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INDEX Masthead...........................................................................................................6 Editor’s Letter...................................................................................................8 Jeffrey Deitch . . ................................................................................................ 12 Mirror Mirror.. ................................................................................................ 18 Est4te Four. . ................................................................................................... 36 Dustin Yellin.. ................................................................................................. 48 Pier Glass . . ...................................................................................................... 54 Good Fork....................................................................................................... 58 Vladi Banjac................................................................................................... 60 Lola Schnabel. . ............................................................................................... 66 Home / Made..................................................................................................72 Red Hook Winery........................................................................................... 74 Hope & Anchor...............................................................................................78 Fort Defiance................................................................................................. 82 Architects.. ...................................................................................................... 86 Future Green Studio . . .................................................................................... 90 Cora Dance Company.. .................................................................................. 96 Sunny’s.......................................................................................................... 100

SPECIAL THANKS TO OUR CONTRIBUTORS PHOTOGRAPHERS Michael Mundy, Sue Kwon, Tyler Sparks, Patrick Hoelck, Deborah Senise and Patrick McMullan WRITERS Jared Gabrow, Kelly Bartnik, Lauren Festa EDITORIAL TEAM William Lords, Genevieve Espantman, Angie Parker

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Banco Luca Meda Hi-Line 6 Ferruccio Laviani Montecatini chair Gio Ponti Graduate bookcase Jean Nouvel New York Flagship Store 60 Greene Street, Ph. (212) 673-7106 Modus Miami Miami, 4100 NE 2nd Avenue suite 103-203, Ph. (786) 363-9111 In-Ex Los Angeles, 8800 Wilshire Blvd., Ph. (310) 358-0500

moltenidada.com


HIDDEN PL4CES PUBLISHER Est4te Four EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Patty LaRocco EDITOR Gina Harrell CREATIVE DIRECTOR Risa Knight ART DIRECTOR Xander Vinogradov

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LETTER FROM THE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Red Hook in the 1980’s had a mix of ruffians, artists and industrial businesses creating a neighborhood coined ‘Residustrial.’ It was an isolated section of Brooklyn that had little draw to outsiders beyond Sunny’s bar, which was a meeting place of locals and ultimately the artists whose presence helped to change the shape of the neighborhood. I went to my first city auction for a group of properties in Brooklyn in 1988. I had purchased my loft in Tribeca in the early 80’s, which at the time was far more desolate than Red Hook is today. All we had was a liquor store on the corner of Canal and Watts, a deli that was six blocks away, and two neighborhood haunts: Puffy’s and Walker’s. Anyhow, back to the auction! I fell in love with a townhouse on Van Brunt that had been damaged by a fire on the top floor. My budget was $50k tops, and I was carrying $25k cash with me, as it is required at city auctions to pay half at closing bid. I was only a girl in my mid-twenties, but I saw Red Hook just as I had seen Tribeca: as a special artistic enclave on the water. I was sitting there in a room with men twice my age – locals, contractors, teamsters, you name it – and I was incredibly nervous but very determined. I kept raising my hand as the bids painfully came to 40k, 45k, 48k (mine) and then finally 55k. I lost. Fast forward to 2012. After seven years as a real estate broker in the city, I had the opportunity to work for artists looking for studio spaces, and naturally my beloved Red Hook was at the top of my list. I brought them all over Conover, Coffey, and Van Brunt Street to name a few.

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I was working with a high profile collector, who wanted to build a museum. That’s when I discovered 202 Coffey, a Civil War period warehouse in near original condition right on Valentino Park. The existing characteristics of the building included wooden trusses and ceiling heights of up to 35 and 55 feet in some locations. At that time I also had the pleasure of meeting Estate4, the developers and visionaries of the space. ‘The Italians’ as I call them, were very excited that I was bringing a museum to their beloved 202 Coffey. At 170,000 square feet, 202 Coffey was a perfect space for my friend and client. It was then that I saw 160 Imlay, and after decades of living in Manhattan, decided that this would be my future home. Then we all know what happened a year ago in October: Hurricane Sandy. Needless to say, he unfortunately decided not to buy. However, the upside of the experience was that I saw Red Hook differently than he did, and more than ever I recognized a village that is tenacious and robust, full of heart and passion. I am as determined as ever to make Red Hook my home after 25 years of longing. Thank you to everyone that has contributed time, creativity, and endless hours to Hidden Places. I especially want to thank the generosity of the locals, as well as the vendors for sharing their stories and love of this very special enclave. Special thanks also to Gina Harrell and Risa Knight for making this beautiful magazine happen. Patty LaRocco, Editor-in-Chief


RED HOOK AT A GLANCE

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NEXT STOP: RED HOOK

NYC arts stalwart Jeffrey Deitch highlights the untapped potential of NYC Waterways photography by

P A T R I C K M C M U L L A N text by J A R E D G R A B O W

Sitting down on a Friday afternoon in Jeffrey Deitch’s new SoHo’s office, he looked enthused. “Welcome back to New York”, I said with a smile. “Good to be back” he said, almost instinctively. After his most recent post on the west coast, Deitch is now bringing his talents back to the city where he made Deitch Projects famous, among a litany of other successful initiatives. Deitch has the sharp look of a corporate executive that one might expect from a Harvard MBA mixed with the sage insights of a Bob Woodward. Deitch has had a storied forty year career as an accomplished art dealer and curator, working alongside art collectors such as Jose Mugrabi and the Goldman family. When asked about the comparison between the LA and NYC art scenes, Deitch puts things in perspective. “In the 1970’s, New York was really the place. Since then cities such as London, LA, and Beijing are all on the map and have lively art scenes. But NYC is still undoubtedly the capital”. Deitch further explains how geography can play a role in creating community. “In LA, artists have to make plans to see each other since everything is so spread out. In NY, they can bump into each other”.

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Perhaps part of what also makes the arts capital unique is what lies just beyond the fringe. Deitch has long had an appreciation for the waterfront, even previously building his former namesake project in Long Island City. With Deitch’s inclination to be close to the water, its only natural that he’s currently evaluating several new potential art projects in Red Hook. “The New York City waterways are not only among the most beautiful spots in New York, they are perhaps among the most beautiful destinations up and down the east coast”, Deitch claims. “There’s something underappreciated about them. If you go back 150 years, staring across the harbor view from Red Hook to Wall Street, in some ways time has stood still”. Recently however, the waterfront has had a good run. Several supporters of Mayor Bloomberg have pointed to pro-development policies during his tenure that helped clean up the waterways, create incentives, and spur new developments. But equal time should be given to the role that artists have had to help create dynamic neighborhoods that have attracted new entrants and businesses. These emerging artistic communities could further play a continued role in NYC’s re-envisioned future on the water’s edge. Deitch helps explain. “Strong artistic communities cannot be one-sided, but must have a balance. Having only new buildings and developments would make an environment too sterile. But on the other hand a lack of economic resources limits the ability for art to be discovered and flourish”. Deitch further believes that great artist communities usually have what he describes as “café cultures” that all have common characteristics, including a strong support network where artists feel comfortable enough to linger and connect with each other. Deitch also highlights the way that technology may play a role in developing the type of communities that attract artists. While not without its de-

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tractors among artists, social media has played a role in breaking down borders that had previously placed different groups of artists in silos. Now, within certain communities a painter can connect through technology to grab a coffee and run into a musician, photographer, fashion designer, or writer, drawing inspiration. This new artist gravitates towards places that allow this type of technological exchange to naturally flourish. “Creating dynamic creative communities has to be organic”, Deitch explains. He says while tricky to pull off, several developers are embracing the importance of the intricacies in developing such artistic communities and are getting it right. “There are great examples, such as the new Spring Studios on Varick St. in Tribeca and Wynwood Walls in Miami. In particular, developers like Est4te Four and what they have done in London and Milan are also great examples of this type of organic and authentic interchange. It’s been really amazing”, Deitch says. “When it works, it drives other artists to come”. Est4te Four is planning a similar move out of their playbook in Red Hook. Deitch believes that Est4te Four’s developments in Red Hook are already starting to have a familiar impact to that of their previous work, as new galleries and nonprofit art centers surrounding the developments have increased funding and new artists continue to descend on the neighborhood. When it comes to Red Hook’s potential to continue to grow into such a community, Deitch believes it’s sitting on a great deal of untapped potential. While limited accessibility could be argued both as a strength and weakness for the neighborhood, the times seem to be a-changing. “Red Hook really is emerging into a bike culture”, Deitch explains. In a recent gallery show with SWOON in Red Hook, hundreds of art lovers made it to the grand opening on bicycles, and SWOON herself rode a bike back home after the show. While

clearly bike culture in Brooklyn has made it’s mark and is here to stay, other interesting and more out-of-the-box type ideas are starting to surface as well. A recent NY Times article “Let’s Build a Bridge - No Cars Allowed” made a plea for NY to build a pedestrian bridge connecting the south Brooklyn waterway, Governors Island, and lower Manhattan. While exciting to discuss, most acknowledge that this type of solution would still be years away, at best. Deitch suggests Red Hooker’s reach for something a little more near-term. “How about an enhanced water taxi service like what they have in Hong Kong?” Deitch smiles. Over the past several years, architects, developers, and government transportation officials have worked to enhance the waterways of Hong Kong, helping commuters and tourists alike gain accessibility along the waterways. The recent initiatives have helped to revitalize Hong Kong’s waterfront and in particular have helped grow Hong Kong’s art districts. As opposed to just taking Hong Kong’s version of the MTA Subway (the “MTR”), now people have the option to hop from an arts gallery show in West Kowloon, and grab a water taxi afterwards for an amazing view of the skyline, and to end up enjoying the nightlife of Lan Kwai Fong. So could New York be next with a night starting at a Red Hook arts gallery, a view of Wall Street and ending with drink in the Meatpacking District? With Deitch’s offices in SoHo, upcoming projects in Red Hook, as well as his love for NYC’s water ways, he may be best served getting his own boat.


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MIRROR MIRROR photography by W I L L I A M creative direction by R I S A

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LORDS KNIGHT


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V E R E D A GREY FUR VEST (LEFT) V E R E D A BLACK FUR AND CROCODILE JACKET (RIGHT)

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(LEFT) M I S G U I D E D BLACK LACE DRESS B - L O W BLACK LEATHERBELT M C M BLACK LEATHER STUDDED COLLAR Y S L BLACK SUEDE BOOTS

(RIGHT) L A C A R I S A BLACK LEATHER GLOVES

M I S G U I D E D BLACK

LEATHER & CREPE DRESS

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ALON LIVNE BLACK CHIFFON GOWN

PRIESTESS NYC BLACK LEATHER SHOES

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LA CARISA BLACK CHIFFON GLOVES

PRIESTESS NYC BLACK CHIFFON DRESS

TOM FORD METALLIC PLUM LEATHER SHOES

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CHARLOTTE RONSON BLACK PLASTIC JACKET

COURTNEY MAGINNIS GREY SILK BODYSUIT

BRIAN ATWOOD BLACK PATTEN LEATHER SHOES

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LILA SHAWS BLACK EMBELLISHED JACKET V E R E D A GREY FUR VEST

COURTNEY MAGINNIS BLACK SPANDEX BODYSUIT

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COURTNEY MAGINNIS BLACK SILK BRA

H U E BLACK NET STOCKINGS P R A D A BLACK LEATHER BOOTS


stylist G E N E V I E V E E S P A N T M A N - make up A N G I E P A R K E R - hair D A X A N D E R S O N


(LEFT) V E R E D A BLACK FUR JACKET B L A C K D E N I M BLACK CREPE SUIT (RIGHT) PRIESTESS NYC BLACK LEATHER HARNESS M A N G O BLACK LEATHER SHOES

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EST4TE FOUR COMES TO BROOKLYN photography by

PATRICK HOELCK

HP:  Can you give us a brief history of Est4te Four – How and when did the company form?  What are your respective backgrounds? 

Everything started 17 years ago in Milan when Alessandro was a professor in Finance as well as an M&A advisor.  He decided to begin a new adventure in real estate driven by his passion for art, design and urban architecture.  The Est4te Four trademark soon became the ability to transform historical buildings and former industrial areas into exceptional and innovative workspaces dedicated to the global fashion, art and design markets. The company’s development concept lies in the regeneration of substantial buildings in urban zones close to popular locations. With the primary structure already established, the company subsequently converts these often empty shells into dynamic environments popular with such industries as fashion, art, public relations, advertising, graphic and product designers and contemporary icons who wish to thrive in genuinely inspiring spaces.  We are very selective in choosing projects, taking into consideration the effect the development will have on the surrounding area and understanding the importance of achieving the perfect balance of tenants to ensure the viability of a sustainable creative community.

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A L E S S A N D R O CA J R AT I C R I V E L L I

MASSIMILIANO SENISE

ST E FA N O M A R C I A N O

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1 6 0 I M L A Y – Premier Representation and Sales by Patty LaRocco email plarocco@elliman.com or call 917-696-0699

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We are very selective in choosing projects, taking into consideration the effect the development will have on the surrounding area and understanding the importance of achieving the perfect balance of tenants to ensure the viability of a sustainable creative community.

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HIDDEN PL4CES / D E V E L O P E R S

We built our reputation for crafting elegant, practical urban environments in Milan, creating a most unique space, dubbed the Zona Tortona, which is arguably the largest fashion quarter in the world and houses many leading brands’ headquarters, such as Zegna, Tod’s Group, Armani and Diesel, to mention a few.  Prior to this transformation, Zona Tortona was an area of derelict warehouses and factories. After Milan, the company successfully expanded into London, New York and Los Angeles, where it exported its concept whilst also, on a lesser scale, encompassing highend residential. In London, we bought a sorting office in Victoria (Howick Place) from Royal Mail that we converted into a building for creative people.  Howick Place is a perfect example of our expertise in changing the perception of an area and accelerating its observance as a vibrant, artistic and cool place to be.  In just one building, we have attracted two of the most famous living designers:  under the same roof, we put the Headquarters for well-known Australian designer Marc Newson, and the World Headquarters for fashion designer and movie producer/director Tom Ford. Howick Place is also proud to host the European headquarters of the contemporary art auctioneer Phillips. Howick Place has become recognized for its high-profile events. These include the CHANEL and Swarovski Fashion Shows, the Mario Testino and Annie Leibovitz exhibitions, and a number of shows for London Fashion Week. As a natural evolution of our business, we also started to develop in New York.  50 Varick Street in Tribeca was our first project and will soon become the home of Spring Studios, a full-service fashion advertising agency which is also recognized as Europe’s leading photographic studio complex. 50 Varick will undoubtedly become an iconic destination for the fashion industry in New York. Our story in New York is continuing with Red Hook, Brooklyn, as you know...

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HP Est4te Four is known as a development firm that builds working and living spaces for artists.  Can you tell us a bit about your inspiration for the Spring Studios transformation in Tribeca? We have been working for many years neck-toneck with many fashion designers and brands, and we can anticipate exactly what their needs are, therefore gaining the reputation we have today.  We were contacted by the founder of Spring Studios to find and develop their new location in New York, and that is how 50 Varick was born.  50 Varick is a good example of how Est4te Four is different than other developers.  Demolishing slabs to gain extra feet of ceiling height to make the space more unique is something very few developers would ever do in New York.  Our passion for design and beauty in general goes beyond numbers and spreadsheets! HP: What is the main goal in generating a creative space from start to finish?   And how does the surrounding neighborhood inform your creative choices?  The prospective inhabitants? With Red Hook in particular, we were attracted by the existing strong artistic atmosphere.  We feel we can be an accelerator of this movement of creative minds, and bring in a wider variety of creativity, achieving a critical mass that will eventually attract a wider audience on its own. HP:Tell us about the projects you are undertaking in Red Hook. We have taken a remarkable presence on the waterfront.  We think this will be a wonderful opportunity to regenerate a significant part of the area and build a strong creative community – rediscovering the industrial soul of the area with artistic craftsmen, and mixing this with media companies and recording studios will diversify and foster collaboration and inspiration within the community. HP:  How are your plans for the Red Hook projects similar or different to 50 Varick or Zona Tortona? Our Red Hook project is based on a similar concept as Zona Tortona, except it will be dedicated to more variety of creativity.  The culture in Zona Tortona was mainly based on fashion and design since those are the dominant industries in Milan.  50 Varick represents fashion, and it’s just one of the components you will find in Red Hook.  Red Hook will also be open to other types of liberal expressions, like music, art and creative media.

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HP:  Why did you choose Red Hook as the location for these new undertakings and what features of the neighborhood are most inspiring to you artistically? Red Hook was like love at first sight for us.  We were immediately intrigued by the mystique and sense that it was ‘undiscovered’ and the compelling views of New York’s most iconic structures.  There is a great sense of nature in Red Hook, which is difficult to find in New York City. HP:  Tell us about your Regeneration work. All of our developments will be driven by a high respect of the original character of the buildings, while at the same time creating something new.  Our mission is to keep the authenticity of the neighborhood. HP:  What are the benefits for a neighborhood like Red Hook to be on the receiving end of projects such as yours? Red Hook will benefit from a livelier, more vibrant environment, additional public transportation and educational programs. In particular, as a member of the Game Changer program, we are focusing on creating a new water taxi station in Red Hook, and to create a bike sharing program throughout the community.  We are also sponsoring an art community center called The Point that organizes visual art programs at The Good Sheppard, and so far it has been a tremendous success.  We are confident that other educational programs will be created or sponsored by us and our future tenants. HP:  How do you envision Red Hook in 10 years? The most wonderful place in New York!

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PIONEER MAN Dustin Yellin’s Grandiose Visions for the “Fishing Hamlet on the Edge of the Abyss” photography by

M I C H A E L M U N D Y text by J A R E D G R A B O W

Tucked just a block away from Red

an already vibrant Red Hook art scene.

Hook’s main thoroughfare, Van Brunt This labor of love is the brainchild street, sits an old shipyard building of 38- year old contemporary artist that looks like it has many stories to

Dustin Yellin, who many now consider

tell. Only a few hundred yards away

to be a local celebrity due to his

from the Clinton Wharf, you can see

popular art galleries, and his strong

how the brick industrial building with network among artists, curators, and high ceilings at one time was an ideal celebrities. Yellin had been eyeing setting for building and repairing the property on Pioneer Street from ships before setting back to sea. Since his nearby studio for the several then, the building has taken on many

years before purchasing it in 2011. In

different lives, most recently known as a ribbon ceremony during the grand the Time Moving and Storage building, opening, Yellin cast his vision of a a 24,000 square foot Civil War era “creative utopia” where artists could industrial warehouse. Now it’s better

come to draw inspiration, innovate,

known as a trophy for the arts called

and create alongside others. “Great

“Pioneer Works”, Center for Art and

things happen when you are around

Innovation, the latest fixture added to

great people”, Yellin would later say.

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Driving up and finding parking, the view of the Manhattan skyline looking out from the building’s massive doorway is stunning. A perfect cure for space starved Manhattan, I could see the appeal of Red Hook. “People come here because it’s a place with a soul where people can see the sky”, as one local puts it. Given the reputation for the size and scale of Yellin’s work, this looks like just the place to house a 12-ton sculpture, which just so happens to be one of Yellin’s recent projects. “The Triptych” is described as a “massive 12-ton, three-paneled epic that embodies his vision of the world and human consciousness”. Walking up to the doorway on a late fall Friday afternoon, a small army of people were busy preparing for the evening’s special donor event. White tablecloth was placed over high circular tables with crates of bottles of wine wheeled in underneath. While the building is still getting its sea legs undergoing several renovations, the place already has the look of a first rate venue that will host many exhibitions, performances, and lectures. A dry run dress rehearsal of the evening’s event was underway. Walking past the exhibition hall an opening led to an outdoor courtyard garden with natural walkways surrounded by crabtrees. “He’s a sweetheart so no worries”, an assistant yells out from across the room, referring to the half Labrador, half Rhodesian Ridgeback who seemed to consider the courtyard home. A projector sat on a table casting the individual names of guests onto a white canvas in the form of an industrial wall towering what had to be over 30 feet. “Take a look around, Dustin will be here shortly”, one of the facility’s young assistants said. Walking up to the second floor, on one side of the building were open studios where there were several artists at work. On the other side of the building was the open view of the first floor and the massive exhibition hall. Walking up and down the hallway, you could feel a positive energy. The space certainly had the typical gallery feel of what you might find in SoHo, Chelsea,

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or nowadays in Bushwick. But Pioneer Works is clearly something more - a place where other artists and scientists want to come – to create, build relationships and explore. One could start to envision what Yellin had in mind when he said he wanted to bring a “creative utopia” to Red Hook. In many ways, Pioneer Works is a redemptive, life-positive response to the dystopian art that characterizes the brokenness of many of Yellin’s pieces. If the role of many artists is to present us with questions, it appears that Yellin is also suggesting answers. And it seems as though Yellin’s ambition for what Pioneer Works could become is about the size of his sculptures. New York City has the reputation as a “for-profit” arts scene which does not have many examples of non-profit arts projects getting off the ground and surviving, making the idea of Pioneer Works an ambitious one. In addition to serving as a large-scale exhibition hall, the venue will also house an artists’ residency program, open classrooms, an arts magazine, and a sculpture garden. It will also host visitors for symposiums and public programs. I was starting to feel that Yellin may just be the James Franco of artists – a jack of all trades, but one of the rare people who can pull it off. “You should check out some of our classes”, another assistant suggests. Looking at the brochure, an eclectic range of class topics ranged from “Why We Have Sex?” to “Contemporary Shokunin: Using Traditional Japanese Hand Tools”. Walking back downstairs, Dustin entered with a small entourage of assistants and greeted me with a smile. “Let’s walk and talk”, he said. Dustin looks the part of Brooklyn hipster with a friendly yet reticent vibe that could be characterized of many artists. You can gain a sense of the impatient personality that drew him to drop out of high school for the simple reason that he was not learning what he wanted to. But when asked what drew him to Red Hook as a young artist, Yellin smiles. “Well take a look – it’s a fishing hamlet on the edge of the abyss!” You

get the sense that it’s an equal marriage. Yellin is lucky to have Red Hook, and Red Hook is lucky to have Yellin. He’s a bit more reserved and humble when discussing his role as an arts community leader and how his programs may help children discover their love for the arts. “Pioneer works is really about creating culture and knowledge for the neighborhood. Hopefully it’s also a way to give back”. Dustin also put’s Red Hooks growing popularity and development into perspective for how it could be a boon to the area’s artists. “Let’s hope that Red Hook’s emergence will help bring the community more resources”, Yellin says. Wrapping up the interview, I started to see patrons and donors start to fill up the space and vie for Dustin’s time. But I still had one burning question left. How’s the man able to balance it all? After all, Yellin wears many hats, and one may wonder how he has the time spearhead Pioneer Works, produce an upcoming documentary entitled “The Little Grandfather”, keeping a personal life, maintain his reputation as an artist that helps other artists, and still have time to work on art projects of his own. Yellin concedes at times his schedule does seem crazy. “But the ideas of Buddhism help”, Yellin offers. “It’s great for letting go of attachments”.


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LIKE MOTHS TO A FLAME photography by S U E K W O N text by L A U R E N F E S T A

Mary Ellen Buxton + Kevin Kutch started a small studio in 1994 with the intention of staying private; having fallen in love with a run-down space on what Mary Ellen refers ‘the private side of the Pier’. Since their first celebration -- their 17th anniversary is coming up this Halloween -- Pier Glass has since come into public view in a big way. The glass blowers have quite literally attracted locals with their magic, ‘like moths to a flame’, with their colorful, sculptural and innovative glass designs. They have relocated to the public side of the Pier, still of course in Red Hook, and are maintaining a true sense of artistry unique to this special neighborhood.

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HP: What is Pier Glass? We are a process studio, working with lighting designers, artists, architects, firms and museums. We also have one-onone lessons open to the public on Saturdays, as is our show room. We deal a lot with making prototypes, commissioned work, and additionally the teaching. It’s a 2/3 and 1/3 balance. Recent projects include work with Bradley Stevens, Jacob Designs, Peter Murino; mostly private clients, and some residential. We have worked on restoration projects with places like Merchant House, we have done lighting for New Jersey State House, and we’ve also worked with the MoMA. That project was about 6 years in the making. We created lanterns for their Islamic Art wing, a fairly new addition to the museum. It’s gorgeous how our lighting, even though is sometimes hidden, is very much a part of the art and the atmosphere that the room emits. There is Asian art and European art, and our lighting plays to a Mosque look. It is contemporary lighting, juxtaposed with 12th century artifacts. Within the ten rooms, some of our products are there but you can’t necessarily see them, yet they create a sort of protection. They are there, but floating. HP: How long has Pier Glass been in Red hook? We opened up a small studio in a rundown building in the month of May, when Kevin and I moved to New York from Denver about 17 years ago. HP: How would you describe Pier Glass in a few words? We are multi-functional. HP: Why do you choose to live in Red Hook? Well, Kevin and I moved here from Colorado. Kevin came to the city for work as a studio manager at Brooklyn Glass, a

firm right along the harbor. We loved it instantly. That ‘big sky’ - it really gives you a different feeling, living out here. There is a certain openness about it. When we first arrived, Red Hook was rough and ready. There were two main buses, and you needed to be aware of your surroundings at all times. Our first studio literally had no roof; talk about ‘big sky’ and no power, but it was perfect. We approached the landlord who helped us secure it and we set to work on restoration. It’s changed a lot since then. There are local shops popping up here and there where there once was nothing. From coffee to clothing, yet it’s still this very tight knit community. Lots of young families have moved in, but also artists and creative types. People like us. I also feel like housing here is at a premium. When new spaces are built or are available on the market, people know about it. It’s very attractive. Imagine the buildings in Manhattan are like mountains. Well, coming from a place like Denver, in Colorado, you could literally climb the mountains. But that’s the difference. It is big and open and spacious. No mountainous buildings. Red Hook is just like that. HP: What is your favorite hidden place in Red Hook? For a long time I would say, it was us and our studio! - Especially when we were on the private side of the Pier. We were sought out by people who had read about us. For instance, in 2006, I remember a French couple came in who had brought with them one of those airplane magazines that featured an article from Time Out New York, talking about Pier Glass! We like to keep it that way, even though, we have become pretty well known, of course, locally, but also around the world. Visit Pier Glass at 499 Van Brunt St.

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A FAMILY AFFAIR photography by

S U E K W O N text by L A U R E N F E S T A

Good Fork’s owner and operator Ben Schneider, along with his wife and head chef Sohui Kim, know what’s good for your fork. Their Korean inspired American menu will surely beckon for second rounds. Admittedly one of the biggest business risks the couple could have ever undertaken has proven the old adage of ‘Location! Location! Location!’ wrong. Or, perhaps, being in Red Hook, it could not be any more right…. HP: Can you give a brief description of yourself, the restaurant, your involvement and the main team? Before opening Good Fork in 2006, I was a working actor and a carpenter; my wife Sohui had graduated from culinary school. I trusted her talents with food to the point where we decided we should open up a restaurant of our own. Good Fork is now a destination restaurant. Being in Red Hook, there isn’t a whole lot of foot traffic, so everything that typically should have been bad for business on paper, has proven to be the exact opposite. People come from all over New York City and really all over the world. We are able to do what we do, despite the ‘small town’ vibe. My team is a family. It’s really quite amazing. Together we’ve created this physical place, but also this very unique identity and that makes it special.

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HP: Tell us about your signature drink or dish.

HP: Why do you choose to live in Red Hook?

Though we say ‘Korean inspired’ we are not a fusion restaurant by any means. As for dishes, our Korean-style steak and eggs is a top contender, along with our ‘addictive’ chicken dish. And perhaps our most famous dish that has been featured on The Food Network and which Sophie won the culinary contest on Bobby Flay’s Throwdown, is our dumplings. That was a great experience for us! As for drinks, people have come to love our rendition of a Blood Orange Margarita. HP: What kind of crowd do you draw? We get all types of people. Intellectuals, hipsters, artists, business types, elderly folk, Manhattanites. Everyone here is comfortable in the company of their differences. It’s really an awesome mix. It’s grown up and sophisticated, without being stuffy.

I grew up on the Upper East Side and then moved to Chicago for about ten years. I just really love the feeling of living in a small town in a big city. I love the strange characters you get here. The community feeling that we’ve built. Everyone knows each other. It’s a great feeling of support. It’s just so charming, like that old industrial feel, and something of a Mid-Western movie era. HP: What is your favorite hidden place in Red Hook? There are many, but probably Valentino Pier. There are also beautiful parks.


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photography by SUE KWON

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HIDDEN PL4CES / AROUND RED HOOK

REELING IN RED HOOK’S FINEST photography by M I C H A E L M U N D Y text by L A U R E N F E S T A

Art is not an object so much as it is a conversation. How to have one? Usually, it begins with people in a room sharing a dialogue of common interests. Such is the idea behind Estate4’s projects 202 Coffey and 160 Imlay, of which self-described jack-of-all-trades Vladi Banjac, is a ‘small’ part. The vision: not to live in the past of the oft-glamorized hell hole of 1980’s New York City, but to revitalize the idea that artists, both known and struggling, can have a place to come and to live, really live, not just get by, and to converse and create art. HP: Vladi, tell us about the contrast of Red Hook in the 1980’s and 90’s and how it compares to what we see today. The 1980’s in Red Hook and in much of New York City was littered with drugs, gangs, and hookers. It was the wild west of New York. The Lower East Side was the capital, but Red Hook was not a safe place to

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raise a family. All the way up to the 2000’s, there were a lot of killings and turf wars, a lot of drug dealings. Right now we don’t have those gang wars, no more prostitutes, no more cops harassing people. We have some annoying parking laws and Pier curfews, but ultimately, Red Hook has changed so much. It is still this industrial area, and it is an artists’ capital. Williamsburg was sort of the same. There was all kinds of crime twenty years ago. Artists started moving there and things started to change for the better. But then we see money-hungry people coming in and making it too expensive to live. I think Red Hook is safe from that kind of fate. It is not as accessible as Williamsburg is via Manhattan. There is no real viable transportation, no trains you know. I think also everything changed after 9/11 for all of New York City, Red Hook included. There is a shift and new pioneers here.


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HP: How did you end up in Red Hook? I have been hanging out here for 14 years. Right before they built the new Pier, going back even to when it was really horrible. Money helped to build a new Pier and a new park in the days when Greg O’Connell started to flex his muscles. It was transforming into a place for artists, but it did not happen overnight. At first, the people who were running things here, the locals, were looking at all of these people and saying what is happening here? Why are they moving into our neighborhood? HP: Why do you think they started moving to Red Hook? What is so appealing to them – and this only my opinion – but I think because Williamsburg and the Lower East Side, as well as SoHo and West Village became too expensive to rent, the standard of living became too high. If you were an artist, you couldn’t afford your career, especially if you weren’t popular. They looked to places in Brooklyn, first Williamsburg, but even today we can see that this place has become just as bad, in terms of cost of living as anywhere in Manhattan. The places for ‘culture’ have become a sort of trust-fund-kid party land. That’s what started driving a lot of artists to Red Hook. Don’t get me wrong. There has been art here the whole time -- steel workers and painters – they were the pioneers of this place, here in the gritty beginnings. I think these people inspired everybody who would come after. Red Hook is not for people who feel they are entitled to live here. Red Hook is a place for people that deserve to be here. It is for a mature audience. There are lots of people with kids and married people, without the Carroll Gardens aspect, you know, the families and the nine to fivers. Red Hook is a haven for the struggling artist who doesn’t have to struggle so much, as he would in Manhattan, let’s say. The people who live here are part of a tight-knit community and everyone knows each other in a way.

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HP: What kind of work do you do in Red Hook? I am a general contractor. I have a lot of different skills. I graduated from FIT as a fashion designer, and worked in the Fashion District for 8 or 9 years. Fashion, I realized, is an art, but if you really want do your own thing in fashion, you need money. I decided that it was not for me. I looked to business, and later learned how to do tiling, be an electrician, and telecommunications. I am also a fisherman. You need to know how to do a few things if you want to live in New York, I think.

Red Hook is for a mature audience. It is not for everyone and not for just anyone. HP: What is the main goal for the Red Hook projects? A physical goal would be constructing all the buildings, but the ultimate goal is to bring in artists, it is my grand vision of Red Hook, I believe that there has to be a place in New York where it is only for art and not for cultureless rich people to come and take over it. The whole goal is to deserve Red Hook and not turn it into another club paradise. We are looking at the long run. We want to be part of the new wave and the history that is being made in Red Hook. To construct and make all of these buildings takes a lot of work. Aldo works really hard and everyone involved too. We want to create a place for painters, sculpture-makers, even musicians, really any kind of respectful art that brings in a respectful crew. You can be a symphony orchestra or ballet dancers or hip-hop, whatever; there is no discrimination, as

long as it’s controlled and peaceful. There are quite a few artists living here now, who are realizing what Red Hook is. I don’t mean to say, you have to be an artist to live here. There are respectful people who don’t make art, but they respect the art making and that’s fine. People in art and people who are broke and people who love art are welcome. I just never want Red Hook to change into some new Upper West Side. I not interested in having young people who are fake as fake flowers. Manhattan is for them, a place to party and to be single. You know, I have a really talented eleven-year-old son who thinks Manhattan is the coolest place. I think one day even he will get over it. But like I said, Red Hook is for a mature audience. It is not for everyone and not for just anyone. HP: What is your favorite hidden place in Red Hook? I do a lot of kayaking around here and there are a few places that I probably am trespassing, but they are my favorite and they are definitely hidden. One is behind the New York City grain building in Gowanus Bay, where Quadrozzi supplies cement for the World Trade Center, there is a huge abandoned ship and it’s a perfect little ghost town. My second hidden place would be behind the Snapple building, but not so much because now I have the keys! There is also a building next to Fairway, owned by Greg O’Connell. Inside, it has the water taxis and the old trolleys that used to run in Red Hook. It is 200 yards long, with thick walls, and when you look straight down a room, all you see is long arches all the way to the window. It’s really beautiful. But spending an entire summer at 202 Coffey St. certainly has addicted me to it. If only I could show it to all! Red Hook is special. It has the best view of Manhattan and the Statue of Liberty. Remember how I told you I hated Brooklyn? I love Brooklyn now!


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202 COFFEY ST. photography by DEBORAH SENISE


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photography by TYLER SPARKS

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A SOFT SPOT FOR RED HOOK text by

LAUREN FESTA / GINA HARRELL

Lola Schnabel, 29, may be young in age in the art world, but she is no novice. The Brooklyn-based visual artist has been profiled by The New York Times and Interview, has held solo exhibitions, and counts Francesco Clemente, Sandro Chia, Salman Rushdie and John Ahearn as people in her circle. Her art captures the temperament of a person, rather than the likeness; hazy, inky lines form delicate shapes and faces on her canvases . Her own temper? Some call it violet. Courtney Love calls Lola “her own woman”, complimenting Leo Steinberg’s anacoluthon reference for the artist, the Greek term meaning ‘not following’. We talk to this young talent about her work, living in the infamous artist haunt that is the Chelsea Hotel and recently locating to the emerging artist hub of Red Hook.

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HP: What is your connection to Est4te Four? I’m hoping to do a concert at the Coffey Building with this wonderful new musician named Benjamin Clementine, who is like Nina Simone, and make some kind of very large scale work in that space. HP: How did you end up in Red Hook? You know, I don’t know exactly how. I lived in the Chelsea Hotel for the last 10 years so; it’s kind of like a time capsule when you leave a building like that. You realize that you’ve been there for 10 years of like extremely fast-paced action. I lived in this little tower on the roof and so I just think it’s very important for me to have some outdoor space. I love nature and you know, to see the sky and also it’s become so noisy in the city that it’s unbearable. I just rented an apartment on Van Brundt that has a chicken coop so I’m pretty happy and excited about that!  And it has these two beanstalks; it’s like Jack and the Beanstalk going up to the sky.  I’ve been painting in this barn in Amagansett and it’s a little bit isolated, which I like. I have a little shed with a wood burning stove but I need to be able to have people come and look at my work! I just wanted a little transition from Chelsea to deciding where I wanted to go. For a while I thought I’d move out of New York. I’d always walked to Red Hook because I went to school at St Ann’s from the ages of 5 to 17 in Brooklyn Heights.  I’d just walk down Court St to the water and just look at the water. I did my driving test there when I was 16 and I’ve always had a soft spot for that neighborhood. But now it’s really a neighborhood so, it feels a little less isolated like there’s a whole community that’s started there. HP: Red Hook is a storm-zone. Did that deter your decision in any way? The storm didn’t freak me out at all about the area. That happens every 100 years you know! Some people are scared of that. When we had the storm about 3 week ago, I was there in Red Hook in the

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warehouse on Coffey St and I still loved it! I mean, it was so theatrical! And kind of romantic. I don’t know, that’s the kind of stuff that doesn’t scare me at all because it’s just nature. To tell you the truth with the lights shut off I get to do everything I like to do -- I can read by candlelight, I can paint, I can meditate, I can cook if I don’t have to use the gas --  I’m not really a computer person, so the electricity being off doesn’t really affect my interests or my work. HP: Red Hook seems perfect for you! Why do you feel it’s the right place to be? It really is. I love the people here, you know they’re smiling and they’re walking their dogs, and they know each other on a name by name basis, and there is something really nice about being able to see the sky and the water. I’ve always been inspired by being near the sea or any kind of water. It’s very calming to me and kind of informs my dreams and I just don’t want to hear construction and horns going off every five minutes. I really like being around cutting edge thinkers, writers, illustrators, and artists. I like being where artists are because I don’t fit in to any other group of people. That is so important to me; to be around creative people and people who are resourceful. HP: We know you want to do some work at the Coffey Building. What are your thoughts about this building and Imlay? I think they are the two most beautiful buildings in the neighborhood. If you go to the roof of Imlay, it’s like being in a church. Just the view there is stunning. And then those beams in the building on Coffey St are so impressive. Also, I’ve met a lot of nice people since I’ve been there, like the caretaker, Vladi who could not be nicer.  Here’s an example: We were playing soccer the other day and the storm came and I couldn’t get a car service. Vladi had just caught a fish, so he pulled out a barbecue and made us dinner! And he has

kayaks right there. It’s so sweet! The nice thing about Alessandro is that he’s kind of an anomaly. I’ve been to the space that he did in Milan and it’s just interesting to see this kind of real estate broker/ visionary bringing together this nice community of people through his developments. HP: What is his space like in Milan? It’s a big industrial park, almost like Rivington Park in Los Angeles, with flat-roof buildings. I don’t think anyone thought there was promise there and he really imagined that this neighborhood could be good and basically researched it and brought the Armanis, who moved there, and later all these galleries started moving there too. It’s become kind of like a design district. He turned this neighborhood that was nothing into something. Just the fact that we get along shows how sensitive he is! HP: What is your favourite hidden place in Red Hook? I have a few. I went to the barbecue place the other night and it was just so nice to wait in line and get your meat there. I felt like I was in Wyoming or something. It’s fantastic and I love the guys who run it. I love all these little bars and restaurants that serve clam chowder and lobster rolls; you feel like you’re in Maine or New England. HP: How do you think the Est4te Four project will change Red Hook? I think it’s interesting that Alessandro comes from such a progressive background and it’s amazing that this is where the modern day version of that spirit in his family ends up, you know.  The thing is that in the early days of artists there were always patrons that had to do with the pope or the Vatican. It takes someone with this kind of foresight and sensitivity to understand that for any community to be born the art and the artists come first. Wherever the artists go, everyone else follows...


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photography by SUE KWON

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photography by SUE KWON

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HIDDEN PL4CES / AROUND RED HOOK

WHERE THE HEART IS

photography by text by L A U R E N

SUE KWON FESTA

A lesser known H & M is worth a trip to Brooklyn’s far side any day of the week. Home/Made started out as a tiny wine bar aptly named Tini, just down the street from the newest and current location at 293 Van Brunt Street. We caught founder and Chef Monica Bryne and partner Leisah Swenson in the midst of a very busy wedding-filled weekend. From tracking guest lists to prepping tables, arranging flowers and planning the menu, it is just a small part of what Home/Made does. The fully functioning restaurant serves five-star brunch, lunch, dinner and drinks, keeping all of their ingredients seasonal and local, using products like Red Hook-raised eggs, turning out small plates that taste as good as ‘home made’. Like many of the bars and restaurants in the area, Home/Made hints at an incarnation and restoration, keeping price tags on their vintage furnishings right on the furniture. A cool and shady patio surrounded by trees makes it the perfect spot to rehash the week with close friends or start new life chapters with new-found loves. HP: When was Home/Made started? Home/Made was founded by Chef Monica Byrne and myself in 2006. It was then called Tini wine bar and was just down the street from our current location. HP: Have you always lived in Red Hook? Monica has worked in Red Hook for 10 years, but we both moved here in 2007. HP: What about Red Hook suits your business and your lifestyle? We like the industrial artistry of this laid back neighborhood and feel that we are at home when we are in Red Hook. It’s a small town in the middle of the city. HP: What is the signature drink or dish at Home/Made? Grilled Pizza with seasonal toppings like gorgonzola, local figs and Red Hook

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honey, or our Home/Made lemon ricotta with fresh oregano and chilies. Our signature drink is a Rose Sangria with fresh peaches and basil. HP: What kind of crowd do you draw? People who are our customers enjoy rustic, fresh, simply prepared, delicious food and wine or craft beer in a relaxed but lovely atmosphere. Everyone is welcome though, whether you are in your ripped paint-splattered jeans or in a wedding dress – it’s happened! HP: Tell us about your favorite place in Red Hook. For the view go to Valentino Pier. For fabulous shopping, browse and buy at Metal & Thread. For food and drink – other than ours – we love all of our neighbors, especially newcomer Hometown BBQ & Fort Defiance for great cocktails!

HP: What kinds of people would be interested in coming to and living in Red Hook? Those that are attracted to Red Hook enjoy life a little more than the average person. True Red Hookers know their neighbors, for better or for worse, but we are all cut from complementary fabric. We are creative, resourceful and resilient! HP: Future plans for Home/Made? We plan to open our own multi-disciplinary arts and event venue in the near future. At some point we’ll get tired and will retire to Northern California . . . there might be goats in our future. And golden retrievers. Make that several golden retrievers!


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SPILLING GRAPES photography by M I C H A E L M U N D Y text by L A U R E N F E S T A

Mark Snyder wants to make the people of New York City and beyond aware that there are wine-worthy grapes closer than California. His winery is most unusual, located not on gently sloping hills or bedrock and limestone, but on a gritty corner of Brooklyn waterfront in Red Hook. Mark’s wines are made entirely of grapes from New York-based vineyards, New York State being the third largest grape and wine producer in the country. An advocate of locally made wine, Snyder has been splitting grapes in half for his unique method of wine making, with over seventy varieties. His winery, simply named Red Hook Winery, is the hub of a wine revolution.

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HP: Can you give a brief description of yourself, the winery, your involvement in the operations and the main team? I started in 2008 coming from a business distribution company in 2004. I saw a hole in the market, really, the need for awareness about local grape growing regions. I noticed that there was not a lot of knowledge about it, and I happened to have friends who were wine makers. We decided through distribution and making that we would plant deeper roots. Our model is different than most in that Red Hook Winery is the first in Brooklyn to promote local and great quality wines. HP: How would you describe Red Hook Winery in a few words... We’re sharing resources and information. We are experimental. All vineyards that we work with are in New York, namely the Hudson Valley, The Finger Lakes and Suffolk and North Fork. If you know a little about wine, you probably have heard words like Napa Valley and Bordeaux. Historically there is little awareness and we are aiming to change that.

HP: Do you have offer wine tasting? Yes. Tastings are every day from 11am to 5pm, and tours can be booked, as well as special occasions and by appointment. You can pick up our wines at many retailers in the city too, keeping the winery as a point of production, from grape to bottle, and a point of education. HP: What is your favorite hidden place in Red Hook? All of it. I grew up visiting Red Hook with my dad and I always remember loving the industrial spirit. Large manufacturing facilities, the small businesses and artists. Unlike Williamsburg that is very gentrified, it seemed like Red Hook has stuck to the original concept of blue collar hard working people, with no public transportation, no Starbucks. There’s a lot of spirit, and a slow sense of transition. It is, I think, the last outpost for real true industrial New York City spirit. Since we started the winery, it’s become even more evident.

HP: Do you have a signature wine? We don’t have a signature wine, really. Our principal wine makers are Robert Foley and Abe Schoener, and the grapes we use are divided into two main winemaker techniques, so the wines produced are always different. The similarities between the two create our own ‘terroir’ of our region and unlock the secrets. Because each wine is unique -- we have 70 different wines -- following our philosophy to focus on local areas. For each grower, we work with what they make. Some wineries will take a vineyard block and blend grapes, but we do it differently. We want to micro-examine the regions. We have traditionally styled wines and then there are wines we call avant-garde wines, like a skin fermented white wine. Using the skin is not common practice, but it works!

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“Red Hook is, I think, the last outpost for real true industrial New York City spirit. Since we started the winery, it's become even more evident.”


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photography by TYLER SPARKS

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AN ANCHOR IN A HOPEFUL PLACE photography by M I C H A E L M U N D Y text by K E L L Y B A R T N I K

Neighborhoods have long been defined not merely by physical location, but by the appeal of the businesses that inhabit them; particularly those select few that literally provide an ‘anchor’ for residents and visitors alike. The community in Red Hook has been able to rely on local restaurant and bar Hope & Anchor since 2002 as such a staple institution. Years before the influx of local stores and weekend visitors into Red Hook, Hope & Anchor has been recognized as a neighborhood pillar with its unique diner-inspired décor, its inventive take on American fare and a community-driven atmosphere. Current owner, Pete Ascolese, offered us some insight into his experience with operating a business in Red Hook

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“Red Hook has such a great small town feel. All the fellow business owners know it’s not about competing with each other. It’s about making people want to come to the neighborhood.” HP:How long have you owned Hope & Anchor? I was working there prior to the owners offering me the business. I saw a great opportunity. We were already in business for 8 years at that point and Hope &Anchor was THE only place in Red Hook in 2002. So I knew I had to keep it open. HP:What is it about the community in Red Hook that makes it stand apart from other neighborhoods in New York and Brooklyn? Red Hook has such a great small town feel. All the fellow business owners know it’s not about competing with each other. It’s about making people want to come to the neighborhood; and when they come, they’re “Hooked” (Oh boy!) We know that when one restaurant or bakery or business succeeds, it’s good for the whole neighborhood!

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HP:In addition to owning one of the most popular restaurants in Red Hook, you are also a performer. Can you tell us a bit about what you do and if you have any shows coming up? Being in the restaurant biz is a tough gig. But I’m lucky enough to have an amazing kitchen staff, most of who have been with Hope & Anchor from the start, almost 11 years ago. I do have the freedom to do other things. We have Karaoke every Friday & Saturday at 9pm, and I get to host every once in a while as my alter ego Stella Dora. Also I’m workshopping my new musical called For Pete’s Sake! which will be performed at The Cora Studio Theater at 201 Richards St. on November 8 & 9th (also in Red Hook).

HP: What do you envision for the future growth of Red Hook? Red Hook is one of the most buzzed about neighborhoods in Brooklyn today. The buzz becomes a double edge sword in a way. Landlords and property owners are well aware of the buzz and are slowly pushing some businesses out. Being one of the first places to open in 2002, we have seen it grow up around us. I’m just hoping we can stay in the neighborhood a little longer. Red Hook is such a special place to all of us at Hope & Anchor, and I like to think that Hope & Anchor is a special place for Red Hook.


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photography by SUE KWON

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HIDDEN PL4CES / AROUND RED HOOK

DEFYING THE FORT

Hidden Places Takes a Look at Red Hook’s Fort Defiance photography by

M I C H A E L M U N D Y text by L A U R E N F E S T A

Fort Defiance, a bar-cafe located in Red Hook, is quickly becoming the major food destination for tourists, locals, food novices and experienced connoisseurs alike. Operating for just three years, Fort Defiance has already garnered press from those in the know, notably a near-perfect star rating on Yelp, landing on the pages of New York Magazine, Urbanspoon.com and more. The building is a real life manifestation of its name, located on a strong, hard-to-miss corner lot that spans along Van Brunt St. Named after an American fort built during the Revolutionary War, the bar-cafe maintains its rightful place in Red Hook’s history. Owned and operated by St. John Frizell, an award-winning food and drink writer, the seasonal American menu is created and prepared by Matt Fleming, who brings his culinary expertise from popular New York establishments like James, The John Dory and The Spotted Pig. Fleming creates dig-in-worthy dishes, but it’s the locals that have made the layered deli sandwich a Fort Defiance must-try. Aside from the food, Fort Defiance lives up to its unusual coffee and spirit fusion description, and we aren’t talking B52’s. For anyone who thinks that one establishment cannot be good any serving many things, Fort Defiance quietly challenges these naysayers. The talented Fort Defiance staff, from front to back of house, has truly thought of everything, serving Counter Culture coffee, a New York favorite, during the day, and easily transitioning to the nightlife, when mixologist Zac Overman takes over the bar. Thursday night is Zac’s night - what he calls and what locals know as ‘Forbidden Island’. Overman’s guided tour of all things Tiki has become quite the weekly event; an exploration in exotic drinking opportunities, like the many-feathered Jungle Bird,

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the Vicious Virgin and the mighty Samoan Fog Cutter, paired with a dish called Forbidden Noodles. This night especially draws an eclectic crowd, a wonderful mix of locals, looking for a stay-cation in the borough. Of course, all that is wonderful about Red Hook, but places like Fort Defiance have had their share of strife. Much like rebirth that comes from revitalization, what so much of Red Hook is built on, Fort Defiance is no exception. If you recall Hurricane Sandy, you’ll know that towns closest to the water were hit the hardest. The surrounding area in Red Hook sustained considerable amounts of property damage – Fort Defiance taking a lot of the blow. One thing is for sure though: the water of any wave can’t dampen the spirits of a Red Hook resident, nor the establishments they frequent. It is a small example that illustrates the resiliency and the community-feel that has resonated with many of our subjects, the people and places of Red Hook. Fort Defiance was badly damaged during Hurricane Sandy, the basement completely submerged in water with much of their equipment and inventory lost. Their insurance company would not give them a dime, and the government has offered a not-so-helpful disaster loan. Instead of wallowing in despair and closing its doors, Fort Defiance staff reached out to the community of Red Hook for monetary and emotional support. It’s amazing to think that a business could reach out in this way, but once you begin to understand the fabric that unites Red Hook, it isn’t such a crazy proposition. Red Hook is not just a place of people, so much as it is a place of friends. Patrons of Fort Defiance have helped to rebuild their beloved establishment ever since. How many New York City business owners could say the same? In Red Hook, you almost forget the roar of


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“For anyone who thinks one establishment cannot be good at serving many things, Fort Defiance challenges these naysayers.”

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money-hungry venture capitalists and that New York sense of hustlers’ survival mentality. It is in these small acts of community support and generosity that Red Hook stays different - a true hidden gem. If you should so feel inclined to donate, Fort Defiance has a website. Check them out online at fortdefiancebrooklyn. com/blog. It features the latest updates from the restaurant, as does their @ FortDefiance twitter feed, coupled with current happenings that matter to the foodies of Red Hook and interested novices and regular Fort Defiance-goers. Visitors can find more information on daily specials and happenings and even awards won by Fort Defiance; their most recent being a nomination for wine director Alex Halberstadt for a James Beard Award. They also discuss techniques like ‘tumbling’ oysters along the East Coast, giving critiques where it

matters. Guests who are in the restaurant are encouraged to ask one of the waiters for the complimentary WiFi password. How nice! If you needed another reason to go to Fort Defiance, how about taking in their favorite view of the water from Fairway? Breakfast, lunch and dinner are yours to discover. Except on Tuesday nights when Fort Defiance closes its doors and lets its hard-working staff take a night off. After all, the greats need their rest too, and like neighboring Manhattan, Wednesday is never very far off in sight . . . .


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opposite page: photography by SUE KWON / this page: photography by TYLER SPARKS

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HIDDEN PL4CES / A R C H I T E C T S

THE ARCHITECTS: ALDO ANDREOLI + MORRIS ADJMI photography by

MICHAEL MUNDY

What is your inspiration for the design of 160 Imlay?

  We recognized in this building, and generally in Red Hook, the creative spirit that led in the past three decades to the redevelopment of Soho, Tribeca, Chelsea and the Meat Packing District. We are old New Yorkers and we believe that this spirit is slowly abandoning Manhattan, leaving Brooklyn as the new frontier for visionary design. Continued...

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We also saw the opportunity to design larger units; real New York-style lofts that could be sold at a very competitive price compared to the same product in Manhattan. In light of the aftermath of Sandy, we also saw an opportunity to create a resilient and sustainable building, with the contribution of the Landscape design of Future Green. HP: How did designing in The New York Docking Company, one of Red Hook’s most iconic buildings, impact your thought process? We wanted, first of all, to keep as much as possible; the purity of the existing concrete structure, incorporating at the same time the best new technologies available for energy efficiency and design quality. The New York Dock building was built at the dawn of reinforced concrete’s invention. Everything is beautifully engineered and designed. The rebars are oversized and the forms were perfectly constructed as we can see in the texture of the columns and beams structure. We made sure not to hide these details, respecting the original structural grid as much as possible and exposing the existing details in key locations of the apartments. We decided to create five new cores incorporating exit stairs and elevators in order to eliminate the need for long corridors and allowing, for most of the apartments, the possibility of enjoying views of Manhattan from the living rooms and views of Brooklyn from the bedrooms, all at the same time. HP:The renderings show an exceptional range of textured surfaces. What materials are being used in the design and how do you approach incorporating such a wide spectrum of materials? A great source of inspiration was the view of the harbor in front of the building, with the phenomenal beauty of the apparent chaos created by the containers, the trucks and the cranes. This chaos is only apparent; in reality everything moves according to a very well-coordinated set of actions.

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The wide spectrum of materials that we intend to use in the project reflects this aspect as well. As a consequence, we decided to use concrete, corten, steel, deconstructed real containers, oversize industrial windows, metal panel, and cement wood boards. We decided to design a very pure white kitchen, specially fabricated for us by Molteni in Italy, in order to create an interesting contrast between the old and the new, the industrial and the relaxed, and a warm atmosphere of contemporary Italian furniture; together with native vegetation, deciduous plants, grass and grass-crete. This palette appears chaotic but it’s a very well balanced and coordinated set of colors and materials. We revised and discussed every component several times among us, the project manager and the developers. HP:This building appears to us as being inspired by New York harbor living at its finest....how did the city influence your decisions when designing the Imlay? We love the contrast between the urban Manhattan skyline in the background versus the green and almost pastoral landscape of Governor’s Island in the foreground. We find the contrast between green and concrete, nature and human creation, a very fascinating aspect of New York. The success in the creation of The High Line is a clear example of this somehow unique and interesting interaction. We love this marriage between the industrial city and nature. Humanity is moving into the big cities throughout the planet. Let’s make the cities more human. HP: Please describe the experience of collaborating with Est4te Four to create this one-of-a-kind property? Meeting Alessandro Cajrati Crivelli and his team has been an incredible point of inspiration for us. The first project we did together, Spring Studios in Tribeca, was one of the most interesting and challenging undertakings of our career as designers. In Est4te Four’s vision, money is not the only ultimate goal. They work in a very dynamic way; they create spaces

for the creative people and the creative people become an important part of their development. To work with them is an incredible source of inspiration. We are given a lot of space in our creative freedom, and actually we are encouraged to explore new paths in our design process. We also appreciate Est4te Four’s courage to venture into uncharted territories every time they undertake a project as they did in Milan and London, and now in New York and Los Angeles. HP: Please feel free to elaborate on Coffey. 202 Coffey is a very rare historic building. As soon as we saw it we recognized its landmark value. Prominently located in front of Valentino Park and directly across the water from the Statue of Liberty on the opposite side of the bay, this building is almost a mirror of Punta Della Dogana in Venice; carefully renovated into a museum by the vision of Francois Pinault and the design of Tadao Ando. It’s almost incredible that a building so similar in its structural elements is also standing in an area on the waterfront. This building is inclusive of multiple oversize warehouses. The walls are in brick and the structure holding the roof is made of heavy timber trusses. The volume of each space has almost a church-like quality to it, with ceiling heights reaching up to 45’ in certain locations. We strongly believe that 202 Coffey has the perfect pedigree for the conversion into a museum or a conglomerate of art galleries.


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HIDDEN PL4CES / D E V E L O P E R S

FUTURE GREEN STUDIO images courtesy of

FUTURE GREEN STUDIO

Built in 1913 by the New York Dock Company, the 6-story, 235,000 square foot warehouse was one of the first

benches, providing a continuity in materiality. Rows

poured-in-place, reinforced concrete structures erected

of white birch will be arranged on an extension of the

in New York. The site is imbued with a rich history and

original column grid, recalling the peeling paint and the

an inherent beauty that derives from regular geometries,

beautiful sense of perspective of the found condition

monolithic concrete columns and material traces of its

within the building. Steel ribs in the ground floor garden

industrial past. The landscape design strives to embody

will recall the rhythm, structure and materiality of the

the memory of the site and evolved out of a process of

railroad that was an integral part of past operations.

reduction. Through analysis, the site was pared down

Hidden patterns inscribed in the concrete of the

to its necessary essences and invariable components.

sidewalk will be revealed only when it rains producing

Discarded wood beams will be transformed into custom

an ephemeral phenomenon that will mimic the fleeting nature of memory and experience. In our fabrication shop, we explored this technique by creating prototypes of moisture sensitive concrete.

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HIDDEN PL4CES / D E V E L O P E R S

The landscape is also designed to address the storm is recorded in low-maintenance plant palettes developed events that are becoming an increasing issue along New using resilient, drought tolerant perennials, sedums and York’s waterfront, especially in low lying Red Hook. The woody ornamentals. At 160 Imlay, the plant selections ground floor garden is habitable when dry with paths that are further informed by the texture, color and form of wind through a grassy urban meadow and concrete seat- the vegetation that colonized the site in its abandoned walls that step down from the former loading dock at the state. Plants such as Prairie Dropseed (Sporobolus buildings edge. The garden is planted with salt tolerant heterolepis), Seaside Goldenrod (Solidago) or Butterfly species that will withstand inundation and will act as a Weed (Asclepias tuberosa) all recall the character of a sponge during heavy rain events as water collects in low- spontaneous urban meadow. lying paths and swales. Future Green Studio’s signature

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HIDDEN PL4CES / AROUND RED HOOK

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photography by TYLER SPARKS


www.antoniolupi.it_silenzio, design domenico de palo_ayati, design massimo broglio_ design flesso, design al studio_a.d. riccardo fattori_ph. zerotremedia

HIDDEN PL4CES / D E V E L O P E R S

222 Merchandise Mart Plaza, suite 128 Chicago, IL 60654 www.antoniolupichicago.com info@antoniolupichicago.com

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HIDDEN PL4CES / AROUND RED HOOK

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photography by TYLER SPARKS

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HIDDEN PL4CES

ALL THE RIGHT MOVES photography by K A M A U W A R E text by S H A N N O N H U M M E L Founded in 1997 and opening their home studio-theater in Red Hook in 2009, Cora Dance performs the work of critically acclaimed choreographer and Red Hook resident Shannon Hummel. Called by the New York Times “the modern-dance version of an eloquent short story writer (creating) choreography as vivid and true as a Eudora Welty story” among other substantial praise, Hummel is known for her moving works of great emotional potency performed by outstanding, intuitive, stunning performers. Seeking a home base that allowed the company to develop new work while fulfilling a mission of bringing exceptional dancing to underserved communities, Cora opened its home studio-theater in 2009 in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Since that time, the work of Cora has exploded and abounded in Red Hook and beyond. Cora has not only become a fixture in the lives of many RH community members through its innovative pay-what-youcan education programs and presenting season

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in its studio, but Hummel and the company have received substantial recognition for their artistic and community work from press, elected officials and major presenters across the country. In 2014 Shannon Hummel/Cora Dance plans expansion of its programs in Red Hook into two new dance studios in the Red Hook Public Library (through a partnership with Spaceworks), while touring throughout the country and even preparing for its first ever season at the Brooklyn Academy of Music’s Fisher Space. But despite the prestige that these honors bring, Shannon and Cora always consider Red Hook their artistic home and their newest project literally brings that home. The company will premier phase 1 of COMMON DANCES, a suite of site-based dances for park benches, doorways, park paths, restaurants and even the cars and living rooms of Red Hook residents in July 2014. Visit www.coradance.org for details and keep your eyes peeled. When Cora is around, dance can happen anywhere.


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photography by TYLER SPARKS


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SUNNY’S: NICE & NORMAL photography by M I C H A E L M U N D Y text by L A U R E N F E S T A

Sometimes a bar is just a bar, and then sometimes it’s something more. That’s Sunny’s bar, the oldest continually run bar on Brookyln’s waterfront. Co-owner Tone refers to Sunny’s as a cultural institution and regularly hosts art shows and theatre performances.

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A musician herself, her business partner and husband, Sunny Balzano, is the image maker. Inheriting the eponymous bar from his father and uncle, Sunny and Tone have seen their beloved neighborhood change in the best of ways. Much like running a family business, living and working in Red Hook is a labor of love. HP: How long has Sunny’s been operating in Red Hook? It’s been so many years, at least 100, we say! It’s the only bar that has survived the many changes in the neighborhood. There used to be bars on every corner at one point. Bars come and go, but Sunny’s has remained. HP: How would you describe Sunny’s in a few words... Time warp! When you come inside, you feel you have entered a different era. You leave the world behind and you’re someplace else. We have kept the turn of the century feeling. The building itself used to be horse stables that were converted. Sunny’s was operating in a time before electricity. Can you imagine how a hundred years ago, you used to have to drag ice down? Having a cold drink was truly a luxury! Ice in the time when there was no electricity. You had to think about transporting it, storing it, and finally chopping it up at the bar. Sunny’s has been through the ages! HP: How you came to own Sunny’s? Myself and Sunny are the current owners and operators, but the bar has been in Sunny’s family for generations. They own the building. There were two brothers, Sunny’s father and his uncle, took it over and it was the only thing they knew how to do, and do well. Sunny came back to help his father and uncle out when his

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father got older. Eventually, Sunny took over the family business, and it marked a transition. Sunny is artistic, and went out in the world exploring as a photographer. When he started out running Sunny’s he didn’t exactly fit in or attract the same crowd that had been coming there all those years. But even though he didn’t fit into the neighborhood the way it was back then, he has come to attract people who are like him. So now we have this neighborhood in a great rebirthing stage. All of Red Hook, I think is largely changing to this more creative population, because of places like Sunny’s. It was around during war time, and after that, when you could buy a house very cheaply in Red Hook on auction. Now? There is revitalization. It’s a very exciting time to be here. I’ve witnessed it since 1995, when I moved here; Tone moved here in 1996. It was the start of a new era of the bar. It is true I think that the Sunny family have put out a certain spirit over the years that people have come to value and appreciate. HP: What kind of crowd do you draw? All kinds of people! Artistic types, you know, I mentioned. What I really love seeing is that when you walk in Sunny’s you will see every generation at every age sitting in the same place, and they are all comfortable! Every race, every gender… it’s such a good mix. We are all about people. They all feel what is important is that people don’t have to fit in. if you ask yourself that you’re in the wrong. HP: What is your specialty drink? With the colder months coming, hot cider is a favorite. We make a great dark and stormy, even though it’s no Bermuda, Sunny’s is a block away from the water! We like to keep it classic with the drink menu. We do classic cocktails, Manhattan, Old Fashioned…nothing fancy. Sunny’s makes a regular drink. “Nice and Normal”. We keep the selection small, not having a bunch of bottles that no one knows what to do with. HP: What kinds of people do you think would be interested in buying real estate

in Red Hook? I would say people who are investing in the village, in friendships and in the lifestyle. It is so valuable. We have a community experience living here. You know when you live in a denser part of the city, you have your job and your friends, but you get busy, and people come in and out of your life so quickly. But Red Hook and its people really grow together. That’s part of the reason people come and never leave… HP: Why do you choose Red Hook? The reason I moved here was because I wanted to have breathing room for my mind. I need that. When you live in the city, there is a certain density, and you have to ask yourself ‘how dense do you want to live?’ I needed breathing room! You can really run into friends on the street here. It is a neighborhood, really. People know each other. It’s important, for me at least. Size and proportion matter. HP: Tell us about a hidden place in Red Hook... I love the waterfront. The pier, the parks. I’m from Norway so I need to be close to the water. I could go on… Visit Sunny’s online: www.sunnysredhook.com and 253 Conover Street in Red Hook.


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Hidden Places / 160 Imlay