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Pre Spring | Summer 2013

ISBN 978-1-300-59628-8

90000

9 781300 596288

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Pre Spring Summer 2013

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Front Cover Image Kate Nash by Jenny Brough Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS Red Dress XIANFEN GU Red & White Suit Jacket XIANFEN GU

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Editors Letter

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Editors Letter Happy 2013 and welcome to the dreamers issue. As we start to settle into the new year, we go through a sort of rebirth. Our dreams and aspirations are at their highest: be it creating resolutions, mood boards or just setting one goal we wish to accomplish. During this time of year we are most aware of our desires, our subconscious blends with our conscious ideas and we hope and aim for them to materialize into something tangible. This season we encourage you to tap into those desires and those dreams; no matter how crazy or far fetched they may seem. Having a clear image of what you want is the first step. Inside you’ll find beautiful dreamscapes created by the imaginations of our creative teams and the manifestations of some of our wildest dreams. From the other worldly creations of designer Una Burke, to the illustrations, dreamy prints and pieces of designer David Longshaw to our cover story featuring the lovely Kate Nash, all of our features will encourage you to dream on, fight on and create. Today we are surrounded by so much negativity, so many things trying to draw our attention away from creating, from moving on, from pushing boundaries. We’ve almost sort of stopped. We’ve become engulfed in the more ‘practical, logical, and literal’ we’ve forgotten about the ‘whimsical, the daring and the new’. History keeps repeating itself because we aren’t just taking inspiration from things, we’ve been trained to emulate them instead, our own thoughts have been programed to go along with the status quo. And how boring is that? We sat down with DJ Muggs to discuss not only his creative process but how the lack of creativity and pushing forward is ultimately holding us back. We follow his journey into his rebirth, and his new creation; the album ‘Bass in Your Face’ which is in stores now. I hope this issue inspires you to delve into your own inspirations and create something new. Stick to your passions, think outside of the box, just because something doesn’t exist yet, doesn’t mean that it won’t, maybe the person who needs to create it is you. To quote Franz Kafka - “By believing passionately in something that still does not exist, we create it.” So go forth create, and most importantly dream on.

Le’Keisha Sims Editor and Chief, XO Magazine

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Contributors

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Contributors

Contact infoxomag@gmail.com editor@xomagazineonline.com

For all Advertising and Sponsorship Inquires m@olgny.com

Founder | Editor in Chief Le’Keisha Sims editor@xomagazineonline.com

Submissions Rachel@xomagazineonline.com

Social Media Facebook.com/XOMAGAZINE @xomagonline xomagazineonline.tumblr.com

International Fashion Director Rachael Holland

Contributing Photographers Vic Lentaigne Anya Holdstock Tereza Haszprunarova LGVL Jenny Brough Jesse Ashton

Director of Editorial and Business Development Moeima Dukuly

Graphic Design Fellow Studio www.fellowstudio.com

US Photo and Video Director Jesse Ashton


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Contents

Editors Letter 3

Wandering Traveler

Vibes Clothing Founder explores the scenery of Cape Town

Romeo 14

Úna Burke 26

Interview by Charlie Natter

Imagine 32

It Takes Two 38

David Longshaw 46

Le’Keisha Sims Editor in Chief

Interview by Charlie Natter

NY Calling 54

Stellar Flux 66

Nova Chu 72

Interview by Charlie Natter

Eddi Front 76

DJ Muggs 78

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IO Echo 80 Interview by Taj Ratland

Kate Nash 86 Cover Story | Interview by Kelly Griffin

Retail 96

We Heart 100

Listen 102


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Vibes Clothing founder Tom Hardless goes on an adventure to Cape Town. All photography by Tom Hardless

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Romeo

Photographer Vic Lentaigne Photographer’s Assistant Matthew Tuttle Stylist Melanie Khorshidian Hair Jazz Topalusic Make-Up Jenny Green

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Model Jose from AMCK

Dress ANNE THORBJORSEN Dungarees JAMES SMALL


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Shirt BUKI AKIB Collar Clips CULLIETA

Shirt WILLIAM RICHARD GREEN Tracksuit Bottoms THOM WILL LOVE Army Surplus Boots


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Below Vintage Jumper Dress CORRIE NEILSON

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Opposite Vintage Coat Jumpsuit BUKI AKIB Army Surplus Boots Below

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Shorts with kilt WILLIAM RICHARD GREEN Vintage Coat Underwear STYLISTS OWN


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Opposite Top Shirt CORRIE NEILSON Trousers WILLIAM RICHARD GREEN Opposite Below

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Shirt and Coat CORRIE NEILSON

Shirt CORRIE NEILSON Trousers WILLIAM RICHARD GREEN

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Shirt BUKI AKIB Trousers WILLIAM RICHARD GREEN

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Ăšna Burke

Autumn | Winter 2012 Collection


Interview with Una Burke

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Úna Burke’s studio is as unusual as her designs. She lives and works in a converted retirement home in south London where I have come to see her and talk to her about the new collection. Walking in I am overwhelmed with the smell of leather and Úna is quick to ask whether I can smell the leather because she no longer can. While she shows me around her work room we get talking about the collection, life as a designer and fashion. Growing up in rural Ireland, Úna was taught to sew at a young age by her mother, who used to make clothing for her and Úna’s siblings. “I remember being 5 and being about to sew a corner without the help from my mum. She couldn’t quite believe it”, Úna recalls. As a teenager she used to picture models walking down a catwalk while falling asleep. “It took me a while to realize that it was fashion, we didn’t have access to more than 2 TV channels and there weren’t any fashion magazines available either. It was the influence of my mother and her sense of style really.” She first moved to London 6 years ago to work as a junior designer for a handbag company before moving onto a design job at Burberry and a couple of other labels. In 2009 she completed an MA in Fashion Artifact and her graduate collection RE.TREAT won her the ‘London College of Fashion, Off Catwalk Award 2009’. Since then she has been running and designing for her own label.

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myself. Really fight and force myself to be brave.” Which brings us talking about bravery and strengths and Úna tells me how both are attributes she admires in people and things. They are the women she designs for: fierce and strong. “My pieces are not half-baked products, they are quite fierce and strong and even though the collection always has a feminine touch, I hope that strong women wear my pieces. I love strong women!” Are they her muse, I want to know. “The brave Úna is my inspiration”, Úna proclaims. It is the strength in her pieces that has meant that her pieces have often been associated with fetish. “My collections were never meant to be about fetish or anything like that. For my graduate collection, for example, I looked at trauma and how people dealt with it. Maybe that was also part of why I wanted to experiment with some color, to try and get away from that.” Currently in the process of discussing a collaboration with JeanPaul Gaultier (“I cant quite believe it”) Úna is busy designing the AW’13 collection in time for London Fashion Week. It will be interesting to see whether she will keep being brave or whether she will find a balance between being brave and her much darker roots.

Charlie Natter Úna Burke’s pieces are, as she says, “wearable art, which are indefinable as particular garments, preventing them from being placed into the conventional categories of the fashion industry.” Part of the reason why she loves working with leather, she tells me, is because of its longevity. “It’s not seasonal; you can wear my pieces for many years to come. They are not fleeting. I like that because I don’t like waste.” Is there reason in particular why she chooses to solely work with leather, I want to know. Her love for leather is twofold, Úna explains. First and foremost leather is a material you have to not only study in theory but rather you need to practice to learn how to use it. “You can’t learn leather work from a textbook”, Úna says, “you need to use all your senses, and feel your way along the leather. You need to have respect, understand it, and appreciate the material if you want to work with leather.” That is also why she teaches leather working skills to her team. “I don’t know everything, you know, and I want to learn more.” The other reason she loves leather is because it allows her create very structured pieces. “I love structure”, Úna tells me, “Absolutely love it. Even when I was studying fashion design, before getting into leather, I would try and make everything structured. Even if the material was soft and didn’t want to be structured, like organza.” The current collection is a burst of candy colors, which is unusual for her. Previously her collections were purely made up of pieces in black (“Love black”), nude and cream. “I wanted to try something new”, she says, “something a little happier, a lighter mood, because my moods are often heavy.” Taking her inspiration from bright, beautiful pictures, Úna created some stunning pieces. “I guess it was also about me trying to find some balance in my life, because I work all the time. My boyfriend lives in Dublin so I work, work, work so I have time to go back and see him.” However, working with color for the first time was not an excuse for Úna to play it safe. “The colors I used, aren’t safe colors. I was safe for too long and needed to throw caution to the wind.” How did that feel, I wonder. “I had to fight with


Interview with Una Burke

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My pieces are not half- baked products Ăšna Burke


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Interview with Una Burke

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Imagine

Photography Anya Holdstock Styling Andria Stirling Hair & Make up Seulah Kim Model Anastasia Milli, IMG Special thanks to Lee, Bloomsbury Ballroom


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Opposite Dress BERNARD CHANDRAN

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Opposite Top Dress ANDREW MAJTENYI

Opposite Bottom Dress SOMETHING ELSE Skirt JEFFREY MICHAEL Shoes KURT GEIGER

Above Dress BERNARD CHANDREN Shoes KURT GEIGER

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It Takes Two

Photographer LGVL Stylist Laurence Tooley Hair & Make Up Lizz Payne Set Design Annabel Maquire  Props Tilly Power Models Mac at AMCK Aaron, James, Saloni at MandP Jordan at Oxygen Theresa at D1 Ariana and Ruby at D1 Carley at Bookings Models + Chris

Opposite Him Crew Neck Sweater EDWIN Meringue Jeans MASTRUM

Her Printed Silk Trousers MAISON SCOTCH Top STYLIST’S OWN


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Above Him T-Shirt EDWIN  Grey Shorts PENFIELD Socks MODELS OWN

Her All clothes STYLISTS OWN

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Below All clothing COS. Opposite Right Kharki Paisley Trousers PENFIELD T-Shirt MODELS OWN.

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Left T-Shirt EDWIN White Paisley Trousers PENFIELD


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All clothing COS.

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David Longshaw

Spring | Summer 2013 Collection


Interview with David Longshaw

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Interview with David Longshaw St. Martins and RCA graduate David Longshaw has been showered with attention from the fashion media and prizes alike. Having launched his own label at London Fashion Week in 2010 we talk to him about his dreams, ambitions and new years resolutions.

What did you dream of being when you were a child? Did you always want to be a designer or would rather have been a superhero / fire-fighter / doctor / vet / chef / artist? From being at primary school I remember thinking that one day I’d like to be either a fashion designer, an architect, an animator, a rugby player, play football for Manchester City or be a barrister. (I think the last one was mainly because two of my friends mums were barristers, one used to pick us up in a huge Bentley which I thought was very cool). I loved playing rugby but when I was at primary school it wasn’t even a professional sport, so that idea quickly went out of the window (most of the England team were practising barristers, architects etc). I was crap at football so that one wasn’t happening (at the time City were shit as well). I liked the idea of architecture (creating something people could live / work in, that would be around for years and affect so many lives) and animation (creating my own little world and the magic of turning an inanimate object in to a moving image) but the idea of the immediacy of fashion and the thought of people wearing my pieces excited me more. Fashion designers at the time were increasingly getting involved in so many other projects that I thought if I went into fashion then there could be the possibility of being involved in architecture, animation, design in general at some point in my career.

What is your earliest design or fashion memory? It’s not my earliest memory but I do remember when I was about 15 being so obsessed with getting in to St Martins to study fashion, (as nearly all my favourite designers had studied there) that I went on their open day to find out what I needed to do to get in(A-levels / HND courses etc. etc.). They told me what they looked for and their preferred pathways and I went and did exactly that and more (A-levels, Art Foundation, Pattern Cutting course, work experiences etc.).

Do you remember the first thing you ever designed? If so, what was it and what did it look like? It was probably a dress and it was probably a horrendous costume like piece – I was always very creative, but I think St Martins and the RCA really helped hone my creativity and aesthetic (as did my time in Italy designing for Alberta Ferretti and Max Mara).

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Dream On Issue You do beautiful illustrations, do you see them as an extension of your label or are they a venture separate of your design identity? I think of everything I do from design, to illustration, to my little crudely done animations as an extension of my label. Everything I undertake creatively is all done with the idea that it feeds back into creating a brand and an idea of what my label is and represents. I want the label to be about creativity and ideas, whether that’s a dress, a scarf, a t-shirt, a pencil, an illustration, animation or installation.

Speaking of illustrations You illustrate and write a weekly comic strip for Vogue Italia. How did that come about? Where do you get your inspiration for it? Vogue Italia have featured me since early on with my designs / accompanying illustrations and come to see my collection each fashion week. They’re really supportive of new talent. During March Fashion Week in Paris they came to see my collection and said they thought it would be fun to do a series of something together (they’d seen some things I’d done for British Vogue.com and the design sketches they had featured themselves) - so we had a chat and emailed each other with various ideas until we came up with the idea of a comic strip with new characters, Francesca and Arthur. Inspiration for it comes from all sorts of sources, be it a festival or event that’s about to happen, to a designers new collection.

Tell us about Maude, the fashion mouse. Why did you originally make her? How do you feel about her having become a style icon in her own right? I came up with Maude whilst at St Martins designing my final degree collection – she was a small part in a much larger story called “Nigel’s Diary.” Maude’s an amalgamation of a foul mouthed field mouse (a field mouse with an attitude problem) and a fashion model. I made up a fabric Maude and some of her future MAUDEZINE team out of cashmere given to me by Richard James of Savile Row (after doing some work experience there). Her and her fabric friends were in the hair of my models at the St Martins’ Press show. I liked the idea of Maude and developed her whilst on my MA at the Royal College of Art. Some journalists came in to the RCA to speak to the fashion department and do some tutorials, they liked my characters (in particular Maude) and asked me to do some illustrating for their publications (including the London Fashion Week newspaper). When I moved to Italy to design for Alberta Ferretti, I carried on illustrating for various magazines in my spare time and from there Maude developed in to the ‘cult creation’ (Sept 2011) Vogue) she is today.


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more frocks, more drawings David Longshaw


Interview with David Longshaw Do you ever dream about a collection while you are in the process of designing it? Sometimes it’s a dream, sometimes it is a nightmare… I think most designers dream about their collections. You end up getting so obsessed by the collection and working on it constantly that it is inevitable.obsessed by the collection and working on it constantly that it is inevitable.

Have you ever been inspired by a dream to do a particular piece, use a particular colour or even to design an entire collection? I think probably yes to all of those - I can’t think of a particular collection- but each season I get so immersed in a collection that I can’t help dreaming about it and those dreams influence what I do.

What are your ambitions? More frocks, more drawings, more creative projects. To still be designing and being creative when I’m 90 years old.

Where do you see yourself in the next 5/10 years? Being a lounge singer in Las Vegas. (I can’t sing so this may be a problem).

On a non-fashion related noted: What is on your bucket list? To watch New Zealand rugby team play a Test match in New Zealand. Visit Japan (but I would like this to be work related as well as it would be fun to see the stores I sell to there). Be a villain in a Bond film

Are there any dreams you plan on fulfilling in the upcoming year? To become the sugar plum fairy in a production of the Nutcracker at Covent Garden.

What are your new year’s resolutions for 2013? Are they any different from your previous resolutions? To not give up anything and ideally to do more of everything!! I think last years was the same…

How different is it to design accessories such as bags and scarfs from clothing? With a scarf, it’s all about the art work and what will make a beautiful desirable image. Whereas with a garment there’re far more complexities - what fit you want, what hem length, how do you want the differing fabrics to react, will the print that looks good flat and be ideal for a scarf work when it’s on a 3D

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object and worn from different angles (certain patterns can look awful on certain areas of the body). With a garment there are a million and one decisions to make about how you want the wearer to feel, what will make them want to wear it in the first place, how will others perceive the wearer in it, how can it be made and will it hang as part of the rest of my collection. If you could invent or have someone invent something for the future what would that be? The ability to stop time so I could get even more projects done.

What can we expect to see at London Fashion Week this year from you? With all my collections the colours, prints and shapes all come from either a story or a short animation I create especially for the season. My new collection will be called ‘Painting Over Harry’. It’s inspired by a short crudely put together animation I’ve done about a lady called Iris, her bird Harry and Iris’s obsession with the days of Black and white and the 1973 wedding of Princess Anne.

Charlie Natter


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NY Calling

Photography Clark Franklyn Styling Maria Martin - Caro Stylist´s Assistant Sascha Ehrenreich Make Up Maria Papadopoulou using MAC Hair Stylist Atsushi Takita using Bumble & bumble Hair Stylist´s Assistant Jun Takagi Model Amiee Oxygen Model Management


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Above Dress JAYNE PIERSON

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Top CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Leather Jacket HEOHWAN SIMULATION Leather Jeans CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Necklace MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Bracelets FELDER & FELDER

Red Dress Lee Miller by Christian Blanken Ring MAWI


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Right Coat HAIZHEN WANG Leather Top LEE MILLER Trousers FELDER & FELDER Ring & Necklace MAWI Shoes JULIAN HAKES

Opposite Top CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Leather Jacket HEOHWAN SIMULATION Leather Jeans CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Necklace MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Bracelets FELDER & FELDER Shoes ELISABETH DUNN

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Next Page Left Dress - LEE MILLER BY CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Shoes - WON HUNDRED Bag - SWEDISH HASBEENS

Next Page Right Sweater FANNY & JESSY Shorts CLAUDIA LIGARI Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS Ring MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Bag MILLI MILU

Right Denim Top MAISON SCOTCH Trousers KIRSTY WARD Swarovski Necklace BY NIYA Amethyst Ring MAWI

Left Top KIRSTY WARD Leather Shorts LEE MILLER Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS Bag & Necklace KIRSTY WARD Sandals ZOE LEE

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Opposite Dress LEE MILLER BY CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Shoes WON HUNDRED Bag SWEDISH HASBEENS

Below Top KELLY LOVE Trousers LEE MILLER Red Belt FELDER & FELDER Ring & Necklace MAWI Shoes ELISABETH DUNN

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Below Black leather petal and crystal dress BRIGITTE BARDOT Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS

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Stellar Flux

Photographer Tereza Haszprunarova Stylist Danielle Fontaine Hair & Make Up Michelle Maskell Model Jodie of BookingsModels


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Opposite Dress LEE MILLER BY CHRISTIAN BLANKEN Shoes WON HUNDRED Bag SWEDISH HASBEENS

Below Top KELLY LOVE Trousers LEE MILLER Red Belt FELDER & FELDER Ring & Necklace MAWI Shoes ELISABETH DUNN

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Opposite Black leather petal and crystal dress BRIGITTE BARDOT Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS


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Nova Chu

Spring | Summer 2013 Collection


Interview with Nova Chu Nova Chu’s last collection at London Fashion Week was an explosion of colours and prints. We first met with Nova Chu and Jeff Archer back in September to talk about their label. Now are back to find out a little more about them, their dreams, ambitions and what we can expect to see from her at London Fashion Week in September.

What did you dream of being when you were a child? Did you always want to be a designer or would rather have been a superhero / fire-fighter / doctor / vet / chef / artist? Nova: I always wanted to be Sailor Moon, but then I grew up and realised that superhero’s are not real. Jeff: I wanted to be many things before I was a designer. First I wanted to be an Astronaut, than a Chef, and then a Journalist.

Have you ever been inspired by a dream to do a particular piece, use a particular colour or even to design an entire collection?

Nova: I have been inspired by dreams in the past. The things that inspire me the most from dreams are colours. I find my dreams to be very colourful. Jeff: It was because of a dream that inspired me to do the last collection about road trips. The dream was Nova and I living in the forest as bears and became friends with bisons, and when we got to Yellowstone National Park we saw loads of bisons. Weird, I know.

What are your ambitions? Where do you see yourself in the next 5/10 years? Nova & Jeff: Our ambitions are to take this label to higher heights. We hope to achieve greater success in the next 5 to 10 years. We would ultimately want our label to be sold all over the world. One can dream right?

On a non-fashion related note: what is on your bucket list? Are there any dreams you plan on fulfilling in the upcoming year? Nova: It still has to be winning “The Collection of the Year” Award during my graduate year at London College of Fashion. Jeff: I would have say being accepted to the “One’s to Watch” Show with Vauxhall Fashion Scout last A/W season, and helping Nova win “The Collection of the Year” Award.

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What can we expect to see at London Fashion Week this year from you? Nova & Jeff: At London Fashion Week this year you can expect lots of coats, and dresses infused with animal fur, embroideries, and beadings.

Charlie Natter


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Black leather petal and crystal dress BRIGITTE BARDOT Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS

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Music

Eddi Front Line Forms At the Front

She’s changed her name but her depth remains the same. From Ivana XL to Eddi Lines to her most recent persona - Eddi Front (real name Ivana Carrescia) she just might be the Golidlocks of new music. And perhaps, she’s found the name to suit her and her recent exploration into music. “I can’t really remember a time when music wasn’t in my life.”, says the artist. And after a period of uncertainty and giving art school a try at Savannah College of Art and Design, she returned to New York eager to create music. And so she did. “I put out whatever I could. Constantly. I gave away so much free music it was crazy.” But with the aid of management - she began to work towards a career. “It’s a long road. And sometimes- a lot of time you come across less than trustworthy people. But you learn who to steer clear of. It can be difficult being a female in this industry. But more and more than ever - women hold strong positions in music.” With tracks like the popular Gigantic and the following track, Texas, Eddi Front is constantly compared to that other sultry singer Lana del Rey. But she is less seductive per se- but highly rhythmic. Complete with instrumental construction played by Eddi herself, her roots in classical music are thanks to her father’s experience as a conductor in the genre. With songs like ‘Gigantic’, Eddi’s music contains a vastness it’s hard to put your finger on. It seems as though the strength of the song relies only the somber keys from a piano and Eddi’s voice. There’s is a darkness within Eddi Front - perhaps a side she doesn’t show in the real world - her songs haunt you and she carries influence from artists (like Nick Cave and Cat Power) who have displayed the same quiet, somewhat sad exuberance. Lets hope in time and with experience, we see different facets, perhaps even personalities of her undeniable talent.

Moeima Dukuly

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DJ Muggs Part I DJ MUGGS – The Influence

“I just got bored.” And it’s that simple. How many great revolutions are based off apathy and sheer boredom? Don’t bother answering the question, but embrace the motivation.

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DJ MUGGS, the man behind the legend that is Cypress Hills’ unique sound has such motivation and kaboom: his newest album, Bass For Your Face, presents new explorations in production, sound and the man himself. His work, associations, and personality precede him. MUGGS is best known for his work with seven studio albums with heavyweights Cypress Hills; as well as classics like House of Pain’s ‘Jump Around’ and Ice Cube’s ‘Check Ya Self’.  Having also released solo albums, MUGGS is a consistent darling of the critics, and has an ironclad following of fans - not to mention his art collective, Soul Assassins. With a few decades of experience under his belt, the support of an entire genre and an openness to venture into uncharted territory DJ MUGGS sought out a new way to express himself. “There’s only so much to do in hip-hop, it wears out after awhile.” His curiosity lead him to electronic (and sequentially- dubstep) music and slowly but surely he got acquainted with the structure that made up this complicated genre of music. “I taught myself everything. It was crazy. I started listening to whatever I could and i let what I liked guide me. It was a long process. There was a time where I was - this shit is taking too long and I felt so much frustration -- but I rode it out.” Going from hip-hop to electronic is no easy feat as an artist and a producer - never mind someone who wears both hats. The methods that involve creating classic hip-hop are fairly simplistic - whereas electronic methods are intricate and limitless in terms of sound design. MUGGS as in past albums, brought on a fleet of artists to add to the quality. DJ Bambu, Dizzee Rascal, Chuck D are among those contributing to MUGGS newest album each uniquely adding personal touches to what will inspire other hip-hop players to go explorin’. When asked where the bulk of his influence and learning came from - MUGGS answered with zero hesitation - “Radiohead. They got it on every level and somehow they continue to go further - shit they put out in the 90s, most are just learning how to perfect now.” Lesson to the wise, the best learns from the best. To be continued....

Moeima Dukuly


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Photographer Jesse Ashton Rhodus Stylist Tony Elliott

Hair Luis Payne @ Hairroin Salon & Sebastian Professional Make-Up Natasha Scher @ Hairron Salon

Select wardrobe provided by Spanish Moss

IO Echo He was a boy named Leopold. She was a girl obsessed with Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus in Furs.

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What started as bonding over the name “Leopold” and masochism, at a party in the rolling hills of LA has manifested itself into one of today’s most promising indie bands. Ioanna Gika and Leopold Ross craft moody, oriental grunge pop anthems, like if the Cocteau Twins and Nirvana teamed up to compose blissed-out music about teenage kabuki dancers lost in LA. The duo has been pretty busy this year, touring, opening for Nine Inch Nails at the band’s last show ever, composing the score for Harmony Korine and James Franco’s  new film Rebel and curating at MoCA for Jeffrey Deitch all while somehow finding time to finish up their debut album, Ministry Of Love. “I’ve been in bands since I was 12 years old” says Leopold, when I ask the duo if they’ve always been interested in music, “Its just something thats always been a part of me.” Which definitely shows in the bassist’s CV, he’s been a part of bands such as Error, Fear and the Nervous System, Nojahoda, 12 Rounds and The Big Pink as well as having composing credits on films like “Book Of Eli”, “Twilight” and “Snow White and the Huntsman” (the latter a product of Io Echo). Ioanna, however, took a different route to sonic discovery. Raised on a steady diet of Yanni, Enya, Ioanna took her musical cue from musical theatre, “I never wanted to be an actress but that experience helped me realize my love for being on stage.” I very recently got into IO Echo but as soon as I heard their music I was hooked! Its at once airy and textured and nostalgic yet its like nothing you’ve ever heard before, and in that way they reminded me of The Drums (who they happen to be pretty close with, after meeting them while Leo (then apart of Big Pink) was on tour with them.

They even recorded a song with frontman, Johnny Pierce.) I think one of the things that makes this band so interesting is their mashed up sound, their ability to mash up so many different influences, sounds and instruments to create a very unique, dynamic composite sound. “ The producer [of James Franco and Harmony Korine’s new film Rebel] is a fan and he recommended us to Harmony. We watched the film and it kind of came very naturally to us. There is a very intrinsic nature to images, so we watched the film and did what felt right and usually when we do something like that the director will send us a round of notes and adjustments, Harmony was just like ‘Yeah, this is great.’” “Sonically, nothing is really influencing us right now...” says Ioanna, when I ask about what’s influencing them right now, “but right now we really love songs like Higher Ground by TNGHT and Harlem Shake by Bauuer.” who’dathunk that these gothpop darlings would be into Trap/EDM? But its things like that that make this band even more likeable, their references are endless and they have a hand in all sorts of creative mediums, “We Love MoCA in LA” says Ioanna, “The LA scene is so vast and exciting, and I love supporting everything sonically as well as visually.” This summer the duo curated a music/art festival at MoCA for their pal Jeffrey Deitch, who’s also excited about the up-and-coming creative scene in LA. When asked about fashion and their individual style and aesthetic, Ioanna hips me to her collection of kimonos and the custom one Jeremy Scott made her, but Leo is a bit indifferent on the subject, “I love the color black. I don’t wear black as much as I want to though” and without missing a beat Ioanna chimes in with what I believe to be a perfect dissertation of the band, “Your heart is black and that’s all that matters.”

Taj Ragland


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Smiley Face Sweatshirt HIS OWN Black Skinny Jeans HIS OWN Beanie HIS OWN

Itajamie Silk Wrap UPSTATE  Navy Spanish Moon Dress AMERICAN GOLD Floral Leggings H&M Black Studded Ankle Boots NASTY GAL

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Her Pink Silk Kimono HER OWN

Her Onyx Metallic Crepe Dress, SPANISH MOSS VINTAGE Opening Ceremony Wedge Boots HER OWN Finger Pick rings HER OWN Accessories VINTAGE

Him Sunglasses SOMETHING ELSE BY NATALIE WOOD Floral Print Jacket JOYRICH Black Skinny Jeans HIS OWN

Him Black Skinny Jeans HIS OWN Leather Jacket HIS OWN Black Heart of Gold Studded Top AMERICAN GOLD Accessories VINTAGE Combat Boots VINTAGE

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Him Black Skinny Jeans HIS OWN Leather Jacket HIS OWN Black Heart of Gold Studded Top by AMERICAN GOLD Accessories VINTAGE Combat Boots VINTAGE

Her Onyx Metallic Crepe Dress SPANISH MOSS VINTAGE


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Kate Nash

Photographer Jenny Brough Stylist Rachel Holland Stylist’s Assistants Poppy Sakulku & Jenny Slungaard Hair Tomoyuki Otsuka at Earth Salon

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Make-Up Gemma Wheatcroft from K Management using Illamasqua

Black leather petal and crystal dress BRIGITTE BARDOT Sunglasses CUTLER & GROSS


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Above Green and Black Dress KIRSTY WARD Green Perspex and Leather ‘Shinko’ Collar FIONA PAXTON


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Above Gold Sequin T-Shirt PAUL & JOE Long Silver Necklace DELPHINECHARLOTTE PARMENTIER

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Number Seventeen When Kate Nash says her ultimate goal is “to make a significant difference to the attitude of a generation”, I don’t for a second doubt she will. You see, Kate became an instant indie darling with her infection and offbeat hit pop song Foundations and debut album Made of Brick back in 2007 at just 19 years of age. Since then, while continuing to forge a successful career in the music world, Kate has also used her public platform to speak out on feminism and used music to empower girls everywhere. Just look at her Kate Nash Rock ‘n’ Roll for Girls After School Music Club, which encourages young girls, who are musically minded but feel, in some cases, too insecure to be in a band, to do just that. Or at her Agony Aunt podcasts, where Kate and pal Paula Trounce answer fan’s problems and questions online. How on earth she manages to balance a successful career with activism – plus film acting and blogging – is anyone’s guess. “There really isn’t enough time [in the day],” she sighs, adding “I don’t know [how I do it all] either”. And yet, with her third album about to be released, midway through a tour and recovering from “a minor injury”, Kate – one of the hardest working musicians and certainly one of

90 How do you deal with pressures of being in the public eye? I have a great family and friends and I’ve just never really felt comfortable with too much media attention, so I shy away from alot of it. I don’t go to “celeb hang outs” or to places I know there’ll be paps. I find that weird. I have such a busy schedule, I’d rather hang out with my real friends or family or bunny rabbit or even my TV.

I think a lot of girls look up to you, not only because they like your music but also because you’re a strong successful female artist, who doesn’t shy away from saying what you think or to call yourself the f-word – a ‘feminist’. I’m wondering if you feel a responsibility to be a good role model? I’ve always felt a like I have a responsibility to my fans. I’ve always kind of thought that if you have a platform to speak on, then you should. I think that no one can be or should be perfect and one of the most important things about being a role model is having flaws. You should make mistakes and know that you’re allowed to do that and so is everyone else. But having an opinion is important and kind of preaching that everyone should just be themselves is my vibe.

the nicest – found time to sit down and chat with us.

Hi Kate, thanks for speaking with us. We’re besotted with Underestimate the Girl, which is the first song from your forthcoming album. It sounds grungier, edgier and angrier than your earlier indie-pop songs and I was wondering how this new musical direction came about. Were there any particular influences? The influence was genuinely just how pissed off I was at the time. I’d already finished the record at that time and I had a really bad day / week on top of an already stressful few months so it was just kind of an explosion. I think music is the most healthy way to deal with stress, anger and depression.

When it was released online, people had a real immediate and polarising reaction. People were really vocal in loving or loathing the song, I guess in part because it sounded so different. Were you surprised the song garnered such a strong reaction? Yes and no, I guess. To be honest I was just so excited to be releasing something the day before a tour. I didn’t even consider what people might think of it. I was just really into the song and proud of it and wanted it out there. When it came out, it was pretty wild. It was an exciting time. The reaction fit perfectly with the lyrics of the song about everyone playing it so safe. It’s like people are really afraid of change and react pretty badly to a woman expressing aggression. But it actually saved me about six months of PR work to do! And plus, I’ve always believed if everyone likes what you’re doing, you’re doing something wrong. My true fans really got it and it’s good to sift out the fakers every now and then.

Did you have good role models growing up, who were they? My mum was always very outspoken and political and is a nurse so has a very practical and caring outlook on life.

In 2011 you started the Kate Nash Rock ‘n’ Roll for Girls After School Music Club, which helped girls, who wanted to be musicians but perhaps felt they couldn’t for various reasons, realise their dreams. What did you learn from the experience? How insecure our youth have become. How much the bullying culture that we celebrate and indulge in this country has had a terrible effect on kids. It would make a cute 14-year-old girl say that she was too ugly to be a musician and give up on the idea of even writing a song let alone pursuing a music career. It’s time we did something about this.

We’re too excited to hear your new album when it comes out later this year. For now, what can you tell us about it? I recorded it in LA in March with Tom Biller. We stayed in an amazing mansion in Echo Park with crazy antiques and taxidermy everywhere! It was the most incredible experience of my life and a very healing time. I hung out with loads of friends over there and we had an amazing two months. It’s definitely my best work so far. In a weird way, I didn’t think too much about what I was writing. There was a lot going on for me emotionally at the time so I just had to write to survive. I kind of puked this one out. I’m really excited about everyone hearing it.


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F__k that! love yourself more. Kate Nash


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Number Seventeen What is the perfect scenario to listen to it in?

Opposite Checked Dress MISSONI

ROAD TRIP! Or in your bedroom daydreaming and writing in your diary pretending to do homework. Will finish nicely in bed with ‘Lullaby for an Insomniac’.

The title single from your new EP Death Proof has the same title as a Tarantino film. What’s the connection there? I felt like the guitars were Tarantino-esque and Death Proof is my favourite of his movies. Also the song is about having your heart burnt off in a metaphorical and literal sense. I had my heart ripped out and broken and I also had surgery when I was a kid to burn off a section of my actual heart that was broken. I like the idea that I can’t be killed emotionally by someone. They can keep fucking with me and I will stay strong and not be broken down by someone else’s problems. Whenever someone is being shitty to you they are projecting what they are uncomfortable about themselves onto you. It’s hard to see through that, but if you can, you really are emotionally death proof. I wanna see chicks standing up for themselves. … Life is too short and there’s too much fun to be had to be treated like crap, you know? So yeah, my advice is be emotionally death proof. Don’t let the bastards get you down and break you. Fuck that. Love yourself more.

What ambitions do you have? I wanna do more movies and records and a musical. I also wanna write a radio play. And, I believe in revolution. The ultimate thing for me to achieve would be to make a significant difference to the attitude of a generation.

Anything you’d like to add or tell XO Mag readers? Just keep up to date with what I’m doing and new releases via my twitter.com/katenash and website www.myignorantyouth.com! Kate’s new album Girl Talk will be released in March 2013. Her EP Death Proof is out now.

Kelly Griffin


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Opposite Red Sequin Gown Dress MARINA QURESHI White Beaded Cape CHARLOTTE SIMPSON Gold Loop Earrings SATYA Black and Gold Platform Sandals SAM EDELMAN Brushed Gold Cuff with Spikes MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE

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Retail

Photographer Keanoush Da Rosa Stylist Jaime Jarvis & Jessica Foster Hair Virginie Moreira Make-Up Amber Dorne

Opposite Jumper MINK PINK Pants AMERCIAN APPAREL Shoes TOPSHOP Headpiece CROWN AND GLORY Rose ring DISAYA Bra STYLISTS OWN


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Living In A State Of Dreaming Inspired by some of the dreamy looks we’ve been seeing on the runways this season, XO takes the look from day to night with Felder & Felder, Louise Gray and more.

Wake up from your sweet dreams W/ a lightweight jumper,and fun accessories.

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Below Top FELDER & FELDER Skirt JAYNE PIERSON Shoes TOPSHOP Necklace STYLISTS OWN Collar Clip CULLIETTA

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Sheer and glistening fabrics give everyday pieces a added boost.


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Above Blouse REBECCA TAYLOR Skirt JAMES HOCK Shoes KAT MACONIE Necklace DISAYA

Necklace BLOODY GRAY Earrings AIMEE�S VINTAGE

End the night with the unexpected. Throw on some of your favourite accessories, a fun top and your set to go.


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[1] Band Crush AlunaGeorge AlunaGeorge is the dynamic duo behind the 2012 sleep hit ‘ Your Drums’. Featuring glossy, hiccuping r&b beats with pop sensible melodies, we’re totally enamored. Download: ‘You Know You Like It’ EP.

[2] Stuck On Repeat Christopher Owens - Lysandre We were all quite heartbroken when the news of one our beloved indie bands, Girls were

breaking up. But not all is lost ex-frontman Christopher Owens is back with his debut solo album, Lysandre. Killer lyrics, a vast array of instruments and the kind of charm that only Chris can give, we’ve had this stuck on repeat.

[3] Favourite T NY blogger Rachel Lynch of I hate Blonde has just released a teaser of her new line, Blonde DNA. The “Modern Medicine” muscle Tee has definitely been on our most wanted list. Get Yours Here: http://blondedna.com

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J’adore The Chameleon Clock App

Can’t Stop Watching Girls & Scandal

Ever get sick of trying to find the perfect Ipad/phone background? Well the chameleon clock app uses your device’s rear facing camera to show what’s behind the Ipad, which in turn blends the device with the natural surroundings. Turning off your alarm was never so customizable (the app also allows you to customize the clock display to either white or black). We can’t tell you how many different surfaces we blended our Ipads with! The Chameleon Clock app is currently available in the apple app store.

We’re super stoked for the return of our new favourite gaggle of Friends the cast of Lena Dunham’s hit show GIRLS (which just won two Golden Globes ).They will back on our tv screens Jan 13. Then Thursday’s go back to being intriguing with the return of abc’s Scandal! We cant wait to see what drama Olivia Pope gets in. Catch Scandal con Thursdays at 10/9c on ABC.


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XO Magazine No. 17 - the Dreamers Issue