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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision August, 2008

“The Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee works together with property owners, business owners, the County of Sacramento, and other stakeholders to develop and implement a plan of improvements that enable the Fair Oaks Village to increase its viability as a thriving business district.� Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee’s Mission Statement


Tabl e of C ontents

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

Acknowledgements

2

Introduction

3

A Vision for Fair Oaks Village

4

The Planning Process

6

A Brief History

8

Existing Conditions

9

Recommendations

17

Districts

18

Public Enhancements

24

Private Enhancements

28

Implementation Matrix

30

Appendix A - Visioning Workshop

31

Appendix B - Regulatory Environment

36

Appendix C - Traffic Calming Devices

38

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A ck n owle d g e m e nts Advisory Team

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee David Hill Barry Brown Becky Lund Tino Cuevas Angela Talent Renee Taylor Shenna Mealey Tyler Janes John O’Farrell David Newlin Tom Zlotkowski Johanna Castelo

Consultant

Mogavero Notestine Associates Mike Notestine David de la PeĂąa

Participants

Organizations County of Sacramento Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce Fair Oaks Recreation and Parks District Fair Oaks Water District

Individuals Local Business Owners Local Land Owners Local Residents

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


I n t rod u ct ion

e Bouleva rd

et

Temescal Stre

sB

lvd

.

ve. ia A

Fair Oaks Boulevard

n lifor Ca

The Village Enhancement Vision:

Fai r

Oa

k

B r id ge Stre

Encompasses the views of stakeholders that make up Fair Oaks Village. Identifies community strengths and assets. Identifies community needs and concerns. Establishes goals for improving Fair Oaks Village’s commercial district. Presents specific recommendations to reach those improvement goals.

g

Su n r i s

The Village Enhancement Vision has provided an opportunity for community members to shape the neighborhoods where they live, work, own property or manage businesses. The visioning process addressed land use, zoning, transportation, urban design and related community issues. It brought together a diverse range of interests to develop a shared vision for Fair Oaks Village. The goal of this Village Enhancement report is to summarize the work completed to date and to provide a document that can be used in order to implement the shared vision.

• • • • •

Fair Oaks Boulevard in

ay W

In early 2007, a small group of interested citizens formed a committee to pursue the betterment of the Village. As stated in its mission statement, the Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee, or FOVEC, was formed to provide a means to preserve and enhance the Village through a collaborative process. The FOVEC has partnered with Sacramento County, the Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce, and others to guide future improvements in Fair Oaks Village’s commercial area. This collaboration and public process has resulted in the creation of this visioning document.

Wi nd

Central Ave.

Fair Oaks Village is a historical community in the heart of Fair Oaks, California. It is nestled behind the bluffs of the American River and shielded by hilly terrain from the busy Sunrise Boulevard to the West. The character of this community sets it apart from the development that surrounds it. It is a unique place full of eclectic buildings, parks, cultural monuments, and wildlife. Its commerce is supported by surrounding residents and occasional visitors. The unique qualities of this place ought to be preserved and strengthened, and the commercial success of this area should be enhanced through the implementation of sensitive improvements within the Village.

et

Implementation of this Village Enhancement Vision will help Fair Oaks Village in a number of ways. A widely embraced Vision can: • Clearly describe what the community wants accomplished. • Provide a framework for other community and planning decisions. • Give direction to Sacramento County and other service providers about appropriate capital improvements for Fair Oaks Village. • Offer residents and businesses the opportunity to offer a clear picture of the type of development Fair Oaks Village wants. • Inform property owners and potential developers about what businesses are needed and the types of development that will be encouraged. • Provide guidelines for the design of new development so it will complement and enhance the existing commercial area.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

Map Source: MNA

Fair Oaks Village Overall Concept Sketch Map

3


The Vi si on Fair Oaks Village Districts Fair Oaks Village is an eclectic place. It can be difficult to find, and it is also easy to get lost within it. Each street has its own unique buildings, trees, and parking requirements, just to name a few differences. Because of this, no single solution should be applied to improvements in the Village as a whole. A This vision of Fair Oaks Village is comprehensive and made up of many smaller visions. As part of this process, the Village was broken down into five separate “districts.” Each of these districts has its own character, strengths, and challenges. Each district vision suggests improvements that are targeted to that district. The overlapping of these districts also serves to improve the “sense of place” within Fair Oaks Village by strengthening the natural structure of the community. The five districts identified on the map are briefly described below.

D

A: Gateway Districts Both the North and South Gateways serve as transitional areas between the busy auto-oriented environment along Sunrise Boulevard and the quiet, pedestrian environment of the Village. These districts should draw attention to the Village but also encourage drivers to slow down and to appreciate the finer character of the Village surroundings.

C

B: Village Boulevard

B

This portion of Fair Oaks Boulevard is the commercial heart of the historic Fair Oaks Village. It is similar to the general idea of a historic “Main Street.” Streetscapes and buildings within this district should support a healthy pedestrian shopping environment.

C: Park Loop

A

The Park Loop encompasses the Plaza Park and Amphitheatre on the West, the Village Park and Community Clubhouse on the East. This district is the public “green” for the community; as such, it should accommodate a variety of public events and also serve as a day-to-day open space for residents to enjoy.

D: North Village Boulevard As Fair Oaks Boulevard winds to the north, the street begins to lose some of its unique “Village” characteristics. This portion of the boulevard should be identified more with the Village; it should encourage people to safely drive, cycle, and walk from outlying residential areas into the Village.

LEGEND A

Gateways

B

Village Boulevard

C

Park Loop

D

North Village Boulevard

E

Bridge Street

E

E: Bridge Street The historical bridge over the American River connects Fair Oaks Village to the American River Parkway trail system and to adjacent neighborhoods. The quality of the Bridge Street connection should be enhanced by a new plaza, better access and directional signage to encourage more visitors to explore the Village.

Map Source: MNA

Fair Oaks Village Districts

4

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Character of the Village in 2018 The following is just one possible depiction of what the Village might develop into over the next decade . . . From a distance you can almost hear music as you approach the Village Center. Driving west and south on Fair Oaks Boulevard you have just passed under the east portal of the Village, a large bronze archway integrated into a lush street landscape, and the sights and sounds of the Village begin to surround you. The section of Fair Oaks Boulevard you just drove used to be a wide thoroughfare, but now expanded landscaping in the street median and in front of the sidewalk has begun to provide a tree canopy that frames a much calmer street. The older utilitarian streetscape is being updated to be consistent and attractive, and retail stores are being fixed up. The sidewalk and storefronts are a new kind of public space that complement the new apartments across the street. Turning right at Main street, you stay on Fair Oaks Boulevard and head toward the newly-constructed roundabout, passing the new Fair Oaks Water District building on the left and a grouping of specialty shops and eateries on the right. The continuous sidewalks are new and complemented by period street furniture, marked crosswalks and lamp posts. Under construction near the roundabout, a threestory parking structure is integrated into the hill and almost blends into the retail center. Traveling most of the circle, the large bronze chicken and the adjacent, mature oak trees create a sense of place for the “main” street you are about to turn onto. The sounds of Sunrise Boulevard are off to the right well beyond another gateway monument for those entering the Village from the west. At the corner above the roundabout, the vastly remodeled and expanded “Town House” advertises a soon-to-be-opened wine bar and restaurant. The large open air patio wraps around the corner and extends down “main” street towards the old Chamber of Commerce building site that now contains a small business center. The main street is full of patrons wandering through specialty shops, eateries and art galleries, whose displays range from outdoor pottery to handmade jewelry to landscape painting by local artisans. The main street is alive with color from raised landscape boxes filled with annuals, and street banners

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

hanging from the period street lights. The building on the right has a new façade and sidewalk. Traffic is slow and constant but moving cautiously with the steady stream of foot traffic moving to the park for a concert at the remodeled amphitheatre. The recent park improvements provide more seating and areas for street vendors and umbrella carts providing snacks and beverages to the show goers. California Street is alive with theater patrons and Village strollers out for an evening of entertainment. Dozens of tables fill a wide sidewalk where cafes and restaurants serve guests who have views of the park and the theater complex. Matching ornamental iron street furniture provides a unique accent to newly-placed brick paver sidewalks and crosswalks. Moving south across California Avenue, the new diagonal parking and the planting of new street trees provide a buffer for pedestrians visiting the stores and eateries on both sides of the boulevard. A new small boutique hotel is under construction up on the hill next to the hardware store that will offer fine dining and bed and breakfast style accommodations. Many of the businesses have redone their exteriors to enhance their beauty. The result is a visual feast of architectural interest. Heading down the hill toward the south entrance to the Village, a decorative, low-profile parking structure has opened on the corner between the Village Boulevard and Sunrise Boulevard. Small trolley buses and hansom cabs wait around the side of it to pick up Village patrons. The pedestrianfriendly intersection discourages speeding on the Village Boulevard, dispersing it in several directions toward Bridge Street and the parking garage entrance. The intersection has activity from cyclists and walkers coming up Bridge Street from the American River Parkway, while others filter down to the restaurants along Howard to stroll the Village. Turning right, you pass under the south Village entrance arch to the corner of Fair Oaks Boulevard and Sunrise Boulevard, and rejoin the rest of Sacramento on a typical day in 2018.

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T he P la n n in g Pr o c e ss Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee The Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee (FOVEC) was initiated in January 2007 and formalized in October 2007, as a working group of property owners, business owners, staff from various Sacramento County Departments, and other stakeholders to evaluate improvements that would enable Fair Oaks Village to increase its viability as a thriving business district. FOVEC - related work is being coordinated with the Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce and the Sacramento County Department of Transportation. FOVEC’s mission is: “To work together to develop and execute a plan of improvements to the Fair Oaks Village commercial area to increase its viability as a thriving business district.” The committee is comprised of representatives from the following: • Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce • Fair Oaks Village business owners • Fair Oaks property owners • Fair Oaks Recreation and Parks District • Fair Oaks Water District • Fair Oaks Community Planning Council • Fair Oaks residents • County of Sacramento FOVEC envisions developing an ongoing County/community partnership that will play a vital role in supporting and implementing the Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision. During the implementation of this Vision, the Committee will continue to act as advisors to the County and others responsible for action.

Public Process The County of Sacramento, in partnership with Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee (FOVEC) and other neighborhood institutions, sponsored a Village improvement workshop on Wednesday, November 28, 2007 and a follow-up workshop on April 23, 2008 (see Appendix A). Planning for the events was coordinated over several meetings with FOVEC. Prior to the workshop, the consultant team had several meetings with the planning committee to discuss the Village’s assets, liabilities and physical and institutional needs. In addition, the team conducted several focus group interviews. Focus group interviews allowed the consultant team to learn vital information about community concerns, past efforts and future hopes. Focus groups included representatives from: • • • • •

Fair Oaks Village business community Fair Oaks Village Property owners Fair Oaks Village Historical Society Fair Oaks Recreation and Park District Fair Oaks Water District

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Workshops The November 2007 improvement workshop was held in the lower level of the Community Clubhouse. The event was attended by over 60 participants. The workshop consisted of two exercises: a Community Image Survey and a working group session. The Community Image Survey consisted of reviewing and commenting on 30 photographic slides taken in Fair Oaks and other communities. As a whole, the photographs presented contrasting views of commercial districts (streets, sidewalks, retail areas, office buildings, housing, gateways and civic features). The survey invited community residents into the planning process and helped to gauge what they wanted to see in their neighborhood. The group topic session involved a neighborhood-wide effort to assess planning issues such as land use, circulation, transit, streetscape, crime, parking and opportunity sites for the Village. Committee meetings, focus group meetings and workshop results show there are many important issues affecting the Village, including:

Workshop attendees shared thoughts and ideas about the presentation

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

Lack of parking Increased traffic Pedestrian access/sidewalks ADA compliance Overall traffic safety Streetscape improvements Safety and lighting Improving building architecture Rundown/vacant property Additional pedestrian traffic Maintaining Fair Oaks Village character Attracting and keeping businesses Maintaining the quality of local businesses

The April 2008 workshop provided the opportunity to report back to the community what was communicated at the November workshop and to show some initial enhancement concepts to improve the Village. The concepts were generally agreed upon and specific constructive comments were received. The concepts and additional comments have been refined and incorporated into the Vision. Detailed workshop results can be found in Appendix A.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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A B r ief H is t o r y Fair Oaks Village History The following brief historical narrative is excerpted with permission from the Fair Oaks Historical Society’s website (http:// www.fairoakshistory.org/history/fohist.htm) and was written by Steve Abbott in 2005.

The history of Fair Oaks began long before its 1895 development as an agricultural colony. Native Americans, the Maidu, lived here for at least 10,000 years we are told. Approximately fifty years before the colony’s beginning, our area was inhabited by the miners of Northern California’s Gold Rush. And thereafter a few families settled in the areas we now call Citrus Heights, Orangevale, Carmichael, and Fair Oaks. Families from the East Coast and Midwest soon read in the various newspapers, magazines, and advertising brochures touting Fair Oaks as a demi-paradise just waiting for both the serious and gentleman farmer to enter Eden and effortlessly make a good living or to retire without worry. The soil was fertile, the climate moderate, water was plentiful, an electric railroad was planned, and success awaited anyone who would step up and take a chance. When prospective colonists came to see the area, excursion trains brought them from Chicago to Sacramento, then on to Folsom and through the already-producing orange groves in Orangevale terminating their journey in the Fair Oaks bluffs. Years later the Fair Oaks Development Company, along with a few increasingly influential Fair Oaks residents, was able to convince Sacramento County to build a bridge across the American River. The company negotiated with the Southern Pacific Railroad to build a rail line from the existing Sacramento-Placerville line to the new Fair Oaks Bridge. The development company then improved the water system by bringing in 28-inch steel water mains with many laterals. With these improvements, Fair Oaks had a fair chance at life. Sadly, the Fair Oaks Development Company was not able to generate sales; by 1902, the company gave up its efforts.

8

Just about this time however, Fair Oaks began to bloom as a community. A real school had been built. A business block with fi rst-rate architecture was completed. A lumber yard and other stores were opened. An agricultural cooperative was established. Several fi rst-rate homes were built. A bank was started. Dredging for gold in the American River had begun on a major scale, and a rock crushing plant thrived from the gold dredge tailings. Fair Oaks seemed to be holding its own, even thriving well past the turn of the century. In 1932 however, nature dealt the agricultural community a hard blow and there was a devastating freeze. Not only were many orchardists and merchants struggling in the early stages of the Great Depression, but the freeze wiped out dreams of commercial or farming success. While a few struggled on, many had to find other ways to support themselves. With improvements in transportation, many could commute to other places for work. The development of air bases in nearby Rancho Cordova and North Highlands, along with the later boom in aerospace attracted residents of a new breed, many of whom made their living by working for concerns outside the community. These events changed Fair Oaks life forever. But if one takes a slow walk around town today, one can see the vestiges of orange groves, and the olive and almond orchards. Some original Fair Oaks buildings hide under several layers of remodeling. A lucky visitor might meet residents who were born in the 1920s and 1930s who can tell them fi rst hand about what life was like when Fair Oaks was fulfilling its original design intent.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Exi st in g Con d itio n s Location Fair Oaks Village is an unincorporated community in Sacramento County approximately 16 miles east of downtown Sacramento. The Village is just east of Sunrise Boulevard and north of the American River and includes the Village’s commercial district.

Map Source: Google Maps / MNA

Map Source: MNA

Fair Oaks Village Study Area

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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Road Network The study area includes approximately 18,000 lineal feet of public streets, including Class A, Class C, Local Streets, and alleys. Rights-of-way vary throughout the study area but generally the street widths are adequate to accommodate improvements to street configurations, including sidewalk, street tree, and parking improvements. Streets in Fair Oaks Village are generally small-scale and local serving, with the exception of the east-west Winding Way/Fair Oaks Boulevard and Sunrise Boulevard. Some streets are very narrow and could even be considered alleys in character. The Village’s street system, while sometimes confusing because of its organic pattern, is very interconnected by suburban standards, and is relatively small. Traffic volumes are not known and were not measured as part of this study; further analysis of volumes must be undertaken before any recommended improvements are undertaken. STREET NAME

CLASS *

LENGTH (LF)

STREET NAME

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

622

CLASS *

LENGTH (LF)

HOWARD ST

LOCAL

591

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

481

CANYON DR

LOCAL

205

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

288

WINDING WAY

LOCAL

237

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

244

CALIFORNIA AVE

LOCAL

386

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

234

CRESTLINE AVE

LOCAL

569

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

207

SACRAMENTO ST

LOCAL

284

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

253

CALIFORNIA AVE

LOCAL

21

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

352

MAIN ST

LOCAL

158

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

184

CALIFORNIA AVE

LOCAL

412

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

285

CALIFORNIA AVE

LOCAL

220

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

574

WATKINS DR

LOCAL

207

FAIR OAKS BLVD

A

351

CRESTLINE AVE

LOCAL

734

BRIDGE ST

C

151

MAIN ST

LOCAL

149

BRIDGE ST

C

327

CALIFORNIA AVE

LOCAL

190

BRIDGE ST

C

290

TEMESCAL ST

LOCAL

171

BRIDGE ST

C

728

SACRAMENTO ST

LOCAL

434

BRIDGE ST

C

469

WATKINS DR

LOCAL

482

CENTRAL AVE

C

487

RIDGE ST

LOCAL

498

TEMESCAL ST

LOCAL

286

ENTRANCE ST

LOCAL

400

CALIFORNIA AVE

LOCAL

256

SACRAMENTO ST

LOCAL

286

MAIN ST

LOCAL

273

SACRAMENTO ST

LOCAL

140

PARK DR

LOCAL

684

WINDING WAY

LOCAL

247

HOWARD ST

LOCAL

130

WINDING WAY

LOCAL

206

TEMESCAL ST

LOCAL

484

MAIN ST WATKINS DR ALY

ALLEY

506

Class C Roads

OLD WINDING WAY

LOCAL

161

ALLEY

481

Local Streets

OLD WINDING WAY

LOCAL

225

FAIR OAKS BLVD WATKINS DR ALY

OLD WINDING WAY

LOCAL

514

WINDING WAY

LOCAL

253

TOTAL

Fair Oaks Boulevard (Class A Roads)

Alleys

18,007 L.F.

* Class A roads include curb, gutter & sidewalk; Class C roads are not fully improved and have inconsistent curb, gutter, and sidewalks; Local roads have reduced rights-of-way and some curb, gutter, and sidewalks.

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LEGEND

Map Source: MNA

Fair Oaks Village Road Network

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Transit There are two Regional Transit (RT) bus routes serving Fair Oaks Village: the 21 Sunrise running at 30 minute frequencies and the 28 Fair Oaks-Folsom, running at 45 minute peak hour frequencies and at 1 hour frequency off peak. Both busses take circuitous routes through the heart of Fair Oaks Village. These routes, in addition to the 91 Citrus Heights / Sunrise route along Sunrise Boulevard, connect to the light rail stations along Folsom Boulevard. Bus routes may require minor changes to accommodate recommended street improvements.

Existing bus stop at Main Street and Fair Oaks Blvd.

21 - Sunrise

itr 91 - C

us Heights / Sun

rise

28 - Fair Oaks / Folsom

Bicycle With its location near the American River Parkway, the Village is home to many cyclists and a destination for many who use the Parkway. Cyclists frequently gather in the park areas and at local restaurants, especially on the weekends. Currently, all bicycle circulation in the Village is shared with automobiles, and bicycle facilities such as bicycle racks are not widely available.

Pedestrian While Fair Oaks Village is pedestrian in scale, pedestrian amenities are inconsistent. There are locations without standard sidewalks, locations with substandard sidewalks, and locations with full curb, gutter and sidewalks that meet County standards. Because of the Village’s age and hillly terrain, many pedestrian areas do not meet Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) standards.

Map Source: RT & MNA, July 2008 Existing sidewalk facilities are inconsistent and not compliant with current accessibility standards

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

Fair Oaks Village Transit Routes

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Parking A lack of parking was identified by FOVEC, focus groups, attendees at the workshops, and the community at large as the number one challenge facing business district revitalization. According to anecdotal evidence provided by the community, shortages are worst during normal weekday business hours; many available parking spaces are used by business owners and employees. There are very few private parking lots in Fair Oaks Village. Most parking is on the street and is occasionally provided in the front yard setback, which appears to be in the public right-ofway. On-street parking is often unmarked and drivers can unintentionally consume more than one parking space, compounding parking issues. Much of the discussion surrounding parking issues centers around the need to develop appropriate public parking, whether that parking is surface parking lots or a multi-level parking structure. In several locations, especially around Plaza Park and Village Park, parking spaces are not well-marked. This results in poor utilization of parking areas when drivers claim more space than is actually needed. There are several opportunities for on-street parking improvements that would improve the efficiency of parking with the Village.

Existing back-out diagonal parking on Fair Oaks Boulevard

Existing parking lot in front of Community Clubhouse

Further study is needed to assess the actual parking demand and therefore the needs for the Village. Because of the many large events and festivals, parking management is a critical component of successfully accommodating more visitors.

Existing perpendicular parking on Park Street

Existing parallel parking on Fair Oaks Boulevard

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Unmarked perpendicular parking at Plaza Park

Existing parking on California Avenue

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Land Uses Land uses in the Village are generally local serving retail, food service, institutional, office, and professional service. There is a desire on the part of the community, as attested to at FOVEC meetings and at the Community Workshop, to attract more quality retail and restaurants that would attract a larger customer base from a larger market area.

Retail use

Office & Retail mixed-use building

Public utility land use

Public gathering facility

Map Source: Sacramento County GIS data / MNA Residential use

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

Restaurant use

Fair Oaks Village Existing Land Uses

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Vacant / Underutilized Sites & Parking Areas There are several sites considered either underutilized (not the highest/best use for the Village) or vacant. These sites are likely to be improved over the lifetime of this Vision. This could result in a change in land use or intensification which is consistent with the mission of enhancing the Village. While parking spaces are already limited within the Village, several key sites that currently have surface parking could be better utilized for the benefit of the community and the land-owners if a more comprehensive parking strategy is implemented. These surface parking lots are identified here but are not intended to imply any proposed change of use.

Vacant • • • • •

Intersection of Ridge and Bridge Intersection of Fair Oaks and California Intersection of Fair Oaks and Howard Parking area north of Bridge and east of Fair Oaks Various vacant lots

Underutilized • • • • •

Auto dealership at Fair Oaks and Bridge Fair Oaks Water District Corporation Yard Chamber of Commerce site Former Fair Oaks Elementary School “Townhouse” building

Parking Areas • • • •

Auto dealership at Fair Oaks and Bridge Parking lot south of the Community Clubhouse Parking lot north of Bridge and west of Temescal Parking lots at Winding Way and Fair Oaks Boulevard

LEGEND Vacant Under-utilized Surface Parking Lots

Vacant & Underutilized Parcels

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Buildings The variety of building styles in the Village can best be described as eclectic. There is no dominant architectural style, but rather a concert of many distinct but still compatible styles. The most appealing of the Village buildings, regardless of style, share a few common traits: quality construction, human-scaled detail, visual interest to passers-by, and some authenticity of individual styles. Descriptions of some of the architectural styles found in the Village are below: • Victorian Style - these buildings were popular from the 1860’s through the 1890’s and are characterized by elaborate decoration, vertical forms, formal interior arrangements with tall ceilings, and often garish colors. Existing commercial building on Fair Oaks Boulevard

Historic building with Victorian and “gold rush” styles

• Tudor Revival Style - popular from the 1890’s to the 1920’s, tudor revival buildings were a reaction to the ornate Victorian style. They harken back to traditional european styles, especially simple rustic medieval buildings. They are characterized by pitched roofs, half-timbering, vertical windows with mullions, and chimneys. • Mission Revival Style - these buildings took inspiration from the many Spanish missions built in California during the 18th and 19th centuries. They are characterized by simple plastered or stuccoed exteriors, colonnades, and flat or tile roofs. This style was most popular from the 1890’s to about 1920. • Craftsman Style - polular from the 1890’s to the 1930’s, this style celebrated the aesthetic of artisan handcraft, simple forms, and local materials. Deep porches and overhangs, exposed woodwork, expressive shingle siding, and natural colors are characteristic of this style.

Mission elements cover this building’s original Craftsman facade

Existing Art-Deco building on Park Street

• Art Deco - popular in the 1920’s and 30’s, this style celebrated the modern machine age, and especially streamlined forms that suggested movement. Buildings are characterized by stepped facades, geometric shapes, curved edges, strong horizontal and vertical lines, and inlaid concrete decorative elements. • Mid-century Modern - popular in the 1950’s, especially in California, this style is known for its open spaces, large glass expanses, post-and-beam construction, and simple materials. • Ranch Style - these homes were most popular from the 1940’s to the 1970’s and have been built throughout the United States, especially in more suburban areas. They are characterized by their horizontal shape (mostly single-story), garages, and modest detailing. A few noteworthy buildings in the Village are in poor condition. Most notably, the former Town House, the Community Clubhouse, and the Old Fair Oaks Library building are in need of rehabilitation.

Newer commercial building in Tudor Revival style

Historic Library building with Tudor revival elements

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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Current Applicable Regulations Design and development in the Fair Oaks community is regulated by several County plans, policies, and ordinances. These include the General Plan (update currently underway), the Fair Oaks Village Special Planning Area Ordinance, the Neighborhood Preservation Area, the American River Parkway Plan, the Zoning Ordinance (update currently underway), the Fair Oaks Community Plan, and the Commercial and Residential Design Guidelines. A summary of these documents and their influence over design and development in the Village is included in Appendix B. The Fair Oaks Community Planning Council serves as the decision-making body over local land-use issues previously decided by the Planning Commission, Zoning Administrator and the Subdivision Review Committee. The seven Council members are nominated by the District 4 Supervisor, and the Council is appointed at-large by the Sacramento County Board of Supervisors.

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


R e c om m en d a tio n s

Fair Oaks Boulevard in

g

e Bouleva rd

r nia

. Ave

lvd

sB

Oa

k

ge

The County of Sacramento Fair Oaks Recreation and Park District Fair Oaks Water District Regional Transit

Stre

et

• • • •

Fai r

B r id

Public enhancements are projects or activities undertaken by the public sector. Improvements would include signage, gateways, circulation and parking improvements, street furnishings, and park areas. Public agencies involved would include:

.

Public Enhancements

et

lifo Ca

Temescal Stre

The following pages contain potential improvements to the five districts identified here as well as to the Village as a whole. Conceptual site plan sketches of the districts demonstrate the different needs of each district as well as potential approaches that would enhance the Village. All of the concepts shown will require further study, community input, agency review, and approval before they could be implemented.

Fair Oaks Boulevard

Su n r i s

District Improvements

Wi nd

ay W

This Vision for the Fair Oaks Village is expected to be implemented in stages over a period of years. A fi rst step could be to initiate improvements compatible with existing uses and County goals, such as the installation of gateway elements and the development of the directional signage (wayfinding) program. This would be followed by more aggressive activities such as the design and development of additional on-street parking, and streetscape, traffic calming and pedestrian improvements. During this period the Recreation and Park District will, as funds become available, create a master plan and enhancement program for the Park/Plaza/Clubhouse complex. In addition to the County’s and Park District’s activities, the private sector will need to step up and develop or redevelop opportunity sites, rehabilitate buildings, and attract appropriate businesses.

Central Ave.

Enhancement

DISTRICT LEGEND Gateways Village Boulevard Park Loop North Village Boulevard Bridge Street

Map Source: MNA

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Plan

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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New roundabout

Di stri cts

Remove Cut-Thru

New consistent & improved accessible sidewalk throughout Curb “bulb-outs” & improved pedestrian crossings Narrow vehicle lanes & redesigned parking areas Preserve existing intersection paving

Village Boulevard District This portion of Fair Oaks Boulevard is the commercial heart of the historic Fair Oaks Village. It is similar to the general idea of a historic “Main Street.” Streetscapes and buildings within this district should support a healthy pedestrian shopping environment. The Village Boulevard would be bounded on each end by gateway elements that announce to visitors that they are entering the historic heart of Fair Oaks. These gateway elements should incorporate public art elements as part of the signage. They should also operate as traffic calming mechanisms to help drivers transition from an auto-oriented environment into a more pedestrian-oriented environment. Bulbouts and crosswalks should be made visible and prominent. Street improvements should include redesigned, accessible sidewalks, street trees where possible to provide shade and beauty, pedestrian-scaled lighting, as well as other street furnishings such as benches, waste receptacles, and directional signage. Parking should be added and reconfigured to improve safety. One concept for parking that was discussed in public workshops was the installation of “back-in,” versus the more common “back-out” diagonal parking.

Redesign parking and lanes at intersection

New sidewalks & street trees

New mid-block pedestrian crossing

New “bulb-outs” & pedestrian crossings

View from Bridge Street and Fair Oaks Boulevard, looking north

18

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


New On-Street Parking

Speed Table

Park Loop District The Park Loop encompasses the Plaza Park and Amphitheatre on the west, the Village Park and Community Clubhouse on the east. This district is the public “green� for the community; as such, it should accommodate a variety of public events and also serve as a day-today open space for residents to enjoy. In order to improve the intimate feeling and pedestrian safety around the park loop, it is recommended that Park Street on the north and California Avenue on the south be converted to one-way only traffic. This will allow for a narrower street and for additional on-street parking. New perpendicular parking is also proposed along Temescal Street and Main Street, in areas that currently have vaguely-defined parallel spaces. The addition of new on-street parking would also allow for a redesign of the current parking lot in front of the Community Clubhouse. This would open up a space that is more appropriate for a public park setting.

Reconfigure parking area

Plaza Park

Village Park

Speed Table Widen sidewalk for outdoor seating and improve crosswalk to theater Existing WPA Wall Potential Rose Garden with relocation of existing parking lot

New On-Street Parking

Narrow vehicle lanes & redesigned parking areas

View from California Avenue and Fair Oaks Boulevard, looking east toward the amphitheatre

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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North Village Boulevard District

Improve Intersection

On-Street Parking

New Trees & Natural Swale

New Crosswalk

New Sidewalk, Curb & Gutter

Gateway & Improved Intersection

New Roundabout

On-Street Parking

New Street Trees

Bicycle Lanes

Improve Intersection

Gateway / Signage

As Fair Oaks Boulevard winds to the north, the character of the Village begins to change. This portion of the boulevard should be identified more with the Village; it should encourage people to safely drive, cycle, and walk from outlying residential areas into the Village. Street improvements are recommended along the entire length of the North Village Boulevard. Existing rights-of-way range from 45 feet to 60 feet and are sufficient to add consistent and accessible sidewalks, Class II bicycle lanes, and street trees in some locations. In certain areas, additional perpendicular on-street parking may also be accommodated and would enhance the sense of the North Village Boulevard as an extension of the historical downtown area. Key intersections are currently unsafe and not friendly environments for pedestrians. It is recommended that free-right turn lanes be eliminated and that bulb-outs and crosswalks be installed at all three 90-degree intersections along Fair Oaks Boulevard. Additionally, street furnishings should also be added to enhance the character and safety of the North Village Boulevard. These would include pedestrian-scaled lighting, street trees, and benches and waste receptacles at prominent locations, such as at bus stops.

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Bridge Street District The historical bridge over the American River connects Fair Oaks Village to the Parkway trail system and to adjacent neighborhoods. The quality of the Bridge Street connection should be enhanced by a new plaza, better access and directional signage to encourage more visitors to explore the Village. The proposed “Donor’s Plaza” will add visual aesthetic and educational value to Bridge Street. In addition to the plaza, other improvements should be further studied that could improve the connection between the Village and the American River Parkway. These may include better pedestrian and bicycle access, improved and better surveilled parking areas, new lighting, better signage that would direct visitors up the hill and to the Village, and a safe vehicle turn-around area.

New Sidewalk

Additional Parking

Accessible Granite Path

Parking & Car Turnaround

“Donor’s” Plaza View from Bridge Street toward the American River Parkway

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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Gateway Districts & Signage / Wayfinding System

There are two main points of entry to the Village from Sunrise Boulevard. Both the North Gatway and the South Gateway serve as transitional areas between Sunrise Boulevard and the Village. These districts should draw attention to the Village, encouraging drivers to slow down and appreciate the finer character of the Village surroundings. Signage systems are very important to the success of community revitalization. Once viewed as a navigational aid, directional sign systems are now seen as a way to market an area’s resources, evoke a sense of history and character, and improve the streetscape. A well thought-out directional sign or wayfinding system will help bring Fair Oaks Village to a more humanscale by pointing out attractions, adding historical explanations, directing people to parking locations and identifying community facilities and amenities. For years, indoor malls, airports, and corporate campuses have used well-designed wayfinding systems. Now, these environmental graphics are being used more and more by traditional downtown commercial areas as well as community corridors.

View from the North Gateway District at Winding Way and Fair Oaks Boulevard, looking toward the Town House and Park

People make judgements about a place based on how well designed and understandable it is to find certain things. Currently, the only sign programs in Fair Oaks Village are County street signs scattered throughout local streets and minor gateway signs at Fair Oaks and Sunrise Boulevards.

Gateway sign to Downtown Roseville, California

In marketing a commercial district it is important to announce the fact you have arrived at a significant place or destination. Ideally, there should be places called gateways where large amounts of traffic move through a specific point. These points should be in the public right-of-way, so automobiles and pedestrians pass a physical structure. Proposed gateways into Fair Oaks Village should be enhanced with items like monument signage, mini-plazas, and similar elements. These improvements would occur at the following locations:

View into the South Gateway District from intersection of Sunrise Boulevard and Fair Oaks Boulevard, looking north-east

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• In the median on Sunrise Boulevard at Fair Oak Boulevard and Winding Way • Along the American River Parkway on the bike trail • On Fair Oaks Boulevard near Central Avenue • At Fair Oaks and Sunrise Boulevards • At Fair Oaks Boulevard and Winding Way

Minor Gateway Monument

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Once visitors approaching Fair Oaks Village pass through these gateway elements, they will need easily recognizable directional signs to help them locate important destinations in the area. To be effective it is very important that these directional signs are: • • • •

Graphically interesting Uniquely designed Externally illuminated Used in the Village only

Directional signs should identify locations like: • • • • • • • • •

Community Clubhouse, the amphitheatre, plaza and park Historic Library Building American River Parkway and bike trail Bluff Donor Recognition Plaza with Interpretive Signs The Village from the Parkway/ Bluff Donor Recognition Plaza Parking Businesses Recreation and Park District Offices Water District Offices

Directional Map for Pedestrians

All new public directional signs should incorporate a custom-designed Fair Oaks Village logo designed by a graphic artist or through a communitysponsored design competition. The Fair Oaks Village logo design should be set over a field of integral color that can be used on all other street furniture. The logo should employ a crisp, non-italicized lettering style. There should also be a program to replace the standard street signs with a distinctive sign program similar to Fulton Avenue or the Sunrise Marketplace. Directional Map for Pedestrians

Major Gateway Minor Gateway Directional Signage Map Source: MNA

Fair Oaks Village Signage & Gateways Plan

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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Pu blic En h a n c e m e n ts

Transit Networks Two Regional Transit (RT) bus routes serve Fair Oaks Village: the 21 Sunrise and the 28 Fair Oaks-Folsom. Both busses take circuitous routes through the heart of the Village. These routes, in addition to the 91 Citrus Heights / Sunrise route along Sunrise Boulevard, connect to the light rail stations along Folsom Boulevard. Bus routes may require minor changes to accommodate recommended street improvements. Route 21 could stay on Sunrise Boulevard and still adequately serve the core of the Village. Route 28 could serve the Village by staying on Winding Way/Fair Oaks Boulevard. The County should work with RT based on the level of ridership from Village bus stops to reroute these lines.

Automobile Circulation There are several automobile circulation enhancements proposed for the Village: • The installation of a roundabout at Fair Oaks and Winding Way to address existing traffic safety issues; additional traffic studies and design work will be required to determine feasibility. (A discussion on roundabouts and bulbouts can be found in Appendix C.) • Conversion of California and Park Streets to a one lane one-way couplet in order to slow traffic and provide additional right of way (ROW) that could be used as a parking resource. (See the parking discussion that follows.) The additional ROW will allow for the provision of wider sidewalks along California near Fair Oak in the heart of the Village. • While clockwise flow around the park would eliminate left turns, the proposed counter-clockwise flow is intended to attract and direct visitors from the “Village Boulevard” toward the theatre and eateries on California Avenue. • Narrowing of traffic lanes in the Village Boulevard area would enhance safety, slow traffic and provide additional area for parking. • Elimination of the curved section of Fair Oaks Boulevard near Winding Way to enhance safety, slow traffic and provide additional area for parking. • The installation of bulb-outs at several locations to slow traffic and improve pedestrian safety. • To redesign the Fair Oaks/Howard/Bridge intersection to eliminate the free left turn lane on Fair Oaks Boulevard.

Bicycle Accommodation Conceptual sketch of potential roundabout

Shared streets, where vehicles and bicycles share the same lanes, are generally acceptable on low-traffic volume streets. Traffic calming measure such as those listed above would improve safety for cyclists. The “North Village Boulevard” portion of Fair Oaks Boulevard, as shown in the district portion of this document, should include new bicycle lanes, along with Winding Way, to provide a safer route for cyclists to move through the Village. In addition, new bicycle parking should be installed, where the physical opportunity exists, throughout the Village.

Pedestrian Features The narrowing of traffic lanes (recommended in the section on automobile circulation) will free up right-of-way for sidewalk widening and the provision of continuous sidewalks. Other pedestrian enhancements include

Aerial view of existing intersection

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• • • •

Bulb-outs at several locations. Enhanced crosswalks. Pedestrian connection between Park Drive and Fair Oaks Boulevard. Enhanced pedestrian facilities between the Village and the Parkway/ Bluff Donor Recognition Plaza

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Parking As discussed earlier, on-street parking and private parking lots are scattered throughout the Village. Most parking resources are available for retail customer use. Generally, there is a 9am to 5pm parking shortage. As commercial activities intensify, there is a good chance that parking will be at a premium in the Village. Additionally, as property uses intensify through new development or renovation it will become increasingly difficult for property owners to meet the County’s parking standards.

North Gateway Parking Area Back-in Diagonal Parking in commercial district

A number of recommendations are presented below that should be considered as part of a comprehensive parking analysis. • Conduct a parking demand, supply and management analysis. • Provide a coherent parking striping program. • Provide back-in diagonal parking along California Avenue and the southern end of Fair Oaks Boulevard. • Initiate parking time limits of 2 to 4 hours. • Establish a parking funding mechanism that meets County standards to fund/develop public parking. • Establish a transportation management program. • Develop a program for the joint use of adjoining properties, the redesign or reorganization of existing parking areas, and develop new lots accessible from major Village entry points that are convenient for shoppers and visitors.

South Gateway Parking Area

Back-in Diagonal Parking improves safety for cyclists

South Gateway Parking Area

Parallel Parking Perpendicular or Diagonal Parking General Location of Larger Parking Need Map Source: MNA Parking structure buffered by retail in Virginia

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

Fair Oaks Village Parking Concept Plan

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Street Furnishings The Village will be a well-used corridor by people in autos, bicycles, and by foot. The new streetscape aims to improve the function and the beauty of the Village. Emphasis is placed on creating an inviting space at the pedestrian scale. Proposed improvements follow: • • • • •

Install historical Acorn-style lighting, as shown left, at a pedestrian scale throughout the Village. Install pedestrian lighting spaced at approximately every eighty (80) to one hundred (100) feet. Install artistic banners that commemorate the community and /or promote community events. Coordinate street furnishings with Acorn-style fixtures. Consider using a color such as green or brown for street furnishings and lighting, rather than black, to provide a distinct character and more liveliness.

Paving Materials The textures and colors of paving materials can enhance the overall character of the environment and need not be cost-prohibitive. Simple scored concrete walkways are adequate throughout most of the Village. At special nodes, such as bulb-outs, pedestrian crossings, retail areas, and public parks and plazas, specialty paving should be utilized. Brick, concrete pavers, and stone are appropriate materials that provide a resilient and accessible surface. Pedestrian Crosswalks should be marked to be immediately visible to drivers and cyclists. Throughout the Village, County standard “triple-four” markings are appropriate. At special nodes, such as the gateways specialty paving should be considered.

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Park, Square and Community Clubhouse The area discussed previously as the “Park Loop� functions as the public living room for the Village. It is the open space amenity that residents and business owners enjoy on a daily basis. It is a place for children to play and for seniors to stroll. It is also a place that can be used tor large gatherings. Visitors come from far away to enjoy the outdoor amphitheatre. Shoppers enjoy the sight as a pleasant backdrop as they walk along the sidewalks. The Community Clubhouse accommodates many large gatherings. The park area accommodates all of these events now, but it can still be improved to be a more pleasant place and to enhance the business environment for local shops and restaurants. An improved park area would feel like one public space rather than several spaces. This can be accomplished by creating a consistent walking environment around the park. The Plaza Park area would feel more formal, perhaps with a small gazebo or bandstand as a focal point. The parking lot in front of the Community Clubhouse would be replaced by a rose garden. Additional on-street parking would mean no loss of parking spaces. The images on this page represent the quality of space that is envisioned for the park area. These improvements are feasible but must be accomplished with a consensus of the many stakeholders who use and operate the grounds.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

27


Private Enhancements Private enhancements are projects or activities undertaken by the private sector. This would include: • • • • •

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce Community Organizations (Rotary, etc) Private Businesses Private Property Owners

Property-Based Business Improvement District (PBID) Another option available to the Fair Oaks Village property owners is to form a Property-Based Business Improvement District (PBID). A PBID is a voluntary self-assessment mechanism that would provide ongoing funds to support the Village revitalization effort. Typical activities supported by Improvemet District funds are increased security, streetscape improvements, and marketing efforts. A PBID could, for example, pay for the installation of hanging flower planters throughout the Village and pay the ongoing costs of watering and maintaining the plants. A PBID could be an important tool to foster the long-term Village enhancement programs.

Building Rehabilitation & New Infill Development

Events

Great town centers include some common components:

Special events and programs like parades, street fairs, sidewalk sales and ethnic festivals are a common programming activity of main street organizations. Events range from specific shopper promotions to programs that create a different image for the area. Special events and programs counter the perception that Fair Oaks Village is “dead.”

• • • • • • • •

Mixed-use development districts (residential, retail, office) Street frontage at a pedestrian scale with active and articulated ground-floor uses Buildings oriented to the street Placement of buildings close to the back of sidewalks Buildings close together forming a continuous “street wall” characteristic of an urban environment Vibrant public spaces and public art Parking at the rear of buildings Appropriate transitions to residential neighborhoods

As rehabilitation or new infill development occurs it is recommended that it conforms to design guidelines that should be prepared subsequent to the approval of this Enhancement Plan.

Private Sector Organizing Effective ongoing maintenance, promotion, and development will need to be coordinated between Fair Oaks Village business and property owners. The Main Street Program is nationwide and promotes revitalization through a successful formula called the Main Street Principles. The Main Street Four-Point Approach™ is a comprehensive strategy that is tailored to meet local needs and opportunities. It encompasses work in four distinct areas - Design, Economic Restructuring, Promotion, and Organization - that are combined to address all of the commercial district’s needs. The philosophy and the eight guiding principles behind this methodology make it an effective tool for community-based, grass roots revitalization efforts. For more information, please go to: www. mainstreet.org.

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Events and programs are, unfortunately, often staged just for their own value rather than as an integrated component of a total improvement effort. A well-planned event should consider where activity is needed, when the event should take place, what scale the event should be, what types of events are most appropriate/appealing, and who will be attracted to the event. Activity programming can become a management tool that attracts people to places that are otherwise underused, inviting people who might not ordinarily come into Fair Oaks Village at a certain time, or to brighten up and provide surprises for people who may come to the Village on a routine shopping trip. The Fair Oaks Chamber of Commerce does a good job sponsoring many community events throughout the year, including: • • • • • •

Concerts In The Park Annual Fair Oaks Spring Fest. A Taste of Fair Oaks Fair Oaks Dog WalkSafe Halloween in the Village Christmas In The Village

There are additional events including those sponsored by the Fair Oaks Recreation & Parks District, the local Village Merchants Association, the Fair Oaks Theater Festival, and the Blues Festival.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Business Attraction, Including Desired Businesses

Recruitment of Retailers Serving the Local Community

The Fair Oaks Village community should recruit businesses that will move the Village closer to an optimal balance of retail, office, entertainment, dining and services. Steer resources where they will fit best based on space needs. Approach specific targeted retailers to fill key locations.

Armed with a site inventory and a retail leakage analysis, a designated retail business recruiter should focus on:

The community should also recruit diverse local-serving shopping and service businesses. Examples include: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

American River nature tours Art gallery / gift store - more Artist live & work spaces Bakery - French / Swiss, breads Bead shop Bike shop and / or rental Book store Camera store Club / Music venue Coffee / tea specialty shop Computer training / school Condos - owner occupied above businesses County community service office County training facility Craft shop Delicatessen Dress shop Drug store Dry cleaner Farmer’s market Flower stand Gifts - women, home decoration, novelty, cards, funky / chic jewelry Ice cream parlor / smoothies, soda fountain

• yogurt / candy • Laundromat • Market - small neighborhood grocery, fresh food, natural foods, meat, butcher, some food service offered, pasta, health food, produce, specialty foods, bread cheese, wine, chocolate • Microbrewery • Museum - history / geology of the Sierras / American River • Music / CD shop • Nursery • Office supplies • Pharmacy • Prepared dinner shop • Recycling center • Restaurants with outdoor seating, family style, American home cooking, German cafe, lunch wagon, pizza • Shoe repair • Skin care • Theatre, indoor • Travel agency • Yarn shop

• Preparing promotional materials about Fair Oaks Village, regularly updating them to include changes, public space improvements, etc. • Meeting with area real estate brokers to inform them of opportunities, provide them with promotional materials and discuss attracting successful retailers from the surrounding area or national/regional chains that might fit the Fair Oaks Village market. • Meeting with area developers and communicating opportunities in Fair Oaks Village as described above. • Canvassing other communities in the region to identify successful retailers in target categories, and discussing the possibility of opening a store in Fair Oaks Village. • Attending regional business, retailer, developer and broker meetings to promote Fair Oaks Village, including local and regional chambers of commerce. • Attending International Council of Shopping Centers (ICSC) events and meetings. ICSC (www. icsc.org) is an industry association devoted to improving retail opportunities in shopping centers and downtowns, including actively helping retailers link with communities seeking retailers. Using mailing lists to find and contact local retailers. The Dun and Bradstreet Marketplace® is one of hundreds of comprehensive sources for company names and contact information. If the previous methods of locating interested retailers are unsuccessful, such lists sorted by retail type, location, annual sales, and other factors can be purchased for a nominal fee. City and county business license lists may also be useful.

Specialty Retailer Recruitment Specialty retailers may attract shoppers from a larger trade area. Specialty retailers must be sufficient in number in the Village, and should be clustered near each other so they create a retailing district whose reputation becomes larger than each individual retailer. If specialty retailers can have some logical connection to Fair Oaks Village, this could provide them with a competitive advantage in marketing.

An ongoing retailer recruiting effort should be implemented to attract quality retailers to both serve the local population and attract shoppers from the larger region. This effort could be initiated by County economic development staff, but at some point efforts could be assumed by FOVEC, Chamber of Commerce, Property-Based Improvement District, or by a local volunteer with appropriate knowledge and commitment to the task.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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Implementation Matrix 6 Month Implementation Plan SPECIFIC WORK PLAN OBJECTIVE

RESPONSIBLE PARTY(PARTIES)

PRIORITY

OUTPUT

FUNDING SOURCE

A.

Present Vision Document to Board of Supervisors

FOVEC

High

Board endorsement of process to date and support for implementation

None

B.

Establish role of FOVEC in future implementation

FOVEC / County

High

Organizational chart for implementation

None

C.

Seek additional endorsement of Vision document

FOVEC

High / Med

Support for implementation at local level

County

D.

Initiate study work and public amenities plan

FOVEC / County

High

Outline of initial implementation elements

County

E.

Participate in process to hire project manager

FOVEC / County

High / Med

Hiring of project manager for Vision implementation

None

F.

Participate in development of a property / business owners group

FOVEC

Med

Support group to assist in the development of the Vision through local input

None

G.

Seek additional implementation resources

FOVEC

High / Med

Additional revenue to implement Vision

Unknown

Note: This plan is reliant upon the development of an implementing structure that is to be defined as a result of additional County of Sacramento funding for the initial start-up activities High = 0-3 Months; Med = 3-6 Months

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


App en d ix A - Visio n in g W o r kshop Table 3

Table 7

On November 28, 2007 a Fair Oaks Visioning Workshop was held in the Fair Oak Recreation and Parks District’s Community Club House. At the beginning of the workshop participants were administered a Community Image Survey (CIS). The Community Image Survey is a powerful planning and public participation tool that can help decision-makers and their constituents. Rather than using words to describe places, the Survey uses visual images to help people better understand crucial planning elements and make more informed, pro-active decisions about creating places where they want to live, work, shop and play.

• • • • • • •

The Survey doesn’t tell people how to make their communities more livable. Instead, it presents them with clear, visual images of alternative land-use and transportation patterns and involves them in a process of evaluating their existing environment and envisioning their community’s future.

Table 4

• • • • • • • • •

Survey participants are given a few seconds to rate each of the 40 slides on a scale of -10 to +10 (with 0 being ‘neutral’) depending upon how much they like or dislike the image. They are assured ahead of time that there is no right or wrong answer. The quick pace of the survey seeks to gauge their initial, ‘gut’ reaction to the images that are presented. Their response can be found under separate cover at www.fovec.net . Attendees were then divided into 9 groups and asked a series of 4 questions the following are their responses:

1. What are the 2 most important issues (positive or negative) that the Village will face in the next 10 years?

Table 1

Table 2

• • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Beautify Parking Traffic Rundown property/vacant property* More diversified businesses Reuse declining property Mixed use residents* More walking traffic*

Parking ADA compliance Comprehensive plan (work together) Character of the Village Traffic management and pedestrian access

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

• • • • •

Building and keeping businesses* Too much traffic Keeping quality businesses Growth and parking More outdoor seating venues Too much surface street traffic* Too little chicken management

Lack of foot traffic* Lack of parking along Main St.* Lack of speed controls, too much speeding Traffic disrupting quality of life Traffic safety overall

Table 5 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Diverse private ownership Parking Vibrancy Financing for improvements More variety in merchants Streetscape improvements Center for leisure and recreation Become a destination* Combat economic decline Cohesive plan* New infill development plan Improve positive architecture

Parking Maintaining culture Vandalism Types of people at park Bus riders Parking in the Village all day Attracting positive retail establishments Time limit on parking Using as park and ride

Table 8 • • • • • •

Keep Village character Lighting Traffic Parking Street lights Public transportation

Table 9 • • • • • • • • • •

Buildings need refreshing Lack of style, need charm Attractiveness Parking Want business friendly locals not chains Viable mix of business, recruitment Zoning Sidewalks Create demand Expand along Fair Oaks Blvd.

Table 6 • • • • • • • • •

Economic viability Keeping the character* Village look* Parking Continuity of look Too much traffic Up keep and maintenance Survival of small businesses Impact of increased traffic

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2. What kind of public area physical improvements should be developed in the Village?

Table 1 • • • • • • • •

Entrance feature Landscape Walk friendly Streetscape* Child friendly area More housing in Village Attract more walking Garage parking nearby*

Table 2 • • • •

Traffic circle/parking lots Open space/empty buildings Car lot is an eye sore Entrance sign

• • • • •

signage Lighting, banner poles with flowers Entrance features Chamber building Ordinance Garbage cans

Table 6 • • • • • • •

Community center expansion, ex. Pool Focal point in Plaza, ex. Fountain* Monument feature, gateway* More community center activities Car lots gone Entrance to the Village-signature* Coordinated streetscape, lighting and signage*

Table 3 • • • • • •

Park improvement-seating, landscaping Connecting sidewalks Park maintenance at Plaza Park Need “Charming” street Coordinated landscaping effort Cleanup ugly corners

Walkability

More foot access to river* Better curb appeal* Lack of parking and need for permit system ADA improvements More local Village transit Better transportation choices, less on street parking • Village/Hamlet

Table 5 • • • •

Streetscape (sidewalks, buildings) Parking Get rid of car lots More cohesive landscaping, walkability,

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Table 1

Table 6

• • • •

• Bringing new small businesses and promotions • Directional signage for businesses of the Boulevard • Improvement to sidewalks • Streetscape enhancement • Business promotion • Business recruitment • Unified promotional campaign • Maintenance of streets and sidewalks • Code enforcement

Streetscape enhance Monitor junky businesses Business recruitment Rebuilding higher density houses above businesses • Business assistance* • Marketing support

Table 2 • Business rotation/increase sales tax • What will be the mission or vision • Promotion-parking service for business

Table 3 • • • •

• Improve streets and sidewalks, at least make it safer • Lighting • Trees, flowers, hanging baskets

Recruit businesses Keep up the historical aspect Keep the charm County street improvement

Table 8

Table 8 • • • •

Village portal identifier Consistency of store fronts Tie together streetscape and landscaping Street lights

Table 9 • • • • • •

Street beautification Lighting Easier walking on sidewalks Chickens Retail and housing together enhance livability Missed opportunity at Sunrise and Fair Oaks Blvd.

Table 4 • • • • •

Table 7 • Obtain grants • Trash bins

Table 7

Table 4 • • • • • •

3. Considering that the County and the Chamber have limited resources, where should their efforts be focused?

Promotion of Village in general* Parking needs to be better organized ADA Improve streetscape and building frontage* Stronger CC & R control

Table 5 • Streetscape enhancements, lighting, banner poles • Events to draw people • 2 entrances • Business improvement • Force building owners to maintain building • Promote Village through signage

• • • • •

Public awareness of Village Special identity Publicity Village cohesiveness Parking enforcement

Table 9 • • • • • • • • • •

Sidewalk improvement Streetscape and landscape Parking Business recruitment Need a unified message, who are we trying to attract Façade improvement funded with self assessment district Lighting Eliminate billboards Unique in Sacramento County Code enforcement to get rid of blighted areas

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


4. Are there places in or near the Village that present special development opportunities? Table 1 • • • • • • • • • • • •

Across from dental building Parking structure* Neighborhood bar & grill Move water district yard Relocate auto repair and dealership Upgrade older buildings Abandoned houses and lots Chamber lot/Townhouse* Redirect cars/dangerous Too many salons/antique shops Freshen up buildings Require plants

Table 2 • Vacant buildings-Fair Oaks school site, car lot on Fair Oaks Blvd. • Ugly buildings-space on south side of the Hardware store • Empty spaces

• • • •

Empty lots Trash and chicken leftovers Marshall building Chamber building

• • • • •

Table 6 Water district presence too much Townhouse make viable* Chamber new building* Beautification, enhancement, keep name and character of Village • Used car lots not appropriate* • Reuse vacant properties • • • • • •

Priorities Table 2

Table 7

• • • • • • •

• • • • • •

Parking Keep the character of the existing Village Promote business-unify Planning – to draw people to the Village Traffic circulation Village-too much can be harmful Village identity –important

Additional parking spaces Maintaining the culture Monitor for inappropriate parking Attracting a positive clientele Security Parks made as drug and alcohol free zones

Table 7 Chamber building Remove palm, trees in front of park Remove the chickens Fair Oaks and Winding way triangle Townhouse

Table 8 Table 3 • • • • •

Townhouse Vacant lots Chamber building Water district building Used car lots

Table 4 • • • • • •

Fair Oaks corner car lot 10500 FOB- vacant lot for development Old Townhouse site Lot behind Slocum House Overall Main St. Taller buildings allowed

Table 5 • • • •

Some ugly buildings Used car lots Town house Funeral home parking lot

• • • • • • • • •

Make Park St. included Public and trash collectors Messy palm trees Ugly buildings- Chamber and Sterling Financial Get proactive about getting renters Fix sidewalks Control traffic flow better (one way) Painted parking slots Tear down palm trees, pave more parking

Table 9 • • • • •

Entry to Village from Sunrise-folks drive right by Use zoning to encourage attractive businesses No empty buildings, e.g. Connies Chamber building Better use of shopping center on west side of Sunrise at Winding Way • Move Water District corporation yard • Central parking • Power lines underground

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

33


Second Workshop On April 23, 2008 a 2nd Fair Oaks Visioning Workshop was held in the Fair Oak Recreation and Parks District’s Community Club House. At the beginning of the workshop participants were presented with preliminary comments in response to the input received at the 1st workshop. Following the presentation the participants responded. Following is a list of their comments: • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

One-way couplet – Look at reverse flow Parking time limit Study of Back-in Parking Success Roundabout – will it divert traffic thru neighborhood? (For example, Temescal and Main) N. Village Blvd. – Mid Block crossing – closer to store? Existing Fair Oaks Village signs may have been stolen? Housing (more dense to support businesses) (owner – occupied) Also kind of businesses Need more parking especially for festivals New Parking lot (park?) (No?) Like Expanded park area in front of Community Clubhouse FOWD Land can it be relocated? Test back-in parking now? Stripes Theft/burglaries – coordinate with law enforcement Bike parking, funding.

In addition participants were also provided the opportunity to provide input via comment cards. Following is that input: • Parking structure would be good in the Racey’s property or the current Water District office. Love the concept of the narrower lanes and the pedestrian walking streets with al fresco dinning. Not sure about back in parking. • Good Presentation! I feel that Bridge St. is a gateway and a good way to increase flow to the Village and decrease crime. If small coffee shops were near-bike trail signage to Village. • We own the oldest building –10203 Fair Oaks Blvd. We believe that block should be included in the sidewalk plans. • As a store/business owner I would not like to lose the personal parking places in front of our store. Have the spots directly in front of the store is for our personal safety due to the nature of our business. Also we would like the bus stop in front of our business removed since it scares some of our clients and they need armed secured escort to get them to their car. They are afraid to go past the working people at the stop. I think as one gentleman mentioned during the meeting is ticketing the people who leave their cars to take the bus all day. I know the parking is difficult and I appreciate all the work you as a group are doing. Also, can we reroute the busses to the park or out of the Village. The buses knock down things on the corner in front of the store, like handrails. • I see a definite need for some kind of parking structure but NOT in the park. Thank you for a great presentation – love the great ideas and vision. • A parking structure would be a dream come true. Your parking plan looks good on paper but if it doesn’t really give us a lot more parking spaces, what is the point of all that expense? Parking and streetlights are still the priority. I like the roundabout for the horrible triangle. The palm trees at the park are messy and should be removed for more parking. Just slowing down those commuters who speed through the Village would be wonderful also. Thank you for your hard work. PS – Eliminating the bus stops at FO Blvd. and California St. would help eliminate the criminal element from coming here. My shop is at the bus stop and I see drug addicts and all kinds of people we do not want here (there is a bus stop at the car wash if someone really needs to take the bus). • If a street is narrow or a one-lane road put minimal sidewalk improvements on one side of road only. Need to have a 4-hour time limit for parking to discourage people parking and taking bus to work. Is there a possibility of having private parking lost used as parking area for the Village? We need a crosswalk for FO Blvd. in front of the Methodist church so people can cross road higher than and light. This would allow apartment people to walk to the Village. How about the FO water districts new building have a basement parking for community use with monitored gate and nominal parking fee.

Scenes from the second public workshop

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• Good plan so far – the roundabout and back in parking are great (I’m 74 and would not find it difficult to do either!!!) • Parking – Could the water district put public parking under their new building? Put parking structure in vacant lot kitty corner from Sunflower. Really like the roundabout concept and wider sidewalks. If you increase the time of the green light on Winding Way crossing Sunrise, it will encourage people to use that route because they could go left on Sunrise or across Sunrise more easily than at Fair Oaks and Sunrise. For event parking, arrange a fun and exciting train, bus, hayride, pedicabs to transport people from the shopping mall parking lots, (Bel Air, Gold River) and American River parkway lots, Fair Oaks park by the library.

• Overall great job, very impressive. Should we be thinking about some “anchor” shops for the Village? What kinds of businesses do we need to attract to support the community we want to be? What kind of community do we want to be? What will it take doesn’t this need to be addresses? • Great job. I hope it doesn’t take forever to get some of these things done. A lot of good ideas. • How will roundabout effect residents using Old Winding way (one way street)? Is there any interest in putting together a volunteer “talent list” for some projects? • Great job with physical planning – what is the plan for funding and implementation?

• Current limitation on parking times to eliminate individual taking a spot all day – 2-hour limit. Like the roundabout suggestion.

• Would agree with use of vacant or undesirable properties to be a “plan target”. Let’s work on Water District.

• How can peripheral streets (Crestline, Entrance west end of California Ave) eventually be incorporated in a possible Phase II Village enhancement?

• Great presentation! Need to think through the consequences of the changes of Temescal and Main Street, etc. traffic. Parking options could use some more thought. Are you planning on having a booth at the Fair Oaks Fiesta on May 3rd?

• Bravo! A great beginning to making FO Village a destination and pleasant place to find and remember. • You are a breath of fresh air – new eyes – especially well done in theater/plaza area, including 1 way. Roundabout disrupts FO Blvd. would send cars through Main and Temescal. • Presentation was too slow but good ideas. Good Sandwiches Thanks. • Please consider time limit parking in all areas of the Village so that outside residents will be discouraged (and fined) from parking all day. • Generally a very positive set of ideas. What is Missing? Close in housing within walkable access to provide a source of pedestrian to serve as locally focused business customers without having to drive to the Village. • Use the big park for parking – not many people use it except to occasionally fee the chickens and Bongo drums and drink, get drunk and trash businesses across from the park and urinate in our alley and leave trash behind.

• Keep up the good work – changing the appearance and appeal should also help change some of the types of businesses as well as the mindset. Have you included “branding” on your list of things to eventually discuss? • I really enjoyed the meeting of several topics, but I have a topic that needs brining up. I don’t know if you know of the place. It called Illinois pond in the sailor bar area. Well, as we know a lot of new people are arriving in Fair Oaks; and finding our hinder jewels. They are not too kind on respecting the area. I would like to get something done on the respect of the pond before everyone thinks it’s a place to swim or go fishing because it’s a place of solitude…a place for wildlife and hiking. All we need is some signs that say “no fishing or swimming”, or some kind of wording put up that way they will respect the area. • I think the arches that will go over Sunrise that will say “Welcome” to Fair Oaks Village is a king idea, and the turn about near old winding was on the north-end of the Village is a good idea. But, there is a creek right next to the Winding Way, right beside the road that needs cleaning and respected. The creek runs clear down to meet the American River going east along Winding Way toward the Sailor Bar entrance on the right, and it begins at Sunrise at Winding Way.

• I would like to know if you have some sort of time frame for this project? How do businesses get help when streets are closed during construction?

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Ap pen d ix B – Re g ula to r y En vironment Regulatory Documents General Plan The County General Plan is a set of policies and programs that form a blueprint for physical development. It is a long-term legal document consisting of written text and diagrams that express how a community should develop. The plan is a basis for land use decision making used by policy decision makers such as the Planning Commission and the Board of Supervisors. Future development and revitalization efforts in the Fair Oaks Village will have to be consistent with the General Plan.

Fair Oaks Village Special Planning Area Ordinance (SPA) In order to protect the as a viable commercial area and retain it’s environmental an historical character as identified in the Community Plan 1989 the County adopted the Fair Oaks Village SPA. The SPA regulates: • Land Uses • Development Standards • Signs

Neighborhood Preservation Area (NPA) The Neighborhood Preservation Ordinance (Section 537-20 of the County zoning code) created this NPA with the intent to “protect the unique single-family residential character of the Fair Oaks Village neighborhood. The Board of Supervisors found that Fair Oaks Village neighborhood is a distinctive, semi-rural neighborhood that contains a special blend of characteristics that should be preserved.” As defined in the Ordinance, the unique features of Fair Oaks Village neighborhood include: an electric mix of home styles, sizes, ages and values; low density; exiting narrow streets frequently used for walking; very few curbs, gutters or sidewalks; very few streetlights; and abundance of large, mature trees; and a diverse wildlife population. The NPA regulates: • Land Uses • Development Standards • Non-Conforming Structures

American River Parkway Plan The County of Sacramento has principal responsibility for administration and management of the American River Parkway as guided by the American River Parkway Plan. The American River Parkway Plan is defined to include the American River and adjacent floodplain, from the confluence with the Sacramento River up to Folsom Dam. The County of Sacramento, however, has day-to-day management responsibility for the portion of the Parkway from the Sacramento River confluence to Hazel Avenue, exclusive of the fish hatchery facilities. Plan policies include: Balanced management: 1.1 - The American River Parkway is a unique regional asset that shall be managed to balance the goals of controlling flooding; preserving and enhancing native vegetation, native fish species, the naturalistic open space and environmental quality within the urban environment; maintaining and improving water flow and quality; providing adequate habitat connectivity and travel corridors to support migratory and resident wildlife; providing recreational opportunities; and ensuring public safety. Recreation: 1.2 - The Parkway shall be oriented to passive, unstructured water-enhanced recreation activities which are appropriate in a natural environment, and which are not normally provided by other County recreational facilities. To this end, development in the Parkway shall be minimal, and facilities which are primarily visitor attractions should be placed in less sensitive areas within the County Park system. Insofar as possible, development shall not occur in areas of natural ecosystems that are still relatively undisturbed. Resource protection: 1.3 – Limitation on the use of the Parkway through design and management tools to prevent overuse of the Parkway, and preserve the environmental quality, thereby ensuring the integrity of the Parkway for future users. Land Use: 1.4 – No existing publicly owned Parkway lands shall be disposed of through sale, lease, or de facto uses adverse to the goals and policies of this Plan, in order to assure the long-term protection and integrity of the present boundaries of the Parkway. Cooperation: 1.5 - Coordination and cooperation in Parkway planning and management is essential, especially in recognizing the many important roles of jurisdictions and agencies with regulatory responsibilities within the Parkway.

Zoning Ordinance The SPA and NPA supersede the County Zoning Ordinance.

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Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


Commercial and Residential Design Guidelines

Code Enforcement

In 2006 the County adopted “The Community Design Guidelines” for commercial and mixed-use developments. The Guidelines have three tiers of specificity including principles, design goals and design guidelines.

Sacramento County’s Community Assistance and Resource Center takes complaints on community hazards and nuisances. A list of complaints that will be responded by the County include:

• Principles: These are the highest order of design criteria. Broadly stated, they establish the overall objectives for every project. There may be many ways to accomplish them, but they must be met. • Design Goals: The design goals are the next tier of design criteria for projects. They are more issueoriented and establish expectations for what projects must accomplish in terms of various design issues, such as site planning, landscaping, architecture and signage. • Design Guidelines: The design guidelines provide more detailed direction on how projects should address facets of design issues. For example, the criteria for making a site plan successful (i.e., pedestrian connections, landscaping, building orientation, etc.).

• • • • • • • •

Relevant sections of the design guidelines include Section 1 that regulates commercial districts and Section 3 that controls Village centers. Sometime in 2008 the Board of Supervisor will consider the adoption of multifamily design guidelines.

• • •

Abandoned vehicles on public property for longer than three days. Air quality hazards including smoke, pesticides, other airborne irritants. Businesses operating without a license. Environmental health (food facility complaints); poor sanitation or practices at retail facilities. Facilities (restaurants, bars, markets, cafeterias, etc.) that may be in violation of California Uniform Retail Food Facilities Law. Building conditions; substandard buildings or pest/vermin infestation. Illegal construction or occupancy; construction without a permit or occupancy of a substandard structure. Illegal dumping; large household items disposed improperly, including but not limited to appliances, furniture, mattresses, and tires left in public right-of-ways or roadsides. Road and sidewalk pavement failures, potholes, unsafe sidewalks, and traffic hazards, as well as bushes, trees, fences, or other vision obstructions. Unsanitary or unsafe premises. Zoning violations; improperly disposed rubbish or debris, commercial vehicles in neighborhoods for too long, improper building setbacks, illegal businesses, or non-conforming signage.

FOVEC and individuals should be aggressive and contact the Center when nuisances occur. Sacramento County’s Community Assistance and Resource Center is on the web at: http://www.msa.saccounty.net/communityhazards/report.htm

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

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Ap pen d ix C – Tr a ffic Ca lm ing Devi ces Bulb-Outs (Curb Extensions)

Bulb-outs, also known as curb extensions or neckdowns, extend the sidewalk or curb line out into the parking lane and reduce effective street width. Bulb-outs significantly improve pedestrian crossings by: • • • •

Reducing actual crossing distance Visually and physically narrowing the roadway Improving pedestrians and motorists visibility Reducing actual time pedestrians are in the street

Bulb-outs placed at intersections essentially prevent motorists from parking in or too close to a crosswalk; they also keep motorists from blocking a curb ramp or crosswalk. Motor vehicles parked too close to corners present a threat to pedestrian safety since they block sightlines, obscure visibility of pedestrians and other vehicles, and make turning particularly difficult for emergency vehicles or trucks. Motorists are encouraged to travel more slowly at intersections or midblock locations with bulb-outs as the restricted street width sends a visual cue to motorists. Turning speeds at intersections can be reduced with bulb-outs (curb radii should be as tight as is practicable). Bulb-outs also provide additional space for curb ramps and for level sidewalks where existing space is limited. While also providing opportunities to install street furniture, additional landscaping, trash receptacles, bicycle stands, public art, signs, etc.

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Roundabouts

Roundabouts can be used as a traffic calming tool on roadways with higher volume traffic. Modern roundabouts are circular intersections that use horizontal deflection on entry and exit to bring vehicle speeds down to 15-20 mph. Motorists entering the roundabout are required to yield to vehicles already in the circle. Because traffic can move continuously through a roundabout, it is 30 percent more efficient at moving traffic than a typical stop-controlled intersection. Roundabouts are much safer than traditional intersections with 40 percent fewer vehicle collisions, 80 percent fewer injuries and 90 percent fewer serious injuries and fatalities. The safety benefits of roundabouts are based on several factors: • Lower vehicle speeds: At typi cal signalized intersections motorists are usually speeding up, especially if they expect the light to change. As motorists approach a roundabout they are slowing down. • Fewer points of conflict: At a typical two-lane, four-way intersection there are 32 vehicle-tovehicle and 24 vehicle-to-pedestrian points of conflict; at a roundabout points of conflict are reduced to eight for both vehicles and pedestrians. • Simplified operation: The reduced number of points of conflict at roundabouts is due to the

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision


fact that vehicles circulate counter-clockwise in just one direction. Left-turning movements that commonly result in some of the worst crashes at typical intersections are eliminated because drivers leave the roundabout by turning right.

Speed Tables

A 2000 study by the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety states that “Results… indicate that converting conventional intersections from stop sign or traffic signal control can produce substantial reductions in motor vehicle crashes.” Roundabouts can also be designed to accommodate pedestrians and bicyclists. Properly designed roundabouts in urban areas are designed to bring vehicle speeds down to 15-25 mph, speeds at which motorists are much more likely to yield to pedestrians. Concerns that smoothing out traffic flows at a roundabout will make it difficult for pedestrians to find a gap to cross has not been found to be the case. For example, a large two-lane roundabout in Clearwater, FL handles over 6,000 pedestrians during peak summer season without any problems. A splitter island in a roundabout provides a refuge for pedestrians as they cross the street and simplifies crossing by letting them focus on vehicles traveling in only one direction. Pedestrian safety studies have shown that crossing one lane of traffic is very safe. Because roundabouts are more efficient at moving traffic it is often possible to use a one-lane roundabout instead of widening an intersection to four or more lanes. A four-lane intersection might require a pedestrian to cross over 50 feet. A one-lane roundabout breaks the crossing into two 14 foot legs. Roundabouts also work well for bicyclists. Most bicyclists at roundabouts simply take the travel lane since vehicles are circulating at a comfortable bicycle speed. Less confident bicyclists can be provided with a ramp on the approach to the roundabout so they can exit and walk their bicycle across at the crosswalk. In areas with high bicycle use the sidewalk and crosswalk areas should be wide enough to avoid creating conflicts between bicyclists and pedestrians. Roundabouts can also be designed to accommodate large trucks. The outer circle of a roundabout has a raised three and a half inch curb that a large truck can use to accommodate its rear wheels. In addition to improved vehicle and pedestrian safety, and in spite of lower speeds, roundabouts dramatically outperform traffic circles in terms of vehicle throughput. Because a roundabout’s circular traffic is always moving, they outperform ordinary junctions with traffic signals as well. Roundabouts are still fairly new in the United States and many communities express concern when they are fi rst proposed. However, once they are built residents often embrace them and recognize that they are safer, quieter, more attractive and more efficient than typical signalized intersections. While traffic engineers often recommend roundabouts because they are more efficient than a typical stop-controlled intersection, lower speeds and more predictable vehicular movement also make them very safe for pedestrians and bicyclists.

Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Vision

A speed table is a traffic calming device designed as a long speed hump with a flat section in the middle. Speed humps are generally long enough for the entire wheelbase of a passenger car to rest on top. The long, flat design allows cars to pass without slowing as significantly as with speed humps or cushions. Because they slow cars less than similar devices, speed tables are often used on roads with typical residential speed limits. Speed tables are effective in calming traffic on streets where the speed limit needs to be maintained rather than slowing cars more significantly. Traffic speed, volumes, and accidents have been shown to decrease with the use of tables. Although not as responsive to emergency vehicles as speed cushions, speed tables cause less of a delay than humps and are typically preferred by fi re departments over speed humps. One sample of 8 sites found a 45% decrease in accidents per year with the use of speed tables.

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Traffic Circle

A traffic circle is an intersection with a circular shape and, usually, a central island. In some traffic circles two-way traffic is allowed within the circle. It is much more common, however, that traffic is allowed to go in one direction only around a central island. Traditionally, traffic entering a circle has the right-of-way, although some circles give right-of-way to the primary roads. In roundabouts, as opposed to traffic circles, entering traffic must yield to traffic already in the circulatory roadway

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Profile for Susan Dakuzaku

FOVEC 2008 Vision  

Vision document identifying the vision for Old Town Fair Oaks from FOVEC Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee

FOVEC 2008 Vision  

Vision document identifying the vision for Old Town Fair Oaks from FOVEC Fair Oaks Village Enhancement Committee

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