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PORTFOLIO 2019-2020 Pratt Institute 2019 B.Arch graduate with a minor in Construction Management.

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John Walter John recently graduated from the Pratt Institute School of Architecture in the Spring of 2019. Before that he attended HSPVA

Resume

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Education / Work History 2010-2019

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Work Experience VG Studio Architectural Intern July-November 2018

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(TX) where he studied visual arts with a focus on sculpture and painting. The subject of his work then was urban sprawl and speculations on future forms of

Before receiving his professional degree, he made contributions to several projects at VG studio in Houston under the licensed architect Victoria Goldstein who was previously employed at Zaha Hadid Architects. He also worked under Scott Sorenson and Richard Sarrach of the ITL (Interdisciplinary Technology Lab) group at Pratt on the installation for the annual Pratt Design Show. Currently John is collaborating with another licensed architect, Brent M. Porter, on a green roof structure for a commercial strip in the town of Aguas Calientes which rests below the famous site of Machu Picchu.

Japan Travel Studio Escape Pod Train individual work Summer 2017

Thesis

Pratt Institute

Now John is looking for work that revolves around the design, testing, and realization of collaborative work/ living spaces.

Dormitory Project w/ partner Do Phuong Mai Fall 2016

TX - NY

of his studies was realized in his partner thesis with Richard Reyes titled “SYMBIOTIC NOMADS� which was a live/ work marketplace in Manila.

Some more about John...

Symbiotic Nomads w/ partner Richard Reyes FA 18 - SP 19

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human habitats. This led John to pursue his degree at Pratt where he had the privlidge of continuing that interest through various works. The culmination

Columbia University Boathouse Project w/ partner Belen Cavdar Spring 2017

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Consultant // Draftsman // Renderer

713 - 857 - 4403

jdw.twtx@gmail.com


1 : Resume


RESUME 2019 Pratt Institute 2019 B.Arch graduate with a minor in Construction Management.

John Walter

Consultant // Draftsman // Renderer

Consultant / Draftsman / Renderer / Model Maker

789 Saint Marks Avenue

jdw.twtx@gmail.com

Brooklyn, NY

713 - 857 - 4403

Education

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Pratt Institute ~ Bachelors of Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2014-2019 Brooklyn, NY ~ Graduated in Spring 2019 minor in Construction Management

HSPVA ~ Visual Arts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2010-2014 Houston, TX ~ Graduated in Spring 2014 focus in Visual Arts

Academic Work

Research Assistant ~ Brent M. Porter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2019 - Present Assisting on the Aguas Calientes Green Roof Project under Brent M. Porter Traveled to Peru to investigate the site and develop schematics for a green roof proposal.

Fabrication Team ~ ITL (Interdisciplinary Technology Lab) . . . . . . . . .Spring 2018 Working under Scott Sorenson / Prof. Richard Sarrach Assisted with the fabrication of parts and assembly of the installation for the annual Pratt Design Show.

Work Experience

Design Skills

VG STUDIO ~ Victoria Goldstein . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . July 2018 - November 2018 Architectural Intern Work included rendering, schematic design, construction documents, model making, graphic representations, and 3d modeling.

~ 3D Printing

~ Rhino

~ Autodesk Maya

~ Maxwell Rendering

~ Adobe Illustrator / Photoshop / InDesign

~ Revit

~ Autocad

~ Sketchup

~ Grasshopper

~ Vray

~ Laser Cutting ~ Maxwell

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Work Experience


2 : VG Studio Architectural Intern Principal : Victoria Goldstein July-November 2018

I made contributions to several projects at VG studio in Houston under the licensed architect Victoria Goldstein who was previously employed at Zaha Hadid Architects. One of my tasks was a competition to design a public theater in Spain. It required two venue spaces, one for film, and another for the flamenco dancing classes and performances that would take place there. There is a diagram in figure 63 that shows how the program would have been broken up in my scheme. I Decided to separate the two main venue spaces into individual structures. Mainly because we had the space for it and it would have allowed for the rest of the site to remain as public park and additional parking spaces which were considerations the competition guidelines asked to accommodate. During my time at the studio I was also asked to handle a lot of interesting residential work. My favorite stuff to do

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Figure 1 : Competition Massing Model. Render by John Walter.

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in an office setting was the rendering work as seen in figures 61, 64, and 65. I worked closely with Victoria in getting these renderings to read materially like the client wanted and making sure they really conveyed the space. The rendering in figure 64 is my favorite because I got to play a lot with textures and really dressing up a scene which was not something I was used to people wanting to see. I thought it was funny that I didn’t realize how students tend to neglect materiality and detail in renderings to focus on the space but that wasn’t necessarily what people in the client world cared about. In figures 66 and 67 is the drawings I spent the most time developing for Victoria. The Haddon House was a development that had been halted because of a code issue in regards to a cable clearance on the site that needed to be accounted for. The structure intersected the restricted 10’ clearance space required for the length of the property which, until that point, had not been noticed in the

Figure 2 : Section Render by John Walter.

approved construction documents. I had to go in and re-design the steel structure (figure 62) in some parts completely to be reconfigured in a way that satisfied the clearance, but also created spaces on the interior that still were in accordance with the building code in Houston. This was a lot more work in 3d design than I can really show in images because it required reworking major elements of the roof design, which at that point had already been finalized, and the stair way as well which had a huge effect on the way the main level plan flowed.

Figure 3 : Detail Modeling by John Walter.

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PRIVATE OFFICES

Figure 4 : Competition Massing Diagram. Drawn by John Walter.

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Figure 5 : Interior Render by John Walter.

Figure 6 : Front Perspective Render by John Walter.

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Figure 7 : Haddon House Section. Drawing by John Walter.

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Figure 8 : Haddon House Plans. Drawn by John Walter.

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Selected Works 2019


3 : Symbiotic Nomads Thesis ~ w/ partner Richard Reyes Manila, The Philippines Critics : Philippe Baumann, Michael Su Fall 2018 - Spring 2019 This was a year long project that began with researching individually different portions of the urban scape of Manila in the Phillipines. The project was designed as a Manila specific work-live that considered the various dynamics surrounding the introduction of a mass transit system to areas of the city that previously were very disconnected. We questioned the initial notion that this project was an immediate benefit to the under-served communities throughout the various parts of the city but specifically to the people in our site which was the fifth stop along the proposed MMSP (metro manila subway project), the East Avenue station. Particular attention was paid to the institutional structures existing on our site (figure 2) and the various modes of land use and occupation that fortify and perpetuate inequality in Manila. The community of roughly 8 to 10 thousand residents

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Figure 9 : Aerial rendering by Richard Reyes.

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Figure 10 : Enlarged Abstract Site Plan by John and Richard.

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in an informal housing cluster on the site we came to call “symbiotic nomads”. This term is what we used to describe informal residents, who in our project, would repossess institutional structures for living and market activity and reclaim undeveloped landscape to create community assets. Community assets are utilities that are useful, beneficial and profitable; pedestrian infrastructure, symbiotic landscape, and nomadic markets. The greatest threat for symbiotic nomads of Manila is private predatory interests; they participate in the monumental takeover of land adjacent to and within informal communities. The Filipino government doesn’t consider possibilities of upward mobility for the lowest class. This leaves land development in the hands of private companies and corrupt government officials. Government agencies attempt to solve an under-development issue by joint venturing with third parties typically but these coalitions have

Figure 11 : Institutional Entities on the site.

been unsuccessful mostly because they lack the will to see and address the real cause of inequality in this context which is how land ownership works in the Philippines. So what we designed was the countermeasure or defense. Incremental takeover of land in the opposite direction. The first move we made was to design the train station as part of our project. We wanted that to be the catalyst for opportunity on the site. By directly connecting the symbiotic nomads to the subway and it’s commuter populous we create the space for interaction between these two groups which are typically separated. Symbiotic nomads aren’t taken kindly to in commercial spaces or places where you need money so they’ve usually had to create their own space for that. Providing a market space directly connected to the informal residents and also a wide patch of undeveloped land that they could use to grow crops or products that they can then profit off of is the

Figure 12 : View of residential level. Model by John Walter.

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Figure 13 : Abstract site plan showing the specific area of intervention.

quickest route to upward mobility for these people. The ability for them to incrementally make and break new boundaries on the site would lead to a seemingly less organized use of land (figure 5), but we believe that breaking down these walls figuratively and literally would lead to a more inclusive and open way of living. Exemplified by the actualization of these ideas in figures 3 and 4, the red circulation would be a pedestrian infrastructure that allows the informal community more points of access to this space for collaboration and would also lead to the deconstruction of old buildings in the search of a more customized use for these groups. They would create a market on the ground level (figure 6) which reshapes the landscape and connects down to the subway station. Above would be studio and work spaces that service that market (figure 7) and above that social and residential spaces for the “upwardly mobile” symbiotic nomads. The reason we never

show an image of a whole building is because we never set out to design a building, our intention was always to design a set of conditions that could be repeated throughout the site and Manila to create a more holistic idea of what urban renewal can and should be. It is disingenuous in our eyes to suggest that focusing efforts in any one building or place solves issues facing under-served communities elsewhere so we instead proposed a method for creating new “local synergies” for these people that could adapt and grow to serve new needs.

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Figure 14 : The market level. Drawing by Richard Reyes.

Figure 15 : Work / Cooking Level. Drawing by Richard Reyes.

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Figure 16 : Social Level. Drawing by Richard Reyes.

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Figure 17 : Model by John Walter

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4 : Dormitory Project Pratt Institute~ w/ partner Do Phuong Mai Brooklyn, NY Critic : Andrew Lyon Fall 2016 This was my first housing project which was designed as a replacement for Pratt Institute’s freshman dorms. Having also lived in one of the freshman dorms it provided a unique perspective on the requirements for such a building and how personal views inform design proposals. Me and my partner studied Paul Rudolph’s “Colonnade Condominiums” as precedent which fueled one of the main elements of our design. This element or elements were a series of unit types (figure 45) which interlocked in section to produce tertiary spaces to be occupied collectively. The variability in unit types also created a facade with a lot of form and allowed us to use it as outside circulation between units/communal spaces (figure 43). We wanted the project to have a connective network of spaces. The main reason for this was the previous dorms lacked connectivity and were very tiny. The

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Figure 18 : Model by John Walter.

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little amount of communal space that was offered often was poorly lit and didn’t have expansive views. Our design allowed for large group study and recreational spaces (figure 44) that had big window walls to let plenty of light through and were connected to both sides of the building which activated cross ventilation. So passive cooling also became an integral component of the design in section at many points between communal spaces. Figure 46 shows the previously discussed unit-type stacking and how that relates to the ground. We thought it was really important that each unit type be multi-leveled to some extent and that resting and gathering on the micro level be separated. There was a lack of private resting spaces in the old dorms so since we had the space to accommodate that feature and fulfill the rest of the program requirements dictated to us we integrated it. It was important in our eyes to have resting spaces that were private, semi-private,

UNIT TYPE 1

Figure 19 : Common area model photo. Model by John Walter.

UNIT TYPE 2 DN UP

Figure 20 : One of the 3 unit types. Drawing by D.P. Mai.

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UNIT TYPE 3

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and then communal. This breakdown created a “gradient of isolation” which most freshmen students entering college life don’t expect to get. Another challenge of this project was designing a complete facade system which integrated with the various lighting and use conditions throughout the structure (figure 49). Some dilemmas the facade needed to overcome were; changes in slope, differing levels of privacy, doorways and other openings. At one point we completely redrew the project on a more regular grid (figures 47, 48) so as to make the facade design easier to integrate. Being that this was a corner site (figure 50), with one very busy street side and one quite street, we decided to treat the two facades differently. The street facing the traffic we made closed off and flat, while the street side that was less crowded was given more open spaces and connectivity to promote hanging out outside and not being alone. The other accommodations we had to make were


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Figure 21 : Short Section. Drawing by D.P. Mai.

for open space on the ground level and parking. Those issues though were nonexistent for us because we efficiently stacked and designed the units and this made it easy to design an open and public garden on the ground level and create the necessary space for an entrance to the underground parking. This project was very valuable for me personally because it made me aware of challenges on the micro and macro scale that need to be overcome when designing a building that functions for a huge body of people.

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Figure 23 : 3rd Level Plan. Drawing by John Walter in Revit.

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Figure 24 : Technical Section. Drawing by John Walter.

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Figure 25 : Model by John Walter.

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5 : Boathouse Project Columbia University ~ w/ partner Belen Cavdar New York, NY Critic : Jane Lea Spring 2017 This project was meant to be an answer to Columbia University’s growing problem in relation to how they use a boat dock that is also meant for public use. They had a rowing team which used an old boathouse on the site for many years and so consideration for how they use the site had to be made as well as how you move people though the site that aren’t out there to row with the team. What me and my partner decided to do was to separate the scheme into two separate but connected boathouses. One for the school’s team, and one for the public. It needed to be done in a way that minimized redundancy while at the same time accommodate the individual needs of the administration, the teams, and the public. We made the lockers shared between both boathouses (figure 42) but separated by gender because that was something that the people we spoke to from the school didn’t mind

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Figure 26 : Roof Plan. Drawing by John Walter

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and thought made the community feel bigger. The other space we had to consider in terms of traffic was the deck in front of the two boathouses (figure 36). It was required to have enough space to turn the team boats at a diameter of 60’. Being that this element of the scheme was so large it was imperative that both boathouse have their boats pull out and load back in the direction of this space (figure 40). Another element of the design we wanted to clearly emphasize was the public’s access to this space. We distinguished it materially as seen in figures 36 and 37 with the wooden boardwalk. This was a multi-level boardwalk which could bring the public inhabitants throughout the whole site. The only moments the public couldn’t go to were covered by the metal facade panels clearly marking the private zones. This way of breaking up the different levels of program made it so that each inhabitant could have a completely different view of the

Figure 27 : Rendering view from the creek by John Walter.

site depending on their use. Somebody just walking by may never see this as a boathouse but as the public garden where they take their kids up to look at the river. Whereas administration officials and team members may see this as a place of work and the public rowers may see this as a recreation or community space. The ability for the project to be read in multiple ways goes to the main idea of our project which was to erase the clear lines of division that seemed prevalent before. Which alienated certain users and made them feel as though this wasn’t also their space.

Figure 28 : Rendering view looking out to the creek by John Walter.

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ion

Figure 29 : Cross Section. Drawing by John Walter.

Design 302

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Ortho Views Ortho Views

Long Elevation Figure 30 : Long Elevation. Drawing by John Walter.

Long Elevation

Long Section Long Section Figure 31 : Long Section. Drawing by John Walter.

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Detail Study

Green Roof Planting Irrigation Manifold Root Barrier Drainage Board Roofing Membrane Concrete Topping Insulation Steel Structure Metal Cladding Air Barrier Rainscreen Insulation Steel Structure Insulation Interior Finishes Window Glazing Mullions Glass Door Metal Handrail U Chanel Drain Pipes Planting Steel Beam Wood Decking Flooring Beams Substructure Main Beam Steel Column Steel Studs Foundations Wood Platform

Plan Detail

Figure 32 : Technical Section. Drawing by John Walter.

SP-17 Prof. Jane Lea

Design 302 Selected Works 2019

John Walter Belen Cavdar

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Figure 33 : Main Level. Drawing by John Walter.

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6 : Escape Pod Train Japan Travel Studio ~ indiv. work Tokyo, Japan Critics : Richard Sarrach, Chi-fan Wong Summer 2017 This was my first studio that I traveled out of the country for. It was a five week trip to Taiwan and Japan where we saw amazing architecture and people and it really was the first time I experienced a place where things were obviously designed for people who do and need things a different way than myself. The task of this studio was to design a train car for commuters in Japan. It was suppose to be a hybrid between a train car and an art installation. I studied craft and how people from various perspectives in Japan thought and lived out craft. I decided to mix the focus of my work in this case being that it was also an art installation so that it incorporated my own experiences of Japan as well as others. I spent time studying wood joinery (figure 29) and learning how to incorporate it into my work. I chose wood as the main material I would use because the detail and construction using wood

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Figure 34 : Model by John Walter.

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that I was privileged to see throughout Japan and specifically Kyoto inspired me. I decided to make the spaces in my train car about isolation and escape. This was fueled by a sense of immensity that I experienced when I first arrived in Tokyo which was the biggest and most dense city I feel I’ve ever been to. I imagined being someone who had lived their my whole life and how small that would make me feel. Also at some points the crowds just got to be so large in certain populated areas. So it became clear that a space which separates one from their surrounds and their sense of scale would be a feeling of relief compared to the norm. I remembered a time on my trip where me and a friend took a long hike through a forest by the “Silver Pavilion� in Kyoto and the feeling of isolation and comfort we achieved inspired the forest condition I created on my train car. With a series of lumber members cut at different lengths and placed at varying heights

Figure 35 : Rendering of train on commute. Render by John Walter.

it helped to create a feeling as if the inhabitant were in a field of these members and getting lost like in a forest. The pods placed in a sort of automated plan (figure 33) furthered the feeling of isolation and removal from the outside world. You could open one of these pod doors (figure 32) and crawl in to meditate. As you do so the train would move while this series of pods would gently rock and sway along.

Figure 36 : Interior Model Photo. Model by John Walter.

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Figure 37 : Componentry Diagrams. Drawn by John Walter.

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Figure 38 : When the train meets the station. Render by John Walter.

Figure 39 : Model Photo. Model by John Walter.

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Figure 40 : Cross Section of the “Escape Pod”. Drawing by John Walter.

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Figure 41 : Overall Plan and Section. Drawn by John Walter.

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John Douglas Walter jdw.twtx@gmail.com 713 - 857 - 4403

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Thanks!

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JW

TX - NY

713 - 857 - 4403

jdw.twtx@gmail.com

Profile for John Walter

John Walter Portfolio - Abbreviated Version  

John Walter Portfolio - Abbreviated Version  

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