Issuu on Google+

Bachelor of Management Academic Session 2010/2011


Vision Transforming Higher Education for a Sustainable Tomorrow

Mission USM is a pioneering, transdisciplinary research intensive university that empowers future talent and enables the bottom billions to transform their socio-economic well-being

i


STUDENT’S PARTICULARS

Name I.C. No. Address during academic session

Permanent Address

E-mail Address Tel. No. (Home) Cellphone No. School Programme of Study

ii


CONTENTS PAGE i ii iii iv

UNIVERSITY MISION AND VISION STUDENT’S PARTICULARS CONTENTS ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2010/2011 1.0

2.0

3.0

THE BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT

1

1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 1.6

Introduction Programme Objectives Learning Outcomes Area of Specialisation Main Administrative Staff List of Staff – Academic and Administration 1.6.1 Top Management 1.6.2 School Administrative Staff 1.6.3 List of Academic Staff

1 1 2 3 7 9 9 10 11

ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION

15

2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.5 2.6 2.7

15 19 20 24 28 33 33

Information on Course Registration Interpretation of Unit/Credit Examination System Unit Exemption/Credit Transfer Academic Integrity USM Mentor Programme Student Exchange Program

UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS

35

3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4

35 35 37 38

3.5 3.6

Summary of University Requirements Bahasa Malaysia English Language Local Students – Islamic and Asian Civilisations/Ethnic Relations International Students – Malaysian Studies/Option Third Languange/Co-Curriculum/Skill Course/Options

iii

40 41


4.0

BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT PLANNING SCHEDULE

45

5.0

MINOR PROGRAMMES 5.1 Graduation Stucture 5.1.1 The Curiculum Structure 5.2 Course Code 5.3 Major Programme 5.4 School of Social Siences 5.5 School of Science Computer 5.6 School of Communication 5.7 School of Education 5.8 School of Languages, Literacies And Translation

51 51 52 53 55 58 60 61 62 64

6.0

THE PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS

65

7.0

COURSE SYNOPSIS

67

8.0

GENERAL INFORMATION GRADUATION PLANNER INDEX STUDENTS’ FEEDBACK

82 87 88 91

iv


ACADEMIC CALENDAR 2010/2011 (12 JULY 2010 – 10 JULY 2011) FOR ALL SCHOOLS (EXCEPT SCHOOL OF MEDICAL SCIENCES/ DENTAL SCIENCES) Registration For New Students - Saturday-Sunday, 3 – 4 JULAI 2010 WEEK 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 -10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 – 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34 35 36 37 38 39 40 41 42 43 44 -52

DATE Monday, 12/07/10 - Friday, 16/07/10 Monday, 19/07/10 - Friday, 23/07/10 Monday, 26/07/10 - Friday, 30/07/10 Monday, 02/08/10 - Friday, 06/08/10 Monday, 09/08/10 - Friday, 13/08/10 Monday, 16/08/10 - Friday, 20/08/10 Monday, 23/08/10 - Friday, 27/08/10 Monday, 30/08/10 - Friday, 03/09/10 Saturday, 04/09/10 - Sunday,19/09/10 Monday, 20/09/10 - Friday, 24/09/10 Monday, 27/09/10 - Friday, 01/10/10 Monday, 04/10/10 - Friday, 08/10/10 Monday, 11/10/10 - Friday, 15/10/10 Monday, 18/10/10 - Friday, 22/10/10 Monday, 25/10/10 - Friday, 29/10/10 Saturday,30/10/10 - Thursday,07/11/10 Monday, 08/11/10 - Friday, 12/11/10 Monday, 15/11/10 - Friday, 19/11/10 Monday, 22/11/10 - Friday, 26/11/10 Saturday, 27/11/10 - Sunday, 26/12/10 Monday, 27/12/10 - Friday, 31/12/10 Monday, 03/01/11 - Friday, 07/01/11 Monday, 10/01/11 - Friday, 14/01/11 Monday, 17/01/11 - Friday , 21/01/11 Monday, 14/01/11 - Friday , 28/01/11 Saturday,29/01/11 - Sunday , 6/02/11 Monday, 07/02/11 - Friday, 11/02/11 Monday, 14/02/11 - Friday, 18/02/11 Monday, 21/02/11 - Friday, 25/02/11 Monday, 28/02/11 - Friday, 04/03/11 Monday, 07/03/11 - Friday, 11/03/11 Monday, 14/03/11 - Friday, 18/03/11 Monday, 21/03/11 - Friday, 15/03/11 Monday, 28/03/11 - Friday, 01/04/11 Monday, 04/04/11 - Friday, 08/04/11 Saturday, 09/04/11 - Sunday,17/04/11 Monday, 18/04/11 - Friday, 22/04/11 Monday, 25/04/11 - Friday, 29/04/11 Monday, 02/05/11 - Friday, 06/05/11 Sunday, 07/05/11 - Sunday, 10/07/11

] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ] ]

ACTIVITIES Teaching Learning Period

MID-TERM BREAK Teaching Learning Period Revision Week Examinations SEMESTER BREAK Teaching Learning Period MID-TERM BREAK Teaching Learning Period

Revision Week Examinations LONG VACATION

COURSE DURING LONG-TERM BREAK [KSCP] 44 - 45 46 - 47 48 49 - 52

Saturday, 07/05/11 Monday, 23/05/11 Monday, 06/06/11 Sunday, 11/06/11

- Sunday,22/05/11 - Friday, 03/06/11 - Friday, 10/06/11 - Sunday, 10/07/11

Break Teaching Examination Break

Courses in Health Campus will begin/end earlier due to different holiday schedules.

v


1.0 THE BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT 1.1 Introduction The Bachelor of Management degree programme, USM, was introduced in the 1984/1985 academic session, as one of the degree programmes offered by the School of Social Sciences. In December 1989, the management section under the School of Social Sciences became an academic school on its own, i.e. the School of Management. Over the past 15 years the school has enjoyed huge success. It was named the best school in the teaching of management and accounting in the year 2003. It was based on the result of a survey commissioned by the Ministry of Higher Education to a Consortium of Professors from New Zealand in collaboration with a local auditing company, Atarik & Company. Other measures of achievements are the employability of its graduates by multinational companies and the big 4 audit firms and the high reception of practitioners on the activities run and managed by the school. The success story of the School of Management continues with its improvement efforts by constantly changing and coordinating its curriculum. Changes in the business environment have given rise to many management issues such as: globalisation; concentration on the manufacturing sector; sophisticated and innovative technology, which include automation and computers; rapid expansion of the capital market; enhancement of work ethics and other issues deemed important in the future. Being a School that trains management experts, the curriculum of the School of Management programme provides training to cope with these changes. Efforts to enrich and update the curriculum are constantly made to ensure that the programme offered is relevant, dynamic and successful in fulfilling the nation’s and industry’s needs effectively. A thorough review of the programme was conducted in 1999. As a result the new curriculum (SPTT [M]) was introduced during the 2000/2001 academic sessions. A new Management programme was initiated to enhance students ability to an experiencing competitive environment. 1.2 Programme Objectives The objectives of the Bachelor of Management degree programme are: (a) to provide the country with managers having basic skills as well as in specialised fields of management;

1


(b) to produce managers who are efficient, effective, analytical and possess excellent communication skills; (c) to instil ethical values and to raise awareness towards social responsibility in future managers; (d) to produce management graduates equipped with information technology skills and capable of adapting to continuous changes in technology; and; (e) to produce managers who possess a global and innovative entrepreneurship skills. 1.3 Learning Outcomes Students completed their studies at the School of Management with Honours degree in Bachelor of Management, will be expected to: (i)

gain knowledge in the fields of endeavor and areas of study.

(ii)

develop and sharpen technical skills, practical skills and demonstrate the ability to form perceptions towards guided feedback.

(iii)

use scientific thinking skills in conducting research works and help them to obtain basic information and objectives.

(iv)

have the communication skills to manage, process, analyze and apply information for decision making.

(v)

perform the duties in a team and be able to solve the problems associated with group work such as conflict, motivation and contribution.

(vi)

exhibit characteristics of leadership and management professional with integrity without compromising the norms and values of Eastern societies.

(vii) manipulate and enhance the skills of information technology in implementing the management activities such as planning, organization, leadership, control, and decision making. (viii) be sensitive and concentrate on the development of knowledge by focusing on the need to be competitive and to be sustainable. (ix)

apply new practices in the field of business management and entrepreneurial gained through lectures, teaching, and practical training.

(x)

demonstrate the characteristics of leadership and be innovative in creating opportunities through entrepreneurship.

2


1.4 Areas of Specialisation Students undertaking the Bachelor of Management degree during the 2010/2011 Academic Session may elect to specialise in one of the following four [5] areas of specialisation: • • • • •

Finance. Marketing. Operational Management. Organisational Management. International Business.

Finance Aim and Purpose The aim of the finance programme is to provide students with premium education and a holistic experience to prepare them to face the challenges in pursuit of their future career in the banking, corporate finance and investment management sectors. The society has a high expectation of financial management education in Malaysia, partly due to the rapid expansion in the economic and financial markets both nationally and internationally. It cannot be denied that an enhancement in economic competence and the strengthening of the financial market depends greatly on the expertise and professionalism of the human resources. Therefore, the main objectives of the finance programme include the following: (a) to expose students to decision making processes of a financial controller. (b) to enhance students understanding of investment analyses and processes, investment instruments and the operations of the financial market. (c) to prepare students to face the changes and challenges in the financial market in order to be able to contribute towards improving the financial market competence.

3


Marketing Aim and Purpose The field of marketing is based on the statement, the purpose of an organisation is to create customers . Marketing encompasses planning and strategic management of market supply that fulfils the needs of the consumer and at the same time, creating profits for the organisation. As a discipline, it contains some principles that can be used as a guide to identify the target market, understand customer needs, design the market supply concept (both the product and the services) and finally plan the circulation, price and promotion strategies. The objectives of the marketing programme include: (a) to encourage an appreciation of consumer and market orientated philosophy of organisational management. (b) to inculcate students skills in marketing opportunity analysis which are in line with changes in this sector, politics and in the development of science and technology in the domestic and global environment. (c) to highlight suitable marketing concepts and strategies to help steer the organisation towards excellence. (d) to encourage strategic and ethical practices in marketing management which facilitate and support societal and national aspirations. Operational Management Aim and Objective The present industrial development has resulted in increased attention in the production and services systems. Competitive global environment demonstrates the importance of quality and productivity, as such, the field of operational management can be perceived to play an important role in shaping the environment of competition. In Malaysia, the manufacturing and services sectors have been targeted as catalysts for economic growth in the country in the next decade. As such, this specialisation is aimed at preparing students to participate in the fields of manufacturing and services. Generally, this specialisation emphasises the concept and up-to-date practice of TQM in identifying the needs of the manufacturing and services industries. The objectives of the operational management programme are: (a) to produce graduates who are capable of managing and handling the manufacturing and services industries in an effective manner in accordance with the national growth rate in the two industries. 4


(b) to expose our students to the theories and techniques in the field of operational Management and to equip them with the confidence and skills required to be excellent managers. (c) to broaden our students horizons in the latest developments in management that emphasises quality, which is a factor that determines customer satisfaction, in manufacturing and services. Organisational Management Aim and Purpose Every organisation needs a manager who can plan, organise and implement a task perfectly with the assistance of highly trained and motivated human resources. In consideration and realisation of this fact, the organisational management programme is designed and offers several courses which combine important elements in organisational and human resource management. The organisational management programme is aimed to expose students to the knowledge of organisational and human resource management. Specifically, the objectives of the Organisational Management programme are: (a) to expose students to the field of organisational and human resource management in a comprehensive manner. (b) to broaden a students horizons in the close relationship between management theories and practices. (c) to make students aware of a variety of cultures and globalisation development through exposure to a course that has international characteristics. (d) to show students how knowledge gained in a course can make them highly employable in the job market.

5


International Business Aim and Purpose The offering of a major in International Business is inline with the current business environment. The purpose of this programme is to produce graduates with global perspective and poses distinct worldview through teaching and learning approach adopted. The graduates will develop positive characteristic and attitude through industrial attachment and study abroad. The student will be exposed to the working of multinational firms and local culture. Through this approach, students will be more active and highly confident to explore new world. The placement of students for overseas study scheme and industrial training will create product differentiation to students of Universiti Sains Malaysia. This specialisation begins in Year Two. Students are allowed to select their area of specialisation, however, the School of Management reserves the right to make the final decision.

6


1.5

MAIN ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF DEAN

Assoc. Prof. Dato’ Ishak Ismail

DEPUTY DEANS

Datin Dr. Joriah Muhammad (Academic and Student Development)

Assoc. Prof. Zamri Ahmad (Postgraduate Studies and Research)

Dr. Azizah Omar (Industry and Community Network)

SENIOR ASSISTANT REGISTRAR/ ASSISTANT REGISTRAR

Ms. Nur Mariyam Musa (Assistant Registrar)

Ms. Balkhis Said

(Senior Assistant Registrar)

7


CHAIRPERSON OF PROGRAMME/COORDINATOR

Dr. Mahmod Sabri Haron

(Marketing)

Dr. Amirul Shah Md Shahbudin

Dr. Abdul Hadi Zulkafli (Finance)

(Accounting)

Mr. Quah Chun Hoo (Organisational Management)

Assoc. Prof. T. Ramayah (Leadership Program & Continuous Education)

Dr. Noor Hazlina Ahmad (International Business)

Dr. Siti Rohaida Mohamed Zainal (Post Graduate Studies)

8

Mr. Soh Keng Lin (Operational Management)

Mr. Yusof Hamdani bin Jalalludin (ICT Program & Webmaster)


1.6

LIST OF STAFF SCHOOL OF MANAGEMENT Please refer to www.management.usm.my for details. 1.6.1 TOP MANAGEMENT DEAN Assoc. Prof. Dato’ Ishak Ismail

3370

iishak@usm.my

Academic and Student Development Datin Dr. Joriah Muhammad

2520

joriah@usm.my

Postgraduate Studies and Research Assoc. Prof. Zamri Ahmad

2398

zahmad@usm.my

Industry and Community Network Dr. Azizah Omar

2398

aziemar@usm.my

DEPUTY DEAN

CHAIRPERSON/COORDINATOR Accounting Dr. Amirul Shah Md. Shahbudin

2757

amirulshah@usm.my

Finance Dr. Abdul Hadi Zulkafli

3953

hadi_zml@usm.my

International Business Dr. Noor Hazlina Ahmad

3355

hazlina@usm.my

Marketing Dr. Mahmod Sabri Haron

3434

msabri@usm.my

Organisational Management Mr. Quah Chun Hoo

3426

eq@notes.usm.my

Operation Management Mr. Soh Keng Lin

2317

klsoh@usm.my

Leadership Program & Continuous Education Assoc. Prof. T. Ramayah

3889

ramayah@usm.my

Post Graduate Studies Dr. Siti Rohaida Mohamed Zainal

5155

siti_rohaida@usm.my

ICT Program & Webmaster Mr. Yusof Hamdani Jalalludin

3430

yhamdani@usm.my

9


1.6.2

SCHOOL ADMINISTRATIVE STAFF Senior Assistant Registrar Ms. Balkhis Said

3367

balkhis_said@notes.usm.my

Assistant Registrar Ms. Nur Mariyam Musa

2522

mariyam@notes.usm.my

Research Officer Ms. Rapida Saimi

2533

rapida_saimi@notes.usm.my

Chief Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operations) Mr. Md. Noor Din

3985

mnd@notes.usm.my

Administrative Assistant (Clerical/Operations) Ms. Dasyilahanim Mohd Desa Ms. Maziah Adam Mr. Mohd Yusoff Ismail Ms. Norhaida Abd Hamid Ms. Rosnah Mohamad Saleh Ms. Rusnah Che Amat Ms. Sufiah Abdul Kadir

3363 2398 3363 4979 2533 2398 3984

dasyila@notes.usm.my maziah_adam@notes.usm.my ucop@usm.my norhaidaah@notes.usm.my rosesaleh@notes.usm.my rusnah@notes.usm.my sufiah@notes.usm.my

Administrative Assistant (Secretarial) Datin Zaini Zainon Ms. Maizatulhana Muhamad Ms. Siti Fatimah Mohd Norddin

3984 2520

maizatulhana@notes.usm.my sitifatimahn@notes.usm.my

Technician Mr. Muhamad Rizal b. Mohamed Radi

Ms. Norliza Mohd Ibarahim

4186

iliza@notes.usm.my

3363

hkhairi@notes.usm.my

Office Assistant Mr. Farid Anuar Md. Jasmin Mr. Khairi Hashim

10


1.6.3 LIST OF ACADEMIC STAFF 1.

ACCOUNTING Chairman Dr. Amirul Shah Md. Shahbudin

2757

amirulshah@usm.my

3953 2893 3379 5152 2900 2758 2527 5281 3354 2756

mfauziah@usm.my adelinelhp@usm.my ainuddin@usm.my dayana_kmy@yahoo.com harashid@usm.my phualk@usm.my angjili@usm.my alinawari@usm.my hkchee@usm.my lokcl@usm.my

3953

hadi_zml@usm.my

Assoc. Prof. Zamri Ahmad Datin Dr. Joriah Muhammad Dr. Eliza Nor Dr. Haslindar Ibrahim Dr. Hooy Chee Wooi Dr. Tajul Ariffin Masron

2398 3880 2530 2894 2897 2755

zahmad@usm.my joriah@usm.my eliza.nor@usm.my haslindar@usm.my cwhooy@usm.my tams@usm.my

Mr. Ahmad Zainuddin Salleh Mr. Zainon Harun

2899 2532

zainuddin@usm.my zainon@usm.my

Lecturer Professor Fauziah Md. Taib Dr. Adeline Lau Hooi Ping Dr. Ainuddin Bahari Dr. Dayana Jalaludin Dr. Md. Harashid Haron Dr. Phua Lian Kee Mr. Ang Jili Mr. Ali Nawari Hassan Dr. Chee Hong Kok Mr. Lok Char Lee

2.

FINANCE Chairman Dr. Abdul Hadi Zulkafli

Lecturer

11


3.

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS Chairman Dr. Noor Hazlina Ahmad

3355

hazlina@usm.my

3880 3434 2525 5283 5282 2909

joriah@usm.my aneesali15@yahoo.com iman@usm.my khairulms@usm.my shankar@usm.my yusliza@usm.my

Lecturer Datin Dr. Joriah Muhammad Dr. Anees Janee b. Ali @ Hamid Ms. Iman Khalid A. Qader Dr. Khairul Anuar Mohammad Shah Dr. Shankar a/l Chelliah Dr. Yusliza Mohd Yusoff

4.

MARKETING Chairman Dr. Mahmod Sabri Haron

3434

msabri@usm.my

3370 3952 2753 2526 3354 2525 5153

iishak@usm.my aziemar@usm.my malliga@usm.my mshafie@usm.my nazim@usm.my shahidan@usm.my siti.hassan@usm.my

Lecturer Assoc. Prof. Dato’ Ishak Ismail Dr. Azizah Omar Dr. Malliga a/p Marimuthu Mr. Mohd Shafie Ariffin #Dr. Norizan Mat Saad Mr. Shahidan Shafie Dr. Siti Hasnah Hassan

12


5.

ORGANISATIONAL MANAGEMENT Chairman Mr. Quah Chun Hoo

3426

eq@notes.usm.my

2548

aizzat@usm.my

3343 2919 3430 2891 3368 2892 3355 2909 2526 2898

azura_e@usm.my daisy@usm.my haslizahalim@usm.my hazrili@yahoo.com lilis@usm.my arshadalbanjari@usm.my hazlina@usm.my siti_rohaida@usm.my zmyusoff@usm.my adida@usm.my

2317

klsoh@usm.my

3889 2527 3430 5151 3426 5154

ramayah@usm.my mmokhtar@usm.my yhamdani@usm.my marini_nur@usm.my noorliza@usm.my wongwp@usm.my

Lecturer Assoc. Prof. Aizzat Hj Mohd Nasurdin Dr. Azura Abdullah Effendi Dr. Daisy Kee Mui Hung Dr. Hasliza Abdul Halim Dr. Hazril Izwar Ibrahim Dr. Lilis Surienty Abd. Talib Dr. Mohd Anuar Arshad Dr. Noor Hazlina Ahmad Dr. Siti Rohaida Mohamed Zainal Mr. Mohd Yusoff Zainun Hamzah *Ms. Adida Yang Amri

6.

OPERATION MANAGEMENT Chairman Mr. Soh Keng Lin Lecturer Assoc. Prof. Ramayah Thurasamy Mr. Mohd. Mokhtar Ali Mr. Yusof Hamdani Jalalludin Ms. Marini Nurbanum **Ms. Noorliza Karia Dr. Wong Wai Peng

* On secondment to MIMOS. ** On Study Leave under USM. # On unpaid leave.

13


LIST OF INDUSTRIAL ADVISOR PANEL 1. Encik T. T. Yew Managing Director Motorola Technology Sdn Bhd Plot 2, Bayan Lepas Technoplex Industrial Park, Mukim 12SWD 11900 Bayan Lepas, Penang Fax : 04-6439170 2. Encik Badlisyah Abdul Ghani Head of Islamic banking ED/CEO of CIMB Islamic Bank Tingkat 36, Menara Bumiputra Commerce 11 Jalan Raja Laut 50350 Kuala Lumpur Fax : 03-26910377 3. Encik Ng Swee Weng Partner KPMG 1st Floor, Wisma Penang Garden 42 Jalan Sultan Ahmad Shah 10050 Pulau Pinang Fax : 04-2271888 4. Dato’ Seri Ahmad Farid Ridzuan Group Chief Executive Media Prima Berhad Sri Pentas No.3 Persiaran Bandar Utama 47800 Petaling Selangor Darul Ehsan Fax : 03-77273014 5. Dato’ Mohd Nazmi Mohd Salleh Chairman NADICORP Holdings Sdn. Bhd. Wisma Wahida No. 38, Jalan Chow Kit 50350 Kuala Lumpur Fax : 03-40446835

14


2.0 ACADEMIC SYSTEM AND GENERAL INFORMATION 2.1 INFORMATION ON COURSE REGISTRATION Students are reminded that course registration is official and final. As such, the following details need to be checked carefully to avoid any errors, which can lead to problems: • • • • • • •

Course code Units Classification of course Class timetables Course prerequisite Conditions imposed by the School Maximum and minimum units allowed for registration

Academic Advisory (i) Students should plan their courses for the entire duration of their studies. (ii) Students should meet and discuss their course registration with their academic advisor. The following information can be obtained from Healthy (www.healthycampus.usm.my ) portal prior to the registration activity. • • • • •

Campus

Academic advisory information Academic information such as academic status, GPA, CGPA, and year of study Cumulative Statement of Grades (CANGRED) List of courses offered in all Schools/Centres Teaching and learning timetables for all Schools/Centres

E-Daftar (E-Registration) E-Daftar allows USMs First Degree and Diploma students to register courses through websites that can be accessed from USM s Healthy Campus Portal. The students with active academic status and those that do not have any case that is still pending with the University are allowed to register courses through EDaftar. The period of registration under E-Daftar for Semester I usually starts on the second week of June until a day before the start of Semester I. The period for Semester II usually starts two days before provisional exam result fir Semester I is released until a day before Semester II starts. The actual period of registration under E-Daftar will be announced by the office of the Data & Record Processing Unit (DRPU), usually during the Revision Week of every semester and will be displayed on the school/centres/hostels bulletin board and in USM s website. 15


Under E-Daftar, students can register all the courses except co-curriculum courses. Pre-registration of co-curriculum courses is usually conducted during the second half of the preceding semester by the office of Co-Curriculum Programme (the Division of Academic & International Affairs). Co-curriculum courses will be included in the registration account of the students prior to the EDaftar activity, only if their pre-registration application is successful. The course registration activity is managed by the office of Data & Record Processing Unit (DRPU), Academic Management Section, Registry Department (04-6532925/04-6533169/04-6534195). On-line Course Registration Activity On-line Course Registration (OCR) is meant for students on Probation status (P1/P2) and students who could not participate in the registration activity under the E-Daftar system. OCR is usually conducted on the first day of the semester. Each school is responsible for scheduling this activity. Students must refer to the schedule at their respective school notice boards. Prior to OCR, students are required to get the following documents from Healthy Campus Portal/School/Centre: (i) Course Registration Form (ii) Cumulative Statement of Grades (CANGRED) (iii) Students must obtain the signature of their Academic Advisor or Deputy Dean (Academic and Students Development) for the courses they intend to register under OCR Class Timetable and List of Courses Offered The class timetable and list of courses offered will be prepared by the respective schools and displayed on the notice boards. Students must refer to both of them before selecting their courses. Students are not allowed to register for courses where there is overlapping of lecture hours. Registration of Language and Co-Curriculum Courses (i) All matters pertaining to the registration, adding or dropping of Language and co-curriculum courses will be managed by the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation and the office of Co-Curriculum Programme (the Division of Academic & International Affairs) respectively. (ii) Pre-registration of co-curriculum courses is conducted by the office of Co-Curriculum Programme (the Division of Academic & International Affairs) usually during the second half of the preceding semester.

16


(iii) After the selection process (for curriculum courses), successful candidates will have their courses registered automatically into the system before the E-Daftar and the on-line course registration activities begin. (iv) If there is a need to drop any course (Language and co-curriculum courses), it must be done within the first week of the semester. A penalty of RM50.00 will be imposed if a course is dropped after the first week. Classification of Types of Courses Accounting students are allowed to register for any course provided they fulfill the mandatory pre-requisites of the course. Registration of courses to fulfill the requirements of a programme of study is classified into the following course code types: T - Core (Major) Courses E - Elective Courses M - Minor Courses U - University Courses ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Y - Audit courses which are taken Performance/grades of these solely for acquiring courses will not contribute to knowledge the overall calculation of grade point average, and number of credits required for graduation

Z - Special courses for which a minimum total 'C' grade (Pass) is required before being allowed to proceed to a higher level course (as a prerequisite)

Maximum and Minimum Units Allowed for Registration per Semester (a) Course Registration by "Active" Students The minimum and maximum units allowed for registration in each semester are as follows: Minimum

Maximum

9

20

(i) The maximum limit permitted includes units for co-curriculum and repeated courses. Students are allowed to exceed this maximum limit for Practical Training/Teaching Practice/Industrial Training which are conducted during the long vacation. (ii) The maximum and minimum units are final. Deans cannot waive this ruling at their discretion. However they have the prerogative to allow a student to register less than the minimum units allowed, although this is only for those students who have exceeded the minimum residential requirement. 17


(b) Course Registration by "Probationary" Students The minimum and maximum units allowed for registration in each semester by "Probationary" students are as follows: Academic Status

Maximum Units

Probation I (P1)

12

Probation II (P2)

10

Course Verification Slip The verification slip issued to students after the course registration must be checked carefully to ensure that there are no errors. If there are any errors regarding courses registered, corrections must be done immediately in E-Daftar system/at the respective schools during the registration period. Adding of Courses/Late Registration Adding of courses without a valid reason is not allowed after the registration period. However, consideration may be given as follows: (i) Adding of courses/late registration, with valid reasons, may be approved by the Dean/Deputy Dean in the first and second week only , and is subject to a penalty of RM50.00. (ii) Adding of courses during the third week, with valid reasons, may be recommended by the Dean/Deputy Dean before forwarding to The Data Processing & Records Unit, subsequently for consideration by the Deputy Vice Chancellor (Academic), and is subject to a penalty of RM 50.00. (iii) Requests for adding of courses after the third week will not be entertained. Dropping of Courses Students are allowed to drop courses by the sixth week on condition that they have abided by the ruling stipulated by the University, as follows: (i) The student must complete the relevant form to drop the course, with the recommendation of the lecturer and the Deans approval, and then submit the form to the Examinations Unit. (ii) A student intending to drop a Language course must obtain the signature and stamp of the Dean of the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation as well as the signature and stamp of the Dean in his/her School.

18


(iii) A student intending to drop a co-curriculum course must obtain the signature and stamp of the Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Academic & International Affairs) as well as the signature and stamp of the Dean in his/her School. (iv)

This privilege to drop a course should not be abused. A lecturer at his/her discretion can not recommend a student's request to drop a course if the student has not been serious about the course, e.g. not attending lectures, tutorials, practical training or not doing the coursework. In such cases, students can be barred from taking the examination, given a grade of 'X', and hence not allowed to take the course during the long vacation (KSCP).

Updating of Academic Records The student's academic record details are printed in the "CANGRED". They are advised to check these details and if they find any incorrect details, they can update the information by using specific forms, which are available at their respective School or at the Data Processing & Records Unit (Level 5, Chancellory Building). Students should inform their respective School and the Data Processing & Records Unit of any change in their semester, permanent and/or emergency addresses. 2.2 INTERPRETATION OF UNIT/CREDIT (a) Unit Each course is given a value, which is called a UNIT. The unit is determined by the scope of its syllabus and the workload for the students. In general, a unit is defined as follows: Type of Course

Definition of Unit

Theory

1 unit is equivalent to 1 contact hour per week for 13 - 14 weeks in one semester.

Practical/Laboratory

1 unit is equivalent to 1.5 contact hours per week for 13 - 14 hours in one semester

Language Proficiency

1 unit is equivalent to 1.5 contact hours per week for 13 - 14 weeks in one semester.

Industrial Training/ Teaching Practice

1 unit is equivalent to 2 weeks of training.

19


(b) Contact Contact is defined as formal face to face meeting between the academic staff and his/her students and it may take the form of lectures, tutorials, seminar, laboratory and field work. (c) Accumulated Credit Unit Units registered and passed are known as credits. To graduate, students must accumulate the total number of credits stipulated for the programme concerned. 2.3 EXAMINATION SYSTEM Examination would be held at the end of every semester. Students have to sit for the examination of courses they have registered. Students are required to settle all fees due and fulfill the standing requirements for lectures/tutorials/practical and other requirements before being allowed to sit for the examination of courses they registered. Course evaluation will be based on two components of coursework and final examinations. Coursework evaluation includes tests, essays, projects, assignments and participation in tutorials. Duration of Examination Evaluated Courses

Examination Duration

2 units

1 hour for coursework of more than 40%

2 units

2 hours for coursework of 40% and below

3 units or more

2 hours for coursework of more than 40%

3 units or more

3 hours for coursework of 40% and below

Barring from Examination Students will be barred from sitting the final examination if they did not satisfy course requirements such as absence from lectures and tutorials, and have not completed/fulfilled the required components of coursework. Students also will be barred from sitting the final examination if they have not settled the academic fees. A grade 'X' would be awarded for a course in which a student is barred. Grade Point Average System Student evaluation achievement for courses registered will be as follows: Alphabetic Grade

A

A-

B+

B

B-

C+

C

C-

D+

D

D-

F

Grade Points

4.00

3.67

3.33

3.00

2.67

2.33

2.00

1.67

1.33

1.00

0.67

0

Students awarded with grade 'C-' and below for a particular course would be given a chance to improve their grades by repeating the course during the KSCP (See below) or normal semester. 20


Students awarded with grade 'C' and above for a particular course will not be allowed to repeat the course. The achievements of students in any semester are based on Grade Point Average (GPA) achieved from all the registered courses in a particular semester. GPA is the indicator to determine the academic performance of students in any semester. CGPA is the Cumulative Grade Point Average accumulated by a student from one semester to another during the years of study. The formula to compute GPA and CGPA is as follows: n ∑ U iM i Grade Point Average = i=1 n ∑ Ui i=1 where n = Number of courses taken Ui = Course units for course i Mi = Grade point for course i Example of calculation for GPA and CGPA:

Semester I:

Course

Unit

Grade Point (GP)

Grade (G )

Total GP

ABC XX1

4

4

3.00

12.00

ABC XX2

4

2.33

C+

9.32

BCDXX3

3

1.67

C-

5.01

CDEXX4

4

2.00

C

8.00

EFGXX5

3

1.33

D+

3.99

EFGXX6

2

2.67

B-

5.34

43.66

20

43.66

GPA = 43.66 = 2.18 20 Course Semester II:

Unit

Grade Point (GP)

Grade (G )

Total GP

ABC XX7

3

3

D

3.00

ABB XX8

4

2.33

C+

9.32

BBC XX9

4

2.00

C

8.00

BCB X10

4

2.67

B-

10.68

XYZ XX1

3

3.33

B+

9.99

18

40.99

GPA = 40.99 = 2.28 18 CGPA = Total Accumulated GP 43.66 + 40.99 84.65 38 Total Accumulated Unit = 20 + 18 = 38

21

= 2.23


From the above examples, the CGPA is calculated as the total grade point accumulated for all the courses registered divided by the total number of units registered. Courses During the Long Vacation (Kursus Semasa Cuti panjang) (KSCP) KSCP is offered to students who have taken a course earlier and obtained a grade of 'C-', 'D+', 'D', 'D-', 'F' and 'DK' only. Students who have obtained 'X' or 'F*' grade are not allowed to take the course during KSCP. The purpose of KSCP is to: (i) Give an opportunity to students who are facing time constraints for graduation. (ii) Assist students who need to accumulate a few more credits for graduation. (iii) Assist "probationary" students to redeem their academic status. (iv) Assist students who need to repeat a prerequisite course, which is not offered in the following semester. However, this opportunity is only given to students who are taking courses that they have attempted before and achieved a grade as stipulated above, provided that the course is being offered. Priority given to final year student. Usually, formal lectures are not held, and teaching is via tutorials. The duration of KSCP is 3 weeks, i.e. 2 weeks of tutorial and 1 week of examination, all held during the long vacation. The KSCP schedule is available in the University's Academic Calendar. KSCP Implementation (a) Students are allowed to register a maximum of 3 courses and the total number of units registered must not exceed 10. (b) Marks/grades for coursework are taken from the best marks/grades obtained for a particular course in the normal semester. The final overall grade is determined as follows: Final Grade = The best coursework marks or grade + Marks or grade for KSCP examination

22


(c) GPA calculation involves the LATEST grade (obtained in KSCP) and also involves courses taken in the second semester and those repeated in KSCP. If the GPA during KSCP as calculated above is 2.00 or better, the academic status is active even though the academic status for the second semester was probation. However if the GPA for KSCP (as calculated above) is 1.99 or below, the academic status is as for the second semester. (d) Graduating students (those that have fulfilled the graduation requirements) in the second semester are not allowed to register for KSCP. Academic Status Active Status: Any student who achieves a GPA of 2.00 and above for any examination in a semester will be recognised as ACTIVE and be allowed to pursue his/her studies for the following semester. Probation Status: A probation status is given to any student who achieves a GPA of 1.99 and below. A student who is under probation status for three consecutive semesters (P1, P2, FO) will not be allowed to pursue his/her studies at the university. On the other hand, if the CGPA is 2.00 and above, the student concerned will be allowed to pursue his studies and will be maintained at P2 status. Without any prejudice to the above regulations, the University Examination Council has the absolute right to terminate any student's studies if his/her achievement do not satisfy and fulfill the accumulated minimum credit in line with the number of semesters completed by the student as given in the table below. Total Accumulated Minimum Credit Units

Number of Semesters nd

End of 2 semester

Pure

Applied

Professional

15

15

16

th

End of 4 semester

35

35

38

End of 6th semester

55

55

60

End of 8th semester

75

75

80

The University Examination Council has the right to terminate any student's studies due to certain reasons (a student who has not registered for the courses, has not taken his/her examination card, does not produce it in an examination without valid reasons), as well as medical reasons can be disqualified from pursuing his/her studies.

23


Examination Result A provisional result (pass/fail) through the Tele-academic line: (600-83-7899) would be released and announced after the School Examination Council meeting and presumably one month after examination. Full result (grade) through the Tele-academic line: (600-83-7899) will be released and announced after the University Examination Council meeting and is usually two weeks after the provisional results are released. The official semester results (SEMGRED) will be issued to students during the second week of the following semester. 2.4 UNIT EXEMPTION/CREDIT TRANSFER Definition of Unit Exemption Unit exemption is defined as the total number of units given to students who are pursuing their studies in USM that are exempted from the graduation requirements. Students only need to accumulate the remaining units for graduating purpose. Only passes or course grades accumulated or acquired in USM will be included in the calculation of the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) for graduation purpose. Regulations and Implementation of Unit Exemption (a) Diploma holders from recognised Public and Private Institutions of Higher Learning: (i) Unit exemption can only be given to courses taken at diploma level. (ii) Courses for unit exemption may be combined (in two or more combinations) in order to obtain exemption of one course at degree level. However if the School would like to approve only one course at the diploma level for unit exemption of one course at degree level, the course at diploma level must be equivalent to the degree course and has the same or more units. (iii) Courses taken during employment (in service) for diploma holders cannot be considered for unit exemption. (iv) The minimum achievement at diploma level that can be considered for unit exemption is at least 'C' grade or 2.0 or equivalent. (v) The total number of semesters exempted should not exceed two semesters.

24


(vi) In order to obtain unit exemption for industrial training, a student must have work experience continuously for at least two years in the area. If the student has undergone industrial training during the diploma level study, a student must have work experience for at least one year. The students are also required to produce the report on the level and type of work performed. Industrial training unit exemption cannot be considered for semester exemption as the industrial training is carried out during the long vacation in USM. (vii) Unit exemption for university and option courses can only be given for courses such as Bahasa Malaysia (LKM400). English Language, Islamic and Asian Civilisations as well as co-curriculum. (b) IPTS (Private Institution of Higher Learning) USM Supervised/External Diploma Graduates (i) Students who are IPTS USM supervised/external diploma graduates are given unit exemption as stipulated by the specific programme of study. Normally, unit exemption in this category is given as a block according to the agreement between USM (through School that offers the programme) with the IPTS. (c) Students from recognised local or foreign IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning)/IPTS who are studying at the first degree level may apply to study in this university and if successful, can be considered for unit exemptions subject to the following conditions: (i) Courses taken in the previous IPT are equivalent (at least 50% of the course must be the same) with courses offered in USM. (ii) Students taking courses at advanced diploma level in IPT that is recognised to be equivalent to the first degree course at USM, may be considered for unit exemption as in (c)(i). (iii) The total maximum unit exemption allowed should not exceed one third of the total unit requirement for graduation. Total Number of Exempted Semesters Semester exemption is based on the total unit exempted that is equivalent to a semester for a particular programme. Program

Units Required for Graduation

3 Year

100 - 126

4 Year

130 – 150

Total Number of Units Exempted

Total Number Semester Exempted

< 15

None

15 – 29

1

> 29

2

< 16

None

16 – 32

1

> 32

2

25


Definition of Credit Transfer Credit transfer is defined as the recognition of a total number of credits obtained by USM students taking courses in other IPTA (Public Institution of Higher Learning) within the period of study at USM, and is combined with credits obtained at USM to fulfil units requirement for his/her programme of study. The transfered examination result or grades obtained in courses taken at other IPTA will be combined in the Cumulative Grade Point Average (CGPA) calculation. Category of Students Who Can Be Considered for Credit Transfer USM full-time first degree level students who would like to attend specific first degree level courses at other IPTA. USM full-time diploma level students who would like to attend specific diploma level courses at other IPTA. Conditions (a) Basic and Core Courses (i) Credit transfer can only be considered for credits obtained from other courses in other IPTA that are equivalent (at least 50% of the content are the same) with the courses offered by the programme. (ii)

Courses that can be transferred are only courses that have the same number of units or more. For equivalent courses but with less number of units, credit transfers can be approved by combining a few courses. Credits transferred are the same as the course units as offered in USM. Average grade of the combined course will be taken into account in CGPA calculation.

(b) Elective or Option Courses (i) Students may attend any appropriate courses in other IPTA subject to permission from the School as well as the approval of other IPTA. (ii) The transferred credits are credits obtained from courses at other IPTA. No course equivalence condition is required. (c) Minor Courses (i) For credit transfer of minor courses, the School should adhere to either conditions (a) or (b), and take into account of the programme requirement. 26


(d) The total maximum units transferred should not exceed one third of the total number of units for the programme. (e) Credit exemption from other IPTA can be considered only once for each IPTA. (f) The examination results obtained by a student taken at other IPTA will be taken into account for graduation purpose. Grade obtained for each course will be combined with the grades obtained at USM for CGPA calculation. (g) Students who have applied and approved for credit transfer are not allowed to cancel the approval after the examination result is obtained. (h) Students are required to register courses at other IPTA with not less than the total minimum units as well as not exceeding the maximum units as stipulated in their programme of study. However, for specific cases (e.g. students on extended semester and only require a few units for graduation), the Dean may approve such students to register less than the minimum and the semester will not be counted in the residential requirement. In this case, the CGPA calculation will be carried out as in KSCP. (i) USM students attending courses at other IPTA and if failed in any courses are allowed to reseat the examination if there is such provision in that IPTA. (j) If the method of calculation of examination marks in the other IPTA is not the same as in USM, a grade conversion method will be carried out according to the existing scales. (k) USM students who have registered courses at other IPTA and decided to return to study in USM, must adhere to the existing course registration conditions in USM. Application Procedure for Attending Courses/Credit Transfer USM students who would like to attend courses/credit transfer at other IPTAs should apply using 'Borang Pemindahan Kredit'. The application form should be submitted for the Dean's approval for the programme of study within three months before the application is submitted to other IPTA for consideration.

27


2.5

Academic Integrity

"Integrity without knowledge is weak and useless. Knowledge without integrity is dangerous and weak" â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Samuel Johnson Being a student of the Universiti Sains Malaysia requires a firm adherence to the basic values, integrity, purpose and meaning of a university education. The most essential values in academia are rooted on the principles of truth seeking in knowledge and honesty with regards to the intellectual property of oneself and of others. Thus, students must bear the responsibility of maintaining these principles in all work done in their academic endeavour. Academic dishonesty violates the fundamental purpose of preserving and maintaining the integrity of university education and will not be tolerated. The following, although not exhaustive, are examples of practices or actions that are considered dishonest acts in academic pursuit.

28


(a)

Cheating Cheating is the unauthorised use of information or other aids in any academic exercise. There are numerous "infamous" ways and methods of cheating including: • Copying from others during a test or an exam. • Using unauthorised materials or devices (calculator, PDA, mobile phone, pager, etc.) during a test or an exam. • Asking or allowing another student to take a test or an exam for you and viceversa. • Sharing answers or programmes for an assignment or project. • Tampering with marked/graded work after it has been returned, then resubmitting it for remarking/regrading. • Allowing others to do the research, writing, programming, or other types of assignment. • Submitting identical or similar work in more than one course without consulting or prior permission from the lecturers involved.

(b)

Plagiarism Plagiarism is "academic theft". It violates the intellectual property rights of the author. Simply put, it is the use, in part or whole, of other's words or ideas and claiming it as yours without proper attribution to the original author. It includes: • Copying and pasting information, graphics or media from the Internet into your work without citing the source. • Paraphrasing or summarising other's written or spoken words that are not common knowledge, without referencing the source. • Not putting quote marks around parts of the source that you copy exactly. • Using someone else's work or acquiring papers, assignment, project or research you did not do and turning it in as if you had done the work yourself. • Giving incorrect information about the source of reference. • Not acknowledging collaborators in an assignment, paper, project or research. Plagiarism is, however, often misunderstood. There are numerous sources in the Internet that describe plagiarism and explain acceptable ways for using borrowed words. Students should explore the relevant materials.

29


Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding prohibition against plagiarism (Part II, Provision 6): 6. (1)

(2)

(3)

A student shall not plagiarise any idea, writing, data or invention belonging to another person. For the purpose of this rule, plagiarism includes: (a)

the act of taking an idea, writing, data or invention of another person and claiming that the idea, writing, data or invention is the result of one's own findings or creation; or

(b)

an attempt to make out or the act of making out, in such a way, that one is the original source or the creator of an idea, writing, data or invention which has actually been taken from some other source.

Without prejudice to the generality of sub rule (2), a student plagiarises when he/she: (a)

publishes, with himself/herself as the author, an abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book which is wholly or partly written by some other person;

(b)

incorporates himself/herself or allows himself/herself to be incorporated as a coauthor of an abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book, when he/she has not at all made any written contribution to the abstract, article, scientific or academic paper, or book;

(c)

forces another person to include his/her name in the list of co-researchers for a particular research project or in the list of co-authors for a publication when he/she has not made any contribution which may qualify him/her as a coresearcher or co-author;

(d)

extract academic data which are the result of research undertaken by some other person, such as laboratory findings or field work findings or data obtained through library research, whether published or unpublished, and incorporate those data as part of his/her academic research without giving due acknowledgement to the actual source;

(e)

uses research data obtained through collaborative work with some other person, whether or not that other person is a staff member or a student of the University, as part of another distinct personal academic research of his/her, or for a publication In his/her own name as sole author, without obtaining the consent of his/her co-researchers prior to embarking on his/her personal research or prior to publishing the data;

(f)

transcribes the ideas or creations of others kept in whatever form, whether written, printed or available in electronic form, or in slide form, or in whatever form of teaching or research apparatus, or in any other form, and claims whether directly or indirectly that he/she is the creator of that idea or creation;

(g)

translates the writing or creation of another person from one language to another whether or not wholly or partly, and subsequently presents the translation in whatever form or manner as his/her own writing or creation; or

(h)

extracts ideas from another person's writing or creation and makes certain modifications without due reference to the original source and rearranges them in such a way that it appears as if he/she is the creator of those ideas.

30


(c)

Fabrication Unauthorised invention, alteration, falsification or misleading use of data, information or citation in any academic work constitutes fabrication. Fabricated information neither represent the student's own effort nor the truth concerning a particular investigation or study thus violates the principle of truth seeking in knowledge. Some examples are: • Making up or changing of data or result, or using someone else's result, in an experiment, assignment or research. • Citing sources that are not actually used or referred to. • Intentional listing of incorrect or fictitious references. • Falsifying of academic records or documents to gain academic advantage. • Forging signatures of authorisation in any academic record or other university document.

(d)

Collusion The School does not differentiate between those who commit an act of academic dishonesty with those who knowingly allow or help others in performing those acts. Some examples of collusion include: • Paying, bribing or allowing someone to do an assignment, test/exam, project or research for you. • Doing or assisting others in an assignment, test/exam, project or research for something in return. • Permitting your work to be submitted as the work of others. • Providing material, information, or sources to others knowing that such aids could be used in any dishonest act.

(e)

Unfair Advantage A student may obtain an unfair advantage over another, which is also a breach of academic integrity, in several ways including: • Gaining access to, stealing, reproducing or circulating of test or exam material prior to its authorised time. • Depriving others of the use of library material by stealing, defacing, destroying or hiding it. • Intentionally interfering with other's effort to do their academic work. • Altering or destroying work or computer files/programmes that belong to others or those that are meant for the whole class.

31


(f)

Consequences of Violating Academic Integrity Both students and academic staff must assume the responsibility of protecting and upholding the academic integrity of the university. In the event that a student encounters any incident that denotes academic dishonesty, the student is expected to report it to the relevant lecturer. The lecturer is then responsible to substantiate the violation and is encouraged to confront the perpetrator(s) to discuss the facts surrounding the allegation, and report the matter to the Deputy Deans or the Dean of the School. If the lecturer found that the student is guilty, an appropriate punitive grading may be applied, depending on the extent of the violation. Examples of punitive grading are giving lower grade or "F" on the assignment, test, project, or lower grade or "F" for the whole course. If the violation is deemed serious by the lecturer, the matter will be brought to the attention of the University Disciplinary Authority where appropriate action will be taken. If a student is caught in an examination, the University Examination Board will pursue the matter according to the university's procedure. The consequence then may range from a warning, fine not exceeding RM200, exclusion from any specific part or parts of the University for a specified period, suspension from being a student of the University for a specified period, or expulsion from the University (University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999).

Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding Conduct During Examination (Part II, Provision 8): 8. No student can(a) take any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials, other than those authorised by the examiner, into or out of any examination room, or receive any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials from outsiders when in examination room. Students can receive any form of books, worksheets, documents, pictures or any other materials recommended by the examiner or the Board of Examiners, and authorized by the Vice-Chancellor (b) write, or have somebody else to write, any information or to draw diagrams which can be related to the examination taken by the student, on any parts of the body, or on the clothingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s worn by the student. (c) contact with other students during an examination through any form of communication, or (d) cheat or try to cheat or act in any way that can be interpreted as cheating.

32


Below is an excerpt from the University and University College Act 1971, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Discipline of Students, Rule 1999 regarding Disciplinary Punishment (Part II, Provision 48): 48.

(a) (b) (c) (d) (e)

A student who commits a disciplinary offense under these Rules and found guilty of the offense can be punished according to any one or any two or more of the following appropriate actions; warning; fine not more than two hundred ringgit; banned from entering any or certain premises of the University for a specified period; suspended from being a student of the University for a specified period; dismissed from the University

2.6 USM Mentor Programme Mentor Programme acts as a support-aid that involves the staff undergoing special training as a consultant and guide to USM community who would like to share their feelings and any psychosocial aspects that could harm their social functions. This programme manages psychosocial issues in a more effective manner and finally could improve the well-being of individuals in order to achieve life of better quality. Objectives (a) (b) (c) (d)

As a co-operation and mutual assistance mechanism for dealing with stress, psychosocial problems and many more in order to reinforce the well-being of the USM community. To inculcate the spirit of unity and the concept of helping one another by appointing a well-trained mentor as a social agent who promotes caring society for USM To produce more volunteers to assist those who need help To prevent damages in any psychosocial aspects before they reach a critical stage.

For more information, please visit www.usm.my/mentor 2.7

Student Exchange Program

(a)

Overseas Study Scheme (SBLN)

The student exchange programme is an opportunity for USM students to study one or two semesters abroad at any USM s associate institutions. Ideally, students are encouraged to participate in the exchange programme within their third to fifth semester (3-year degree programme) and within third to seventh semester (4-year degree programme). Studies abroad are planned beforehand with the Dean or Deputy Dean of the respective School, and with the International Office. Credits earned at an associate university are transferable as a part of credit accumulation for graduation. 33


(b)

Student Exchange Programme between Higher Education Institutions (RPPIPT)

RPPIPT aim to give opportunity to USM students to pursue their studies for a semester or for one academic session in other IPTA in Malaysia. Through this programme, the students can transfer their credits for the courses taken at other IPTA. For more information, please visit http://www.usm.my/io

34


3.0 UNIVERSITY REQUIREMENTS 3.1 Summary of University Requirements Students are required to take 15 - 18 units of the following University/Option courses for University requirements: University Requirements

No. of Units

(i) Bahasa Malaysia (ii) English Language (iii) Local Students • Islamic and Asian Civilisations (TITAS) (2 Units) • Ethnic Relations (2 Units) • Core Entrepreneurship* (2 Units) International Students • Malaysian Studies (4 Units) • Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) (iv) Third Language/Co-Curriculum /Skill Course/Options Students have to choose one of the followings: (A) Third Language Package (6 Units) (B) Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package† (4 - 6 Units) (C) Co-Curriculum/Skill Course/Options† (3 Units) Total

2 4

6

3-6 15 - 18

* Students from Schools which have a similar course as this are exempted from following this course. The units should be replaced by an option course. † Students from the School of Education are required to choose a uniformed body co-curriculum package from (B). Students from the School of Health Sciences must take at least one unit of co-curriculum course.

Details of the University requirements are given in the following sections. 3.2 Bahasa Malaysia (a)

Local Students The requirements are as follows: • LKM300/2 - Bahasa Malaysia III This course is for students who do not possess credit grades in the Bahasa Melayu subject at the SPM level. These students are required to take and pass with a minimum grade of C in LKM300 as prerequisite (type Z) and then pass with the minimum grade of C LKM400 - Bahasa Malaysia IV. • LKM400/2 - Bahasa Malaysia IV All Malaysian students must take and pass LKM400 with a minimum grade of C in order to graduate. 35


Entry requirements for Bahasa Malaysia are as follows: No 1. 2.

Qualification SPM/MCE/SC (or equivalent qualification) (a) LKM 300 (b) SPM/MCE/SAP (or equivalent qualification) (c) STPM/HSC (or equivalent qualification)

Grade Pass

Level of Entry LKM300

Type

Units

Z

2

Status Prerequisite Compulsory

A-C 1-6 LKM400 P/S

U

2

Graduation requirement

Note: To obtain credit units for Bahasa Malaysia courses, a minimum grade of C is required. Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation if they have different Bahasa Malaysia qualification from the above.

(b)

International Students • International students pursuing Bachelor’s degrees in Science, Accounting, Arts (ELLS), Education (TESL) and Housing, Building and Planning. All international students in this category are required to take the following courses: Code LKM100

Type U

Units 2

• International students (non-Indonesian) pursuing Bachelor’s degrees in Arts International students in this category are required to take and pass three Intensive Malay Language courses before they commence their Bachelor’s degree programmes. The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code LKM300 LKM400

Type U Z

Units 2 2

• International students (Indonesian) pursuing Bachelor’s degree in Arts. The Bahasa Malaysia graduation requirement for this category of students is as follows: Code LKM200 LKM300 LKM400

Type U U Z

Units 2 2 2

Note: Students must pass with a minimum grade of C for type U courses and no minimum grade is required for type Z course (LKM400) for international students.

36


3.3 English Language All Bachelor’s degree students must take 4 units of English Language courses in fulfillment of the University requirement for graduation. (a)

Entry Requirements for English Language Courses No

English Language Qualification

Grade

Level of Entry

Status

1.

*MUET LSP401/402/403/404 †Discretion of Dean

Band 6 A-C

LHP 451/452/453/ 454/455/456/ 457/458/459

Compulsory/ Option/Type U (2 Units)

2.

*MUET LSP300 †Discretion of Dean

Band 5 A-C

LSP 401/402/403/ 404

Compulsory/ Type U (2 Units)

3.

*MUET LMT100 †Discretion of Dean

Band 4 A-C

LSP300

Compulsory/ Type U (2 Units)

4.

*MUET †Discretion of Dean

Band 3/2/1 (Score 0 - 179)

LMT100/ Resit MUET

Pre-requisite/ Type Z (2 Units)

* MUET: Malaysian University English Test. † Students may obtain advice from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation if they have different English Language qualification from the above. Note: • Students are required to accumulate four (4) units of English for graduation. • In order to obtain units in English Language courses, students have to pass with a minimum grade of C. • Students with a Score 260 - 300 (Band 6) in MUET must accumulate the 4 units of English from the courses in the post-advanced level (LHP451/452/453/454/455/456/457/ 458/459*). They can also take foreign language courses to replace their English language units but they must first obtain a written consent from the Dean of the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation. (Please use the form that can be obtained from the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation.) [*The number of units for LHP457 is 4 and for LHP451, 452, 453, 454, 455, 456, 458 and 459 is 2.] • Students with a score of 179 and below in MUET are required to resit MUET to improve their score to Band 4 or take LMT100 and pass with a minimum grade of C.

37


(b)

English Language Courses (Compulsory English Language Units) The English Language courses offered as University courses are as follows: No

Code/Unit

Course Title

1.

LMT100/2

Preparatory English

Students from all Schools

School (If Applicable)

2.

LSP300/2

Academic English

Students from all Schools

3.

LSP401/2

General English

School of Education Studies (Arts) School of Fine Arts School of Humanities School of Social Sciences

4.

LSP402/2

Scientific and Medical English

School of Biological Sciences School of Physics School of Chemical Sciences School of Mathematical Sciences School of Industrial Technology School of Education Studies (Science) School of Medical Sciences School of Health & Dental Sciences School of Pharmaceutical Sciences

5.

LSP403/2

Business and Communication English

School of Management School of Communication

6.

LSP404/2

Technical and Engineering English

School of Computer Sciences School of Housing, Building and Planning Schools of Engineering

3.4 Local Students - Islamic and Asian Civilisations/Ethnic Relations/ Core Entrepreneurship (a) Islamic and Asian Civilisations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): HTU 223 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Islamic and Asian Civilisation (TITAS) (2 units) This course aims to increase studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; knowledge on history, principles, values, main aspect of Malay civilization, Islamic civilization and its culture. With the academic exposure to cultural issues and civilization in Malaysia, it is hoped that students will be more aware of issues that can contribute to the cultivation of the culture of respect and harmony among the plural society of Malaysia. Among the topics in this course are Interaction among Various Civilization, Islamic Civilization, Malay Civilization, Contemporary Challenges faced by the Islamic and Asian Civilization and Islamic Hadhari Principles.

38


(b) Ethnic Relations (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): SHE 101 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Ethnic Relations (2 units) This course is an introduction to ethnic relations in Malaysia. This course is designed with 3 main objectives: (1) to introduce students to the basic concept and the practices of social accord in Malaysia, (2) to reinforce basic understanding of challenges and problems in a multi-ethnic society, and (3) to provide an understanding and awareness in managing the complexity of ethnic relations in Malaysia. At the end of this course, it is hoped that students will be able to identify and apply the skills to issues associated with ethnic relations in Malaysia. (c) Core Entrepreneurship (The course is conducted in Bahasa Malaysia) The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C): WUS 101 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Core Entrepreneurship (2 units) This course aims to provide basic exposure to students in the field of entrepreneurship and business, with emphasis on the implementation of the learning aspects while experiencing the process of executing business projects in campus. The mode of teaching is through interactive lectures, practical, business plan proposal, execution of entrepreneurial projects and report presentations. Practical experiences through hands-on participation of students in business projects management will generate interest and provide a clearer picture of entrepreneurship world. The main learning outcome is the assimilation of culture and entrepreneurship work ethics in their everyday life. This initiative is made to open the minds and arouse the spirit of entrepreneurship among target groups that possess the potentials to become successful entrepreneurs. By exposing entrepreneurial knowledge to all students, it is hoped that it will accelerate the effort to increase the number of middle class entrepreneurs in the country.

39


3.5 International Students - Malaysian Studies/Option (a)

Malaysian Studies The following course is compulsory to pass (with a minimum grade of C) for all international students: SEA205E - Malaysian Studies (4 Units) This course investigates the structure of the Malaysian system of government and the major trends in contemporary Malaysia. Emphasis will be given both to current issues in Malaysian politics and the historical and economic developments and trends of the country. The discussion begins with a review of the independence process. An analysis of the formation and workings of the major institutions of government â&#x20AC;&#x201C; parliament, judiciary, bureaucracy, and the electoral and party systems will follow this. The scope and extent of Malaysian democracy will be considered, especially in light of current changes and developments in Malaysian politics. The second part of the course focuses on specific issues: ethnic relations, national unity and the national ideology; development and political change; federal-state relations; the role of religion in Malaysian politics; politics and business; Malaysia in the modern world system; civil society; law, justice and order; and directions for the future.

(b)

Option/Bahasa Malaysia/English Language (2 Units) International students need to fulfill a further 2 units of option course or additional Bahasa Malaysia/English Language course.

40


3.6 Third Language/Co-Curriculum/Skill Courses/Options Students have to choose one of the followings (A/B/C): (A)

Third Language Package (6 Units) Third Language Courses are offered as University courses. They are offered as a package of three (3) levels, 2 units per level. The total number of units per package is 6. Students are requested to complete all levels (3 semesters). The packages offered are as follows: Commn. Arabic

Commn. Chinese

Commn. Japanese

Commn. German

Commn. Korean

LTA100/2

LTC100/2

LTJ100/2

LTG100/2

LTK100/2

LTA200/2

LTC200/2

LTJ200/2

LTG200/2

LTK200/2

LTA300/2

LTC300/2

LTJ300/2

LTG300/2

LTK300/2

Commn. French

Commn. Russian

Commn. Spanish

Commn. Tamil

Commn. Thai

LTP100/2

LTR100/2

LTE100/2

LTT100/2

LTS100/2

LTP200/2

LTR200/2

LTE200/2

LTT200/2

LTS200/2

LTP300/2

LTR300/2

LTE300/2

LTT300/2

LTS300/2

41


(B)

Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (4 - 6 Units) Students who choose to take packaged co-curriculum courses are required to complete all levels of the package. It is compulsory for students from the School of Education to choose a uniformed body co-curriculum package from the list below (excluding Seni Silat Cekak). The co-curriculum packages offered are as follows: â&#x20AC;˘ Armed Uniformed/Seni Silat Cekak Co-Curriculum Package (6 Units) (3 years) PALAPES Tentera Darat (Army)

PALAPES Tentera Laut (Navy)

PALAPES Tentera Udara (Air Force)

SUKSIS (Student Police Volunteer)

Seni Silat Cekak

WTD102/2

WTL102/2

WTU102/2

WPD101/2

WCC123/2

WTD202/2

WTL202/2

WTU202/2

WPD201/2

WCC223/2

WTD302/2

WTL302/2

WTU302/2

WPD301/2

WCC323/2

â&#x20AC;˘ Unarmed Uniformed Co-Curriculum Package (4 Units) (2 Years)

(C)

Kelana Siswa (Rover Training)

Bulan Sabit Merah (Red Crescent)

Ambulans St. John (St. John Ambulance)

WLK101/2

WBM101/2

WJA101/2

WLK201/2

WBM201/2

WJA201/2

Co-Curriculum/Skill Course/Options (3 Units) All students are encouraged to follow the co-curriculum courses and are given a maximum total of 3 units for Community Service, Culture and Sports Co-Curriculum Courses (Students from the School of Health Sciences must take at least one of the co-curriculum courses including those listed in (B) above while those from the School of Education must take one of the uniformed co-curriculum packages from (B) above (excluding Seni Silat Cekak)). Students who do not enroll for any co-curriculum courses or who enroll for only a portion of the 3 units need to replace these units with skill/option courses. The co-curriculum, skill and option courses offered are as follows:

42


(i)

Community Service, Culture and Sports Co-Curriculum Courses Packaged (Students are required to complete all levels) Khidmat Masyarakat (Community Service) (2 Years)

Jazz Band (3 Years)

Karate (3 Semesters)

Taekwondo (3 Semesters)

WKM101/1

WCC108/1

WSC108/1

WSC115/1

WKM201/1

WCC208/1

WSC208/1

WSC215/1

WCC308/1

WSC308/1

WSC315/1

Non-Packaged (1 Semester) Culture

Sports

WCC103/1 - Catan (Painting)

WSC105/1 - Bola Tampar (Volley Ball)

WCC105/1 - Gamelan

WSC106/1 - Golf

WCC107/1 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Gitar (Guitar)

WSC110/1 - Memanah (Archery)

WCC109/1 - Koir (Choir)

WSC111/1 - Ping Pong (Table Tennis)

WCC110/1 - Kraftangan (Handcrafting)

WSC112/1 - Renang (Swimming)

WCC115/1 - Tarian Moden (Modern Dance)

WSC113/1 - Senamrobik (Aerobic)

WCC116/1 - Tarian Tradisional (Traditional Dance)

WSC114/1 - Skuasy (Squash)

WCC117/1 - Teater Moden (Modern Theatre)

WSC116/1 - Tenis (Tennis)

WCC118/1 - Wayang Kulit Melayu (Malay Shadow Play)

WSC119/1 - Badminton

WCC119/1 - Senaman Qigong Asas (Basic Qigong Exercise)

WSC122/1 - Selaman SCUBA (SCUBA Diving)

WCC120/1 - Canting Batik (Batik Painting)

WSC123/1 - Kriket (Cricket)

WCC121/1 - Seni Khat (Calligraphic Art)

WSC124/1 - Sepak Takraw

WCC122/1 - Seni Memasak (Culinary Art)

WSC125/1 - Futsal

WCC124/1 - Kompang Berlagu (Melodious Kompang)

WSC126/1 - Bola Jaring (Netball)

WCC125/1 - Seni Wau Tradisional (Traditional Wau Art)

WSC127/1 - Pengurusan Acara (Event Management)

WCC127/1 - Kesenian Muzik Nasyid (Nasheed Music Art) WCC128/1 - Seni Sulaman Benang dan Manik Labuci (Thread Knitting and Sequin Beads Art) WCC130/1 - Seni Fotografi SLR Digital (Digital SLR Photographic Art)

(ii)

HTV201/2 - Teknik Berfikir (Thinking Techniques)

(iii)

Other option/skill courses as recommended or required by the respective school (if any)

43


(iv)

English Language Courses The following courses may be taken as university courses to fulfill the compulsory English Language requirements (for Band 5 and Band 6 in MUET) or as skill/option courses:

(v)

No 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8.

Code/Unit LHP451/2 LHP452/2 LHP453/2 LHP454/2 LHP455/2 LHP456/2 LHP457/4 LHP458/2

9.

LHP459/2

Course Title Effective Reading Business Writing Creative Writing Academic Writing English Pronunciation Skills Spoken English Speech Writing and Public Speaking English for Translation (Offered only in Semester II) English for Interpretation (Offered only in Semester I)

Foreign Language Courses The foreign language courses offered by the School of Languages, Literacies and Translation can be taken by students as option or compulsory courses to fulfill the number of units required for graduation. Students are not allowed to register for more than one foreign language course per semester. They must complete at least two levels of a foreign language course before they are allowed to register for another foreign language course. However, students are not required to complete all four levels of one particular foreign language course. The foreign language courses offered are as follows: Arabic LAA100/2 LAA200/2 LAA300/2 LAA400/2

Chinese LAC100/2 LAC200/2 LAC300/2 LAC400/2

Japanese LAJ100/2 LAJ200/2 LAJ300/2 LAJ400/2

German LAG100/2 LAG200/2 LAG300/2 LAG400/2

Spanish LAE100/2 LAE200/2 LAE300/2 LAE400/2

French LAP100/2 LAP200/2 LAP300/2 LAP400/2

Thai LAS100/2 LAS200/2 LAS300/2 LAS400/2

Tamil LAT100/2 LAT200/2 LAT300/2

Korean LAK100/2 LAK200/2 LAK300/2

Russian LAR100/2

44


Business Statistics Ethnic Relations Preparatory English

ATW125/4 SHE101/2 LMT100

**

University Course (1 unit)

Financial Accounting

ATW114/4

For International Student On

Extra Curriculum (1 unit)

Minor Course (4 unit)

Business Communication I

SEA205E/4

HTU223/2

ATW262/4

**Malaysian Studies

TITAS

Principles of Finance

Organisational Behaviour

ATW112E/2

ATW251/3

Microeconomics

Business Research Method

Course Title

ATW107/3

ATW202/3

Course Code/Unit

Introduction to Management

Course Title

ATW104/4

Course Code/Unit

YEAR 2 [ SEMESTER 1]

45

AMP348/4

AMW347E/4

AMW346/4

AMW345/4

AMW342/4

AIW398/4

AFW369E/4

AFW364/3

Course Code/Unit

Retailing

Strategic Marketing

Integerated Marketing Communication

Consumer Behaviour

Services Marketing

International Project Management

Security Investment and Portfolio Management

Analysis of Financial Statement

Course Title

YEAR 3 [SEMESTER 1]

Table 2: BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT PLANNING SCHEDULE

YEAR 1 [ SEMESTER 1]

4.0

AIP351/4

AFP372E/4

AFP367/4

AFW365E/3

AFP313/4

AFP312/4

ATP397/4

ATW394/3

Course Code/Unit

International Human Resource Management

Econometrics in Finance

Islamic Finance

International Finance

Personal Finance

Entrepreneurial Finance and Venture Capital

Management Studies

Business Ethics

Course Title

YEAR 4 [SEMESTER 1]


46

Organisational Development Service Operations Management Project Management and Facilities Location International Marketing

AOP361/4

AOW359/4 APP381/4 APW379/4

AMP346E/4

Human Resource Management

Material Management Global Supply Chain Management Minor Course (4 unit)

APW380/3 APW382/3

AMP353/4

AMP350/4

Minor Course (4 unit)

Compensation and Benefits Management

Brand Marketing

Marketing Management Project

International New Venture

AOW358/4

AIW302/4

Organisational Theory

International Business Strategy

AOW353/3

AIP359/4

Consumer Behaviour

AMW354/4


Business Law Macroeconomics

Business Communication II

Introduction To Managerial Psychology Operations Management

Principles of Marketing Principles of Finance

ATW108/3

ATW113E/2

ATW124/3

ATW223/3

ATW241/3 ATW262/4

Course Title

ATW103/3

Course Code/Unit

YEAR 1 [SEMESTER 2]

AIW301/3

AFW362/3

AFW360/3

ACE465/3

ATW401/3

ATW395/3

ATW212/4

Course Code/Unit

International Corporate Finance

Management of Financial Institutions and Market

Corporate Finance

Social Environmental

Entrepreneurship

International Business

Accounting Management

Course Title

YEAR 2 [SEMESTER 2]

47

ATW305/12

Course Code/Unit Practical Training

Course Title

YEAR 3 [SEMESTER 2]

AMP352/4

AMP351/4

AIP311/4

Internet Marketing

Seminar on Marketing Issues

Cultural Environment of International Business

Financial Derivatives

Econometrics in Finance

AFP372E/4 AFW368/4

Public Finance

Financial Economics

Strategic Management

Course Title

AFP314/4

AFP311/4

ATW393E/4

Course Code/Unit

YEAR 4 [SEMESTER 2]


Consumer Behaviour Marketing Research Integerated Marketing Communication Strategic Marketing International Management Managerial Psychology Management Science Management Information System

AMW342/4 AMW345/4 AMW346/4

AMW347E/4 AOW356E/3 AOW360/3 APW301/3 APW302E/3

University Course (4 unit)

Minor Course (4 unit)

International Trade Law

AIW303/3

48

APP396E/4

APP378/4

APW373/4

AOW355/3

AMW347E/4

Minor Course (4 unit)

Electronic Commerce

Techology and Innovation Management

Quality Management

Industrial Relations

Strategic Marketing


Business Statistic TITAS Extra Curriculum (1 unit)

ATW125/4 HTU223/2

For International Student On

University Course (1 unit)

Financial Accounting

ATW114/4

**

Minor Course (4 unit)

Business Communication I

SEA205E/4

SHE101/2

ATW262/4

**Malaysian Studies

Ethnic Relations

Principles of Finance

Organizational Behaviour

ATW112E/2

ATW251/3

Microeconomics

Business Research Methods

Course Title

ATW107/3

ATW202/3

Course Code/Unit

Introduction to Management

Course Title

YEAR 2 [ SEMESTER 1]

ATW104/4

Course Code/Unit

YEAR 1 [ SEMESTER 1]

49

ACE465/3

AMP352/4

AMP346E/4

AIW398/4

Course Code/Unit

Minor Course (4 unit)

Social and Environmental Accounting

Internet Marketing

International Marketing

International Project Management

Course Title

YEAR 3 [SEMESTER 1]

AIW302/4

AIP359/4

AIP351/4

AMP350/4

ATW394/3

Minor Course (4 unit)

International New Venture

International Business Strategy

International Human Resource Management

Marketing Management Project

Business Ethics

Course Title

YEAR 4 [SEMESTER 1]

Course Code/Unit

BACHELOR OF MANAGEMENT PLANNING SCHEDULE (INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS)


Business Communication II Introduction to Managerial Psychology Operations Management Principles of Marketing

ATW113E/2 ATW124/3

ATW223/3 ATW241/3 AOW356E/3

University Course (4 unit)

Minor Course (4 unit)

International Management

International Trade Law

International Corporate Finance

AIW301/3

AIW303/3

Entrepreneurship

International Business

Accounting Management

Course Title

ATW401/3

ATW395/3

ATW212/4

Course Code/Unit

YEAR 2 [SEMESTER 2]

ATW305/12

Course Code/Unit Practical Training

Course Title

YEAR 3 [SEMESTER 2]

50

Course Code/Unit

APW373/4

AIP311/4

AFW368/4

Minor Course (4 unit)

Quality Management

Cultural Environment of International Business

Financial Derivatives

Strategic Management

Course Title

[INTERNATIONAL EXPOSURE]

*YEAR 4 [SEMESTER 2]

ATW393E/4

This course/the equivalent will be taken at the respective universities during international exposure for credit transfer.

Macroeconomics

ATW108/3

*

Business Law

Course Title

ATW103/3

Course Code/Unit

YEAR 1 [SEMESTER 2]


5.0 MINOR PROGRAMMES Students from the School of Management, majoring in Finance, Marketing, Organisation and Operation must minor in a Minor programme offered by another school. The total number of units to be accumulated is 20. The minor programmes that may be taken by these students are as follows: (1) Economics, Political Science, South East Asian Studies, Psychology (School of Social Sciences). (2) Computer Science, Information Technology (School of Computer Sciences). (3) Communication Studies, Science and Environmental Journalism (School of Communication), (4) Islamic Studies, English Language, Translation and Interpretation (School of Humanities). (5) Japanese Language Studies and Chinese Language Studies (School of Languages, Literacies and Translation).;

5.1 (a) Graduation Structure Students are required to accumulate 136 unit for Bachelor of Management. Students are required to obtain a minimum of 6 semester . The distribution of the units shown in Chart 1 for Finance, Operation, Marketing, Organisation and International Business major. (b) Offering Course Structure Structure course offering for all fields is shown in Chart 1. Students are required to register/pass Core Course, Common Core Courses, Major Courses, Minor/Elective Courses and University Courses.

51


5.1.1 The Curriculum Structure Chart 1: The Bachelor of Management Degree Structure

Courses/Level

100

200

300

400

28 -

20 8 8 -

22 8 8 4

3 4 4 4

-

2 2 -

Programme Finance Operation Management Organizational Behaviour Marketing and International Business Total

Common Core Major Core Minor* Elective University Courses Malay Language English Language Islamic Civilization and Asian Civilizations (TITAS) Ethnic Relations Co-curriculum/Option Course Skill Courses/Option Malaysian Studies (for International Student only) Foreign Language (option)

2

1

2 1

1

73 20 20* 8

2 4 2 2 3 2 4 6

15 Total:

136

* Minor package should be taken according to the offering by the respective schools. ** Minor package for International Business are as follows: 1. Japanese or 2. Mandarin Student may register any level of course.

52


5.2 COURSE CODE Each course has a course code which is made up of 3 alphabets and 3 numbers. Its explanation is as follows:AXY n nn

Serial Number Course Status: 0 = Compulsory 1 = Option: Major/Elective Course Level: 1 = Level 100 courses 2 = Level 200 courses 3 = Level 300 courses 4 = Level 400 courses

Type of Course: P = Option/Elective W = Compulsory

Course Categories: P = Operations Management F = Finance O = Organisational Management M = Marketing T = Core I = International Business

A = School of Management

53


Table 2: Area of Courses Offered

COMMON CORE (73 UNIT) Code/Course Units ATW104/4 ATW103/3 ATW112E/2 ATW113E/2 ATW107/3 ATW108/3 ATW114/4 ATW124/3 ATW125/4 ATW202/3 ATW212/4 ATW223/3 ATW241/3 ATW251/3 ATW262/4 ATW305/12 ATW394/3 ATW395/3 ATW393E/4 ATW401/3

Course Title Introduction to Management Business Law Business Communication I Business Communication II Microeconomics Macroeconomics Financial Accounting Introduction to Managerial Psychology Business Statistics Business Research Method Accounting Management Operations Management Principles of Marketing Organizational Behaviour Principles of Finance Practical Training Business Ethics International Business Strategic Management Entrepreneurship

54


5.3 Major Programmes MAJOR CORE: CHOOSE 1 FROM THE FOLLOWING 5 MAJOR PROGRAMMES BELOW: OPERATION MANAGEMENT [MAJOR COURSES - 20 UNIT] Course Code/Unit

FINANCE [MAJOR COURSES - 20 UNIT]

Course Title

Course Code/Unit

Course Title

APW301/3

Management Science

AFW360/3

Corporate Finance

APW302E/3

Management Information System

AFW362/3

Management of Financial Institutions and Markets

APW373/4

Quality Management

AFW364/3

Analysis of Financial Statement

APW379/4

Project Management and Facility Location

AFW365E/3

International Finance

APW380/3

Material Management

AFW368/4

Financial Derivative

APW382/3

Global Supply Chain Management

AFW369E/4

Security Investment & Portfolio Management

Elective Course (8 Unit)

Elective Course (8 Unit)

AOW358/4

Human Resource Management

AFP311/4

Financial Economics

AFP367/4

Islamic Finance

AFP312/4

Entreprenuership Finance and Venture Capital

AFW369E/4

Security Investment & Portfolio Management

AFP313/4

Personal Finance

APP378/4

Technology Management and Innovation

AFP314/4

Public Finance

APP381/4

Service Operation Management

AFP367/4

Islamic Finance

APP396E/4

Electronic Commerce

AMP350/4

Marketing Management Project

AMP350/4

Marketing Management Project

AFP 372E/4

Econometrics in Finance

55


ORGANISATIONAL MANAGEMENT [Major Courses - 20 Unit] Course Code/Unit

Course Title

MARKETING [ Major Courses - 20 Unit] Course Code/Unit

Course Title

AOW353/3

Organisational Theory

AMW342/4

Service Marketing

AOW355/3

Industrial Relations

AMW345/4

Marketing Research

AOW356E/3

International Management

AMW346/4

Intergrated Marketing Communication

AOW358/4

Human Resource Management

AMW347E/4

Strategic Marketing

AOW359/4

Organizational Development

AMW354/4

Consumer Behaviour

AOW360/3

Management Psychology

Elective Course - 8 Unit AFP367/4

Elective Course - 8 Unit

Islamic Finance

AMP346E/4

AMW343/4

Marketing Research

AMP348 /4

Retailing

AOP361/4

Benefit and Compensation Management

AMP350/4

Marketing Management Project

APP378/4

Technology Management and Innovation

AMP351/4

Seminar on Marketing Issue

APP396E/4

Electronic Commerce

AMP352/4

Internet Marketing

AMP350/4

Marketing Project

AMP353/4

Brand Marketing

Management

56

International Marketing


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS [Major Courses 24 Unit] Course Code/Unit

Course Title

ACE465/3

Social and Accounting

Enviromental

AIW301/3

International Corporate Finance

AIW302/4

International New Business

AIW303/3

International Trade Law

AIW398/4

International Project Management

*AMP346E/4

International Marketing

**AOW356E/3

International Management

Elective Course 4 Unit AIP311/4

Cultural Environment of International Business

AIP351/4

International Human Resource Management

AIP359/4

International Business Strategy

AMP352/4

Internet Marketing

APP381/4

Service Operation Management

APW373/4

Quality Management

* This course is COMPULSORY for student majoring in International Business but ELECTIVE for other students.

57


For each minor programme recommended, the package of courses is as follows: 5.4

School of Social Science 5.4.1 Economics Compulsory [8 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

SEW211/4

Microeconomics I

SEW213/4

Macroeconomics I

Optional [8 units] Choose 2 courses SEU225/4

Development Economics

SEU226/4

Labour Economy

SEU228/4

Malaysian Economy

SEU229/4

Islamic Economy

Note: Students from the School of Management must have registered for ATW107/3 Microeconomics and ATW108/3 Macroeconomics. 5.4.2 Political Science Compulsory [12 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

SKW103/4

Introduction to Political Science

SPW202/4

International Relations

SPW206/4

Philosophy of Politics Optional [8 units] Choose 2 course

SPU206/4

Malaysian Government and Politics

SPU207E/4

Foundation of Public Policies

SPU303/4

Administration of Development

SPU311/4

Third World Ideologies

SPU312/4

Theory and Practice of Conflict Resolution

SPU313/4

Selection Issues in North-South Relations

SPU314E/4

International and Regional Government Politics

SPU315E/4

Public Sector Administration

SPU316/4

South East Asian Politics

SPU317/4

Malaysian Political Economy

SPU318E/4

Democratic Government

58


5.4.3 Southeast Asian Studies Optional [20 unit] Choose 5 courses Course Code/Units

Course Title

HST241/4

Modern History of Southeast Asia

SEA301/4

Politics and Regionalism in ASEAN

SEA302/4

Economic Transformation in Southeast Asia

SEA303/4

Societies and Culture of the Nusantara

SEA304/4

Southeast Asian Art and Heritage

SEA305/4

Contemporary Malaysia

SEA306/4

Independent Studies

5.4.4 Psychology Compulsory [4 units] Course Code/Units STU241/4

Course Title

Basic Psychology

Optional [16 unit] Choose 4 courses STU241/4

Health Psychology

STU242/4

Social Psychology

STU243/4

Psychology Development

STU244/4

Abnormal Psychology

STU342/4

Healing Therapy

59


5.5

School of Science Computers 5.5.1 Computer Science Compulsory [10 units] Course Code/Units CPM111/3

Course Tit le Principles of Programming

CPM213/3

Programming Methodology & Data Structures

CMM222/4

Database Organisation & Design Optional [10 unit ] Choose 4 courses

CMM321/4

System Analysis & Design

CPM313/3

Programming Language Concept & Paradigms

CPM314/3

Software Project Management Process & Evolution

CSM331/3

Data Communication & Networks

5.5.2 Information Technology Compulsory [10 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

CPM111/3

Principles of Programming

CMM221/3

Multimedia Systems

CMM222/4

Database Organisation & Design Optional [10 units]

CMM321/4

System Analysis & Design

CMM322/3

Information Systems Management Theory & Practice

CMM323/3

Web Engineering & Technology

CMM324/3

E-Business Strategy Architecture & Design

Note: (1) (2)

Students from the arts schools are encouraged to take the Information Technology package. Students who intend to minor in either Computer Science or Information Technology must commence their minor studies in Year I Semester II.

60


5.6

School of Communication 5.6.1 Communication Foundation [3 units] Choose 1 course Course Code/Units

Course Title

YKT101/3

Introduction to Human Communication

YKT102/3

Introduction to Mass Communication

YKT103/3

Communication and Society Common Core Course s (4 units)

YKT111/4

Communication Theories and Research I

YKT112/4

Communication for Social Development

Major Courses (9 units) Choose 3 courses YFP324/3

Cinematic Studies

YFP321/3

Television Studies

YBP223/3

Advertising

YBP224/3

Public Relations

YWP215/3

Introduction to Journalism

YFP222/3

Script and Screen Play Writing

YBP326/3

Corporate Communination

YBP327/3

Media Management

Note: Students are required to accumulate 16 units in total .The distribution of the units is as follows: Foundation Common Core Major Core

: 3 units : 8 units : 9 units

61


5.6.2 Science and Environmental Journalism Core [3 units] - Choose 1 course Course Code/Units

Course Title

YKT102/3

Introduction to Mass Communication

YKT103/3

Communication and Society Core [10 units]

YWP221/3

Journalism I

YWP325/3

Scientific Writing and Reporting (compulsory)

(compulsory)

YKT112/4

Communication for Social Development or

YKT214/4

Communication Technology Optional (3 units)

YWP223/3

Feature Writing

YWP324/3

Media, Science and the Environment

Note: Students are required to accumulate 16 units. The distribution of the units is as follows: Foundation Common Core Major Core

: 3 units : 4 units : 9 units

5.7 School of Education 5.7.1 Islamic Studies Minor [20 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

HIA101/4

Introduction to Islamic Studies

HIU122/4

Elaboration of the Islamic Creed: Concepts and Realisation

HIS213/4

Sources and Principles of Islamic Law

HIS224/4

Islamic Family Institution

HIU225/4

Education and Moral Virtues in Islam

HIS315/4

Muamalat: Concept and Application

Choose 1 courses [4 units]

Note: Students intend minor in Islamic Studies are required to obtain at least a Grade C in HIA101/4 Introduction to Islamic Studies .

62


5.7.2 English Language Minor [16 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

HEA101/4

Introduction to the English Language

HET123/4

A Study of Language

HET224/4

Style in New Literature in English Choose 1 course s [4 units]

HET321/4

Writing for Professional Purposes

HXE308/4

English for Specific Purposes

HET322/4

Language, Power and Idelogy

Note: Students intend minor in Islamic Studies are required to obtain at least a Grade C in HIA101/4 Introduction to Islamic Studies .

5.7.3 Translation and Interpretation Minor [20 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

HBT100/4

Introduction to Theories and Practices of Translation

HBT105/4

Translation Methods

HBT112/3

Malay and English Grammar and Editing Strategies

HBT206/3

Producing and Editing Translations

HBT302/3

Sociolinguistic and Translation

HBT305/4

Interpretation Project

63


5.8 School of Languages, Literacies and Translation 5.8.1 Japanese Language Studies Compulsory [20 units] Course Code/Units

Course Title

LLJ100/4

Elementary Japanese

LLJ200/4

Intermediate Japanese

LLJ300/4

Advanced Japanese I

LLJ400/4

Advanced Japanese II

LLJ401/4

Business Japanese (option course)

5.8.2 Chinese Language Studies Compulsory [20 unit] Course Code/Units

Course Title

LLC100/4

Basic Chinese

LLC200/4

Intermediate Chinese

LLC300/4

Advanced Chinese I

LLC400/4

Advanced Chinese II

LLC401/4

Business Chinese

5.8.3 Communicative Arabic Compulsory [20 unit] Course Code/Units LLA100/4

Course Title

Communicative Arabic I

LLA200/4

Communicative Arabic II

LLA300/4

Communicative Arabic III

LLA400/4

Communicative Arabic IV

LLA401/4

Business Arabic

64


6.0 THE PROGRAMME STRUCTURE AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS Basic Courses Basic courses are introductory courses or courses that build the foundation in a specific programme of study and as a result form the pre-requisite courses that are compulsory for all students of the programme. These courses are at the 100 and 200 levels that have been determined by the same programme of study or another programme of study that is related. These courses are common to all students of the programme of study. Core Courses There are two types of core courses in the Bachelor of Management programme. The first type is the common core courses and they are compulsory for all students. The second type is the major core courses that are compulsory for students who specialize in a particular field of specialization. Elective Courses Elective courses are those that help to increase studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; knowledge either in the field of accounting or in another field. They are courses offered either in the accounting programme or those that are offered in other programmes. Students have the option to select their own list of elective courses. Minor Courses Minor courses are a package of courses in one area of specialization or a package of courses reserved for and offered to students of another programme of study. Students of the School of Management are encouraged to take minor programmes from the following fields: Economics, Psychology, TV and Film Production, Journalism, Computer Science, Translation, English and Islamic Studies. Optional Courses Optional courses are courses chosen by students from among those that are outside their program of study. The main objective of an Optional Course is as a substitute course for students who do not take Co-curriculum courses and Skill/Analysis courses. Audit Courses In principle, the university allows students to register for any courses on an audit basis for the purpose of enhancing the students knowledge in specific fields during the duration of theirs study. However, the units of any such audit courses will not be taken into consideration for graduation purposes. The registration procedures for courses on an audit basis are as follows:

65


[a]

Students can register for courses on an audit basis for the purpose of augmenting his/her knowledge in specific fields. Registration for the said course must be done within the course registration week.

[b]

Only students of active status are allowed to register for courses on an audit basis.

[c]

Courses registered for on an audit basis are designated as code Y courses. This designation will be indicated on the relevant academic transcript. A space at the bottom of the academic transcript will be reserved for listing the courses registered for an audit basis.

[d] Courses registered for on an audit basis will not be taken into consideration in determining the mĂ­nimum and mĂĄximum units of courses registered for. [e]

Students must fulfill all course requirements. Students who register for courses on an audit basis, are not obligated to sit for any examinations pertaining to that course. A grade R will be awarded irrespective as to whether the student had or had not sat for the examination.

[f]

Commencing with the Academic Calender of 2009/10, registration for the Audit subjects (designation code Y) shall no longer be allowed through E-Registration for all courses. The registration can only be performed during the official period of online registration (in person) at the office, at the respective Schools or Centres.

Course Prerequisites Student are allowed to register for any course provided they fulfill the prerequisites of the course. There are 3 types of prerequisites. Pass (P) If a Pass in Course A is a prerequisite for Course B, then student must take Course A and obtain the mĂ­nimum of a Grade C before he/she is allowed to take Course B. Sequential (S) If Course A is a sequential prerequisite (S) for Course B, then a student must take Course A and sit for the examination before he/she allowed to take Course B. Concurrent (C) If Course A is a concurrent prerequisite for Course B, then a student must take Course A and sit for the examination at the same time as Course B.

66


7.0 COURSE SYNOPSIS ATW103/3 - BUSINESS LAW This course exposes students to principles of business law as derived from case law and statute law. It is hoped that students will have a general understanding of those laws applicable to them in a business relationship, be it as an individual/ partner or in the context of the management and running of a business entity in the Malaysian business environment. ATW104/4 - INTRODUCTION TO MANAGEMENT The course aims to provide students with the theories, concepts, techniques and practices of modern management which are important in the context of business world. It has four essential management functions: planning, organizing, leading and controlling. Students are exposed to the most contemporary and up-to-date account of the changing environment of management and management practices in the reallife management context. ATW107/3 - MICROECONOMICS This course emphasizes on how market operation in order to understand how the economy system is functioning. While forming a coherent view on the economic reality, microeconomics provides techniques that may increase the role in developing public policy and individual decision-making. Other topics that will be discussed are the elasticity of demand and supply, system of economy, theory and cost of production, and advantages and disadvantages of a market structure. ATW108/3 - MACROECONOMICS This course exposes the students to understand the macroeconomic environment in which businesses, households and governments operate. Consequently, students need to understand macroeconomic theory and be able to apply that theory in interpreting and analyzing macroeconomic information, events and policy ATW112E/2 - BUSINESS COMMUNICATION I This course has been designed to increase studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; awareness about the functions and significance of communication in the business world. This course focuses on the application of communication principles in achieving business objective. Special attention is given in developing listening and conversational skill. ATW113E/2 - BUSINESS COMMUNICATION II This course has been designed to increase studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; awareness about the functions and significance of communication in the business world. This course focuses on the application of communication principles in achieving business objective. Special attention is given to the development of writing and conversational skill.

67


ATW114/4 - FINANCIAL ACCOUNTING This course introduces the principles of financial accounting to students which encompasses basic accounting concept and model, accounting cycle, cash and internal control, sales debtors, purchase, creditors and goods cost sold, fixed asset, intangible asset and depreciation, inventory and partnership. ATW124/3 - INTRODUCTION TO MANAGERIAL PSYCHOLOGY This course exposes students to managerial psychology. This course incorporates a study of the theories and research about basic managerial topics in psychology as well as their relationship to the psychological functioning of the individual as a social being. Students will develop an insight into managing themselves as well as working with and managing others, more effectively. Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management ATW125/4 - BUSINESS STATISTICS This course aims to provide basic statistical method which is required in management studies. The concepts to be discussed in this course includes descriptive statistics, probability, probability distribution, sampling and sampling distribution, estimation, hypothesis testing (one and two populations), analysis of variance, chi square analysis, correlations and regression analysis and multiple regression. In doing analysis the student will also be exposed to the use of SPSS software. ATW202/3 - BUSINESS RESEARCH METHOD This course is to give exposure to students regarding issues in research, formulation of problems, hypothesis, theories, research evaluation, research design, data measurement and collection, sampling, data analysis and research report writing. ATW212/4 - ACCOUNTING MANAGEMENT This course aims to give a lead to students on planning, control and decision making are among several management main functions. The main focus of this course is to provide accounting information production to be used by managers in planning and supervising business operations and to make specific decision when necessary. Important account information is emphasized in this course is goods cost, activity, and budget. ATW223/3 - OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT This course contains the theories and applications of operations management. It comprises strategies, tactics and operations of management of the transformation processes and the delivery of goods and services. Therefore, this course considers operations management problems and provides qualitative and quantitative solutions to improve efficiency and effectiveness.

68


ATW241/3 - PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING This course is an introduction of marketing course to students. It encompasses theory and marketing philosophy that focuses on elements such as product, price, place and promotion which is the foundation of marketing theory building. In addition students are also be given exposure how environmental factors such as technology development, consumer, marketing and global community can influence the practice of current marketing practices. ATW251/3 - ORGANIZATIONAL BEHAVIOUR This course is designed to provide students with the knowledge of the complex interplay between people and the organizations in which they work. It prepares them to appreciate how the findings of behavioral sciences can be applied to the solutions of problems involving human behavior in the workplace. Pre-requisite: Introduction to Management ATW262/4 - PRINCIPLES OF FINANCE This course exposes student to the function of finance. It also introduces the basic concepts in finance such as time value of money and; risk and return in order to make financial decisions. ATW305/12 - PRACTICAL TRAINING Practical training course is compulsory to all third year, semester two students. This training is conducted for a period of six months. Students will be assigned in organisations to gain exposure, real work life experience and practices of management executives that cover various fileds such as marketing, international business, organisational behaviour, finance, operations and accounting. Students are also encouraged to do research collaboration that benefits both parties. ATW393E/4 - STRATEGIC MANAGEMENT This course concentrates on ways in formulating, implementing, and evaluating strategies. Strategic-management concepts and techniques are studied. Students will use the knowledge acquired from previous business courses, coupled with new strategic-management techniques learned, to chart the future direction of different organizations. Pre-requisite: Final Year Students Only. ATW394/3 - BUSINESS ETHICS This course will examine how values and principal shape the conduct of business in the development of our societies. Hence, it will focus on what businesses and professionals ought to engage in or not engage in rather than about how to stay out of jail. Nevertheless, legal implications too will be given some consideration. Pre-requisite: Final Year Students Only.

69


ATW395/3 - INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS This course aims to introduce students to the issues of international business and globalization. Among the topics to be covered are international trade and investment, international financial markets, and managing international operations. ATW401/3 - ENTREPRENEURSHIP This course introduces the concept of entrepreneurship and guide students through the process of creating a successful new venture. This course also includes a clear explanation on the process of entrepreneurship as well as the purpose of entrepreneurship. Pre-requisite: Organisational Behaviour

70


FINANCE AFP311/4 - FINANCIAL ECONOMICS This course introduces the students to the principles of money and its role in the economy. They are also exposed to the equilibrium interest rates determined by the supply and demand of money. The aim of financial policy, the implementation of financial policy by central bank, comparison between the views of Keynes and Monetarist on aggregate demand and the impacts of financial policy on output and inflation are also discussed. Pre-requisite: Microeconomics, Macroeconomics AFP312/4 ENTREPRENEURIAL FINANCE AND VENTURE CAPITAL This course emphasizes on financial management of small and medium enterprises. It covers important components involving venture capital financing, financial performance, financial planning and financial strategy. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AFP313/4 - PERSONAL FINANCE This course emphasizes on personal financial management. It focuses on cash management, trust fund, credit card, property financing, insurance and personal taxation. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AFP314/4 - PUBLIC FINANCE This course introduces the students to the public finance management through the exposure to government policies in relation to increase in revenues and the impact on the provision of public services. Students are exposed to the impact of taxation, budget analysis, social insurance policy, health insurance and allocation of government income on development and welfare. The impact of policies is not only on urban residents but also on rural communities. AFP367/4 - ISLAMIC FINANCE This course explains the transformation of Islamic finance to be the one of the most viable and efficient alternative models of financial intermediation. This course also highlights types of challenges faced such as lack of standard financial products, regulatory disparities among regulators at the national level and the need for harmonized regulation across the globe. This course also exposes the students to several improvement plans so that the students could appreciate the development in contemporary Islamic banking and finance sectors. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance

71


AFW360/3 - CORPORATE FINANCE This course will give further exposure to the students to the basic concepts of finance like time value of money, valuation, and risk and return. These concepts will be applied in the indepth discussion on capital budgeting, dividend policy and capital structure. The students will learn how financial managers use finance concepts in making investment and financing decisions in order to maximize value. Besides, mergers and acquisitions, and international finance, will also be covered. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AFW362/3 - MANAGEMENT OF FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS AND MARKETS This course exposes students to the function of markets and financial institutions. The focus of the course is on the management of financial institutions, rules and regulations, plans and financial analysis. The course starts with topics related to financial markets. It also analyzes the basic issues such as credit, liquidity, capital and bank mergers. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AFW364/3 - ANALYSIS OF FINANCIAL STATEMENTS This course emphasizes on how to manage and use the firm financial information and the financial concepts. These concepts are important in analyzing the financial data and making the decision from the economic perspective. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AFW365E/4 - INTERNATIONAL FINANCE This course exposes students to international finance. Three dimensions distinguish international finance from ‘domestic’ finance. They are i) foreign exchange and political risks, ii) market imperfections, and iii) expanded opportunity sets. Financial managers should learn how to manage foreign exchange and political risk using proper tools and instruments, deal with (and take advantage of) market imperfections, and benefit from the expanded investment and financing opportunities. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AFW369E/4 - SECURITIES INVESTMENT & PORTFOLIO MANAGEMENT This course is an introductory investment course. Students will be exposed to the available investment alternatives and to the theory and practice of investments and portfolio management. This course covers the primary financial securities – stocks, bonds, and derivatives, and methods for combining these underlying assets into a portfolio. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance

72


AFW368/4 - FINANCIAL DERIVATIVES This course provides understanding on financial derivatives transaction on concepts, techniques and strategies on futures market and options mainly on hedging, speculating and arbitraging activities. Emphasize on Bursa Malaysia derivatives instruments such as FTSE BM KLCI Index Futures, FCPO, KLIBOR, SSF and OKLI. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance, Corporate Finance AFP 372/4 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ECONOMETRICS IN FINANCE This course focuses on the background and application of econometric techniques in the area of finance. The course introduces basic econometric concept and exposes students to the various methods and models commonly found in empirical finance research. Pre-requisite: Final Year Student

73


MARKETING AMP346E/4 - INTERNATIONAL MARKETING This course aims to introduce students to the theories and activities of marketing management at the international level. Students should understand the effects of environmental factors and the organisationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; culture on the tendency to explore the international market, the method to enter the foreign market and planning necessary strategies. Pre-requisites: Principle of Marketing AMP350/4 - MARKETING MANAGEMENT PROJECT This course is a basic research course for marketing student who are keen to further develop their research skill in marketing. Students are given the opportunity to carry out the proper way of conducting an academic research. Knowledge in research method, basic statistic and marketing research would be an added value for students taking this course. Pre-requisites: Marketing Research AMP351/4 - SEMINAR ON MARKETING ISSUE This course intends to expose students to become an informative manager to understand the importance of marketing and the way it functions for both products and services. This course stresses on the latest marketing issues such as consumer behaviour, technological change, social, political and legislation. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing AMP352/4 - INTERNET MARKETING This course exposes students to internet function as one of the promotional tool in marketing field. Student can understand how marketing is handled effectively by using internet. Overall, this course enables students to understand and apply internet-based marketing to decide about problems in marketing management in an integrated manner. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing AMP353/4 - BRAND MARKETING This course focuses on the role of branding and the importance of integrated branding as a combination method in marketing field. Students will be exposed to brand planning and selection, the link with consumer behaviour, segmentation, and positioning of goods and services. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing

74


AMW342/4 - SERVICES MARKETING This course aims to introduce students to the skills of marketing the services particularly by service organizations. Students will be introduced with the marketing concepts and service model, to understand the importance planning processes, marketing strategies and promotional issues which are related to the supply of services. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing AMW354/4 - CONSUMER BEHAVIOUR This course involves the thoughts that people experience and the actions they perform in consummation processes. It also includes all elements in the environment that influence these thoughts, feelings and actions. These include comments from other consumers, advertisements, price information, packaging, product appearance, and many others. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing AMW345/4 - MARKETING RESEARCH This course provides understanding on the research techniques in the marketing functions. It involves design development, data source, data collection methodology, sampling, data analysis, preparation of research report and the importance of research in the decision making process. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing AMW346/4 - INTEGRATED MARKETING COMMUNICATION This course emphasises the role and importance of integrated marketing communication as one of the promotion methods in marketing. Students will be exposed to how advertising is planned and implemented; media planning and selection; its use as a marketing tool in influencing consumer behaviour; copy and artwork preparation; advertising laws and regulations. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing AMW347E/4 - STRATEGIC MARKETING This course will introduce to student, understanding of strategic marketing management and its relationship with corporate strategy. Decision making analytical technique, strategic marketing analysis, internal and external situational analysis, strategic marketing models and marketing strategies would be discussed in this course. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing, Final Year Students Only

75


AMW348/4 - RETAILING This course concentrates on the marketing issues of retailing. It covers the management of retailing institution (purchasing policy, pricing determination, management information system and sales person management). This course also discusses the influence of consumer behaviour, technological change and change of business structure in retailing. Pre-requisites: Principles of Marketing

76


ORGANISATIONAL MANAGEMENT AOW361/4 - COMPENSATION AND BENEFITS This course focuses on the compensation model, compensation strategy, and task analysis technique. Designing a strategic and effective compensation system to attract calibre employees and to motivate them will also be discussed. Pre-requisite: Organizational Behaviour, Human Resource Management AOW353/4 - ORGANISATIONAL THEORY This course exposes students to the concepts of organizational theory and structure. Students will also be taught how to apply these theories and concepts in an organization and it environment to ascertain that organizational effectiveness is achieved. Pre-requisite: Organizational Behaviour AOW355/3 - INDUSTRIAL RELATIONS The course aims to provide students an overall understanding and exposure of Malaysian industrial relation laws and practices. Students are also exposed to the processes of industrial relations from the perspectives of management and unions/employees representatives. Pre-requisite: Organizational Behaviour AOW358/4 - HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT The course aims to provide students with the concepts, theories, and current techniques of human resource management. Students will also be exposed to the core functions of a human resource manager and how the role of HRM evolves in the global environment. Pre-requisite: Organizational Behaviour AOW359/4 - ORGANISATIONAL DEVELOPMENT This course exposes students to the concepts of Organizational Development and the ways to plan and introduce changes to organisations. Pre-requisite: Organizational Behaviour, Organisational Theory AOW360/3 - MANAGEMENT PSYCHOLOGY This course highlights the theoretical underpinnings of the application of psychological principles in the management of organizations. Students will develop a deeper insight into managing themselves as well as working with and managing others, more effectively. Pre-requisite: Organizational Behaviour

77


OPERATIONAL MANAGEMENT APW373/4 - QUALITY MANAGEMENT This course contains concepts, theories, knowledge and techniques of quality control, quality assurance, total quality management, quality systems and standards. The impact of quality improvement and its assurance upon enterprise productivity will also be discussed. Appropriate operations management software will be introduced wherever applicable. APP378/4 - TECHNOLOGY AND INNOVATION MANAGEMENT This course aims to provide exposure to the concept of technology management and innovation, the importance and impact of technology management and innovation to organizationsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; performance. The scope of learning will cover the role of technology in value creation, competition advantage, development of technology, integration of technology management in the organizational planning, life cycle of technology, research and development, and management of technology resources and linkages. APP381/4 - SERVICE OPERATIONS MANAGEMENT This course consists of knowledge and skills of service operations management for example the service concept, new service development, customers and customer relationships, customers expectations and satisfaction, moments of truth, management of service supply chain, service providers, resource utilization, operations improvement, service quantitative models, service strategies, service culture and complexity of operations. APP396E/4 - ELECTRONIC COMMERCE This course explains the development of information technology and the Internet (ecommerce specifically) with an emphasis on developing the organisationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s web page, online electronic transaction (application and database development), server and network management. APW301/3 - MANAGEMENT SCIENCE This course aims to provide knowledge and understanding regarding some tools and quantitative models to solve practical problems in management decision- making. Specifically, this course will focus on transportation models, resource allocation model, linear programming (simplex and graphical methods), project management (CPM and PERT), and decision analysis and queuing techniques.

78


APW302E/3 - MANAGEMENT INFORMATION SYSTEM This course exposes students to MIS and organization, data and information, computer technology and the database management system. The contents include the role of MIS in organizations, the concept of data and information such as representation files and tools, computer technology such as CPU and number systems, input and output, data storage, communication and information system design. APW379/4 - PROJECT MANAGEMENT AND FACILITIES LOCATION This course introduces project management (network analysis), selection of facilities location and use of computer software. It will focus on the planning, implementation, control, and termination projects. APW380/3 - MATERIAL MANAGEMENT This course gives exposure to the students regarding the theory to an integrated approach for store and warehouse management, procurement, inventory management, value analysis, material requirements planning, JIT system and QS software for MRP. The contents include the theory and integrated approach for materials management, purchasing system, vendor selection procedures, price forecasting, international purchasing and make or buy decision, store and materials requirement planning and JIT system. APW382/3 - GLOBAL SUPPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT This course exposes the students to the issues of harnessing global resources to the advantage of the organization and to satisfy all stakeholders. Therefore these resources naturally attract global and local producers. The benefits derived from the successful management of global and local resources in the production of goods and services are the reduction of costs and lead-time, and improvement of flexibility and quality.

79


INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS ACE465/3 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL ACCOUNTING This course exposes the students to the basic concepts of social and environmental accounting. It focuses on the impact of accounting information on the issues of social justice, ethics and environment. AIP311/3 - CULTURAL ENVIRONMENT OF INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS This course will expose the students to the environmental culture of international business. Students will be able to understand the importance of basic element of culture which will shape the decision making process in international business and it will also teach them the process of conducting a successful negotiation. This course will also relate the cross culture communication and negotiation skills. AIP351/4 - INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT The course will focus on the theory, model and concept development of the international business, organizational behaviour, cross cultural management and implication of human resource management. The course will focus on the management and development of the international human resource management, issues on the selection and recruitment, compensation and rewarding system, training and development, performance evaluation and carrier development. AIP359/4 - INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS STRATEGY This course focuses on the strategies to develop world class firms that practise innovative management style. This course covers issues on strategies selection that are suitable based on the current situation and emphasizes on the strategies employed by employers who carried out international business and investment. This course also focuses on the global chain concept that practises sustainable and innovative management principle. AIW301/3 - INTERNATIONAL CORPORATE FINANCE This course covers issues related to international corporate finance and firm international finance operation. The first part will be analyzing all the related issues of international trade policies, euro market and derivative monetary. The second part involves the related issues of international firm operation. This course will focus on the identification, measurement, and the effect of foreign exchange management, political risk implication toward international corporate finance. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance

80


AIW302/4 - INTERNATIONAL NEW VENTURE This course will analyze the process of globalization that forces firms to operate in a challenging environment. This course will focus on strategizing the development of the world status firms in the global value chain and practicing the innovative and sustainable management. Pre-requisite: Principles of Finance AIW303/3 - INTERNATIONAL TRADE LAW This course will introduce the students to the aspects of international commercial law which has an influence the ability of a firm to do transaction globally. Students will also analyze the agreement which is related to the sales of a product or service. This course will analyze in depth the effect of trade liberation from the perspective of ethics, politics, and economy. AIW356E/AOW356E/3 - INTERNATIONAL MANAGEMENT This course exposes students to the concepts and contemporary issues of international management. Similarities and differences between international and domestic management styles would also be compared. AIW398/4 - INTERNATIONAL PROJECT MANAGEMENT Student will conduct a project that relates to business internationalization for a company. The project is related to the multinational firms where the students undertake their practical training. The project applies “problem based learning” where student have to observe the problems that the firms where they do their placements experienced. Acting as consultants, the students have to submit a full report containing the problems, the analysis, and subsequently offer recommendations on how to unravel/solve the problems. Student shall be placed in multinational firms from April June (3 month) at the end of semester 4 in an Academic Year. Writing reports will be conducted at semester 5 and the report submission will be followed with students’ presentation. Report on students’ performance the final year project will be tabled at Board University Examination Council - KSCP. Pre-requisite: Business Statistics

81


8.0 GENERAL INFORMATION 8.1 External Examiners External examiners are appointed every year for the two degree programmes the Bachelor of Management and the Bachelor of Accounting. The role of external examiners includes an evaluation of the overall structure and running of the programmes, conducting discussions on related research projects, as well as inspecting the facilities/equipment at the School. The external examiners appointed include Professor Stephen T. Parkinson (University of Ulster), Professor Alan Geare (University of Otago), Professor John R. Grinyer (University of Dundee), Professor Mohd. Ismail bin Sayyed Ahmad (Universiti Putra Malaysia), Professor Barjoyai Bardai (UKM), Professor Zafar Uddin Ahmed (Nanyang Technological University) and Dr. Veerinderjeet Singh (Arthur Andersen & Co.). 8.2 Facilities The School of Management offers the facilities/equipment required to support its teaching and learning programmes. Availability and provision of laptops, LCD projectors, a variety of software such as Acctrak, Amos, Idea etc., which enhances the presentation of lectures and seminars by the lecturers make this learning and teaching programmes more effective, interesting and impressive. There are three computer laboratories for teaching purposes and an MBA lounge for postgraduate students to use for discussion and revision sessions. 8.3 Career Options The School of Management offers two degree programmes, i.e., Bachelor of Accounting and Bachelor of Management. In the Bachelor of Management degree programme, students may major in any of the following areas: ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰ ‰

Finance Marketing Organisation and Human Resource Operational Management International Business

Sensitive to enhancing the career options of its students and taking intoconsideration the views of professional and industrial practitioners, the School of Management has designed a firm curriculum. The success of thesecurriculum is evident and has resulted in increased opportunities for graduates to obtain employment in both the public and private sectors, e.g. as auditors in charted accounting firms.

In addition, the job opportunities of the graduates of the Bachelor of Management

82


degree programme are equally good. Many of the graduates of this School have built their careers in multinational companies such as Lever Brothers, Procter & Gambel and the Boston Consultant Group. A close analysis will reveal the fact that graduates of the Bachelor of Management degree programme who majored in Finance have an increased opportunity to work in the banking and financial securities industries. The Marketing major also guarantees a good income in the sales and advertising sectors while the Human Resource major graduates may get jobs in the public and private sectors in recruitment, training, public relations and operations. The Operational Management field is a new area that has been introduced taking into consideration the national economic development in the manufacturing and services sectors. This area of specialisation, specifically targets the hotel, transport, insurance, tourism and electronic industries. Graduates of the School of Management are successful in multinational companies such as Dell, Intel, Unico, Motorola and Hitachi. The School is proud to have produced graduates of caliber who are successful in their choosen current careers. One of our graduates is currently a Director of a bank in Cambodia and another a Brand Manager of Nestle. These graduateschievements prove their ability as well as complement the firm and the effective education received from dedicated and knowledgeable lecturers. 8.4 Alumni The graduates produced by the School of Management are highly professional and effective in fulfilling the needs of the country. The USM Management Alumni is proud of its achievements. Realising the need for the sense of belonging and nostalgia among management graduates, the Management Alumni has affiliated with the USM Alumni to: ‰

Establish a close relationship in the Alumni in meetings that can strengthen the spirit of cooperation through activities and programmes.

‰

Know the developments and success of the Management and Accounting Alumni.

‰

Obtain feedback and suggestions from the Alumni on developing the management system and organisation administration.

‰

Establish a close relationship between the Alumni and the School of Management through a smart partnership for the advancement of the school and its undergraduates as well as for research and development activities.

‰

Internationalise the social activities implemented by the Alumni.

83


‰

Establish a Management Alumni that is location-based (Kuala Lumpur and Sabah & Sarawak) to coordinate activities and programmes.

The increase in the Management Alumni membership indicates that it has benefited the alumni as well as graduates of the Management and Accounting programmes. The School of Management hopes that all Alumni members are proud of it, for it can serve as a platform for the members to establish closer ties. The position of the Management Alumni at the Main Campus, with its many attractions will be able to inspire the development of the Management Alumni towards greater success. The Management Alumni can act as a catalyst in channelling information and as a platform for the sharing of ideas and visions for the benefit of religion, race and the nation. 8.5 Prizes and Dean’s Awards The Gold Medal is awarded to the following students: ‰

Anugerah Pelajaran Diraja oleh Majlis Raja-Raja Malaysia - For final year students who excel in all fields.

‰ Hadiah Pingat Emas Tuanku Canselor (The Tuanku Chancellor Gold Medal Award) - For the best final year student who excels in all fields. ‰ Hadiah Pingat Emas USM (awarded by Persatuan Wanita USM) The USM Gold Medal Award - For the best final year female student who excels in all fields. ‰ Hadiah Pingat Emas ACCA (The ACCA Gold Medal Award) - For the best final year student of the Bachelor of Accounting degree programme. ‰ Dean’s List - The Dean s Certificate is awarded to students who obtain a GPA of 3.5 and above every semester. ‰ Book Prizes (awarded by CPA Australia) - For the best first year student of the Bachelor of Accounting degree programme. 8.6 The Management Society The Society is actively organising activities to fulfil the needs of management and accounting students.

84


The objectives of establishing the School Society are as follows: ‰ To demonstrate the ability of the School of Management, USM as a local academic school that is capable of producing Management graduats of high quality and calibre. ‰ To provide final year students with the opportunity to interact with corporate figures in career counselling and recruitment activities. ‰ To establish close ties among students, members of the Management Society, USM Alumni and the university. ‰ To prepare students with the opportunity to interact with international management students of other universities. In line with this philosophy, the Committee has planned the following activities: ‰ Interaction Day. ‰ Management Night. ‰ Management Week. ‰ Student Career Expo. To respond to the country s call for local universities to produce graduates who are not only experts in their fields of study but also possess other skills, the Management Society provides a platform for students to achieve this goal. Besides getting the opportunity to participate in activities such as career talks, career exhibitions and corporate image demonstrations that will increase their knowledge, members of the Society will also get hands-on experiences on planning, managing and implementing those activities on their own without depending on the university administration. 8.7 The Graduate Studies Programme The School of Management, being fully committed in implementing its graduate studies programmes and focused on of Master s and PhD programmes by research is evident from the impressive increase in the number of candidates and graduates since the introduction of the programmes. Master and Ph.D. Programmes by Research The Master and Ph.D. by research programmes are offered on a full-time and part-time basis. The research clusters that have been identified by the School are as follows:

85


• • • • • •

Enterprise Governance. Leadership and Work Culture-Value. Internationalisation. Technology Management. Consumer Market-based Research. Finance Market-based Research.

The School has been successful in getting both local and foreign students to register for its research programmes. Please refer www.gsb.usm.my

8.8 The Study Abroad Scheme Universiti Sains Malaysia offers the Study Abroad Scheme to first and second year students who are interested in pursuing their studies for one semester in an overseas university. The aim of the scheme is to give students some international experience with a credit transfer option. Further information can be obtained from the International Relations Office, Academic and International Affairs Division, USM.

86


Required Semester

Core [T] Units Units Course Code Grade

87

Minor [M]/Elective [E] Units Units Semester Grade Course Code University Courses [U] Units Units Grade Semester Course Code

GRADUATION PLANNER

Pre-requisite [Z]/Audit [Y]/Others Units Units Semester Grade Course Code


INDEX ATW 103/3 – Business Law (67)

ATW 394/3 – Business Ethics (69)

ATW 104/4 – Introduction To Management (67)

ATW 395/3 – International Business (70)

ATW 107/3 – Microeconomics (67)

AFP311/4 – Financial Economics (71)

ATW 108/3 – Macroeconomics (67)

AFP 312/4 – Entrepreneurial Finance And Venture Capital (71)

ATW 112E/2 – Business Communication I (67)

AFP 313/4 – Personal Finance (71)

ATW 113E/2 – Business Communication II (67)

AFP 314/4 – Public Finance (71)

ATW 114/4 – Financial Accounting (68)

AFP 367/4 – Islamic Finance (71)

ATW 124/3 – Introduction To Managerial Psychology (68)

AFW 360/3 – Corporate Finance (72)

ATW 125/4 – Business Statistics (68)

AFW 362/3 – Management Of Financial Institutions And Markets (72)

ATW 202/3 – Business Research Method (68)

AFW 364/3 – Analysis Of Financial Statements (72)

ATW 212/4 – Accounting Management (68)

AFW 365E/4 – International Finance (72)

ATW 223/3 – Operation Management (68)

AFW 369E/4 – Securities Investment & Portfolio Management (72)

ATW 241/3 – Principles Of Marketing (69)

AFW 368/4 – Financial Derivatives (73)

ATW 251/3 – Organization Behaviour (69)

AMP 346E/4 – International Marketing (74)

ATW 262/4 – Principles Of Finance (69)

AMP 350/4 – Marketing Management Project (74)

ATW 305/12 – Practical Training (69)

ATW 393E/4 Management (69)

88

Strategic


AMP 351/4 – Seminar On Marketing Issue (74)

AOW 359/4 – Development (77)

AMP 352/4 – Internet Marketing (74)

AOW 360/3 Psychology (77)

AMP 353/4 – Brand Marketing (74)

APW 373/4 – Quality Management (78)

AMW 342/4 – Services Marketing (75)

APP 378/4 – Technology Innovation Management (78)

AMW 354/4 – Consumer Behaviour (75)

APP 381/4 – Service Operations Management (78)

AMW 345/4 – Marketing Research (75)

APP 396E/4 – Electronic Commerce (78)

AMW 346/4 – Intergrated Marketing Communication (75)

APW 301/3 – Management Science (78)

AMW 347E/4 – Strategic Marketing (75)

APW 302E/3 – Management And Facilities Location (79)

AMW 348/4 – Retailing (76)

APW 380/3 – Material Management (79)

AMP 350/4 – Marketing Management Project (76)

APW 382/3 – Global Supply Chain Mangement (79)

AOW 361/4 Benefits (77)

And

ACE 462/3 – International Accounting (80)

AOW 353/4 – Organisational Theory (77)

AIP 311/3 – Cultural Environmental Of International Business (80)

AOW 355/4 – Industrial Relations (77)

AIP 351/4 – Inrenational Human Resource Management (80)

AOW 358/4 – Management (77)

AIP 359/4 – International Business Strategy (80)

Compensation

Human

Resource

89

Organisational Management

And


AIW 302/4 – International New Venture (81) AIW 303/3 – International Trade Law (81) AIW 356E/3 – International Management (81) AIW 308/4 – International Management (81)

Project

90


STU UDENTS’ FE EEDBACK The aim of thhis feedback fo orm is to obtainn students’ respponse regardinng the content of this guidebbook. This infformation will be useful for the t university in improving this guideboook. Please responnd to items 1 - 5 below basedd on the following 4-point scaale. 1 - Strongly Disagree

2 - Disagree

3 - Agree

4 - Stroongly Agree

Please circlee the number. 1.

This guidebook is very y useful. 1

2.

2

3

4

The infoormation provid ded in this guiddebook is accuurate. 1

2

3

4

If you chose c 1 or 2 for f question no. n 2, please provide p the nuumber of the pages(s) that contain th he inaccurate information. i

3.

The infoormation provid ded in this guiddebook is clearr and easy to unnderstand. 1

4.

4

2

3

4

I prefer to t use the CD that t is providedd compared to this guidebookk. 1

6.

3

Overall, I would rate th he quality of thhis guidebook as a good. 1

5.

2

2

3

4

If there is any other information thhat you think should be inccluded in the gest in the spacce below. guideboook, please sugg

Please send this feedback form f to School’’s General Officce in the 4th weekk of Semesterr I, Academic Seession 2010/20111

91


USM BO Management 2010/2011