the bedroom. When Carla Jean enters the room, Chigurh is sitting in a chair in the corner of the room with no light shining on his face or body, although there is light shining in through the window. No light on Chigurh’s face means that he is an evil person


because of the minimum light shown. Without knowing he was a ruthless murderer, it can be seen he is evil because of the light usage used when he is shown. On the other hand, the same scene where Anton Chigurh is cast as a dark character is used to contrast Carla Jean as an innocent and good character. Using more bright light on her shows she is a good character because the bright light is associated with good in the way that it is more noticeable and cheerful. Carla Jean’s face and body is well lit in this scene as opposed to Anton. By using different shades of light on the two characters in the same scene, the directors can better associate the difference between the two character’s moralities. Another example of the use of light on a good character is the use of light on Sheriff Ed Tom Bell in the closing scenes of the film. As the sheriff tells his dreams to his wife, his face is brightly lit by the natural light coming from the kitchen window. The light shows that the sheriff is good because the light used is brighter and happier. By the end of the film, the directors have already associated the use of light with good characters. Light can also be used to show a transition between behaving good or evil. In the scene where Llewellyn is sitting on the hotel bed waiting to attack Anton Chigurh, the light shown on Llewellyn’s face questions whether he is a good or bad character. It is questionable because a shadow only covers half of Llewellyn’s face while the other half is well lit. By acknowledging the use of light on Anton and Carla Jean’s faces, the directors leave the moral position of Llewellyn up to the viewers. After the directors have associated light with good and dark with evil, they break these associations in order to draw attention to the inability to predict or stop the evolution of evil. In order to show the advancement of Anton Chigurh, the directors have him commit crimes in daylight and well lit areas. For example, the scene when Anton Chigurh firsts demonstrates his


captive bolt gun, he is standing in broad daylight on the side on the road. Later in the film, he blows up a truck in front of a pharmacy in broad daylight and walks away unnoticed. The uses of light in these scenes seem odd considering Anton is a criminal avoiding capture. The decision to use this technique also breaks the previously established association of evil equaling darkness. The purpose for breaking this association is to strongly convey the idea that evil is unpredictable; so unpredictable that murder in broad daylight is acceptable. Later in the film, Sheriff Bell finds out Anton had walked back into a crime scene in broad daylight. Although this scene is not shown in the film, it is important for the directors to include the words, broad daylight. This scene also contradicts the behavior of normal criminals and causes Sheriff Bell to question his methods for tracking Anton Chigurh. Bell knows Anton Chigurh is different and more advanced than other criminals. He knows he is more advanced than other criminals because he has not been able to capture him. Bell knows Anton is more powerful than the normal criminals based on how well he acts and the does his deeds. The Coen brothers draw attention to the problem of Anton not being stopped through the use of contradictory lighting, suggesting the use of the same technique would prove favorable for Sheriff Bell. Instead of using contradictory light to break the association between darkness and evil, the directors reinforce that darkness is supreme over light and good by overpowering scenes with darkness. Sheriff Bell struggles throughout the film with not knowing a way to stop Anton Chigurh. Towards the end of the film, the Sheriff Bell comes to terms with his inability to adapt to stopping the new evil. The directors use darkness and shadows to show the struggle of Sheriff Bell with coming to terms with his inadequacy. The scene when Sheriff Bell returns to Llewellyn’s murder shows the best picture of the stress of chasing Chigurh. Sheriff Bell is sitting on the bed with the wrinkles in his forehead and face clearly defined by the shadows. The


directors use darkness to show stress which is important because it seems the darkness is stronger than light. The breaking point for Sheriff Bell comes a moment before in the same scene. As Sheriff Bell enters the hotel room, he is engulfed in darkness. He does not see the shadow of Chigurh behind the door. At this point Bell sits on the bed as if he has given up. The directors use the engulfment of darkness to show the strength and overwhelming nature of evil. Although Sheriff Bell has finally caught up with Chigurh, he gives up and later retires. The use of darkness to show the weakness of good reinforces that evil is supreme. Evil and good is shown to be related based on the way the light was represented through out the movie. The different light techniques used in the film were used as a way of determining the good and the evil and distinguish between the two. Evil is usually seen as dark, scary and harmful while good is seen as the opposite. The dark light is a form of representing the scary and harmful parts throughout the film and a way of showing it is unpredictable. The bright light served as a symbol for representing the good and used to make the characters and scenes more calm, peaceful and innocent. The different lighting showed the difference between good and evil and the significance of them.

.


.

Works Cited

No Country for Old Men. Dir. Joel Coen. Prod. Joel Coen and Ethan Coen. Miramax. 2007. DVD.


Yaneli Aguiniga Theater Appreciation Theater Critique In The Heights In The Heights was a Broadway musical that was performed at the Classic Center on November 17. This musical was produced and presented by Stephen Gabriel. It was a musical that told the story about the life in the Washington Heights community located in New York

Comment [GSC1]: Reword this sentence Comment [GSC2]: Combine this sentence with the first one Comment [GSC3]: Add comma

City. It was a great production that did a great job in incorporating the six elements of theater. The audience included a big crowd that went to see the show. They showed to have been engaged the musical and really enjoyed it. They were paying attention and listening to what was

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happening. They were laughing at the funny parts, cheering for the performers, and clapping at

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the end of every song. At the end of the show, everyone was cheering and stood up to clap for

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the performers as they bowed on stage. The performers did a great job in performing. There were young and older actors whose roles ranged from singing, dancing and acting. Some actors were funny and others were more serious. They were sometimes singing and dancing at the same time. They were well engaged in their character and showed to have confidence in their acting because they didn’t show to be nervous. Rather, they were enjoying their roles and having fun with it. They spoke loud and clear and were able to be heard from far back. The text was well written and well organized. It was written around an episodic structure. It included many scenes taking place in different parts of the community with lots of characters. It included singing, monologues, and dialogue with other characters. This text included love

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stories between different characters and written to be sad and funny at the same time. It included a lot of action, conflicts and involved different types of characters. The director of this play was Thomas Kail. He did a great job in organizing and putting the show together. He was able to put together a scene that represented the story well and went along with the characters. The main scenery was arranged well and the blocking of the characters was coordinated well with the scenery. The theater space was well used. The theater was a proscenium stage that included space

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on each side for the performers to enter and exit at various times and change costumes if needed. It allowed plenty of space for the audience to sit with different levels of seating. This theater also allowed space for the orchestra up front to play the different songs throughout the play. It allowed lots of room for the main scenery with all the buildings and for the performers so they can move around and dance with plenty of space. The design elements included the scenery, costumes, lighting and sound. The scenery in the play included a big 3-D scene of a community with apartments, stairs and different stores. This scenery was the main scene where everything took place. It also included a big scrim in the back where a bridge was painted on it. Some of the other props they used would be brought out on stage from inside the stores. During the scenes at the hair salon, the performers would bring out the chairs and pretend they were inside the salon. They did the same thing with the food store and the car shop. The costumes included normal clothes worn by everyday people in their community like pants, shorts, shirts, and hats. They also had dance clothes that some performers used when they were dancing on stage. The lighting was well used and very well coordinated with the performance. There were lights from the top and the side shining onto the stage as a whole. There was one light that only shined onto one character and would move as the character

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did. At the beginning it was dark and then brightened up. In some parts it would dim or dim to complete darkness like it did at the end of the first act. Sometimes it would dim as a whole a then light up only on one side of the stage. When the characters danced, the light would change colors and sometimes move around. It was sometimes blue or red and shined with different patterns on the floor. It also included special effect of fireworks that would light in the back ground from different colors. The sound was loud enough for it to be heard. It involved sound of singing and the music played. There was the sound of the orchestra playing from in front of the stage. It also included the sound of fireworks exploding in the background and at the end of the first act it ended with a big noise. This production was a great show that was put together very well. It was well organized and did a good job in showing the scenery. The mains scene was well built and it went perfectly with the story. The lights were also well used and they were appropriate for the scenes. The singing and dancing were well coordinated and the performers did an excellent job. Everything turned out great and I really enjoyed watching it. Out of all the shows I saw, this was my favorite one.

Comment [GSC10]: Who is they referring to?


Yaneli Aguiniga Theater Appreciation Theater Critique In The Heights In The Heights, a Broadway musical performed at the Classic Center on November 17, was produced and presented by Stephen Gabriel. The musical told the story about the life in Washington Heights, a community located in New York City. This excellent production did a great job in incorporating the six elements of theater and using different examples of them. The audience included a big crowd that went to see the show. They showed engagement towards the musical and really enjoyed it. They were paying attention and listening to what was happening in the play. The audience was laughing at the funny parts, cheering for the performers, and clapping at the end of every song. At the end of the show, the audience was cheering and stood up to clap for the performers as they bowed on stage. The performers did a great job in performing their parts in the play. The performers consisted of young and older actors whose roles ranged from singing, dancing and acting. Sometimes the performers were singing and dancing at the same time. Some of the actors were funny and others were more serious. They were well engaged in their character and were confident in their acting because they did not show any signs of being nervous. Rather, they were enjoying their roles and having fun with it. They spoke loud and clear and allowed the audience who sat in the very back to hear them clearly. The text was well written and well organized. The text was written around an episodic structure. Many scenes were involved taking place in different parts of the community with lots of characters. It also included singing, monologues, and dialogue with other characters. This text


included love stories between different characters and written to be sad and funny at the same time. A lot of action was involved with many conflicts and different types of characters. The director of this play was Thomas Kail. He did a great job in organizing and putting the show together. He put together a scene that represented the story well and went along with the characters. The main scenery was arranged well and the blocking of the characters was also coordinated well with the scenery. The theater space was well used and took advantage of all the space it offered. The theater was a proscenium stage with space on each side of the theater for the performers to enter and exit at various times and change costumes if needed. The theater offered plenty of space for the audience to sit with different levels of seating. This theater also allowed space for the orchestra up front to play the different songs throughout the play. Enough room was offered for the main scenery with all the buildings and for the performers so they can move around and dance with plenty of space. The design elements included the scenery, costumes, lighting and sound. The scenery in the play included a big 3-D scene of a community with apartments, stairs and different stores. This scenery was the main scene where everything took place. A big scrim was included in the back where a bridge was painted on it. Some of the other props the performers needed were brought out on stage from inside the stores. During the scenes at the hair salon, the performers brought out the chairs and pretend they were inside the salon. They did the same thing with the food store and the car shop. The costumes included normal clothes worn by everyday people in their community like pants, shorts, shirts, and hats. They also had dance clothes that some performers used when they were dancing on stage.


The lighting was well used and very well coordinated with the performance. Lights from the top and the side shined onto the stage as a whole. One of the lights only shined onto one character and moved as the character moved. At the beginning it was dark and then brightened up. In some parts the lights dimmed or dimmed to complete darkness like it did at the end of the first act. Sometimes the lights dimmed as a whole a then lit up only on one side of the stage. When the characters danced, the lights changed colors and sometimes move around. It was sometimes blue or red and shined with different patterns on the floor. It also included special effect of fireworks that would light in the back ground from different colors. The sound was loud heard very well. The sound involved sounds of singing and the music played. There was the sound of the orchestra playing from in front of the stage. It also included the sound of fireworks exploding in the background and at the end of the first act it ended with a big noise. This production was a great show that was put together very well. It was well organized and did a good job in showing the scenery. The mains scene was well built and went perfectly with the story. The lights were also well used and were appropriate for the scenes. The singing and dancing were well coordinated and the performers did an excellent job. Everything turned out great and I really enjoyed watching it. Out of all the shows I saw, this was my favorite one.


The Development of Monsters Through Time  

English 1102 Final Portfolio

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