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X ATSULL F IRST N ATION

F RASER R IVER R UN M AY 2010 I SSUE

A RT W ORK SUBMITTED

BY

B ILLY S ELLARS

S PECIAL POINTS OF INTEREST : 

Staff Reports

Employment Opportunities

Upcoming Activities/Events/Meetings

News Releases

Child Safety Activity

Important Information

I NSIDE THIS ISSUE : S TRENGTHENING F AMILIES

2

H EALTH C OMMITTEE M EETING 3 E MPLOYMENT O PPORTUNTIY / O FFICE M ANAGER R EPORT

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F AMILY C ONNECTIONS R EPORT

5

F IRE B URNING B AN

6

S QUAW H ALL P ROJECT

7

N ATURAL R ESOURCE R EPORT

8/9

S ECWEPEMC G ATHERING / E MPLOYMENT O PPORTUNITY

10

F LIES

11

IN THE

K ITCHEN ???

H OUSING R EPORT

12/13

L ETTER TO F IRST N ATION S UMMIT

14

H EAD S TART C ALENDAR

15

N EWS R ELEASE

16

A BORIGINAL F LAG D AY

17

B AND A DMINISTRATION R EPORT

18

C OYOTE N ATIVE C LASSIC T OURNAMENT

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C HILD S AFETY A CTIVITY

20


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Strengthening Families Together Course April 28th- June 30th in Williams Lake

Do you have a relative or friend with a serious mental illness. Strengthening Families Together is a 10-session group for families and friends, which provides information, skill-building, and support. BCSS in Williams Lake, is hosting the above 10 week informational and support program. This program will run each Wed. from 6:30pm to 8:30pm. Topics which will be explored include:

The different types of mental illness

Treatment and medications for mental illness

 Gaining empathy in understanding the lived experience of a person who has a mental illness 

Problem solving, listening and communication techniques

Strategies for handling crisis and relapse

Caring for the caregiver

How to cope with and support your loved one living with a mental illness If you are interested, contact BCSS Coordinator, Susan, at 250-392-5553 or email at bcsswl@telus.net Please register soon; enrollment is limited to 14 participants.

* Location of Classes is to be Announced to Participants.


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E MPLOYMENT O PPORTUNITY Williams Lake Indian Band Job Posting The Williams Lake Indian Band has an opening for a Certified Journeyman for a term position (May 3 to June 11, 2010). This is a teaching position for 6 weeks (Monday to Friday) for the Bladerunner Program. Number of participants in the program is 13. This position is required to teach &/or inform on the following:            

Blueprint Reading Construction Awareness Training Wood Frame Construction Theory Occupational Level One First Aid (TRU) Confined Space Entry (TRU) WHIMIS (TRU) Respiratory Awareness Scaffolding and Ladder Safety Shop and Tool Safety Fall Protection Mold Remediation Asbestos Abatement

Applicants must be certified in their trade. Location of the training is at the Williams Lake Indian Band Carpenter Shop. Please forward resume with references to: Marg Shelley Band Administrator Williams Lake Band 2672 Indian Drive Williams Lake, BC V2G 5K9 Email: marg.shelley@williamslakeband.ca

O FFICE M ANAGER R EPORT

BY

R OXANNE S TOBIE

Happy Earth Day everyone! I have recently been hired as the Office Manager at the Soda Creek Band Office. My first day was April 19, 2010 and it feels great to be back out here again. There was an in office opportunity and I decided to apply and was the successful applicant. My son Peyton is now 9 months old and we are both adjusting well to him being at Daycare. I will be assisting the Finance Manager 2 days a week and 3 days a week will be for Administration and I report to Rhonda Phillips. An overview of my duties will be preparing for Council and Manager Meetings and taking minutes, day to day administrative duties, supervise Receptionist, provide assistance to team members and management, maintain database and hard copy files, coordinate travel arrangements and schedules, process Accounts Receivable, backup for Accounts and Payable/Payroll clerk. Have an enjoyable spring and I look forward to seeing you all again. Take Care.


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F AMILY C ONNECTIONS R EPORT

BY

S ANDRA S ELLARS

Hello everyone, hope all is well with you and your families. The Good Food Box distribution date for this month was on April 19, 2010. The Good Food Box Program was very successful last year so we are continuing it for the 2010 fiscal year. To qualify for the program you must be a band member, be on the flyer distribution list and have children under the age of 18 living at home as of April 1, 2010 as we pre pay for the whole year. The Health Department is providing good food boxes to all elders age 65 and over for the upcoming year. The distribution day is always the 3rd Monday of each month, with a phone call reminder on the Friday before. We are looking for volunteers from our community to help us at the Elks Hall at 10:00 am on distribution days. I would like to thank all of the volunteers who helped us out last year. If you have any recipes, food storage tips or canning tricks you would like to share with other families, please drop them off at the Health Station by the 15th of each month and we will add them to the good food boxes. If you find you cannot use all your veggies, please pass it out to your family or contact Edith at the Health Station and she will be able to use it for her Meals on Wheels or Adult Day Program. We are still looking for donations to the Youth and Family Centre, hopefully with spring cleaning you may be able to donate pictures, movies (DVD or VHS), chairs, couches, curtains, etc. Any donation would be greatly appreciated J Knucwentwecw Society will be providing 4 more sessions for the Foster Parent training then we are finished. Our group has slowly dwindled down to six people from the original ten who started. Soda Creek/Deep Creek presently have no foster parents. If anyone is interested in becoming a foster parent call me at (250) 989-2355 or Yvonne at (250) 392-2995 to get more information. David Faubert (Support Counselor) and I will be drumming and singing every Monday from 4:00 pm to 5:00 pm at the Health Station if anyone would like to learn some songs, learn to drum or just to ask questions. We have a few extra drums and sticks available, if you have one at home, please bring it with you. Ball Hockey is on Tuesday and Thursday evenings from 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Wildwood School. I have sent out a consent form to parents to fill out for anyone under the age of 18 who will be attending ball hockey. We need current phone numbers of parents in case their youth or child gets hurt while playing. June is coming up fast and we will have to decide where ball hockey will be for the summer months or if participants would like a break for the summer. Please think about it and give me a call if you would like the program to continue or if you have any suggestions of where we could play. Take care all, enjoy the warmer weather and if you have any questions or concerns, please stop by for coffee, phone me at the Health Station at (250)989-2355 or I can stop by and visit with you.


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T HE S QUAW H ALL P ROJECT : I NVITATION

TO COMMUNITY

L AUNCH

Williams Lake, BC: urban ink Productions and Twin Fish theatre collective are pleased to invite the community to meet the artist team and the youth trainees selected for the Squaw Hall video and community arts project. The Community Launch takes place Sunday, April 25, 2pm at the Longhouse. Videographers Cease Wyss and Terry Haines (formerly of Williams Lake) led the youth in an intensive video training over the April 17, 18 weekend. The youth practiced their new skills at the Indoor Rodeo, and are now preparing to interview elders in their communities. Initial interviews with First Nations elders have stoked the youths‟ enthusiasm for learning about a part of local First Nations‟ history, focusing on the importance of the Stampede and Squaw Hall to local communities. “I‟m so stoked, this is something I never knew about. I can hardly wait, this seems awfully important to me” said Mason Rankin, a member of the youth video team. Along with Mason, the youth video team consists of Reanne Elkins, Larissa Myers, Taylor Myers, Taylor Salanski and Chantuu Stump. (and one more) The youth will act as researchers, in discovering for themselves the First Nations stories of Stampede Days during the 50s, 60s and 70s in Williams Lake. As well as being trained in media skills and acting as an artistic team, the youth will earn a minimum wage. The Project is seeking elders who have memories of Squaw Hall and the Williams Lake Stampede, in the 50s, 60s and 70s, to share their stories with the youth. Interested elders are encouraged to call Tracey Elkins, at 250 302-8778. Phase One of the Squaw Hall Project, the Youth Video Intensive takes place April 13 – May 20, 2010, and is led by video and theatre artists from urban ink Productions (Vancouver) and Twin Fish Theatre (Nelson). In Phase Two in 2011, the community will be invited to participate in the creation of a community play based on the stories collected. Project leader Rosemary Georgeson is pleased the Squaw Hall Project has received broad-based community support. “We are so fortunate to have so many community leaders guiding us, by agreeing to sit on the Advisory Council to the Project” Rosemary said. Advisory Council members are: Mamie Hall Elkins, Nuxalt Nation, School Principle; Barbara Mack, Aboriginal Health Liaison at Memorial Hospital; Geraldine Bob, Shuswap Language Teacher FN4LW; Jacqueline Clement, former council member of Carrier Nation; Sage Birchwater, author and former staffperson at the Williams Lake Tribune; Laurie Walters, Williams Lake City Councillor; Harry Jennings, President of Williams Lake Art Council; Troy Forcier, Program Services Coordinator, Noopa Boys and Girls Club and Sarafine ???, Carrier, education student at ?? university. For more information about the Squaw Hall Project and Community Launch, please contact Rosemary Georgeson, 604 644-2870 (local call).


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N ATURAL R ESOURCE R EPORT

BY

S ALLY S ELLARS

I would like to begin by thanking the community members for their interests, questions and the visits to our office; it shows you read my report in the FRR and the interests of working for our community. The questions that are raised help me to identify the needs and give me ideas for proposals and how to gain access to monies. The visits to the NRD are pleasant and really show that the community wants to be recognized for their input and questions are answered. I have been working on a schedule for 2010 which will make this office more responsible and efficient. Some things I do as the NRM are listed, please if any questions or concerns bring them forward and I will do my best to answer them, or find the answers for you. Meetings that I attend: Joint Resource Council (JRC) @ NSTC (Joint Resource Council 2010 Referral Strategy) JRC council is used to bring together the Natural Resources Managers and the Community Fisheries Representatives from the four communities to discuss each other‟s workloads. The legal authority and responsibility for natural resource referrals resides with each of the individual Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw (NStQ) communities. However, matters of broad significance to NStQ are sometimes brought forward to the Joint Resources Committee for analysis and discussion. The purpose of the Joint Resource Committee is to ensure the NStQ Communities are provided the opportunity to work together on issues of mutual interest and share ideas as they pertain to management, conservation and preservation of the natural resources and fisheries within NStQ traditional territory. The Joint Resource Committee meets monthly. Where the Joint Resource Committee determines that referrals are in fact of broad significance to NStQ and political direction is required, those referrals may be brought forward to the NStQ Leadership Council. The NStQ Leadership Council is a body consisting of elected representatives from each of the four NStQ first nations that has been given certain delegated authority with respect to matters of common concern to all NStQ first nations. Natural resource referrals of broad concern to NStQ fall within the purview of the NStQ Leadership Council. Consultation Guidelines Working Group @ NSTC Northern Secwepemc te Qelmucw (NSTQ) Consultation Guidelines are intended to provide guidance to governments and third parties who are considering activities that may affect the NSTQ people, culture, relationship to their ancestral territory and their rights and interests and therefore come to the NSTQ asking to consult about their proposals. The NSTQ Consultation guidelines express the NSTQ expectations that governments and third parties will consult the NSTQ in a way that recognizes and respects the NSTQ people, political institutions, laws and rights. The constitutional duties of the Crown are clear: Aboriginal Title and Rights create the obligations to consult. Consultation requires accommodation, and If adequate consultation does not take place, then compensation by the Crown, and, in some cases, resource companies is required (2009 NSTQ Consultation Guidelines, A guide for Government and Third Parties). Technical Working Group I am not part of the Technical Working Group, but I have accepted an invitation to review the Forestry Chapter and the Forest Act [RSBC 1996] Chapter 157 Part 5 - Timber Marking and be available for answers/input for the Technical Working Group. I do have some experience in the past with Timber Marks, and was part of a team at Ministry of Forests and Range, in which I received recognition for „Leading the Way to Issue the First Free Use Permit for Domestic Use by First Nations in British Columbia December 2008‟. Horsefly Roundtable I received a telephone call from Bruce McLeod, Horsefly Roundtable for an invitation to attend a 7pm-9pm meeting once per month, and with permission accepted this offer. Andrew Meshue, CFR from Williams Lake Indian Band sits at this table also, with the purpose to discuss issues within the Horsefly area in regards to salmon, creeks, mining, watersheds, and community events which are held in Horsefly throughout the year. The roundtable in my opinion is a great way to build community relationships because this group has many concerns that match our concerns and it is nice to hear a voice from a different angle. I appreciate this group for their hard dedicated work to protect the watersheds, trout, salmon and water within this area. I brought Jeannette Merriott with me to the last meeting in April and we agreed that there is a lot to be offered form this roundtable, and so I will continue this relationship. The „Salmon Festival on the September Labour Day Weekend‟ is a hot topic and there is plenty of effort going into this event, and I have volunteered to be part of this event and hopefully our community has a big presence this year in Horsefly to welcome the salmon from there long journey to the ocean and back to the their spawning beds in Horsefly. I will be looking for volunteers for this event in the near future, so if you are willing to participate please give me a call or stop by the NR office. Upper Fraser Fisheries Conservation Alliance (UFFCA) The UFFCA I have attended a meeting last July 2009 and one just in March 2010, only because this is under the Community Fisheries Representative job description. The UFFCA purpose is to develop and implement co-operative management for the protection of fish species and the ecosystems upon which


P AGE 9 fish depend, and to advance and advocate issues on behalf of Upper Fraser First Nations with respect to the conservation and sustainable management of fisheries and aquatic resources. People in the communities need understanding of „in river fishery‟ compared to the „ocean fishery‟. The concerns are many, which include but not limited to, only food fish, no commercial fishing, escapement targets, the funding required to aid in business/organizations, working together to become more viable, and structure the business and capacity building, so we can move to viable markets, area needs infrastructure, training, governance structure, controlled Mgnt. The areas of concern begin with no real up to date data, no dollars, can we move forward?, and do we want to move forward? Other challenges include conservation, environment, and personnel changing in staff, community and political support, what is the Total Allowable Catch? The people, all feel the right to sell fish already exists, how do we enter into this process, and if we want to enter into this process? There are more questions than answers at this time, more are around policing, guardians of the land and fish, sale of fish, some communities work on their own others wonder how we work together! Commercial versus the Family Food Supply! The Fraser River salmon and our watersheds and our creeks our habitats and conservation of riparian areas, the food and spawning beds are being disrupted at this very fast rate and we as a people need to build our knowledge base in these areas which affect us and this is an area where we are going to be hit the hardest. Pacific Integrated Commercial Fisheries Initiative (PICFI) PICFI is connected to UFFCA and PICFI is designed to support the long-term economic viability of Pacific commercial fisheries and the sustainability of fisheries resources. Principles are guided by principles that the conservation is paramount, consistency with treaty approaches, participation is voluntary and inclusive, responsiveness and flexibility to meet different interests, priorities and capacity. The responsibilities and collaboration in integrated fisheries comes with greater responsibility to be involved in collaborative management programs and processes which bring values and adaptive based lessons. With all this the key is “the Salmon, the spawning beds , the habitat, the conservation, the journey of the salmon and the return of the salmon each year” without this we cannot begin to plan the commercialization of our most treasured resource… Likely/Xat’sūll Community Forest When I first began the NRM position and meeting the community members, I was approached by Jess Mitchell, who is on the community forest board of directors for Xat‟sūll along with Robin Hood, Thomas Phillips, and John Stace-Smith, RPF. Jess believed that I would be a good candidate to be part of this board. Jess asked me if I was interested in taking his seat and that he would like to step away from this position, and I accepted his offer and told Jess that this would need to be accepted by Chief and Council. The last C&C meeting in February this was brought forward and a Band Council Resolution (BCR) was signed and I now sit on the Likely/Xat‟sūll Community Forest. I would like to say thank you to Uncle jess Mitchell for all his support in the community and the beliefs that we are stronger and we can move forward no matter our difficulties of past, and bring to the future our true and honest personalities and knowledge, again thank you Jess. I did a bit of work in Likely late last summer, involved with plants and GPS‟ing sites which may or may not have berry plants. The reason for this is to continue to harvest the berries but also to start managing and taking care of these sites with a more personal touch. The goal is to build capacity for harvesting our berries and medicines on a more regular basis and taking care of our community forest not only for the timber but for the food and spiritual and cultural resources, and being able to have access to our treasured organic natural food, spiritual and cultural traditional supplies within our own traditional territories. Williams Lake Interface Fire Plan Secretariat (WLIFP) WLIFP Secretariat is part of the Cariboo Regional District (CRD) and this is where I discussed the Interface MPB Fuel Management for IR1 & IR2. The rumor has it, that we are in for another hot and dry season with more dangers than usual. The Mountain Pine Beetle (MPB) epidemic has passed through the Cariboo; and the trees have lived their shelf life as standing dead timber and are now at the stage of being the dead danger trees, which cause many difficulties. These subjects of timber and silviculture obligations are of great concern and no easy answer. Fire Protection is also brought to this table and the concerns again are many. I am looking into Fire Protection and the idea of having an initial attack crew from Soda Creek, to be on alert. I have not heard back from Fire Protection because this is a big process of planning which is going on at this time. Williams Lake Interface Fire Plan Secretariat, Private Landowners WLIFP, Private Landowners is a sub-committee of the above group and of course concerns are being felt by all peoples in the Cariboo and throughout BC, that if there was to be fires such as 70 Mile House in 2009 or the Kelowna fires, that we would all have to work together to keep this devastation from attacking our homes and bringing all of to ruins. The WLIFP, sub-committee is coming up with brochures and other ways of advertising the dangers and giving options on how to protect your home and neighbors from this could be devastation. So please, keep your homes and areas protected using all measures possible. NOTICE: Fire Burning Bans Effective April 2nd, 2010 Open fire restricted within the Cariboo Fire Centre All open fires larger than one meter high and one meter wide are prohibited within the Cariboo Fire Center‟s jurisdiction until September 30th, 2010, or until the ban is lifted. The prohibition is being implemented to limit the risk of a fire and for public safety Please refer to flyer on page 6.


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S ECWEPEMC G ATHERING 2010 BY B EV S ELLARS This year the Kamloops Indian Band is hosting the Secwepemc Gathering. It will be on July 23, 24 & 25th. This year they will be doing a grand entry for all seventeen communities. Just like the Olympics we will enter the arena with our “Xat‟sull” banner and all the people from our community will enter. If you can make it please come and help us represent our community.

E MPLOYMENT O PPORTUNTIY


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F LIES IN THE K ITCHEN ??? I'll file this info away until summer when flies are a problem. Who knew it was so easy??? ZIP LOCK BAG - Good tip! We went with friends to Sweety Pies on Sunday for breakfast and sat in the patio section beside the house. We happened to notice zip lock baggies pinned to a post and a wall. The bags were half filled with water, each contained 4 pennies, and they were zipped shut. Naturally we were curious! Ms. Sweety told us that these baggies kept the flies away! So naturally we were even more curious! We actually watched some flies come in the open window, stand around on the window sill, and then fly out again. And there were no flies in the eating area! This morning I checked this out on Google. Below are comments on this fly control idea. I'm now a believer!

Zip-lock water bags Ann Says: I tried the ziplock bag and pennies this weekend.. I have a horse trailer. The flies were bad while I was camping. I put the baggie with pennies above the door of the LQ. NOT ONE FLY came in the trailer. The horse trailer part had many. Not sure why it works but it does! Danielle Martin Says: Fill a ziplock bag with water and 5 or 6 pennies and hang it in the problem area. In my case it was a particular window in my home. It had a slight passage way for insects. Every since I have done that, it has kept flies and wasps away. Some say that wasps and flies mistake the bag for some other insect nest and are threatened. Maggie Says: I swear by the plastic bag of water trick. I have them on porch and basement. We saw these in Northeast Mo. at an Amish grocery store & have used them since. They say it works because a fly sees a reflection & won't come around. DJ Says: Regarding the science behind zip log bags of water? My research found that the millions of molecules of water presents its own prism effect and given that flies have a lot of eyes, to them it's like a zillion disco balls reflecting light, colors and movement in a dizzying manner. When you figure that flies are prey for many other bugs, animals, birds, etc., they simply won't take the risk of being around that much perceived action. I moved to a rural area and thought these "hillbillies" were just yanking my city boy chain but I tried it and it worked immediately! We went from hundreds of flies to seeing the occasional one, but he didn't hang around long.


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H OUSING R EPORT Reminder

BY

M ARNIE S ELLARS

Rent is due on the 1st of every month. Payments can be made at the Front Desk with the receptionist OR they can be made at the Royal Bank of Canada in Williams Lake. The account information is as follows: Transit # - 08640 Acct # - 101 3598.

Bank Deposits for Rent or Arrears If you are making your payments at the Royal Bank, please remember to put that it is a rent payment or an arrears payment, also please remember to put your name on the deposit slip. The Finance Department has informed me that some clients are not putting their full names on the deposit slip; they are only putting their initials. When this is done, the Finance Department does not know where to apply the payment to, so please ensure that you have written down your full name on the deposit slip. * Please make sure that you keep a copy for your house files. Arrears If you have arrears, please call in and set up a repayment plan. This agreement needs to be in writing and signed by you and myself TO THOSE ON S.A.: IT IS UP TO YOU as a Client to make sure that your rent is being paid out of the S.A. Department. You should be receiving a slip with your cheque stating what was paid for out of your Shelter Allowance (Rent, Hydro, Wood, and Phone etc.). If you are not receiving this then you need to contact Maxine Sellars and make arrangements with her.

Tenant Packages I will be setting up appointments with Tenants regarding the Residential Tenancy Agreement, at this time you must have all of the necessary documents needed, as these will need to be attached to your agreements. I will also at this time be asking all tenants who owe arrears to the Band to sign an Arrears Repayment Agreement. I have asked Chief Bev Sellars to accompany me this year, so she can get the chance to meet all of our tenants and understand the Housing Departments responsibilities and the Tenants responsibilities more.

Water Leaks in the home Just a friendly reminder, if you have a water leak, please contact me. Any leak can be a problem. The longer you leave it the more expensive it becomes to have it fixed. A small leak can lead to a large Mould problem if it is not looked after right away.

Up-Date on our Housing Policy We are still working on our Policy at our Housing Alliance meetings. We have had a very full plate at the end of our Fiscal Year. We were all very busy working on completing the CEAP Renovations and wanting to finish the Policy by the end of March, but we were not able to do this. We are working on getting it completed and delivered to the Leadership of each Community soon. Once we complete it and the Leader-


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ship approves it, we will be working on getting it out to the communities. Each household will receive a copy and we would appreciate your feedback.

Backhoe Rental The Soda Creek Band would like to see how many community members would be interested in renting our Backhoe. If you would like to rent the backhoe, please give me a call or leave a message on my voicemail. I would need to know what type of work you are wanting done and the approximate hours you would like to rent the Backhoe for. The reason that we need to know this is so we can get a schedule for the operator, we will only be calling in the operator 1-3 days every 2nd week. We would rent the Backhoe out for $75.00 an hour; we provide the driver and the fuel and maintenance of the machine. (There will be no exceptions.)

L.E.M Rents for the Units in our community – Just a Reminder Phase 1 3 Bedroom - $550.00 4 Bedroom - $570.00 5 or more bedrooms - $600.00 Phase 2 2 bedroom 3 Bedroom 4 Bedroom 5 or more bedrooms

- $520.00 - $550.00 - $570.00 - $600.00

Phase 3 2 bedroom 3 Bedroom

- $470.00 - $550.00

*If you are unsure of what Phase you live in, please give me a call and I will let you know. J

Phase 4 $ 470.00 a month If you have any questions or concerns, please do not hesitate to contact me at the Band Office@ 989-2323 Ext.103. If I am not available please leave me a message on my voicemail or you can e-mail me at: m.sellars@xatsull.com I hope everyone is enjoying the weather that we have been having. Enjoy Spring while it is here because Summer is just around the corner. Take Care. J


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L ET TER TO F IRST N ATION S UMMIT

SUBMITTED BY

R HONDA P HILLIPS


4

3 Baby & Tots Program 11:00 am to

10 Foster Parent Training Youth and

17 Baby & Tots Program 11:00 am to

24 Stat Holiday

31 No program

2

9

16

23

30 ECEBC Conference

D ENISE T AIT

25

18

11 Baby & Tots Program 11:00 am to

BY

H EAD S TART C ALENDAR

26 Family fun night 5:00 pm to

19 Family fun night 5:00 pm to

12 Family fun night 5:00 pm to

5 Family fun night 5:00 pm to

27 ECEBC Conference Richmond

20 Baby & Tots Program 11:00 am to

13 Baby & Tots Program 11:00 am to

8

28 ECEBC Conference

21

29 ECEBC Conference

22

14 15 Pro-D day Childrenâ€&#x;s program

6 7 7 Baby & Tots Program 11:00 am to

1

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N EWS R ELEASE

SUBMITTED BY

A NTHONY M ACK

ITA, GOVERNMENT EXPAND TRAINING OPTIONS FOR ABORIGINALS VICTORIA – New funding of up to $1 million will build skills and success for First Nations, with the Industry Training Authority (ITA) offering trades training for heavy equipment operator, building maintenance and a unique Aboriginal women in trades program, Minister Moira Stilwell announced today. “Tapping into the potential of B.C.‟s First Nations is vital to meet our province‟s future needs for skilled workers,” said Stilwell. “This is a great example of how government and First Nations can collaborate to create new opportunities in skilled, wellpaying jobs.” The ITA programs build on successful existing trades training programs, with an enhanced focus on the Aboriginal learner. Since 2008, over $2 million has been invested through the Canada-B.C. Labour Market Agreement for skills training programs, designed and developed with the support and assistance of the Aboriginal Advisory Council. “Our Government is taking action to ensure Canadians have the skills they need for the jobs of the future,” said the Honourable Diane Finley, Minister of Human Resources and Skills Development. “Through the Canada-B.C. Labour Market Agreement, we are working in partnership with the B.C. government and First Nations to provide the workforce with training and skills development opportunities.” Government is committed to working with First Nations, industry, education and training service providers and the Industry Training Authority to create and enhance employment opportunities for Aboriginals in the skilled trades, and encourage stronger participation in the provincial labour market. “The Tseycum First Nation / Camosun College Residential Building Maintenance Worker Program has improved the skills of community maintenance workers, and improved community safety,” said Frank Michon, co-ordinator and mentor. “This program has helped some complete their apprenticeship and led to a number of new apprentices.” “The Industry Training Authority is delivering on the objectives outlined in our 2008 Aboriginal Trades & Apprenticeship report,” said Kevin Evans, ITA‟s CEO. “With 121 trainees in 2008-09, growing to an anticipated over 180 trainees in 2009-10, the Industry Training Authority and our partners in industry and the First Nations community are building new opportunities in the skilled trades for Aboriginal people.” For more information about the Industry Training Authority‟s Aboriginal trades training initiatives, please visit www.itabc.ca/. For more information about B.C.‟s labour market initiatives, please visit www.gov.bc.ca/aved/.

Media Contact:

Corinna Filion

Kevin Evans

Communications Director

CEO

Ministry of Advanced Education and Labour Market Development

Industry Training Authority

250 952-6508

604 214-8722


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A BORIGINAL F LAG D AY APTN LAUNCHES 2010 NATIONAL ABORIGINAL DAY LIVE FLAG CONTEST

Aboriginal Peoples Television Network (APTN) is pleased to launch its fourth annual National Aboriginal Day Live Flag contest. In 2009, fifteen-year-old Amber Helmer’s design entitled “Connected” was chosen from a total of 272 entries received from across Canada.

APTN is inviting young people between 12 -17 years of age, from across the country, to design a flag that shows the richness and diversity of all of Canada’s Aboriginal Peoples, and which illustrates what National Aboriginal Day means to them personally. As Canada’s only Aboriginal television network, the flag contest is just one of the ways APTN is providing opportunities for young people to share their vision and pride in Aboriginal culture and heritage. The flag contest is part of APTN’s 2010 National Aboriginal Day Live celebrations which also include live performances by some of Canada’s top Aboriginal artists, slated to take place this year on June 20th. Last year the Aboriginal Day Live Flag Contest quadrupled its entries from 66 in 2008 to 272 received from young artists all across Canada.

The contest winner and a parent/guardian will be flown to Winnipeg to receive his/her prize and be part of APTN’s National Aboriginal Day celebrations. The winning flag will also fly on top of APTN’s headquarters in downtown Winnipeg. The winner will earn a cash prize of $500 and the winner’s school will receive $750 towards the purchase of learning materials.

The contest opens April 1, 2010 and is open to all youth aged 12-17. Entries should reflect the rich diversity of the First Nations, Inuit and Métis Peoples in Canada. All entries must be received by May 14, 2010 at midnight eastern time.

To find out more information, official contest rules and submission specifications, visit APTN’s Aboriginal Day Live website after March 26th, at http://www.aboriginaldaylive.com/flagcontest.php


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B AND A DMINISTRATOR REPORT

BY

R HONDA P HILLIPS

I apologize for not writing anything in the newsletter since I have started. I have been so busy trying to catch-up, and deal with day-to-day operations. With that said, there should be no excuses, I need to set aside some time to do a report. Marion has been kind enough to do the minutes from our previous community meeting, and I have also forwarded the community concerns to her as well, so that she could include these with the minutes. We are ramping up for a new season at the Heritage Village this year, and will hopefully have someone hired in the next little while. However, I have had some concerns brought forward to me in regards to the site. There has been some evidence of people drinking at the Lookout, and damages. I understand that this is not always our community members, and I am hoping that if anyone notices this type of behavior at the lookout, you would ask them to leave Soda Creek Property. The crew that has been working at the village, and were the ones that built this lookout; they have worked very hard on this project, and are quite proud of it. This is something that all community members can be proud of, and hopefully treat with respect. I am not sure how we can address Vandalism and lack of respect for property; and am asking suggestions from you. I would love to hear what you think we could do to deter this in our community, especially since we are faced with this issue almost every year. I have had a couple of people phone me in regards to the Xatsâ€&#x;ull Powwow for this year. Unfortunately, due to lack of community volunteers, we are unable to organize the event for this year. Fundraising is a big part of the event, and it has proven to be very difficult without support. There have been concerns in regards to staff and what their involvement is in events such as; Easter, Halloween, Christmas, etc. We have several staff who agree to help with event planning. Our staff participate with the support of supervisors knowing that regular office work is the priority and to date has never been an issue. Along with participating as staff, they also volunteer a lot of their time to ensure community events occur. Without, their dedication, commitment, and hard work; these community events would not happen. I would just like to take this time to thank community members and staff members who do volunteer their time and plan their time efficiently to be able to help with events. We do require more community volunteers to help with events, and ask that if anyone is interested, to please step forward. Our next event will be the Grand Opening of the Village after the development is completed. So keep your eyes peeled for a posting. I am sad to say that our Office Manager, Tracy Delawski, will be leaving us. She will be moving with her husband up North. She has been with us since 2006, and will be greatly missed. We have hired a new Office Manager to replace her; Roxanne Stobie. Roxanne was previously the Administration Assistant for our Health. Our next Chief and Council meeting will be May 21st, 2010; so if you want to be on the agenda, please get a hold of Roxanne. If you have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to contact me at 250-989-2323 ext.106. Enjoy the rest of Spring!


P AGE 19

G OLF : C OYOTE NATIVE C LASSIC T OURNAMENT After many years of discussing the creation of an Aboriginal tournament in the North Okanagan, Andy Vedan and Bob Vedan pulled a team together in 2009 to create the first ever Coyote Native Classic Golf Tournament at Spallumcheen Golf Course in Vernon. The goal of the annual tournament is to provide an opportunity for the game of golf to grow among Aboriginal people of all skill levels. Golf generates positive energy by creating better physical health, personal and mental development, increased self -esteem and confidence. Moreover, sport contributes to the well-being of communities. Golf provides a cardiovascular workout by speeding up the metabolism; a round of golf burns about 300 calories in a 150 pound person who plays 1 hour while carrying clubs. Carrying a golf bag also provides weight bearing exercise which can create long, lean muscles and prevent bone degeneration. Walking around the links allows the body to absorb Vitamin D, essential for strong bones and the regulation of calcium and phosphorus in the blood. Regular exercise and fresh air increase the chances of a good night‟s sleep. Moreover, one has time to chat with friends and make new ones; making friends increases endorphins which help mental outlook and the feeling of well-being. Lane Brewer, a member of the Okanagan Nation, points out, “I am new to golf and would like to encourage people to give this sport a try. I was unsure because of the stereotypes surrounding the sport, (but) I was quick to find that everyone I met treated me fairly and kindly; golf is truly a sport for sportsmanship and camaraderie. .. I was pleasantly surprised when I found out the local course supports students… I will continue playing golf and love what it gives me: a sense of achievement, a passion for something positive, my love for outdoors, a learning environment, and quality time with ..friends.” Last year‟s tournament was a success with teams participating from all over the Okanagan, Shuswap, and Cariboo. (Photos of the participating teams are available on our website at www.coyotegolf.ca .) Prizes were won by both low-scoring teams and higher-scoring teams. The organizing committee would like to promote participating in a life-long sport through golf. So the tournament will take place again this year on May 29, 2010 at the Spallumcheen Golf Course. For information visit the website at www.coyotegolf.ca or call Bob Vedan at 250-545-7558. Future plans for the tournament is to take it from a non-profit event to one that donates to a charity and to move the tournament around to other courses in the Okanagan. 10 TIPS TO KEEP GOLF FUN AND SAFE 1. Warm up and stretch before playing, paying particular attention to your back, shoulders and arms. Include gentle movement and mobility exercises followed by gentle air swings or ball hits using short irons (a type of golf club). 2. Take lessons. Good technique is your best defence against injuries. 3. Stand at least four club lengths away from a swinging club. 4. Use good equipment including shoes, socks, gloves and clothing. 5. Wear sun protection (clothing, hat and 30+ sunscreen) at all times. 6. Drink water before, during and after a game. 7. Know and practise the basic rules and etiquette of the game. Check that no one else is standing close by before you swing. Don‟t play until the group in front is out of the way. Shout „fore‟ to warn of danger to players and spectators. Give way to ground staff and wait until they call you to play on. 8. Lift and carry clubs safely and, when necessary, use a buggy. 9. When the temperature exceeds 35° Celsius, you may need to recon- 2009 Coyote Classic Native Tournament Winners from Penticton: sider the playing conditions for further play. Jason Baptiste, Tommy Lee Gabriel, Val Titus, and Clarence Louis. 10. Stop playing immediately when an injury occurs. Seek first aid or prompt medical treatment for any type of injury, irrespective of how severe it is.



2010 05 - May