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THE ERDISTONIAN THE MAGAZINE OF ERDISTON TEACHERS’ TRAINING COLLE GE ISSUE 1

INSIDE THIS ISSUE Articles 2015 Valedictorian Embraces Constructivist Teaching Parents and the School Teacher Training for Inclusion Highlight Agricultural Science at the St George Secondary School Stories The Man Behind The Wall Last Ball ...and much more!

C E L E B R A T I N G

E D U C A T I O N

I N

B A R B A D O S

FEATURE: INTERVIEW WITH DR MAUREEN LUCAS 2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 1


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Contents 10

15

34 5. Editor’s Note Dr Patricia Saul 6. Minister’s Message The Honourable Ronald Jones Minister of Education, Science, Technology and Innovation 7. From the Principal’s Desk Barbara Parris 8. Message from the Chairman Dr Leah Garner-O’neale 10. FEATURE: Interview with Dr Maureen Lucas

20. Is it a Case of Tie the Heifer Loose the Bull? Angela Smith 22. Parents and the School: A Needed Partnership for Student Success Alicia Alleyne 24. Meet The Staff 26. Inclusion - Providing Education for the Disabled Trudi Harris

38. The Man Behind the Wall Akeelah Griffith 39. Press On Simon Alleyne

28. Last Ball (A Day in the Life of a Ball) Doleen Bowen

15. How to Tell a Story

30. Let’s Get Active as We Teach! Julian Griffin

16. Barbados My Island Home Sherrill-Yvette Ashby

32. Eureka! Dr Ramona Archer-Bradshaw

17. 2015 Valedictorian Embraces Constructivist Teaching Dwight Carter

34. HIGHLIGHT: The Agricultural Science Programme at St George Secondary School Stephen Proverbs

On The Cover: Mr Dwight Carter Photo by Brooks LaTouche

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THE ERDISTONIAN ISSUE 1

Magazine Committee Chief Editor • Dr Patricia Saul Barbara Parris Dr Ramona Archer-Bradshaw Cecelia Rock Grace-Anne Crichlow Desiré Browne Catherine Gibson Laureen Turton Paul Grant Debbie Brathwaite Victor Gibson Felicia Worrell Sponsors AK Supplies D.E. Computers Sagicor Design and Layout Paul Grant (xireldesigns.com) Printed by IMAGEWORX Online xireldesigns.wix.com/the-erdistonian

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Editor’s Note Dr Patricia Saul Deputy Principal, Erdiston College

The Erdistonian is a magazine published annually by the Erdiston Teachers’ Training College as a service to teachers, other educators, and members of the general public who are interested in keeping abreast of what is happening in education locally, regionally and internationally. It is intended as a forum for current theory, research, and practice in education at the primary, secondary and tertiary levels in Barbados. The first edition of the magazine has been launched to coincide with activities for the celebration of the 50th Anniversary of Barbados’ Independence; hence; its theme “50 Years of Pride, Industry and Education.” As we approach the 50th year of our independence, our country is positioned on a rich tradition of dedication to education by successive governments. One of the main reasons why we as a people have been able to pull ourselves up by our proverbial bootstraps is because of the investments our political leaders have made in education. Therefore, our pride is born out of an understanding of where we have come from as a people. Our industry is fueled by our realization of what it took our forefathers to lay the foundation for our future and our recognition of what we must do to continue to pave the way for others coming after us. As a consequence, our commitment to education is inspired by our understanding of the fact that it is a lifelong process which becomes more complex with every era. It is hoped that this magazine will be an instrument that will be used to contribute to the further inspiration and enlightenment of Barbadian citizens. The articles in this edition range from an extensive interview with the first female principal of Erdiston Teachers’ Training College, Dr Maureen Lucas, to poems and essays written by tutors, teachers of primary and secondary schools, and students. There are also some fun activities which add variety to the magazine, while teaching important concepts at the same time. It should be noted that while Erdsiton Teachers’ Training College welcomes articles, essays, teaching tips, and reports of different types on matters related to education locally, the contents of the magazine do not necessarily reflect or imply endorsement by the Erdiston Teachers’ Training College. We at Erdiston Teachers’ Training College express our sincere thanks to all those who contributed to the first edition of “The Erdistonian” and we look forward to your continued support in the future.

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Minister’s Message The Honourable Ronald Jones J.P., M.P. Minister of Education, Science, Technology and Innovation The Erdiston Teachers’ Training College has been a celebrated teachers’ college for the past sixty-eight years. Its mark on the education landscape of Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean has long been recognised in academia and among members of the general public. Teachers from across the many islands who came to Erdiston Teachers’ College to learn their craft have helped to change the developmental dynamics of these Eastern Caribbean islands. Erdiston College is undergoing a major overhaul of its programmes as well as its infrastructure to continue its impressive record and to make teaching and learning more relevant to the 21st Century. This retooling is part of the increased emphasis being placed on equipping teachers and school leaders for the 21st century. In its quest to achieve this laudable objective, the College has been undergoing major infrastructural upgrade. When this work is finished, new classroom space would have been added, administration would be given a new location, and student services would be more accessible to all students. In addition, the library has been upgraded and will be outfitted with modern technologies to aid the research work of students. The western block will be demolished and a new teaching and administration wing with a lecture and arts theatre will be constructed in its place. The main building will be refurbished to ensure that its iconic space and historical significance are maintained. New parking lots have already been laid out, and the driveways will be repaved to make the plant more accessible. This physical work will complement a line of new programmes which are intended to support teaching and learning in our schools. A new emphasis on Teacher / Principal Leadership is being championed to make the leaders of the modern classroom more impactful on teaching and learning. Additionally, the introduction of the Bachelor of Education Primary programme will initiate a new approach to teaching training which will see teachers being trained before they enter the teaching service. Moreover, the Bachelor of Education Primary programme will facilitate the upgrade of trained teachers to degree status. Barbados is moving towards having a 100% trained teaching service. Erdiston is integral in achieving and sustaining that policy initiative as students should have before them trained and fully qualified teachers. Another major emphasis which will gain further momentum would be the constant professional upgrade of teachers. No longer can the teacher rely on past knowledge and methodologies. The rapidity of change and the several technological imperatives which are coming on stream mean that new knowledge and approaches are constantly evolving. In this scenario, teachers have to be kept at the cutting edge. Therefore, a more fluid and versatile Erdiston Teachers’ College will be there to assist teachers in meeting their professional needs. Erdiston Teachers’ Training College will also spearhead the introduction of two new degrees, mainly in the areas of Special Needs Education and Early Childhood Care and Development. I am assured that with the quality staff at Erdiston Teachers’ Training College and the effectiveness of its leadership that the College will be able to constantly reinvent itself to meet the needs of Barbadian education and also export some of these services to others in the region. The launch of The Erdistonian is a classic example of the capacity of the College to reach new facets in its development. This annual magazine will give the College a voice to trumpet the cause of the teaching profession, providing a forum for all educators to share their writing, ideas and research with other educators and members of the general public. I extend my best wishes to the Principal, staff and students of the College as we all go forward for greater achievements in this important year of celebration and achievement.

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From The Principal’s Desk Mrs Barbara Parris Principal, Erdiston College

Dear Readers It is with great pleasure that I welcome you to the Erdistonian, a publication of Erdiston Teachers’ Training College. This edition is dedicated to celebrating education in Barbados and coincides with the island’s fiftieth anniversary of independence. Some 68 years ago, on January 1948, the College opened its doors to 16 young men and women of this country. Since then, the College has sought to live up to its first aim to “to provide a body of specially trained men and women who are capable of making the most of every child’s abilities, however great or small...” Six years later, the College served as a training institution for teachers in the Leeward and Windward Islands. In recent years, however, regional governments have established teacher training institutions in their respective countries and consequently, Erdiston College shifted its focus to expanding training at the local level. While considerable emphasis is placed on initial and continuing professional development for educators, there are also offerings for members of the public. The College continues to expand its programmes and in this regard, is currently transitioning to degree granting. As Barbadians, we are cognisant of the contribution of education to the socioeconomic development of this country. To this end, we at Erdiston College salute educators – current and past - for their indefatigable efforts. I commend this magazine to you and hope that you, the readers, will enjoy and benefit from the submissions in this edition of The Erdistonian.

Barbara A E Parris Principal

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Message From The Chairman Dr Leah Garner-O’neale Chairman, Board of Management, Erdiston College

It is indeed an honour for me to greet you as Chairman of the Board of Management of the Erdiston Teachers’ Training College on the occasion of the launch of the magazine entitled “The Erdistonian.” For many years, the Erdiston Teachers’ Training College has been the foundation of teacher education in Barbados and the Eastern Caribbean. It has successfully produced quality educators who not only have impacted on Barbados and the wider Caribbean, but also the world. Erdiston Teachers’ Training College has had vast experience in providing professional development for all categories of educators in Barbados, but as Dewey noted, we do not learn from experience we learn from reflecting on experiences. Hence, the launch of the Erdistonian provides an opportunity for us to truly learn about the experiences of educators in Barbados as we reflect on 50 years of Pride, Industry and Education. Erdiston Teachers’ Training College has made a valued contribution to the quality of education of which Barbados is justifiably proud. This magazine is also being launched at a time when the College is moving into a new era in teacher education in Barbados which will, no doubt, impact the entire region. As Erdiston Teachers’ Training College unveils its new programmes, this magazine will provide a forum to share its research projects and best practices in teacher education with the wider education fraternity. It should also help to keep educators current in their field. On behalf of the Board of Management, I wish to congratulate the Principal, the Management Team, the Magazine Committee, and the entire Staff of Erdiston Teachers’ Training College on this venture!

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ERDISTON TEACHERS’ TRAINING COLLEGE

NEW

Programme

Bachelor of Education Primary PROGRAMME STRUCTURE The programme will consist of a total of 120 credits outlined as follows:: a.

Fundamentals of Education (27 credits)

b.

General Education (18 credits)

c.

Core Subjects (48 credits)

d.

Practicum (21 credits)

e.

Electives (6 credits)

The Bachelor of Education (B.Ed.) programme is designed to cater to the initial training needs of untrained teachers or persons who are desirous of entering the teaching profession. The programme is also structured to facilitate the professional development of trained teachers who do not possess a Bachelor’s Degree. Hence, the B.Ed. programme makes provision for credits to be awarded for courses successfully completed in other programmes of study such as the Associate Degree in Education (ADE), the Two-year In-service Teachers’ Certificate or their equivalent. The programme will provide participants with a sound foundation in the theory and practice of education to enhance their personal and professional growth. Additionally, it will assist teachers in implementing the curriculum in a manner that caters to the diverse needs of learners. A wide range of issues related to education at the national, regional and global levels will be addressed.

ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS The minimum entry requirements for admission to the primary programme of the Bachelor in Education are five subjects in the Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) at General Proficiency Grades I, II or III, or five General Certificate in Education – Ordinary (GCE “O”) level. These subjects should include: • English A • Mathematics • Social Studies or History or Geography • Science – Integrated Science or Human & Social Biology or Agricultural Science or Pure Science • One additional subject COMMENCEMENT DATE Erdiston College will commence delivery of the B.Ed. programme from September 2016. More information on the programme can be accessed from the College.

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INTERVIEW WITH DR MAUREEN LUCAS Interview Conducted by Dr Patricia Saul

As the setting sun cast its glorious rays across the western sky, I sat down for a heart to heart chat with Dr Maureen Lucas, the first female principal of Erdiston Teachers’ Training College (the College, Erdiston College, ETTC). The topic of our discussion was ETTC: its history, its successes, her role in the development of ETTC and her vision for the future of the College. I was inspired by her candour, depth of thought, commitment to ETTC and by extension, education in Barbados. The following is the text of the interview which I conducted with Dr Lucas.

Dr Patricia Saul What do you consider to be the contribution of Erdiston College to Education and national development in the post- independence period? The late sixties and early seventies, our first decade of functioning as an independent nation, witnessed a marked increase in student enrolment at Erdiston College. This increase in enrolment represented one of the deliberate strategies on the part of government to provide improved educational provisions to the people of the newly independent Barbados by expanding the corps of qualified teachers in the educational system. The then principal, Mr Harold Bayne, expressed some concern about this increase in enrolment, since, as he explained, the College did not have the commensurate resources to meet the increase in enrolment. Mr Bayne and the staff, nevertheless, rose to the occasion and the pattern of high enrolment continued until around the early 1980s when approximately 93% of the nation’s teaching force had received initial training. Erdiston, therefore, between 1966 and 1984, buttressed Government’s development efforts by ensuring that the nation’s teachers had access to a

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Dr Maureen Lucas high standard of initial professional development. Erdiston College also contributed significantly to the growth and development of the Cave Hill campus of the University of the West Indies during the sixties, seventies, eighties and beyond when the Two Year In-Service certificate (initial training qualification) could be used for matriculation purposes. The College, therefore, helped to provide university access to thousands of persons who were standing before classes in the newly independent nation during those decades. This access to university education, in turn helped to improve the quality of


our human resource base - one of the critical indicators which can be used to gauge a country’s economic status. At the same time, this increased access would have contributed directly and indirectly to a wide range of improvements across the educational system and would have been vital to the rapid strides which the nation has made during the last fifty years.

Barbados can boast of solid Early Childhood Education provisions.

Successful completion of the Two Year In-Service certificate always had a highly positive impact on the psyche of the young Erdiston graduate. Successful completion of the programme led thousands of young men and women to see themselves in new light - as achievers, as persons with untapped potential. Their self - esteem was, therefore, enhanced. It is obvious that such buoyancy would have impacted not only their families, but also the students whom they taught, and where conditions were favourable, the schools in which they worked.

Similarly, the introduction of Information Technology training courses for members of the public during the nineties contributed significantly to helping the workforce of Barbados become Computer Literate at the start of the Information Age. Of course, it must be acknowledged that our sister institutions such as the Barbados Community College (BCC) and Samuel Jackman Prescod Polytechnic (SJPP) also contributed in this regard.

The success and self- confidence derived from the possession of the Erdiston skills and experiences prompted many to realize that new horizons were there to be explored and they did so. As a result, we can find throughout Barbados today persons across a wide spectrum of professions who caught glimpses of “a new self ” as a result of success at Erdiston College. Such professions include Law, Law Enforcement, Social Work, University and other types of Tertiary Level teaching, Trade Unionism and Religion. Such transitions have redounded to the benefit of our nation and have caused us to have a far more robust, multi-skilled and rich human resource base than would have been expected. Erdiston College has also made a significant contribution to the development of the field of Early Childhood Education in Barbados through its graduates from the Post Certificate and Teachers Advanced Professional Certificate programmes. When the field was given a significant thrust by the Ministry of Education in the 1990s, many of the persons selected to lead and work in the new nursery schools had received continuing professional training at Erdiston College during the late 1980s and 1990s. These persons functioned at high professional levels and have been instrumental in ensuring that

The Early Childhood Education programme for members of the public has had a similar impact on private Day Care Centres and on their efforts to employ developmentally appropriate practices.

In 1997, the then government of Barbados embarked on a bold new initiative of curriculum reform – the Education Sector Enhancement Project (ESEP). One important aspect of that project was to integrate technology in the curriculum across the system. Erdiston College fully supported this initiative through the training of teachers across the system. What is noteworthy, is that many of the teachers who had participated in the Post Certificate and Teachers Advanced Certificate programmes in IT, prior to the start of the project, served as tutors in the training. Many of those persons were also well placed to serve as school co-ordinators during the life of the project and even up to the current time. You were the first female principal of Erdiston College. How long did your tenure last and what were your most precious moments? I served as the principal of Erdiston College from January 1994 until July 2000. I don’t know that I would use the term “precious moments”. I can, however, think of gratifying occasions and I have experienced many such occasions. However, most of them would not relate to the principalship as such. That is because I never made distinct divisions between being a principal and being a teacher educator. After all, teacher education was my core responsibility. So I very much enjoyed seeing a

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trainee teacher who was undergoing the Practicum improve to the point where she was able to confidently demonstrate competence and expertise in the variety of skills which comprise the teaching act and, at the same time, present tangible evidence that her students had made progress in their learning journey. Those were gratifying and celebratory occasions! As principal, I also experienced gratifying moments when there was strong team functioning among the staff to undergird the introduction and implementation of projects. A good example would be the implementation of the new Mandate for the College over the space of a few months at the beginning of 1994. What new initiatives did you spearhead as principal? • Organizational Restructuring and Refocussing The most important initiative undertaken during my tenure would have been the implementation of a new Mandate and Mission for the College - a significant aspect of which related to the introduction/inclusion of university level programmes. In this instance those new programmes were the Diploma in Education and the Certificate in Educational Management and Administration. The delivery of those programmes began on August 1st 1994. This Mandate was set partly in the context of costefficiency and cost- recovery measures; partly in the context of the fact that the primary teaching force of Barbados was almost fully trained. So we were tasked with the responsibility of introducing new programmes and revising others in a short space of time with what amounted to a serious reduction in staff. When persons retired, the posts made vacant by the retirements were not filled. The nation was under World Bank surveillance at the time and, based on reports which I had heard, the World Bank was of the view that the College should be closed. The general public appeared not to have been in agreement with the Bank’s position and so the then Government listened to the sentiments of the Barbadian public.

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In order to achieve our new Mandate, we revised our philosophical orientation, and invited our key stakeholders to join us as equal partners in the restructuring activities. We revised all of our programmes, developed new ones and apart from the actual restructuring Report, engaged in the first strategic planning exercise which Erdiston had ever undertaken. We then set about implementing that Strategic Plan which addressed a host of matters ranging from Human Resource Development, Programming, Financial Management, Policies and Procedures to Physical Plant Development. All the persons directly involved in the restructuring thrust - the various categories of staff, the Board of Management, the majority of our stakeholders, were of one persuasion – the College would succeed, despite the short period of time allocated for the restructuring activity. We did succeed. Indeed, after implementation started, one of the Interim World Bank Reports expressly stated that “Erdiston had exceeded expectations”. • Programmatic Initiatives My tenure reflected a strong focus on continuing professional education for teachers. Erdiston had, since inception in 1948, concentrated on initial teacher preparation. However, for the most part, the focus shifted gradually from the late eighties. During my tenure, from the mid-nineties, the following new programmes/courses were introduced for the first time at Erdiston College: o The Diploma in Education o Certificate in Educational Management and Administration o Certificate in Information Technology for Principals o Teachers Advanced Professional Certificate o Technical Vocational Teachers In-Service Programme in Adult Education o Distance education programme for Industrial Arts teachers o Expanded special education training for teachers in the system.


• Marked Expansion of Income Generation Activities in Order to Assist in Supporting the Demands of the New Mandate The introduction of the new Mandate was not initially accompanied by resource levels commensurate with stated objectives. It was, therefore, necessary to considerably expand our income generating activities in order to succeed and be accountable. We, therefore, expanded our activities in areas such as course offerings for the general public, rental of plant, (the Board even gave permission for wedding receptions to be held in the Main Building) development of niche markets in certain areas particularly Information Technology, Supervisory Management, Guidance and Counselling, Psychology, Tie- Die and Batik. The development of the niche market in Information Technology was particularly successful and coincided with the nationwide thrust in Computer Literacy in the nineties. These income generating activities were highly beneficial to the College. They helped to speed up the restructuring process and provided us with a financial base for other initiatives. When I left the College in 2000, even though the Board of Management had invested large sums of the money to improve various aspects of the College’s functioning, there was nearly Bds $1 million on that account. • Outreach Services to Teachers During 1997, a new Teachers Resource Centre was established. Fortunately, as with several other of our projects, the College was able to fund this activity without needing to request resources from Government. Our library resources were considerably upgraded as well. Both activities helped to ensure that our teachers had access to the type of materials needed for developing a more comprehensive, eclectic and informed approach to teaching and learning. What I would also note is that teachers who were pursuing programmes elsewhere frequently made use of our outreach services. • Leveraged Information Technology Throughout the Institution

During my tenure, Information Technology was leveraged for academic and administrative uses throughout College and particularly for integration purposes in teacher education programmes. • Physical Plant Upgrades The upgrading of the physical plant to include the renovation of several buildings, the development of a campus-wide LAN and related state- of- the- art information technology laboratories also occurred during the 1994 - 2000 period. Some of the physical plant upgrades and the retrofitting of the Computer laboratories constituted work fully funded by the College. • Annual Conference on Education The Annual Conference on Education was introduced during my tenure. One of the main objectives of the conference was to provide a forum for local, regional and international educators to share research findings and perspectives on current/emerging issues in education. That conference, in recent years, is being sponsored by the Higher Education Development Unit of the Ministry of Education. • Introduction of Values Education Workshops and Courses Societal trends in the late eighties and early nineties in Barbados strongly suggested that the focus on Values which had traditionally characterised Barbadian society was lessening. The College resolved to seek to assist teachers and educators in exploring ways in which schools could seek to integrate Values Education in the curriculum. Therefore, a Certificate course in Values Education was introduced. Additionally, the College hosted workshops and a lecture by Values Education specialist, Professor Clive Beck from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE), University of Toronto. Unfortunately, this thrust had to be shelved as a result of the introduction of the ESEP project. Erdiston College was established in 1948. What changes have you noticed in this organisation over these years?

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• • • •

Greater Diversity in Programme Offerings Improvements in Staff Quality Emphasis on Teacher Reflection Leveraging of IT Across the Institution for Academic and Administrative Purposes • Sense of Community Less Evident What suggestions would you offer for moving the College forward? • Greater Involvement in Teacher Recruitment In my view, Erdiston College needs to be given a greater share of responsibility and involvement in determining the criteria and processes which should be used especially for initial teacher recruitment. After all, the College at some point will be required to provide professional development to such persons and should, therefore, help to provide an early gatekeeping function so that the pool of persons selected reflects, in large measure, and as far as is humanly possible, the traits, attitudes and competencies which will redound to the benefit of the educational system. • Maintain a Proactive Approach to Teacher Education Standards The quality of teachers standing before classes is one of the important factors which will continue to influence the trajectory and competitiveness of our nation in coming decades. While there are other determinants which help to influence teacher quality, Erdiston College must continue to maintain a consistent focus on internationally accepted standards in teacher education and must respond proactively whenever instances of compromise begin to appear. • Incorporate Student Voice in Programme Planning The usual approach to programme planning and implementation in teacher education is to consult with and involve key constituents such as teachers, student teachers, unions, principals, et cetera in the process. However, the views and perceptions of school students, who are the ultimate beneficiaries of the educational process are rarely sought, in any consistent manner. School students make their own

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assessments of the strengths as well as the shortcomings of the quality of instruction which they are receiving as well as of schooling in terms of how it is organised and how it franchises or disenfranchises them as persons. Current developments in society and particularly in schools, point to the fact that student voice is one of the missing links in our educational system. While such an inclusion is not the sole responsibility of the College, the College, in its own interest, has the responsibility to seek to access student voice and be influenced by such voice in its programme planning. • Develop and Implement a Research Agenda Erdiston College has never had a strong research culture. This is understandable given the plethora of job demands which members of the academic staff experience. However, as the institution seeks to maintain and enhance a cutting edge position in teacher education, it is incumbent on the staff to conduct relevant empirical research partly to inform its stakeholders of the perceptions of its key constituents regarding matters of educational import and to suggest solutions to persistent and vexing issues.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT ERDISTON

Erdiston College is sited on a former plantation which was owned by a wealthy merchant planter named Mr Samuel Manning. This plantation was once famous for magnificent gardens, and a variety of plants that its owners had collected from all over the Caribbean.


HOW TO TELL A STORY

1

Begin by drawing the child’s attention to certain concepts about print: name of book, author, illustrator, etc.

2

Discuss the title of the story and have the child predict what the story is going to be about.

3

Draw attention to key words in the title and discuss their meanings.

4

Activate relevant background knowledge and schemas through questioning.

5

If there are pictures on the cover, discuss these and have the child make predictions about the story based on them.

6

Tell the story, stopping at points to discuss what is happening, to make new predictions based on events that have occurred, to study specific vocabulary, and to look at and discuss pictures.

7

If the story has a refrain or repetitive words or phrases, have the child repeat these.

8

Turn the book towards the child while reading so that the pictures can be seen.

9

At the end of the reading, lead a discussion that includes issues such as plot (beginning, middle, end), theme, characters, setting (place where events take place), and likes and dislikes about the story.

10 Have the child predict a different ending to the story. 11 Have the child draw a picture to illustrate the story. Alternatively, the child may be asked to draw the favourite character or favourite part of the story. 12 Have older children write a summary of the story, write entries in their reading logs or journals, answer written questions, create graphic organisers, or rewrite the story from a different perspective. 13 Ask the child to dramatise the story or part of it. 14 Put the book in an area where it is accessible to the child so that he/she may engage in pretend reading. 15 Read the story as often as the child may request. 2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 15


Barbados My Island Home By Sherrill-Yvette Ashby B.A., NDT (National Distinguished Teacher) Los Barbados Up from the deep she arose, Surrounded by the ocean blue. A coral formation Lighted by the morning sun Clothed in the bearded figShadowed by a glowing sunset Barbados, my island home. Barbados! A ‘new discovery’ Peopled by a gentle race Fields of corn, yams, rows of sugar cane. Nets of flying fish. Smiles of contentment as day is done, While sweat drips from weary brows Of proud Barbadians. Barbados! Rudely awakened from slumber sweet, To be colonized by absentee Land lords. An invasion of our private shores. A dot in the triangle of slavery. Dejected, abused, chained and shackled. Adopted by ‘Mother England’ A jewel in the royal crown, A saddened land. Barbados! Crying out from labour painsGives birth! Strong and tall, they now stand True Sons, Daughters of the soil. To rescue, to heal, restore our Pride. Charting new paths, with Hope renewed. Independence, Pledges of Allegiance Fifty years and growing strong. These fields and hills we call our ownBarbados! My Island home.

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2015 Valedictorian Embraces Constructivist Teaching By Dwight Carter

There is an old Chinese Proverb which states that “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” And so it was for some of us 689 days ago and for others 354 days ago that we started on our professional journeys towards becoming trained teachers. We took that first step wondering if we would make it to the end. Today, we can all say that today marks the culmination of our journey; we are the graduating class of 2015. I am deeply humbled to be standing before you to give the Valedictorian’s Address on behalf of my fellow graduates. These past two years for some and one year for others, can be described as the most difficult, challenging and life altering years of our lives. We can truly say we have been on an incredible learning journey. As John Dewey said, “we do not learn from experience… we learn from reflecting on experience.” I am sure that as we reflected on our journeys throughout the different programmes, we would conclude that we have benefited immensely as a result of our varied experiences. We have all developed personally and professionally throughout our years here at the Erdiston Teachers’ Training

College. Graduation is one of those awkward times in our lives when we are torn between the joy of our memories and the excitement of our future. We’ve been impatiently waiting for this day – and now; we just want to hit pause. We want to slow it down, and enjoy the last fleeting moments. Over the next few minutes I would like to share some of the most important skills and concepts which we have learnt during our sojourn at this noble institution. I would also share with you how we moved from fledging teachers to confident professionals who feel that we are now better equipped to deal with the myriad demands of the 21st century classroom. The first principle of which we were reminded at the beginning of our journey at the College was that students watch our behaviours and model them. In fact, it was iterated that we do not just teach through subject knowledge, but we teach by our lives. Consequently, we were encouraged to be role models in behaviour, speech, dress, deportment and attitudes so that there would be no lack of congruence between what we say and what we do.

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Throughout our journey, we were taught about the importance of teaching critical thinking and problem solving skills. To this end, we were exposed to the constructivist approach to learning which promotes that students construct their own knowledge in meaningful situations, with the teacher acting as a guide on the side rather than the sage on the stage. The essence of the constructivist approach to learning is the idea that learners individually discover and create their own knowledge, much of which occurs in groups. In this approach learners are viewed as active participants in their own learning, and not passive recipients of information. Many of our tutors drilled that repeatedly into us. We learnt that to maximise the benefits to be derived from this approach in our classrooms, the environment must be characterised by mutual respect, honesty, and positive relationships between the facilitators and students, with clear communication at the centre. In addition to these positive relationships, an environment where students feel emotionally, physically, and socially safe must exist. Furthermore, in such an environment, students must take an active role in their education by making decisions and taking responsibility for intelligent inquiry and discovery, with the teachers acting as facilitators. Another important principle which was reinforced during our stay at Erdsiton College was that “each student is unique.” Therefore, we were encouraged to cater to their individual needs and learning styles. We as teachers must remember what George Evans said, “Every student can learn, just not on the same day, or the same way.” Students learn in various ways: some through motivation, some through group work, some through peer tutoring, and others will learn through experimenting, discussion, and individual presentations. Concomitantly with the emphasis on group work, greater attention was paid to the use of the co-operative learning strategy in the classroom. Allowing students to develop the skill of working in groups will prepare them for the world of work where teamwork is valued. As a matter of fact,

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“The essence of the constructivist approach to learning is the idea that learners individually discover and create their own knowledge, much of which occurs in groups.” according to the University of Kent, teamwork is ranked as the second most important skill employers expect employees to possess. Additionally, Forbes Magazine classified teamwork as the most important skill employees must possess. This is of paramount importance, as adults must work together in their chosen professions in order to be successful. We too experienced the power of team work when we formed study groups for exams, to finish assignments, or to help another student who was having difficulty grasping a concept on his/her own. Many times we saw the difference peer tutoring and teamwork made, whether it was as students or as teachers. Yet another skill which we learnt to be paramount to classroom success is being able to properly align the curriculum, teaching and learning, and assessment. As such we were urged to strive for congruence between and among our objectives, learning experiences and assessment strategies. Our courses all emphasized assessment as an essential ingredient for effective teaching and learning because it provides feedback to both students and facilitators. This


feedback can guide students’ efficient focus on their learning efforts and can inform facilitators about students’ progress towards learning goals. However, the major purpose of assessment is to promote learning. It is not the goal in itself, but a means to achieve a goal. We proved these statements to be true during our teaching practicum as we used assessment to assist us in identifying areas of challenge for our students and to adjust our teaching to facilitate learning. On several occasions having assessed our students, we either concluded that we needed to review a lesson or that our students were ready to proceed to the next concept. One precept which will remain etched in the minds of all graduates is the importance of effective planning. Our tutors presented planning as a broad-based activity involving the selection of content, materials, and strategies within the context of the students for whom the lesson is intended. In addition, we learnt that the expectations of students should also be appropriate to their different learning styles and needs. In short, we learnt quite early that planning was the fulcrum on which classroom success pivoted and was never to be omitted in the progressive classroom. But life is not life without challenges, and as such our sojourn had its fair share of them. Some hurdles were poor time management, poor study habits, difficulties incurred in balancing study with family commitments, the sacrificing of some pleasures in order to study, dealing with various personalities and attitudes, and a lack of resources. However, through ingenuity and collaboration with other students, family members and friends these problems were solved. Fellow graduates, as Dr. Martin Luther King said, “Free at last, free at last, Thank God almighty we are free at last.”

programmes there was a general consensus that the College needed to address the sequencing of some of the courses within the various programmes. It was felt that this would ensure that students gain full insight into best practices in the specific content areas. Additionally, there was a request that the period of observation in the nursery school for those students pursuing the Certificate in Early Childhood Education, Care and Development should be increased from one day to three to five days. On behalf of the graduates, I want to Thank God for giving us the strength, good health and the ability to complete our journey, because without Him nothing is possible. A heartfelt thank you is extended to the staff of the Erdiston Teachers’ Training College for the work they did to ensure we succeeded: the Principal, and the academic staff who facilitated learning; the library staff who gave assistance in sourcing materials for research; the administrative staff who were courteous and generous when it came to assignments and swift delivery of correspondence; and last but by no means least, the ancillary and garden staff who kept the surroundings clean and congenial for study. Thank you to all the families, friends and coworkers who would have contributed to our success. Your kindness and understanding throughout the years have been invaluable to all of us. Current students of Erdiston Teachers’ Training College remember this maxim, if you fail to prepare, prepare to fail. Once you remain disciplined and committed you too will succeed. Everything is only for a time. Make that sacrifice now and enjoy your rewards later. As a final thought going forward I want to leave you with these words: “If we teach today’s students as we taught yesterday’s, we rob them of tomorrow” (John Dewey).

As we prepare to take our exit from the institution, we would like to make a few recommendations to the College which should impact positively on its functioning and ameliorate some of the challenges which this current cohort experienced. Throughout all

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IS IT A CASE OF “TIE THE HEIFER, LOOSE THE BULL?” By Angela M Smith M.A. Debate surrounding the academic performance of boys has become an international phenomenon largely because examination results in several countries suggest that the performance of girls has surpassed that of boys, in nearly all subject areas at both primary and secondary schools. One of the current issues related to this debate is gender socialisation and the construction of masculinity in Caribbean households (Mills, 2000; Smith, 2003; Parry 2000). The first and most important influence on the perceived gender roles of individuals is their parents. Brannon (2005) suggests that “even before children begin school, their parents and the society in which they live treat boys and girls differently” and, hence, by age 4 or 5, children have developed a concept of gender and know what behaviours are expected and approved for each (p. 296). Brannon offers the following examples of how parents promote gender stereotyping: dolls for girls but trucks for boys, quiet games for girls but noisy games for boys, frilly dresses for girls but grubby jeans for boys, staying close to home for girls but venturing out for boys (p. 296). Consequently, when children begin school, they already “hold beliefs about what clothes, games and behaviours are appropriate for boys and girls, and they bring these beliefs to the school experience.” Then while in the school setting, both male and female teachers reinforce many of the gender stereotypes which were learnt by the children at home. As a result, both boys and girls are socialised along gender lines whether in or out of the classroom. Two patterns of gender socialisation outside of school have been identified in the Caribbean: one for

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females and one for males and these patterns seem to affect educational experiences in many ways. While generally speaking males are “free” and “without responsibility”, females are “restricted” and “homebound”. This has resulted in the use of the analogy “tie the heifer, loose the bull” (Parry, 2000, p.40). Generally speaking, females were found to be given more domestic responsibilities than males, were subjected to stricter discipline, made more accountable for their actions and provided with opportunities not only to undertake but also to complete assigned tasks. Consequently, the type of socialisation which girls receive seems to prepare them much better than boys for the type of schooling that is common in the Caribbean. This involves mainly sitting quietly, listening attentively to the teacher and carrying out given instructions in order to complete assigned tasks (Brown, 20022004). According to Parry (2000) another way in which gender socialisation outside of school seemed to academically disadvantage Caribbean boys especially in Jamaica, is that reading is regarded as being “girlish” rather than being macho or masculine. Consequently, females spent more time reading than their male counterparts and thus demonstrated greater interest and proficiency in reading and writing skills in all subject areas examined by the study when compared with the boys. Clarke (20042005) adds weight to this discussion by positing that “girls are more likely to be reprimanded at home for ‘playing too much’ and told to ‘go take a book’ meaning they should do something academic” (p. 17) while on the other hand boys are regarded as being effeminate if they spend too much time indoors. Dedication to studies and good grades are not considered to be compatible with being masculine or ‘macho’ and, hence, this belief seems to affect the boys’ attitudes to schoolwork and


classroom behaviour. However, the reality is that some girls underachieve just as some boys underachieve (Clarke 2004-2005). Therefore, while gender cannot be ignored as a factor which impacts on the outcomes of schooling, underachievement cannot be accepted as being totally a consequence of gender. “The underachievement of boys has seldom occurred because they are boys . . .” (Mills 2000, p. 238). Consequently, more research-based interventions geared at assisting males in reaching their highest academic potential need to be done with the sole aim of “disentangling the quagmire of male underachievement” (Davis, 2010, p.2). REFERENCES Brannon, L. (2005). Gender Psychological Perspectives (4th ed.). McNeese State University: Allyn and Bacon.

Parry, O. (2000). Male Underachievement in High School Education: In Jamaica, Barbados and St. Vincent and the Grenadines, University of the West Indies Mona, Jamaica: Canoe Press. Smith, E. (2003) Failing Boys and Moral Panics: Perspectives on the Underachievement Debate. British Journal of Educational Studies, 51, (3), 282-295.

INTERESTING FACTS ABOUT ERDISTON

Brown, J. (2002-2004) Gender and family in the Caribbean. [online]. Available at: <URL: http:// www.kit.nl/exchange/html/2002-4_gender_and _family_in_th.asp [Accessed 25 July 2011]

The Southern Limit

Clarke, C. (2004-2005). Socialization and Teacher Expectations of Jamaican Boys in Schools: The Need for a Responsive Teacher Preparation Pro gram. International Journal of Educational Policy, Research, and Practice, 5, (4) 3-34.

Erdiston College. This cave

Davis, J. E. (2010). Male underachievement not unique to Jamaica. Jamaica Gleaner, 176, (99) 18

entrance to the cave on the

Mills, M. (2000). Troubling the ‘Failing Boys’ Dis course. Discourse: studies in the cultural politics of education, 21, (2) 237-246.

(deepest point) of the Berwick Cave runs under is 120 metres long and 393 feet deep. There is also an grounds of the College.

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Parents and the School: A Needed Partnership for Student Success involvement should be present at every stage of a child’s education; involvement is not a one off event, but a process and parent involvement is not a substitute for quality education programmes. “Parents are their children’s first and most influential teachers. What parents do to help their children learn is more important to academic success than how well-off the family is ”(U.S Department of Education, 1986, p.7).

By Alicia Alleyne BA, DipEd, MA Educators and researchers have long declared the importance of family and teacher partnerships as they assist students with reaching a higher level of academic success. Within Barbados this relationship has dwindled and is daily being threatened. It has affected the academic success of students and has also led to other societal problems. Parental involvement as defined by Hornby (2011) looks at parents participating and taking an active role in the educational processes and experiences of their children. A strong relationship and involvement by parents will improve academic outcomes and even students’ attitudes toward their education. Therefore, schools should make every effort to sustain active involvement with parents. This may mean having some flexibility where school policies may need to be revised and having increased opportunities for communication between parents and teachers. Epstein (2008) has championed the importance of parental involvement for many years. Her focus has been a reciprocal relationship between the schools, families and communities. This, she says, is necessary to raise the academic achievement level of students. Her research has led her to make four major conclusions: student success should drive involvement;

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The school is an entity within the society that serves many functions. Durkheim (2014) believes co-operation and solidarity has to be seen between the school, the home and the society. Schools provide a context for socialization where individuals learn to interact with members of the community who are not their kin. When the school and family work together he suggests that it would help the child transition successfully into the community. The educational system functions to allocate the human resources within a community. Where there is a barrier or breakdown in the socialization and cooperation process between the home, school and the community deviance and crime can develop. Many of the children who leave primary school without parental assistance have problems with adjusting in their new setting at secondary school. Some have no discipline and get into negative activities at school, are weak students and make little or no effort while others skip class and eventually drop out without a sound education. Thus, they become a burden on the state. If these situations are not addressed they will continue to affect other social agencies like the Probation Department, the Child Care Board, the Juvenile court and the prison system and these are already stretched to the limit. Therefore, it is important for the family and school to work together to ensure that the child is given all the opportunities necessary to succeed academically.


“When the family is When the family is involved in the educational success of a child, it builds the home and community relationship. Therefore, early parental involvement in academic success promotes positive long-term benefits for the family and community where the child resides. Therefore, parents should support teachers and be actively involved in the academic life of their children. References Durkheim, E. (2014). The division of labour in society. New York, NY: Free Press.

involved with the educational success of a child it builds the

Epstein, J. (2008). School, family, and community partnerships. New York: Sage Publications.

home and community

Hornby, G. (2011). Parental involvement in childhood education: Building effective school- family partnerships. London: Springer.

relationships.”

In Loving Memory The Erdiston Family wishes to commemorate the tremendous contribution of Mr Adrian Kirton to the development of Erdiston Teacher’s Training College. He has left an indelible impression on the teaching of Physical Education which has helped to shape the course of educaional development in Barbados. May he rest in peace.

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Meet The Staff

Rear

Miriam Arthur, Mark Agard, Debbie Brathwaite, Sonjo Lewis, Tracey Carter-Morris, Sheldene Williams, Rozanne Walrond, DesirĂŠ Browne, Omar Boyce, Shirley Fields.

Centre

Paul Grant, Marion Forde, Maureen Edwards-Rochester, Damion Abraham, Anderson Bayne, Gerry Haynes, Jerome Lewis, Laureen Turton, Sharon Warner, Julia Ward, Tricia Jones

Front

Kim King, Catherine Gibson, Felicia Worrell, Hallam Clarke, Dr Ramona Archer-Bradshaw, Barbara Parris (Principal), Dr Patricia Saul (Deputy Principal), Maxine Moore, Jefferson Firebrace, Tessa Collymore

Missing:

Henderson Nurse, Joy Knight-Lynch, Juliette Hawkesworth-Marshall, Matthew Gittens, Jacqueline Benjamin, Angela Collymore, Marcelle Marshall, Victor Gibson, Hal Gibson, Anthony Gibbs Karen Carter, Kerisha Bailey, Nicole Pilgrim, Renesha Williams, Phillip Small, Jan Holligan, Grace-Anne Crichlow, Wendy Lowe-Eastmond

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BRAIN TEASERS 1. What kind of tree can you carry in your hand? 2. What word in the English Language is always spelt incorrectly? 3. Without it, I’m dead. If I’m not, then I’m behind. What am I? 4. What’s full of holes but can still hold water? 5. What letter comes next in the following sequence D R M F S L T _? 6. What 5 letter word becomes shorter when you add two letters to it?

T

R

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A

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Giveway chevrons crossroad red arrow go bus stop men at work no entry round- a- bout pedestrian stop-sign Double- bend green flashing one-way amber Created by Sherrill-Yvette Ashby (Teacher, St. Winifreds)

8. First I threw away the outside and cooked the inside. Then I ate the outside, and threw away the inside. What did I eat? 9. Take off my skin and I wouldn’t cry, but you will. What am I? 10. What kind of room has no door or windows? 11. What has one eye but cannot see? 12. Why do people laugh up their sleeves? 13. What animal breaks the rules? 14. What kind of bell doesn’t ring? 15. What has a neck but no head?

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ANSWERS ON PAGE 29

Word Search Activity TRAFFIC SIGNS AND ROAD SAFETY

7. Johnny’s mother had three children. The first child was named April, the second child was named May. What was the third child’s name?


INCLUSION – PROVIDING EDUCATION FOR THE DISABLED in a policy environment influenced by the social model.

By Trudi Harris BSc., DipEd, MA The White Paper on Education Reform (Ministry of Education, 1995) stated that ‘integrating the mentally and physically challenged into the mainstream school system [is] … part of the strategic plan.’ However, simply enrolling students with special needs into mainstream schools does not ensure inclusion, as if the curriculum is inflexible, or teachers and peers have bad attitudes to students, they will still be excluded (Giffard-Lindsay, 2007). This article proposes successful inclusionary practices through an understanding of disability and specific teacher training. Disability Disability has been identified as a major factor in exclusion from education. The medical model of disability provides a scientific definition as a diagnosed deficit which causes handicap. This dominant model informed the establishment of separate schools catering to children as classified (Giffard-Lindsay, 2007). The social model posits that societal attitudes and environmental barriers, not intrinsic characteristics, disable the individual, preventing them from participating in society (Anthony, 2011). This model charges major societal structures (including schools) as having the deficit to be fixed instead of the child. The practice of inclusion is more likely to be fostered 26 | THE ERDISTONIAN 2016

Inclusion Special education needs imply that any child, with impairment or not, may have a specific educational need during their school life (Giffard-Lindsay, 2007). Inclusion can be presented as a mode of delivery for these needs to be catered for. Although this space does not allow for a discussion on the differences between integration and inclusion, reading the literature suggests some conceptual confusion around the idea of inclusion, and interchangeable use between the two terms. Inclusion allows all students to have access to any school of their choice regardless of their strengths, weaknesses or disability (Charema, 2010), while integration requires students to adapt to the expectations of a ‘normal’ social and educational environment (Anthony, 2011). What is needed for inclusion to work? For Symeonidou and Phtiaka (2009) the prerequisites for inclusion are; • flexible and accessible curricula • accessible school buildings • compulsory differentiation of teaching and assessment • staff trained to implement inclusive practices. Mariga et. al (2014) believe a successful inclusive education programme is made up of; • training teachers • preparing conducive learning environments in schools • empowering parents • educating community members and related professionals.


Both authors speak to physical and human resources but Singal (2008) argues that government policy focuses on resources, physical access and infrastructure, neglecting curriculum, pedagogy and attitudes, which are the hardest to change. While schools have become ‘inclusive’ there is little research on the perspectives and practices of stakeholders in these settings. Teachers need to be professionally prepared for them to support inclusion, and expected changes in the classroom must be preceded and supported by related changes in teacher education. This article acts as a call for research on inclusion in Barbados from the teachers’ perspective. For teacher training itself to be inclusive such research must be used to inform the design and structure of training programmes. This article is taken from a chapter on a piece of writing exploring attempts at and challenges faced by inclusionary classroom practices in developing countries. It is hoped that it can be followed by a piece describing at length the provision of teacher education for inclusionary classroom practices provided by Erdiston Teacher’s College, and inspire future research on the effectiveness of such training. Trudi Harris (Primary School Teacher) Bsc., DipEd, MA.

References

Anthony, J. (2011). ‘Conceptualising disability in Ghana: implications for EFA and inclu sive education’, International Journal of Inclusive Education. 15 (10), pp. 1073-1086, DOI: 10.1080/13603116.2011.555062. Charema, J. (2010). ‘Inclusive Education in Developing Countries in the Sub-Saharan Africa: From Theory to Practice’. International Journal of Special Education. 25 (1), pp. 87-93. [Online]: http://www. internationaljournalofspecialeducation.com/arti cles.cfm?y=2010&v=25&n=3. Giffard-Lindsay, K. (2007). Inclusive Education in India: Interpretation, Implementation and Issues. CREATE Pathways to Success Research Mono graph No 15. Brighton: University of Sussex. Maringa, L. McConkey, R. and Myezwa, H. (2014). Inclusive Education in Low-Income Countries. A resource book for teacher educators, parent trainers and community development workers. Cape Town: Atlas Alliance and Disability Innovations Africa. [Online] Available at: http://www.eenet.org.uk/ resources/docs/Inclusive_Education_in_Low_In come_Countries.pdf. Ministry of Education, Youth Affairs and Culture. (1995). White Paper on Education Reform for Barbados. Bridgetown: Author. Singal, N. (2008). ‘Working towards inclusion: Reflections from the classroom’, Teaching and Teacher Education: An International Journal of Research and Studies, 24 (6), 1516-1529. [Online] http:// dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tate.2008.01.008 Symeonidou, S. and Phtiaka, H. (2009). ‘Using teachers’ prior knowledge, attitudes and beliefs to develop in-service teacher education courses for inclusion’, Teaching and Teacher Education, 25, 543-550. [Online] DOI: 10.1016/j.tate.200902001.

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LAST BALL (A day in the life of a ball) By Doleen Bowen (Teacher, Selah Primary)

“Who put that dirty bag on the table!” Zara yelled, as she knocked Zaire’s bag onto the kitchen floor. She enjoyed getting him in trouble with Mummy. I woke up with a jolt. I am the last of a sextuplet of balls bought as a birthday present for Zaire. I end up in all kinds of predicaments, none of which are of my own choosing. On hearing Zara’s scream, Mummy swooped the bag off the floor and started to inspect it. As usual, it was stuffy and smelly inside. I was dizzy from being tumbled from side to side as their mother complained, “Zaïre, what’s all of this nonsense?” I was lying among crumpled test papers, old snack wrappers, bits of twine, sticks and any other nonsense he could collect. Zara continued screaming and pointing. Mummy was oblivious to the cockroach that had crawled out of the bag and up her back. “Stop that silly nonsense, Zara”, Mummy implored. “A coc… a cock…roach,” moaned Zara helplessly. When Mummy finally figured out that the nonsense meant, a cockroach was making its way up her back, she too started to scream and beat her back with the said bag in which I was lying. By the time she had expended every ounce of her energy trying to rid herself of the persistent cockroach, I was nauseous from being bounced up and down. She hurled the offending bag out the window, not giving two hoots about me. I landed unceremoniously on my backside in a pile of grits. A croaking “Ouch”, was all that I could manage.

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When Zaire arrived at school, he stuffed me into his tight fitting pocket and took off running to the covered court to get in a quick game before prayers. Oblivious to the school rules and my pleas to “read a good book instead”, Zaïre began banging me against the walls. Soon he was joined by a group of his classmates. They were having a rollicking time tossing me around. Well of course, the eagle-eyed Senior Teacher heard the noise and came huffing and puffing to investigate. Zaire ran off and left me and I was whisked away to the dreaded office. Of course, I was left there to sit in the open view of all passers-by, exposed to any grubby fingers that felt like touching me. The Senior Teacher would relish telling the Principal how I ended up there and Zaire and his crew would be called to task at full assembly with me as exhibit number one. At lunch time, I was returned to Zaire amid profuse apologies and promises not to play with me at “inappropriate times.” I doubt Zaire knows or cares what the phrase means. The Principal was so fooled by Zaire’s perfected innocent look, chubby cheeks, charming smile and all. During lunch time play, so many quarrels and near fights broke out over me that I wished I was back in the “sanctity” of the dreaded office. These quarrels spilled over into the classroom. Zaire had been excused to go to the washroom when the crew decided that I was the perfect manipulative for the ongoing preposition lesson. I was removed from Zaire’s bag by Tre, hidden behind the white board,


then kicked under a desk, retrieved and hidden between a pair of sweaty legs, then passed over a couple of heads to land on the teacher’s desk while she was busy writing on the chalkboard. Once again, I was confiscated and was placed inside the teacher’s black leather bag. At least her handbag smelled a lot better than Zaire’s stuffy old bag. Her wallet was open so I got a peek inside and realized that the lady was broke; hence, the series of neatly folded unpaid light and telephone bills. During the last period, I was returned to Zaire for racket ball practice. “Please, don’t give me back to Zaïre. Why can’t I go home with you?” I begged. In an instant, Zaire’s grubby fingers had encircled me. Let the fights begin. Kimon informed on Tre and they got into a shouting match and fist fight. Zaire and Donko slapped me around in a match until Donko was losing miserably. He grabbed me, smacked me down on the ground and stomped away. I was left soaking in a warm puddle of wet mud. Zaire demanded that Donko retrieve and wash me off. Donko ignored him and kept going. Dale gave me a quick cold bath and left me in the sun to dry. Kimon kicked me which angered Zaire some more. Now he had two people to beat up. “Will these boys ever relax?” I thought. The coach stopped the game and sent them all back to the teacher. Tre had arrived first to lay his claim to innocence. Zaire followed him in hot pursuit forgetting that I was still rolling around outside. Zeph took that opportunity to add fuel to the fire by hiding me in his bag. While the poor teacher tried to sort out the mess, the boys got angrier and louder with Zaïre demanding that Tre buy him a new ball. Everyone denied having the ball. Tre, out of the blue or through some six sense, accused Zeph of having the ball in his bag. Tre was on the attack. The teacher tried to separate them by sending the more belligerent Tre to kneel in a corner. He was threatening everyone with licks on the road home and would not calm down.

Once Tre was safely out of the way, Zeph returned the ball to his best friend Zaire with a knowing wink. The teacher threw up her hands in exasperation or more likely- relief. After all, it was Friday evening. Calm restored and evening prayers said, the boys ran off to get their usual snow-cone before the school bus arrived. Once more I was nestled safely in Zaire’s bag, still hoping that Tre’s kneeling backside met up with the Principal’s bamboo. Revenge would finally be sweet.

BRAIN TEASER ANSWERS 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

13. 14.

A palm Incorrectly Ahead A sponge D (each letter represents one note in the diatonic musical scale Do Re Mi Fa Sol La Ti Do) Short Johnny Corn on the cob An onion A mushroom A needle That’s where their funny bones are A cheetah A dumbbell

15.

A bottle

6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

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Let’s Get Active as We Teach! By Julian Griffin, Part Time Tutor, Erdiston Teachers’ Training College Having taught for many years at both the primary and secondary level, I can identify with those teachers who lament about the limited personal time available for engaging in any form or physical activity. For most teachers, whether at the primary or secondary level, the typical school day is hectic and fast- paced from start to finish. Teachers are required to perform their duties as they facilitate the educational needs of their charges while at the same time deal with a variety of what can be described as unrelated, but necessary issues at school. At the end of the working day, most teachers are faced with the challenge of having to divide the remaining hours of their personal time between preparing lessons for upcoming classes and attending to various matters in their own personal lives. This, therefore, leaves many in the profession with very little time to allocate to any form of physical activity. Despite these challenges, the contribution of daily physical activity towards leading healthy and productive lives cannot be overstated. Hence, it is imperative that we as teachers find ways and means to make physical activity a part of our daily lives if we are to be truly effective in the execution of our duties. It has been well documented in many studies, books, journals and magazines that a sedentary lifestyle, which is one where an individual does not receive regular amounts of physical activity, greatly contributes to the increase in non-communicable diseases amongst the population. The four main types of non-communicable diseases are cardiovascular diseases (like heart attacks and strokes): cancers, and chronic respiratory diseases (such as chronic obstructed pulmonary disease and asthma) and diabetes. These diseases are listed by the WHO as the leading causes of death worldwide. Like all 30 | THE ERDISTONIAN 2016

other sectors of the society, the teaching profession has not been immune to the impact these diseases can have on its members. If we are to see any turn around in this trend, major changes have to take place among us as teachers. One such change is for us as teachers to acquire an adequate level of physical activity in our lives on a daily and weekly basis. This leads to the obvious question, “What is an adequate amount of physical activity?” The American Heart Association (AHA) and The Centre for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend at least 150 minutes per week of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes of vigorous activity. This can be broken down to 25 – 30 minutes per day, five times a week. They further recommend muscle-strengthening activities on 2 or more days per week. These activities work all major muscle groups such as legs, hips, back, abdomen, chest, shoulders, and arms. After highlighting the limited time available in the life of the average teacher, trying to squeeze this required exercise into an already packed daily and weekly programme may appear to be a daunting task for most. However, by taking full advantage of the many opportunities available on the job, teachers can amass the recommended levels of physical activity without sacrificing too much in other areas of their lives. Teaching has the potential to be an occupation involving a high degree of physical activity. The efficient teacher is constantly on the move during the working day. Whether he or she is walking from class to class, moving around the classroom giving feedback to students, performing actions during nursery rhymes and jingles or demonstrating the movements for various dances or sporting activities,


teachers have ample opportunities to be highly active whilst on the job. These movements, as limited as they may seem, can significantly account for the amount of physical activity required by individuals on a daily basis. By capitalising on these and other movement opportunities on the job, all teachers can improve their physical health; thus, reducing the possibility of being afflicted by one or more than one of the non-communicable diseases associated with the sedentary lifestyle. WALKING, A WAY OF LIFE FOR TEACHERS Depending on the size and layout of the school plant, most teachers can easily achieve half of the recommended 10,000 steps or 5 miles per day. Teachers at who change classes many times a day and commute back and forth between the staffroom and the classroom may have greater opportunities for walking than those at the primary level. This is because most teachers at the primary level are assigned to a single class and spend most of their day in one classroom. Irrespective of the arrangements, additional opportunities exist in the lives of all teachers for increased walking on a daily basis. Following are some suggestions. 1. Take the longest route to and from classes. Leave a few minutes before classes are due to start and make a full lap of the school before arriving at your classes. 2. Include a few flights of stairs during your daily commute to and from class. Stair climbing is a great way to enhance one’s cardiovascular fitness and lose weight. If you are fortunate to have some in your school, take full advantage of them. 3. Walk a few laps around the playing field. Most schools have spacious playing areas. Try starting or ending your days by walking a few laps around the playing field. With careful planning, this can even be done in between classes during non-teaching periods.

who live within walking distance of the school, this is an excellent way to get in the recommended quota of exercise each week. Travel lightly on those days to reduce the weight you have to carry or have a friend drop your load off at school or at home. If you take the bus then walk a few bus stops backwards or forward rather than taking the bus at the stop closest to the school. Finally, encourage a friend or even a small group to join you when walking. There is always safety in numbers and there is the added benefit of motivating each other if you ever feel like quitting. Remember to wear bright colours if you are walking on the road and invest in a comfortable pair of walking shoes. So teachers, let’s take the longest routes at school, take those stairs, run a few laps with our class and maybe leave the car at home sometimes. Let’s take advantage of these creative and unique opportunities we have at our disposal and just get moving, get healthy, stay healthy and have great fun! REFERENCES American Heart Association. (2014). American heart association recommendations for physical activity in adults. Retrieved May 25th, 2016 from http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/HealthyLiving/ PhysicalActivity/FitnessBasics/American-Heart-Associa tion-Recommendations-for-Physical-Activity-in-Adults_ UCM_307976_Article.jsp#.V0HDxpErLIU Centre for Disease Control and Prevention. (2015). How much physical activity do adults need. Retrieved May 25th, 2016 from http://www.cdc.gov/ physicalactivity/basics/adults/ Donovan., L. (2015). How far does the average american walk in a day? Retrieved May 24th, 2016 http://www.attn.com/stories/2272/how-far-doesaverage-american-walk-day Life Span (2013). Health risks of a sedentary life style. What is a sedentary lifestyle? Retrieved May 24th, 2016 from http://www.lifespanfitness.com/ workplace/resources/articles/health-risks-of-a-sed entary-lifestyle

4. Skip the bus or leave the car at home. This may sound amusing for some but for those teachers

2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 31


EUREKA!

By Dr Ramona Archer-Bradshaw PhD (High Commendation), Dip Ed (Dist) My physics students sat quietly in the classroom listening to me as I told the story of the development of the concept of upthrust. The story was set in Syracuse, between 287 and 212 B.C, and involved a King, Archimedes, a gold crown and a goldsmith who was possibly a thief. The King felt that some of the gold that was given to the goldsmith for the making of his crown was replaced by silver. He asked his court scientist, Archimedes, to find out if the goldsmith was a fraud. Archimedes could not find the answer immediately and thought about the problem night and day. Then, as he went to take a bath in his tub, he realised something. As he immersed himself in the water, the water level rose. This was the moment. Totally unexpected. “ Eureka”, I exclaimed as I ran around the classroom dramatizing Archimedes’ discovery. The students smiled as I could only imagine their awe as they witnessed the humanistic side of science. “Who would have thought that Archimedes’ simple act of bathing in a tub could have solved the King’s problem of stolen gold and could have contributed to our understanding of buoyancy today?” I queried. After class, students gathered around me sharing their ideas and relating their mode of thinking to Archimedes’. “I could have been an Archimedes!” one chimed in. This was my “Aha” moment. Sometimes we teach students what we think they need to know in order to successfully acquire a qualification. However, there are times when we miss the opportunity to empower them so that they, too, can contribute to the existing body of knowledge. In reality, we are preparing students to exist in a world that we and they can only imagine. No one can precisely describe the type of world that will exist

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within the next decade. Yet, as teachers, we are required to educate children so that they are prepared for it. Nevertheless, the world presents us with certain facts every day. 1) Content changes Do you remember when the atom was deemed to be the smallest indivisible particle in an atom? Since then, scientists have split the atom to produce enormous amounts of energy. I also remember the days of nine planets in the Solar System; however, with the removal of Pluto from the list, there are now only eight. These are just two examples of content changes and a major implication for teachers is that we need to stay abreast of the myriad changes that occur. Additionally, we need to place less emphasis on the memorisation of content that could possibly change and more emphasis on the understanding of principles. 2) Skills Change When I was growing up, much emphasis was placed on the art of handwriting. There was a correct and incorrect way to write letters of the alphabet; after all sentences were supposed to be legible. As I entered secondary school, many of my projects reflected neat hand written notes and I could still clearly remember colouring hand drawn pictures to perfection. Times have changed significantly with the advent of the technological age as it is standard for students’ projects to be computer generated with printed graphics and notes in 12 point Times New Romans font. Although the art of hand writing is still important, this society now calls for higher levels of technological literacy. I am always enthralled when I see students typing without looking at the keyboard and using various software to produce their projects. I reckon that students who do not have these techno-


logical skills will be at a disadvantage since the use of technology is so pervasive in our society and seems to be the way of the world over the next century. We as teachers, therefore, need to provide opportunities for students to interface with the technology within our individual classes. Computer aided instruction is a powerful strategy that could be used. I know that in some schools this type of thinking may seem to be wishful but even if you have only one computer that can be brought to the classroom, a wireless mouse works wonders in allowing students to develop some of the skills required.

Taking Problem Solving to the Next Level? – Robotics!

3) Attitudes Endure There were certain subjects that I did not like when I was going to school and there are others that I absolutely loved. In some cases, I am sure that it was the teacher and the teaching that caused me to like or dislike the subject. In other cases, I am not sure what caused the like or dislike. Despite this, I am absolutely sure that many of the attitudes that were cultivated back then still persist today. I remember the old adage “Attitude determines aptitude.” This rings true since a child who does not want to learn may find it impossible to grasp certain concepts and learn certain skills. On the other hand, a child who is eager to learn may find it easier to grasp concepts and develop skills. It is imperative that we, as teachers, create environments that foster persistence, empathy, thinking about thinking and generally, a love for learning. It therefore follows that we must emulate these attitudes as we lead by example.

Robotics is a fun-filled and engaging activity that focuses on students’ ability to problem-solve. During the Robotics activity, students ask questions, search for answers, test and collect data on their robots and share their findings with each other. The benefits of Robotics are two-fold. Firstly, students have fun coding and manipulating robot pieces and secondly, they gain knowledge, skills and attitudes that will be useful in their personal development.

Our greatest joy, as teachers, should not only come as our students consume knowledge but as they stand among the giants of this world in the production of knowledge. Many of our students can add to the body of knowledge but lack the requisite attitudes to do so. Let us empower them in our teaching. The knowledge that we have today is not isolated but the result of human endeavour. Give them an opportunity to understand the levels of reasoning, persistence and metacognition that our forefathers employed in their pursuits. It is possible that, like Archimedes, our students could exclaim “Eureka!…I have found it!” Let us give them the confidence to say “I can…and I will”.

Ramona Archer-Bradshaw, PhD (High Commendation), Dip Ed (Hons); Catherine Gibson, MSc (Merit), Dip Ed (Hons)

Erdiston Teachers’ Training College with the assistance of the Caribbean Science Foundation has been offering workshops for teachers in Robotics. These workshops focus on the construction and programming of Robots. At the end of the workshop, it is hoped that teachers would develop the self- efficacy to develop a Robotics club and/or integrate Robotics into their area of teaching. So how do you get involved? Start a club at your school. We are willing to help! We can be contacted at 429-3620.

2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 33


THE AGRICULTURAL SCIENCE PROGRAMME AT ST. GEORGE SECONDARY SCHOOL

By Mr Stephen Proverbs, Deputy Principal

St. George Secondary School is a mixed, rural secondary school in Barbados. It was established in 1972 and has since aimed to provide the highest quality and most relevant secondary education for students from the surrounding communities and other accessible areas. St. George Secondary School is located in the heart of the fertile St. George valley known traditionally as the “bread basket of Barbados”. Since the days when the Barbadian landscape was dominated by sugar plantations, until present times, agriculture has

formed the backbone of economic and social activity in the area. Due in part to its location and history, an initiative was taken to develop an extensive agricultural project at the school. Objectives of the Agriculture Project at St. George Secondary School: The project aims to: • Create a sustainable model farm highlighting agricultural best practices. Access to the farm facility is to be granted to other schools, agricultural entities, and other interested parties. • Equip students with the knowledge and skills necessary for the production, marketing and sale of a wide range of agricultural products and services (livestock, crops, ornamental plants, landscaping etc.) through hands on experience.

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HIGHLIGHT

• Provide students with the opportunity for certification in Agriculture through Caribbean Secondary Education Certificate (CSEC) and Caribbean Vocational Qualification (CVQ) programmes. • Encourage entrepreneurship in agriculture through highlighting the economic potential of the industry. • Employ sustainable and environmentally friendly agricultural practices (organic farming, recycling, renewable energy, waste reduction) throughout all operations. • Depict agriculture in a positive light and

emphasize the importance of food security to the country as a whole. Scope of the Project: The project is to encompass elements of livestock production, crop production, aquaculture and landscaping as described below. Agricultural Science Laboratory: An Agricultural Science laboratory is to be constructed. This lab will have facilities for the sanitary slaughtering and dressing of livestock animals, vet care, packaging and processing of livestock and crop products, and cold storage. A potting shed is also to be included for seedling production and vegetative plant propagation. Construction of this unit should commence during the first term of the 2016 -2017


academic year. Livestock Production: Livestock being produced include sheep, poultry, freshwater fish and rabbits. A four hundred square foot pen has already been constructed where we are selectively breeding indigenous Barbados Blackbelly sheep. We also intend to supply meat and lambs for sale. Fodder crops are also to be grown in the paddock areas. A six hundred square foot poultry pen has been built for the production and sale of broilers chickens. Rabbit production is being expanded through construction of a four hundred square foot rabbitry. A pond is being constructed for the production of tilapia. The pond will also form part of a hydroponics system for simultaneous crop production. Overflow

pond water will be used for irrigation purposes. Crop Production: A range of vegetable crops are already in production in the school’s two thousand square foot greenhouse. The greenhouse is currently being outfitted with an automated drip irrigation system to maximize production, conserve water and maintain quality. Root crops, bananas and hardier vegetables are produced in the field. The crop fields are also being fitted with an automated irrigation system. An orchard is currently being established at the school. Trees have been planted throughout the school compound to provide food, aesthetic enhancement, and shade. A “Wellness Garden” is being developed where traditional medicinal and aromatic herbs are grown

organically. The garden will also provide an area for quiet reflection and relaxation. Green Systems – Recycle / Reuse / Reduce: All electricity required for irrigation and pond pumps, filters, security lights, ventilation fans, etc. is being supplied using renewable energy (solar panels and a wind turbine). A 2 kilowatt solar system has already been installed on the poultry pen with the capacity to supply electricity for general use, and to power heat lamps and security lighting for the entire livestock unit. A 1 kilowatt wind turbine has been acquired. This turbine will be mounted on the Agricultural Science laboratory building. Water for irrigation purposes is to be supplied through rain water harvesting from the roofs of structures within the agricultural unit and adjoining school buildings. Recycled water from the water

treatment plant in a housing development opposite the school is also being considered for irrigation purposes. A bio-digester is being constructed to convert organic effluent from the livestock animals into useable cooking gas (methane) and liquid fertilizer. Weeds and other plant waste are composted and used to improve the organic content of crop soils and potting mixes. Decomposed solid waste from livestock animals is also used as organic fertilizer. Mulching (using plant waste to cover the soil) is carried out to reduce water loss from the soil surface, and organically reduce germination of weeds in plant

2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 35


beds. Key Roles Played by Students in the Project: Students are actively involved in production, processing and sale of crop products from the greenhouse and fields. They are taught a wide range of horticultural skills including seedling production, vegetative propagation techniques (budding, grafting, air-layering etc.) and lawn and garden maintenance. Students are also responsible for feeding and caring for livestock during school hours. Students from the agriculture, masonry, carpentry and steel bending classes are actively involved in the construction of the livestock pens. Students have also been attached to various agri-businesses through our Agriculture School to Work programme. Candidates from the school have also been entered on an annual basis in the Youth Summer Farm Programme hosted by the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture (IICA) where they are given the opportunity to pursue the CVQ in Amenity Horticulture. Special mention must be made of Shakeil Waithe and Adrienne Scott Brathwaithe. Shakeil performed creditably at the school in areas of both livestock and crop production. While representing the school as a candidate in the Youth Summer Farm Programme Shakeil was awarded a CVQ in Amenity Horticul-

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ture. Shakeil was then attached to a poultry producer / processor within the school community where he has gained permanent employment (he currently holds a supervisory position within the organization) and is now responsible for training and supervision of students subsequently attached to the business. Adrienne exhibited a keen interest in agriculture while pursuing other CSEC subject areas at the school. On successful completion of her CSEC programmes she opted to return to school and be involved in the agriculture programme. Adrienne was also awarded a CVQ in Amenity Horticulture through the IICA summer farm programme. She was attached to a leading landscaping and plant nursery business where she was credited with outperforming some of their employed staff. Adrienne has subsequently gone on to pursue a Diploma in Agriculture at the Samuel Jackman Prescod Polytechnic. Resource Support for the Project: Due to the wide scope of the project resource support was identified as a key challenge from conception. The Board of Management of the school made a substantial initial investment in the project through funding the construction of the greenhouse. Additional support for the project to date has been sought through grant proposals and donations as outlined below. â&#x20AC;˘ The IICA has donated the materials required for construction of the sheep pen, six Barbados Blackbelly sheep and a yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s supply of feed.


• The school was awarded a School Improvement Grant funded through the Inter-American Development Bank – Skills for the Future programme. Award funds are being applied to the construction of the poultry pen, rabbitry, tilapia pond and the automated irrigation system in the greenhouse. • The school was awarded an Agri-Research Grant funded by the Ministry of Agriculture. Funds from this grant are being used for the installation of a 2 kilowatt solar photovoltaic system for the livestock unit, construction of the bio-digester, installation of rainwater harvesting systems and the hydroponics system for the tilapia pond. • The school in partnership with the Barbados Agricultural Society (BAS) was recently awarded a grant from the Competency Based Training Fund (CBTF) supported by the Inter-American Development Bank. Funds from the grant are being used to develop the school as a CVQ training and certification centre for farmers and students in Amenity Horticulture, Crop Production, Poultry Production and Rabbit Rearing. With the support of this grant forty five candidates are currently being trained and certified in Crop Production Level 1 and Amenity Horticulture Level

1. The candidates consist of BAS members, farmers, horticulturalist, landscapers, parents, and students from two other secondary schools. Students from the Agriculture programmes at the St. George Secondary School who have reached school leaving age without completing their CVQ certification, are also being included in the training programme. St. George Secondary School has also mounted several exhibits at Agrofest (the National Agricultural Festival), BMEX (Barbados Manufacturers Exhibition) and the Enviro Waste Expo to increase public awareness and support for the project, as well as raising the school’s profile in the country. CSEC and CVQ Results to Date: The school has had a nearly 100% certification rate in the candidates it has entered for the CVQ in Amenity Horticulture through the IICA Youth Summer Farm Programme. The CSEC Agriculture programme at the school was introduced during the 2013 – 2014 academic year. The first candidates from this programme will be entered for CSEC examination in June 2016. In the upcoming 2016 – 2017 academic year, with support from the CBTF grant the school should be equipped to assess candidates in CVQs in the areas mentioned above. On full implementation of the project it is envisioned that the school will become a leading institution for training in agriculture in Barbados, and a catalyst for increased domestic agricultural production.

2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 37


The Man Behind The Wall

By Akeelah Griffith Age 9 of the Selah Primary School

One late evening, Tiffany passed through a dark, creepy and dirty alley. Suddenly, Tiffany heard a gunshot. Tiffany was a curious girl. She loved discovering new things. Tiffany listened to discover the direction from which the mysterious noises and evil laughter came. She crept through the alley. Finally, she came to a wall. She could hear noises coming from behind the wall. Suddenly, a man grabbed Tiffany. “Help! Help! Someone help me!” shouted Tiffany. “Ha Ha ! No one can hear you in the alley,” said the man. The man pulled out the gun and pointed it towards Tiffany. “If you shout for help or call anyone I’ll shoot you,” said the gun man. “Violence does not pay, you know,” replied Tiffany. “Shush or I’ll pull this trigger,” said the gun man. Time passed. Tiffany was getting worried. She became so scared that she threatened to call the police. “I’m gonna go get a drink and a snack and when I get back and you’re not here, I’ll hunt you down,” said the man. He walked away. Tiffany did not like being held in captivity. She reached into her pocket and pulled out her phone. “Hello, I’m Tiffany Richard. I’d like to report a man armed with a gun. He has kidnapped me. The address is Fredrick Smith Main Street Alley, on the left. Thank you,” said Tiffany. The man wasn’t back yet. The police arrived just before the man returned. “Where is this man you speak about?” asked one of the policemen. “Here he comes now!” shouted Tiffany. The man got an unpleasant surprise when he saw the police. He put up a fight to get away. Finally, the police overpowered him. He was sentenced to prison for abduction and possession of a firearm. “Thanks, you did a good job, you are very brave,” said the policeman. Tiffany went home and told her mother all about her nerve-racking experience. 38 | THE ERDISTONIAN 2016


PRESS ON

GET THE DESIGN RIGHT FOR THIS EDUCATIONAL GAME!!! But yet... I press on. My other half vex because I said I tired... again.. for the fifth time this week. She ain’t happy...but if I don’t do this work nobody else will do it for me. So I make the sacrifice and I press on.

By Simon Alleyne ‘A letter come here for you.’ ‘From who? I hope it aint no more bills.’ ‘Nah it from Erdiston.’ ‘Erdiston? Lemme see, lemme see. Blah , blah, blah. You have been accepted to this programme. Hun I get through!’ And so my journey began with an acceptance letter. I began this programme with the intention of becoming better. A better teacher, a better student, better at classroom management and lesson plans. Better at understanding how we teachers can shape young minds in this land. So I press on... I press my clothes first of all because as a teacher I must represent my profession. Nothing too tight or too suggestive cause when my class is in session the focus is not on me but the knowledge I will transfer to these boys and girls. Every other evening I am up at Erdiston, talking laughing learning. Tired most nights because I am more than just a teacher. I am a husband, a father, you are a wife, a boyfriend, or girlfriend a mother. So forgive me if I nod sometimes in the curriculum or teaching methods class but don’t worry ma’am I got the notes. 3 o’ clock in the morning come and I STILL CAN’T

Deadlines on top of deadlines groupwork and projects....oh shoot!! I forget to carry back the library books last week! Stupse! I would pay the overdue...forty dollars can’t kill me. Look it paid off. I get 3 As and I looking for the fourth one now. Research methods can’t stop me now so I press on. Despite the sleepless nights and the stress and when my health was not at it best The shows that I miss and the events that I wish I could have attended The friends that got offended because I had to say not now or wait til later. I press on because I realise that you don’t get the medal unless you place In the race that we call life and for self development I become my own encouragement because I know that once I start it I would finish it because I press on So yes I am dressed to impress in my best this is my moment not yours. So let me suggest that you bear witness to my success Because when I was working late into the morn I pressed on and on this day I celebrate my hardwork and dedication despite some setbacks and frustration I made it my determination to press on. Soo the lesson I learnt is a simple one and these two words I share with you whatever the task that lies ahead of you remember the words PRESS ON!!

2016 THE ERDISTONIAN | 39


AWARDS IN THE ORDER OF BARBADOS KNIGHT/DAME OF ST. ANDREW (KA/DA) July 1980: Dame Elsie Isalie Payne November 1987: Dr. Sir Keith Donnerson Hunte

CELEBRATING 50 YEARS OF INDEPENDENCE

GOLD CROWN OF MERIT (GCM) November 1985: Miss Olga Patricia Symmonds, J.P. November 2001: Mrs. Norma Joy Ione Holder November 2004: Mrs. Dorien Eulalie Pile, J.P. November 2005: Professor Emeritus Earle Hamblin Newton November 2007: Robert Livingstone Morris November 2008: Mr. Oliviere St. Clair Cox November 2015: Mrs. Jeanese Elaine Badenock SILVER CROWN OF MERIT November 1987: Mr. Lester St. Clair Vaughan November 1989: Mrs. Daphne Elaine Millington November 1993: Mrs. Carol Claudine Bourne November 1997: Mr. Carl W. Springer Mrs. R. Colleen Winter-Brathwaite November 1998: Mr. Patrick Douglas Frost Mr. Keith Alwyn Roach November 1999: Mrs. Janice Anita Millington-Robertson November 2000: Miss Linda Loreda Jemmott, J.P. November 2001: Mrs. Myrtle Imogene King November 2007: Mr. John Benjamin Blackman November 2009: Mr. Jerston Sherlock Clarke, J.P. November 2010: Mr. Ralph Anthony Jemmott Mr. Sylvester Earle Niles, J.P. November 2012: Mrs. Janice Anita Brathwaite-Thompson November 2014: Miss Undene Pamelia Whittaker, J.P. November 2015: Dr. George Malcom Callender BARBADOS SERVICE STAR November 2007: Mrs. Claudine Elise Prescott November 2015: Mr Matthew Farley BARBADOS SERVICE MEDAL November 2009: Mr. Frank Herbert Reid November 2013: Mr. Anthony Sargeant November 2014: Mr MacDonald DaCosta Fingall Mr Andrew Oliver Lokey

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QUEENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S HONOURS 1987 -OBE- Mrs Sybil Leacock 1998 -OBE- Ms Beryl Emmeline Deane 2000 -DBE- Sen. The Hon. Olga Patricia Symmonds 2001 -OBE- Mrs Phyllis Austin Alleyne 2003 -OBE- Mrs Joyce Ophelia Thompson 2004 -MBE- Ms June Yvonne Alleyne 2010 -MBE- Mrs Cora Frances Holder-Waldron 2012 -CBE- Reverend Oscar Holman Millar -OBE- Mrs. Carolyn Adora Sinckler 2013 -OBE- Ms Joan Lorraine Blackett 2014 -MBE- Mr Desmond Anthony Browne

The Erdistonian issue 1  

The magazine of Erdiston Teachers' Training College, developed to highlight and promote education in Barbados. Featuring submissions from te...

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