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I N F O-D E S I G N VISUAL COMMUNICATION DESIGN

K H A L IF . S H E R MA IN E . Q IA N L IN G . S A MA N TH A . J UA N . Z E E

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CONTENTS INF O- DESIG N

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01 . FILA CHART + MINDMAP 02 . INTRO + HISTORY 03 . STORYTELLING 04 . STYLING OF ARTWORK 05 . 8 TYPES OF INFOGRAPHICS 06 . COMMUNICATION DESIGN 07 . SITE PROPOSAL 08 . CONCLUSION

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01

FILA CHART + MINDMAP

FACTS . ID E A S . L E ARNING ISSUE. ACTION PLAN

K E Y P O I NTS 0 1 . D E SI GN S OLU T I ON COULD BE IN THE F ORM O F I NF O G RA P H I C 0 2 . WHAT I S AN I N NOVATIVE APPROAC H? 0 3 . H O W CAN WE PRESE NT OUR INF O?

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01 . F I LA CHART + M I NDM A P

M I N DM A P

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INTRO + HI STORY

I N TR O D U CT IO N TO INF ORMATION DESIG N Information design is the detailed planning of specific information that is to be provided to a particular audience to meet specific objectives. It is the design process applied to the communication of information (content, language and form) and the skill and practice of presenting information so that people can use it efficiently and effectively. Information design also adds meaning and value to data, often by drilling down the essence of the story behind it, to make the data relevant in the context of a wider narrative. In short, it is data presented in visuals. Information designers create clear, organized and concise communications that are easy to read understand and use. They are concerned about the configuration of information on a surface, and what happens when viewers interact with it. It involves any situation in which complex and critical information has to be communicated, and where clear writing and design can help.

PAST

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P RE SE NT


02 . IN T R O + HI STO R Y

CAVE PAINTIN GS Cave paintings were the very first record of mankind communicating with one another in a written form. They used pictures, rather than a series of letters, to represent ideas. The fact that the origins of language were based around a highly visual medium indicates that humans are naturally inclined to process information in a visual way, which makes good information design as important in communication’s continuing evolution as it was 30,000 years ago.

H I E R O G LY P H S Hieroglyphs started with the Ancient Egyptians, whose written language of hieroglyphs essentially comprised a series of pictograms used to express thoughts, ideas and concepts. However, rather than a series of letterforms adding up to the spelling of a single word to represent one of these concepts, their hieroglyphic ‘alphabet’ consisted of different symbols representing different sounds depending on the context, or even complete ideas, almost like a logo.

PRE- CUNEIFORM TABLETS (3000 BC) Pre-cuneiform tablets were the first way of visual communication developed in Sumer, a region of Mesopotamia. Pictograms and signs were engraved in tablets, and followed a rationale to organise information and improve understanding.

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02 . IN T R O + HI STO R Y

TH E G UTENBERG BIBLE (1456) This was the first major book printed with a movable type printing press. It had superb typographic legibility, and a sense of organized visuals, defining a hierarchical structure of the information.

C H ART S A N D G RA PH S (1770- 80S) Joseph Priestley created the first timeline, which was published in 1765. In 1786, William Playfair, a Scottish engineer, invented diagrams to communicate what was previously tabular information including the line graph, bar and pie chart. He published a great collection of graphics in his Atlas, The Commercial and Political Atlas, representing information about economics.

CARTÉ F IG U RATIVE (1869) French engineer Charles Joseph Minard invented flowcharts to depict Napoleon’s retreat from Russia and added statistical diagrams and bar graphs— for example, of the size of Napoleon’s army and the geographical co-ordinates along the path of the retreat—to cartographic maps. His work displays a great amount of information carefully organized and visually coded. This infographic is notable not just for its aesthetic beauty, but its supreme functionality, representing several variables in a single two-dimensional image.

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02 . IN T R O + HI STO R Y

PERIODIC TA BLE (1871) 20

Ca

calcium

Mendeleev presented a classification of the elements according to their chemical properties, noticing patterns that led him to develop his periodic table. Thanks to the clear organization of the elements, Mendeleev predicted several new elements that would complete the table.

SI G N AG E ( 1 8 9 4 ) The first documented apparition of a traffic sign was 1894 on the RN7 by Cannes. First designed for people riding bicycle, it quickly proved necessary to organize automobile’s birth. It was quickly made mandatory in Paris, 1904, and became an international standard staring 1909.

TH E BAUH AU S S CHOOL (1919-1933) The aims of the school were to create a functional and rational idea of design, and bridge the gap between art and industry, becoming the antithesis of the Arts and Crafts movement. Ideas from all advanced art and design movements were explored, combined, and applied to problems of functional design and machine production at the German design school, the Bauhaus, founded in 1919 in Weimar, Germany.

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02 . IN T R O + HI STO R Y

ISOTYPE LANGUAGE (1930S ) The Isotype concept involves the use of elementary pictographs to present complex datas. Otto Neurath felt that the social and economic changes following the First World War demanded clear communication to assist public understanding of important social issues relating to housing, health and economics.

LO N DON U N D E RG ROUND DIAG RAM (1933 ) The invention of the LUD is another important contribution to the development of the information design discipline in the twentieth century. The diagram strictly followed a set of fundamental design rules to produce a usable and effective piece of design.

TH E INTERNATIONAL STY LE (1950S )

SWISS

SWISS

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This style was a synthetic graphic language, based on a mathematical grid and the use of sans-serif typefaces. Its main characteristics were unity of design achieved by asymmetrical organisation of design elements on a mathematically constructed grid; objective photography and copy that present visual and verbal information in clear and factual manner, free from the exaggerated claims of propaganda and commercial advertising of the previous decades.


02 . IN T R O + HI STO R Y

PICTOG RAMS FOR S PORTS (1972) Otto Aicher, a graphic designer, designed the pictograms used for the 1972 Munich Olympics. First attempts had been made at the Tokyo Olympics before but it was Aicher’s pictograms which stayed as a normalized system to describe sports.

ICO N OG RA P H Y ( 1 983- 1986) Susan Kare, another graphic designer, designed the first icons for Apple Computer’s new Macintosh operating system between 1983 and 1986. Those ‘pixelart’ icons together with the graphical interface surely paved the way for the widespread adoption of personal computing.

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03

STORYTELLI NG

INF O-GRAPHIC

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03 . STO RYT E LLING

WH AT IS STO RY T E L LING ? Storytelling is an essential part of information design. Humans are visual learners by nature, and the majority learns and retains information better through images than with mere text. By using efficient infographics that leads people through storytelling, a designer can convey the intended message in a clear and succinct manner.

HOW D OES STORY TELLIN G WORK? Through the use of storytelling, the audience is able to understand and absorb information readily and efficiently. It also helps to deliver a message in a more compelling and interesting way by breaking down large chunks of data. Storytelling works by triggering two areas of the brain, the Broca’s area and the Wernicke’s area, that helps understand the rich detail and action of a story in a more complex way. For example, 65% of a person’s daily conversation is made up of personal stories and gossips. 13


03. STORYT E LLI N G

WH Y D O E S STO RY TELLING WORK? Humans think in the cause and effect process based on previous experiences and stories. By using this concept, stories can be used to influence the audience’s decisions by making them think that an idea is their own idea through emotional relations. Furthermore, through the use of visual metaphors, stories can further engage the audience by activating the part of the brain that controls the senses and movement which makes a story interesting and captivating. Storytelling is a powerful aid to human thinking. From Sanskrit to Hieroglyphics to the modern alphabet, ciphers, objects, and illustrations have been used to share meaning with people, thus enabling collective and collaborative thought. As the human experience of the world becomes more complex and nuanced, the demand for thinking aids increases proportionally. Diagrams, data graphics, and visual confections have become the language humans resort to in this abstract and complex world. Storytelling helps to understand, create, and completely experience reality.

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K H A L IF . S H E R MA IN E . Q IA N L IN G . S A MA N TH A . J UA N . Z E E

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STYLING OF ARTWORK

LAYOU T AND ST RU CT U RE 01 . G RID SYST E M 02 . VISUAL H IE RARCH Y 03 . T YPOG RAPH Y

WH AT A RE G RID SYSTEMS? A grid system is a structure comprising a series of horizontal and vertical lines which intersect and are used to arrange content. It is a way of providing a system that designers can work with to structure and present content and imagery in a much more readable, manageable way. The layout of the grid is often the first aesthetic undertaking, one that will greatly affect the final look, feel, and usability of a design piece. Grid systems are a foundation for order, an agent of clarity. From an information design perspective, grids provide a canvas for content. A grid is an essential aesthetic device that will allow the designer to walk the viewer through the content, one specific message at a time, without actually being there.

H OW DO G R ID SY STEMS WORK? Grid systems enable the designer to build solid structure and form into their designs. The geometric divisions of a grid provide consistency on a single page, in this case any particular form of information design. Consistency is extremely important to usability. Viewers can process content more rapidly when they are familiar with the structure of information. The organizational qualities of a grid provide easy and consistent access to content. Direct and implied alignments on the grid provide links between information sets and move the viewer’s eye through the content. By using grid alignments and informed spacing choices to compartmentalize information, the designer can control large quantities of content. Considering eye movement and rhythm when working with a grid enhances the skimming and scanning of information, helping the viewer to locate relevant content quickly.

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

W H Y A RE G RID SY STEMS IMPORTANT? Grid systems are useful for both the designer and the viewer. It is important to create a good user journey and a good user experience through the designs - after all, the viewer is there to consume the content and the designer would want to make it as good an experience for the viewer as they can. Having a solid grid system to use in their design will allow the designer to do just that, by creating consistency and familiarity, and thus building trust in their design. Using a grid system in the design is one way to achieve a level of consistency that would be otherwise extremely difficult to master and to portray in the designs. Using a grid system in the design also allows for a sense of uniformity and familiarity, which sets the standard for a comfortable experience from the viewer’s perspective.

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

WH AT IS V IS UA L H IERARCH Y? A hierarchy is an order of items into different levels of relative importance. Visual hierarchy is essentially creating this organization and prioritization visually. It creates a center of interest in the infographic, communicates additional meaning through convention and repetition, highlights actions the designer want the viewer to take, and establishes patterns of movement and flow. Through basic design principles, the designer emphasizes one element over another so more important content looks more important. The designer designs related elements to provide visual cues that those elements are on the same level in the hierarchy. They organize everything on the infographic to create a sense of order.

H OW DOES VIS UAL HIERARCHY WORK? Basic design principles such as contrast, repetition and alignment allow designers to add relative meaning to information. Contrast shows relative importance. Without being told, the viewer would know the larger text is more important than the smaller text. Things that are larger would naturally grab our attention first and hence, comes across as more important. Repetition attaches meaning to new elements in relation to old elements. Elements that appeared before will be registered and the next time the viewer sees it, they bring with them information about that same element. It instantly communicates that elements are at the same level in the hierarchy. Alignment creates order. It allows the viewer to quickly connect elements across the page and helps define start and end points. A good example would be grids. A single element that breaks the established alignment calls attention to itself and its importance. Think of a pull quote. Visually, it gives you clues that it is an important concept taken from within the text. 18


04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

To create a hierarchy in design, the visual weight of the elements in the work need to be adjusted. More visual weight is seen as more important, less visual weight is seen as less important. Size, colour, density, value and whitespace are some conditions that can affect visual weight, which can be controlled to balance the entire composition.

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

WH Y I S V IS UA L H IERARCH Y IMPORTANT? In a presentation on Communicating with Visual Hierarchy, Luke Wroblewski, digital and product designer, offered this summary: visual communication is part visual organisation and part personality. Visual hierarchy is a deliberate prioritisation of visual weight enabled by the manipulation of visual relationships to create meaning for users, communicate messages, illuminate actions and organise information. Visual hierarchy is important because it more effectively communicates information. We are visual beings and can quickly pick up on visual cues to better understand our environment. Visual communicators must be aware of this and ensure that the design always delivers the intended message. Hierarchy helps give order. It prioritises items and aid in communication. Visual hierarchy organise, prioritise, and communicate visually by modifying the visual weights different elements carry.

By creating visual hierarchy, designers enable pages to be scanned faster by the viewer and make information easier to understand. Good information design would make smart use of visual hierarchy to make it easier for the viewer to find what they’re looking for. It creates clear paths to completing tasks and highlight actions the viewer wants to take and that designer wants the viewer to take. It communicates messages that reinforce or add to the copy. It is important to remember that before actually designing a hierarchy, the designer should take time to think about the content and what should be seen as more important on the piece of information design work. Hierarchy should begin with thoughtful consideration of the content and goals of the information design. Only after the hierarchy has been decided intellectually should the designer attempt to move into the actual design process. 21


04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

T YP O G RA P H Y Typography is the art and technique of arranging type. It is central to the work and skills of a designer and it is much more than making words legible. The choice of typeface and how the designer makes it work with their layout, grid, color scheme, design theme and so on will make the difference between a good, bad and great design. Good typography is partly down to creative intuition, but it is impossible to become skilled in typography without understanding the basic rules of the craft. Legibility refers to the traits that affect recognition of individual letters and words. Readability refers to clarity and the speed at which typographic content can be read in large quantities (paragraphs, pages, volumes). Legibility of type is discussed in terms of shape, scale, and style. Readability is a function of size, spacing, alignment, and is subject to design and layout decisions.

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

H O W D O E S T Y P O G RAPH Y WORK? Typography is the essential ingredient of design for searching, finding, and using information. Type has unique characteristics, and specific issues must be borne in mind when making typographic decisions for information design projects. The idea of designing type to be more than just legible, but to also be meaningful is part of what confuses a lot of people about typography in information design. Anyone can type out a paragraph of text; few people can use things like letter-spacing, line-height, and font-size to give it a sense of character but a good designer can organize type across an entire layout in a way that imparts meaning to readers and help guide the viewer across the info design layout.

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04 . ST YLI N G O F A RT W O R K

WH Y I S T Y P O G RA PH Y IMPORTANT? Choosing the correct and appropriate elements of type, such as typeface or type size, is mainly driven by variables of font design, application and audience. On every project, designers make choices that balance stylistic needs with direct communication issues. Close attention to legibility and readability can help inform those choices. Type comes in numerous styles: serif and sans serif, display and text, roman and italic, classic and experimental, to state the least. While there may be an appropriate application for every typeface, not all are suitable for the purposes of information design. Type choices should have a heavy focus on accessibility when the purpose is to deliver a clear, unambiguous message directly to a specific audience. The most versatile typefaces are balanced in weight and proportion and should possess no anomalous forms, decorative details, or exaggerated characters. Type selections for information design mostly have distinct individual letterforms that are easily recognized on their own and feel unified when in a group so as to aid in producing a successful piece of information design that communicates effectively and efficiently.

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8 TYPES OF INFOGRAPHICS

8 TY P E S O F IN FO G RAPH ICS There are many types of infographic, each presenting data differently. The appropriate kind of infographic used should match the data to the narratives and ensure that the viewer takes away the intended message after reading it. Infographics come in a wide variety of forms but they can be categorized into eight distinct types.

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0 1 . V I SUA L I Z E D A RTI CL E 0 2 . NUME R I CA L I NF O G R A P H I C 0 3 . V E R SUS I NF O G R A P H I C 0 4 . TI ME L I NE 0 5 . F LO W CH A RT 0 6 . USE F UL B A I T 0 7 . P H OTO I NF O G RA P H I CS 0 8 . DATA V I SUA L I Z ATI O N


05 . 8 T YP E S OF I N F O G R A P H I C S

0 1 . V ISUA L IZ E D ARTICLE The ‘Visualized Article’ is an infographic that takes an otherwise lengthy piece of writing and transform it visually, as if one is reading a strolling picture book. It relies on a strong title that immediately attracts the viewer’s attention and an interesting, plentiful and varied content to ensure that viewers will not be disappointed. Perfect for times when the numbers are not as important, this type of infographic is eye-catching and emotive as it relies on images to speak.

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0 5 . 8 T YP E S OF I N F O G R A P H I C S

0 2 . N U M E RICA L INF OG RAPH IC As compared to ‘Visualized Article’ that does not deal with numbers as much, the ‘Numerical Infographic’ oozes impressive numbers and is filled with data and statistics to help visualize. It relies on engaging designs and impressive figures that captures attention. Boiling down to lots of numbers with little visualization to aid comprehension, this infographic is best when data is key.

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05 . 8 T YP E S OF I NF O G R A P H I C S

0 3 . V E RS U S IN FO G RAPH ICS When there are contrasting ideas in your information, ‘Versus Infographic’ can be used to compare the differences and similarities of two ideas by placing them in a head-to-head comparison. The side-by-side layout of this infographic makes it easy to spot the differences and retain information in mind as viewers compare sections against each other rather than reading chunks of information related to each point separately.

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0 5 . 8 T YP E S OF I N F O G R A P H I C S

0 4 . TI M E L IN E The next type is the ‘Timeline’, which is made up of chronological dates that are visualized to make graphics interesting and shareable. The timeline allows viewers to see progress and changes that have taken place and adds a sense of worldly relevance to the data. When each element of the timeline is visualized, the viewer can experience what it’s like to be carried on a journey. However, it is important to ensure that the data is interesting and relevant enough for people to care.

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05 . 8 T YP E S OF I NF O G R A P H I C S

0 5 . F LO W C H A RT Arguably the most engaging type of infographic is the “Flow Chart�, which involves providing choices to a specific question to viewers so that they reach the right answer for themselves. Design-wise, it is best kept simple but to make the exercise worthwhile, plenty of options should be included to prevent viewers from feeling forced into overly narrow categories. When paired with humour, this lighthearted infographic is guaranteed to hook in viewers with relevant problems.

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0 5 . 8 T YP E S OF I N F O G R A P H I C S

0 6 . U S E FU L B A IT When conveying general information or tips, “Useful Bait” is a great way to explain something or answer a question by visually showing how to do it. This infographic provides useful resources and is something that viewers would want printed on their wall to be referenced over and over. As such, it is best to imagine them being printed out when designing infographics like these. Usability is the priority when it comes to “Useful Bait”, which explains the often-straightforward design. This infographic tends not to have time sensitive information; so they are ideal for sharing at any time.

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05 . 8 T YP E S OF I NF O G R A P H I C S

0 7 . DATA V ISUA L ISATION Finally, we have the bread and butter of the infographic world, the “Data Visualisation�. Data Visualisation infographics works well with lots of data and focuses more on the design. It turns information into something visually creative and appealing, making them unique and interesting. In this classic infographic, data are turned into charts and graphs. When put together with the right element that best represents the data, a beautiful narrative unfolds and the data will do all the talking. With a creative approach along with careful design, this infographic can yield great results. If a picture is worth a thousand words, then Data Vis is worth a thousand more.

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0 5 . 8 T YP E S OF I N F O G R A P H I C S

0 8 . P H OTO IN FO G RAPH ICS For a more professional presentation of your information, ‘Photo Infographics’ suggests an air of professionalism and seriousness that cartoonish infographics struggle to achieve. This infographic offers a unique design and helps visualize content by using real-life photos. It can be used to answer a question, guide the reader or to describe and explain. When working with infographics like such, it is best to use clear and clean lines to avoid an excessively busy graphic. Quality photographs and well-thought out designs are also a must to keep it from being amateur-looking. Even though these types of infographics are some of the trickiest to produce, it is often the most visually arresting and distinct compared to the mass of vector art-based infographics.

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K H A L IF . S H E R MA IN E . Q IA N L IN G . S A MA N TH A . J UA N . Z E E

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COMMUNICATION DESIGN

VI S UAL CO M M U N ICATION Visual communication is everywhere today, ranging from publication to electronic media. In this time of multimedia and mass communication, visual communication has become so much more powerful. Research has shown that we are currently suffering from information overload in today’s high-speed society that is packed with information. Everyday, the average person is bombarded with the equivalent of 174 newspapers worth of data, which is 5 times as much information as we did in twenty-nine years ago in 1986. The average adult attention span is shrinking, with 8 seconds being the average consumer attention span. As such, it is important to have a solution designed to grab attention and make an impact quickly in this fast-moving environment. Visual, in this case, is referring to any form of visual representation, such as actual drawings or even icons.

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06 . COMMUN I CAT I O N DES I G N

H O W D O V ISUA L S WORK? A picture is worth a thousand words. Compared to text, visuals are proven to have a much bigger advantage in being absorbed by the viewer. It makes for better content compared to block of text. Studies show that only 1% of information actually makes it to the brain and 90% of that information is visual. The brain also processes images much faster than text; it takes a tenth of a second to understand a visual scene, which is 60,000 times faster than it takes for the brain to decode text. Example: Visuals are already a solution for real-world problems. Traffic signs are designed to convey all the necessary information in as little time as possible. If they were to rely on text alone, they would not be fit for the purpose.

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06 . CO MMUN I CAT I O N DES I G N

E X AM PL E S 01

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The second example only takes a few seconds because of how our brain processes information. A sentence is a collection of symbols, which when combined, conveys meaning. A traffic sign though is just one symbol that conveys meaning. Simply put, it takes you more time to digest multiple symbols than it does one. Visuals communicate better than words because it is the type of communication our brain craves.

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06 . COMMUN I CAT I O N DES I G N

H O W D O E S V IS UA LS H ELP IN INF OG RAPH I CS ? Visuals are more engaging and appealing than text. It is proven by research that colour visuals increase willingness to read by 80%. Visually engaging content is more attractive, well-designed information piques interest before information is actually processed. Visuals help to increase understanding of infographics. Shown in a study of learning aids by the Educational Technology Research and Development Journal that the understanding of information jumped from 70% to 95% with the introduction of images. People who follows directions with text and illustrations did 323% better than people following directions without illustrations. Visuals make it easier for viewer to recall info in infographics. People remember only 10% of what they hear. This number is made up of 20% of what the viewer reads and 80% of what the viewer sees and does. Visuals are more persuasive as in an experiment, 67% of the audience were persuaded by verbal presentation with accompanying visuals as compared to 50% who were persuaded verbally. Visuals make it more likely for viewers to believe what the designer is saying. It was shown that when random statements such as ‘macadamia nuts are in the same evolutionary family as peaches’ were attached with non-probative photos, people are more likely to believe that it is true. Compelling visuals elements and graphic help to generate up to 94% more views because 60% of people are visual learners.

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06 . CO MMUN I CAT I O N DES I G N

I LLUST RAT IO N IN INF ORMATION DESIG N The multidisciplinary field of information design has provided an interesting area to express ideas for many illustrators. This area of design prioritises the viewer and places an emphasis on effective, appropriate and lucid communication over styling. Information design claims to go deeper than most graphic design activity and advocates modernist values and ideas such as designing with new technology to improve the world and serve people’s needs. In the 1920s and 1930s, the utopian modernist ideals of Otto Neurath and his peers were embodied in an international picture language called Isotype. This system of pictograms inspired generations of information designers and influenced a wide range of design projects from public signs for roads and airports to instruction manuals, travel information, pharmaceutical packaging, sports events and branding. Neurath’s Isotype stick figures also influenced the Otl Aicher’s pictograms and information graphics for the 1972 Munich Olympics.

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06 . COMMUN I CAT I O N DES I G N

Contemporary teams of information designers and architects use a broad range of production media and design artefacts to motivate and engage effectively with their users. This user-centered field of design can provide the designer with a broad and constantly growing range of outlets for their illustrations, including areas such as document design, information graphics and user experience design. Multidisciplinary information design provides designers with the opportunity to collaborate with other creatives and utilise culturally specific conventions and knowledge from fields such as semiology, linguistics, ergonomics and cognitive and perceptual psychology. Visual editing is fundamental to all illustrations and organising principles are deployed as the content of information is edited and structured. Every element of an illustration is an individual sign and its meaning comes from its relationship to other signs. Emphasis in information design is placed on creating accessible systems of encoded signs and clear, effective navigation. In a world assaulted with imagery promoting commodities and consumption, information design offers a much-needed alternative and critical view on the purpose of design and the role of the visual communicator.

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07

SITE PROPOSAL

N E W W IN G - S C H OOL OF DESIG N The areas that we propose are based on the study of the human traffic flow in the new design block. We want the space to be easily spotted and spacious so that we could target more audience. Hence we finalized on two specific areas that could target our goals

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07 . SI T E P RO PO S A L

WA L L 1 The 1st wall is easily visible to the people that comes in from the old design block, as well as the stairs from the second floor. This area has heavy human traffic, and would be distinguishable to anyone who passes by because it’s the only entrance to the new block.

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07 . S I T E P RO PO S A L

WALL 2 The 2nd wall is located adjacent to wall 1 situated right at the same area. The height of the wall spans across the third floor to the fifth floor, so a mural or a projection can be easily seen from all three floors, and would grab a lot of attention to itself, more so being at the center of the new block.

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07 . SI T E P RO PO S A L

PROPOSAL Murals in the form of infographics can be done on the first wall to deliver messages in a clear and concise manner. Since wall 1 is smaller than wall 2 and is nearer to the ground, it is easier and more practical for it to be painted on. Additionally, people passing by would normally not stop for a long period of time to read a heavy chunk of text on the wall, thus presenting the information by using infographics would be efficient and engaging for the audience. For wall 2, a video projection using infographics can be screened on the wall to deliver the message in a more interactive and eye-catching way. Since the wall is big and elevated, painting murals on the wall would be challenging, and hence projecting images would be a far easier and more efficient method.

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CONCLUSION

CO N C LU S IO N People living in the modern day, first world environment tend to mindlessly filter out almost everything they see in sight without much consideration because they just simply do not have the time for it. The attention span of the average person living in a typical fast-paced urban society is drastically decreasing thanks to the world we are living in now that moves at such high speed. Everyone leads such busy lifestyles; hardly anything catches their attention anymore. This makes infographics the ideal information design method to get an intended message across in a short amount of time. Infographics have the ability to capture the attention of people who do not have extra time to spare in just a matter of seconds when done right. By intelligently applying all that has been stated in the report above, such as strong visual hierarchy and impressive storytelling, the end product is a successful piece of information design that can communicate effectively and efficiently.

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