__MAIN_TEXT__
feature-image

Page 1

EQ

PE OP LE | TR AVE L | DE SI G N | FA SH I O N | ST Y L E | D É CO R

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

®

EQLiving.com

FEB/MARCH 2018

68 FABULOUS GETAWAYS FEB/MARCH 2018

DISPLAY UNTIL APRIL 6, 2018

EQUESTRIAN TRAVEL


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES F E B RUA RY | M A RCH 2 0 1 8

42

AMAZING ESCAPES FOR HORSE LOVERS

AMAZING ESCAPES FOR HORSE LOVERS

42

EQliving’s fifth-annual travel guide offers an enticing mix of destinations and experiences that are bound to satisfy any equestrian’s wanderlust appetite.

SIXTY MORE TRAVEL IDEAS

60

Additional destinations from the pages of EQLiving ranging from yachts to a giraffe hotel to the Ferragamo family resort in Tuscany or to a treehouse in England.

AT HOME WITH ODED SHIMONI

62

The Wellington dream home and farm of Oded and his life partner, Nataly Leibovitz, highlight the marvels of collaboration.

HUNT COUNTRY NOIR

70

Contributing editor Sandra Ranke and her creative team present a cross-discipline, fashion-photo essay merging Victorian high necks with formal hunting attire.

MANHATTAN SADDLERY

82

A jewel amidst the metropolitan landscape of New York City, this thriving tack shop is considered the “equicenter” for the area’s equestrians.

86

A FINE BALANCE OF POWER AND PALETTE 4 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

A FINE BALANCE OF POWER AND PALETTE

86

The vivid canvases of artist Susan Easton Burns are alive with energy, passion, and equine mystique.


Discover the Path Less Taken DISTINCTIVE ARCHITECTURE, RESIDENCES & HOMESITES G O L F C L U B • T E N N I S • B E AC H C L U B • E Q U E S T R I A N

W I N D S O R F L O R I DA . C O M


EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS F E B RUA RY | M A RCH 2 0 1 8

20

24

EQ ESSENTIALS

FOOD + DRINK

14

Executive Chef David Viviano of Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa shares a favorite recipe for butternut squash ravioli.

36

Spring Island’s Ron Dietrich focuses on crafting new cocktails such as his Tabby Toddy and Spring Island Manhattan. FASHION

16

32

Jennie Turner Garlington and her daughter Hope design one-of-a-kind satchels sourced from eclectic collectors’ items.

20

Wrap up in luxury alpaca designed by Carina Hildebrandt. FAVORITES

18

Martha Jolicoeur understands Wellington, Florida, real estate.

32

Artist Chris Cosma designs a fitness tool for equestrians.

40

36

Read how horses can move us toward more freedom of body and soul in an excerpt from Our Horses, Ourselves by Paula Josa-Jones.

41

40

The Kentucky “book women” rode miles on horseback to deliver library books during the Great Depression. STYLE

24

Jewelry designers add modern options for active equestrians. ARTS

26

Queen Elizabeth visits artist Andy Scott’s Kelpies sculpture.

106 ON THE COVER Equestrian sport, including the Guards Polo Academy, is idyllic at the fivestar, Coworth Park Hotel in Ascot, England.

PEOPLE

8

IN EACH ISSUE

Paul Chevalier of Whispering Angel Rosé thinks rosé is becoming the “new Champagne” of polo.

EDITOR’S NOTE 10 Welcome to Equestrian Living.

Meet Jeff Petska, the United States Reining team’s Chef d’Equipe.

RESOURCES

102

Look for CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102 to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 106 Meet Odin, a Great Pyrenees who stood guard over his family’s goat herd during the devastating fires in Santa Rosa, California.

6 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

34

SCIENCE

30

Wellington’s recently renovated Palm Beach Equine Clinic is changing the landscape of veterinary medicine. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

91

Fabulous farms and ranches.


OWN A LEGEND…. A spirited performer, ideal for superyacht regattas and luxurious bluewater cruising alike, the award-winning 106’ sailing yacht DANCE SMARTLY is now offered for sale.

Built in America by the renowned Palmer Johnson Yacht Yard, this stunning Ron Hol-

light and visibility and myriad options for dining and entertainment. On deck, DANCE

land design with Peter Beeldsnijder interior boasts beautiful hand-crafted teak joinery,

SMARTLY features a large, comfortable protected cockpit area that safely accommo-

three spacious en suite owner and guest cabins aft, plus a modern galley with private

dates guests for sailing or al fresco dining. Her powerful sail plan is easily controlled

crew quarters forward. As distinctive and pedigreed as the Breeder’s Cup champion

by push-button hydraulic systems, while her long list of other systems and top-quali-

thoroughbred racehorse whose name she proudly carries, this pedigreed yacht features

ty equipment, continually upgraded, ensures safe, comfortable living aboard or world

an expansive split-level raised pilothouse and full-beam main salon with exceptional

cruising in style. Video: youtu.be/OYGWJ9n3Pj0

Florida (954) 527-4320 | Info@WellingtonYachts.com | Rhode Island (401) 683-6070 TED HOOD ✯ MILES DAVID ✯ CHRIS FAIRFAX ✯ DOLF HAFFENREFFER ✯ CHET HARTSHORN ✯ MURRAY LORD BOB MARSTON ✯ JOHN PERKINS ✯ JIM WETHERALD ✯ BRUCE SZAMIER

See more at WellingtonYachts.com


EQ P E O P L E

THE NEW POPULARITY OF PINK PAUL CHEVALIER

of Whispering Angel Rosé on the next Champagne of polo.

example of this. It really has never been better.

As Forbes magazine noted, “Ten years ago no one, not least the fashionable set, would drink any kind of rosé. Fast forward a decade, and it’s become the beverage of choice for the summer thanks to a few delicious brands who brought over their goods from France.”

Does Whispering Angel have a special relationship with polo?

Why do you think rosé is enjoying such a resurgence?

The rosé category was pretty much nonexistent 10 years ago in the U.S. So, it has been our vocation to educate people about rosé and help spread the word. A sort of “Rosé Town Hall” approach has been the key to our success. But there is still much to be done. How was Whispering Angel first created?

It was created at Château D’Esclans back in 2006, which was the first vintage. Sacha Lichine and Patrick Léon, worldrenowned winemakers, crafted a new generation of rosé from Provence using innovative winemaking techniques to produce a richer and more fruit-forward style of wine. Hence, a new generation of rosé was born, and the name became Whispering Angel. Why is it so popular in America? It appears to have a cult following here.

As I mentioned, one of the essential points of difference with Château 8 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

In Equestrian Living’s travels, we’ve noticed that all of a sudden, rosé was everywhere—especially Whispering Angel, which just celebrated its 10th anniversary. We spoke with Paul Chevalier, the national fine-wine director at Shaw Ross Imports, that brings the wine to America.

Yes, and I think that rosé is starting to become the “new Champagne” of polo. Ten to 15 years ago it was all about bubbles; now it is rosé. It is certainly the perfect beverage to be enjoyed chilled in the types of beautiful outdoor settings where polo is played. The light, pale, and dry style of the rosés that we produce in Provence have an elegant and chic feel about them. Château D’Esclans has participated in many of the major polo tournaments, Palm Beach and Palm Desert in the winter, and Greenwich as well as St. Tropez in the summer. Did you grow up with horses?

D’Esclans, where the Whispering Angel is produced, is that we spend a lot of time in the market teaching about, and promoting, rosé. We take a very hands-on approach that is neither fake nor full of gimmicks. Putting a face behind the brand, versus the many other wines, which are mass produced with little personality, is important as well. I think that this has helped create the cult following that Whispering Angel has today. Plus Whispering Angel continues to score well with wine writers and sommeliers. The current 2016 vintage of Whispering Angel rosé is a good

My father had a passion for horses. As a child, I spent many afternoons after school in stables because he owned several race horses. You must lead a very interesting life.

Yes, I call it the rosé lifestyle. It takes me from Nantucket and the Hamptons to the ski slopes of Aspen, not to mention Miami and St. Barths in the winter. But best of all, the home of Château D’Esclans is St. Tropez, where rosé began, in the heart of Provence. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


periodarchitectureltd.com


EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

PHOTO GEORGE KAMPER

WELCOME

I

am somewhat addicted to Instagram, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Social media plays a significant role at Equestrian Living, with the keen intent of offering our content over a variety of channels, on an array of devices, and to a wider scope of readers. It’s an arena that is progressing at warp speed, and I aspire to keep pace. From a creative aspect, it is the incredible imagery on Instagram that draws me in and holds my attention. I typically view the application on an iPhone, which displays neatly cropped images that evoke imaginative scenarios of what may lie outside the frame. For instance, a photo of a barn, barely visible behind a curtain of falling snow, leads me to wonder if it is merely part of a sprawling New England horse farm, or whether a solitary rider enjoying a hack on a wooded trail will emerge onto a vast open landscape. While these are pensive images, the undiscovered

corners of a photograph can lead a viewer to unlimited destinations. In our fifth-annual “Amazing Escapes for Horse Lovers” feature, the photographs dazzle and spark the imagination, especially for those with a penchant for adventure. We’ve assembled an exciting mix of locations and experiences that range from a horseback desert adventure in Chile to an exotic, wild-animal reserve/retreat in England. Our two personal-travel diaries, by contributing editors Bridget Arsenault and Betsy Stein, leave less speculation as to what lies beyond the frames of the photos as they each share in marvelous detail their first-hand experiences in England and Nicaragua. Our fashion-photo essay, “Hunt Country Noir,” is a regal step out for us into the cross-discipline fashion realm. Contributing editor Sandra Ranke and her creative team present a striking narrative, where horses and fashion and strength and beauty coexist in visual harmony. On our visit to the Wellington, Florida, home of professional equestrians Oded Shimoni and Nataly Leibovitz, we witnessed the success of shared visions. In collaboration with designer Vance Burke, they have brilliantly created a modern approach to an open-concept farmhouse. Continuing with this creative theme, we are thrilled to present the arresting paintings of Susan Easton Burns, who has been selected as the official artist for the 2018 Windsor Charity Polo Cup in Vero Beach, Florida. You’ll find her vibrant canvases alive with energy and passion. Additionally, we visit the iconic Manhattan Saddlery, the lone surviving

10 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

tack shop in New York City. We introduce you to Paul Chevalier, the man who predicts rosé is becoming the new Champagne of polo, and share fascinating facts about Jeff Petska, the Chef d’Equipe of the United States Reining team. Of course, we will tempt you with a collection of style, fashion, and food-and-drink options. This issue’s Barn Dog is a particularly heartwarming story about a Great Pyrenees who valiantly stood guard over his owner’s goats and traumatized deer during the Tubbs fire in Santa Rosa, California, last October. You may want to read this with tissues in hand. I invite you to visit our newly designed website, eqliving.com. It’s fresh, inviting, easy to navigate, and showcases the magnificent imagery of Equestrian Living in unparalleled fashion. Soon, the snow-bound EQLiving team will be taking flight to warmer climates, with a full roster of events to attend and equestrians to meet. We look forward to sharing the highlights and gorgeous photography that are bound to capture one’s imagination.


Inside. Outside. Seaside. Experience fresh and authentic Palm Beach flavors at one of our signature restaurants.

BREEZE OCEAN KITCHEN Oceanfront dining with Floridian flavors, enjoy a local craft beer menu curated by our in-house cicerone. Serving an all-day menu from lunch to dusk daily. ANGLE Contemporary American cuisine featuring seasonal ingredients; indulge in an award-winning wine selection. Open for dinner Tuesday – Saturday. TEMPLE ORANGE MEDITERRANEAN BISTRO Creative Mediterranean-inspired daily menu with a “Veuve Rich” Sunday Champagne brunch and Bloody Mary bar. Open for breakfast, lunch and dinner daily. STIR Enjoy gourmet coffees, hand-crafted cocktails, fine wines and small plates, and live weekend entertainment. Open daily. For reservations or more information, contact 561 540 4924. Complimentary valet parking.

100 SOUTH OCEAN BLVD. MANALAPAN FL 33462 EAUPALMBEACH.COM/DINING #EAUMOMENTS


EQ F E B R U A R Y / M A R C H 2 0 1 8

EQ U E S TR I A N EQLiving.com

LIVING

®

VOLUME 7 NUMBER 1 EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters SENIOR EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen Hodess CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rebecca Baldridge, Sandra Ranke, Judy Richter, Sue Weakley DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SOCIAL MEDIA & WEB CONTENT Maggie Carty EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer UK & LONDON EDITOR Bridget Arsenault CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lindsay Brock, Anika Burgess, Carol Cohen Hodess, Allie Layos, Andy Scott, Betsy Stein EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Emily Holowczak PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger PUBLISHING CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle DIGITAL Daniel Flint PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATION HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@eqliving.com Joyce Jones, 954-796-1809, jones@eqliving.com Dick Holcomb, 770-331-7788, dickholc@bellsouth.net EQ LIVING ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. David Sloan, Conceptual Advisor, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, Fashion | LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla. EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY (EQ) became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $24.95 | Canada $39.95. SUBSCRIBE: eqliving.com/subscribe To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQLiving, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: Web: eqliving.com/manage-subscription Tel: 212-699-3636 Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com or mail to 41 East 11th St., 11th Flr., New York, NY 10003

Award Winning Luxury Builder www.woolems.com 2301 Centrepark West Drive #150 West Palm Beach, FL 33409 (561) 835-0401 12000 Biscayne Blvd. #505 Miami, FL 33181 (305) 572-1111

©2018. All rights reserved, Wynnwood Media, LLC. No portion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Living, Equestrian Quarterly, and EQ are.registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.....

Scan to subscribe:

OFFICIAL MEDIA PARTNER US EQUESTRIAN FEDERATION

EQ was chosen OVERALL BEST EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE in its inaugural year by American Horse Publications.

Barnes & Noble and newsstand distribution:

CURTIS CIRCULATION COMPANY


HeatHer D engler hdengler@equestriansir.com 561.722.6702

EquEstrian Club EstatEs Extraordinary opportunity | EstatE homE | Golf Cart to WEf | 1.36-aCrE ovErsizEd lot | 6 BEdrooms | 6.5 Bathrooms | mEdia room | rEsort-stylE pool | priCE upon rEquEst


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

LOC

L

Chef DAVID VIVIANO shares a favorite recipe.

F L AVO R

A

PALM BEACH DELECTABLE T UN CO ITES E RS OR H O FAV

RY

A

BUTTERNUT SQUASH

DAVID VIVIANO, EXECUTIVE CHEF

RAVIOLI

seasoned culinarian with more than 20 years’ experience that spans independent fine dining restaurants and luxury hotels, chef David Viviano joined Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa in July of 2017. He oversees all culinary operations of the oceanfront property including fine dining room Angle, alfresco eatery Breeze Ocean Kitchen, Temple Orange Mediterranean Bistro, Stir Bar and Lounge, inroom dining, and social events. Most recently, Viviano served as executive chef at Montage Kapalua Bay in Maui. There, he led a team of more than 40 associates managing all culinary operations across the luxury resort, including menu creation and kitchen operations for signature restaurant Cane & Canoe. During his tenure, the oceanfront property was awarded the Forbes Five-Star designation and Cane & Canoe the Forbes Four-Star designation for two years running. Previously, Viviano held the unique title of Chef&B at the St. Regis Aspen Resort and Spa, where he oversaw all culinary operations and a team of more than 70 professionals. He also served in various hotels within the Westin Hotels and Resorts portfolio as well at the St. Regis Princeville, the Ritz-Carlton Dearborn, and in high-end restaurants such as San Francisco’s critically acclaimed Jardinière. Viviano’s journey to the culinary world came via an unconventional route. He holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism and is passionate about writing. After realizing his true calling was to be a chef, he expertly melded his two skills by writing culinary-focused stories in a multitude of lifestyle publications. He enjoys cooking at home, surfing, and traveling with his wife, Christina, and sons, Dean and Leo.

INGREDIENTS 8 ravioli 2 ounces brown butter 1 teaspoon sage, chiffonade 1 tablespoon butter 1 butternut squash, diced, roasted 1 apple, small, diced 1 teaspoon parsley, chopped ½ ounce pine nuts 1 toasted piece of sage, fried 1 tablespoon aged balsamic PREPARATION 1. In a pot of boiling water, blanch ravioli until tender and hot. 2. Warm brown butter and add ravioli. 3. Heat olive oil in a large sauté pan on medium heat 4. Sauté apples, add butternut squash, add parsley. 5. Plate ravioli according to picture. Put apples and squash in center. 6. Spoon brown butter over ravioli, drizzle balsamic, garnish with pine nuts and fried sage.

14 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

EAU PALM BEACH is one of only two Forbes Five-Star resorts in Palm Beach and of eight in Florida. It is also an AAA Five Diamond Award winner in 2016; a Condé Nast Traveler’s Readers’ Choice Award winner as #1 Resort in Florida in 2016 and 2015; and Travel + Leisure: World’s Best Award winner in 2013. Situated on a private beach on seven acres of oceanfront with lush tropical gardens, guests are welcomed with Champagne, breathtaking ocean views, and cooling tropical breezes. The resort is known for its sumptuous accommodations designed by Jonathan Adler and the awardwinning 42,000-square-foot Eau Spa.

CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


Build the perfect wedding venue.

B&D WILL BRING YOUR WEDDING BARN VISION TO LIFE

B&D Builders knows timber frame barns – inside and out. Their exquisite craftsmanship and attention to detail is second to none. B&D also knows how to build a venue that fulfills your vision and exceeds your expectations. Call B&D Builders to discuss your wedding barn design.

717.687.0292 | CustomBarnBuilding.com


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

HOPE UNLIMITED BAGS Jennie Turner Garlington designs ONE-OF-A-KIND SATCHELS with her daughter Hope.

J

ennie Turner Garlington, former CNN producer and producer of the current PBS series EcoSense for Living, began creating oneof-a-kind satchels in early 2015 from eclectic collector’s items she spotted on her travels. After finding them well-received, she launched Hope Unlimited Bags, a line of totes she has designed with her 12-year-old daughter Hope. The bags are largely inspired by American Indian art and culture. Nothing is wasted and no two are the same. “We take all kinds of time designing them, which makes each one all the more meaningful,” Jennie said. “Hope Unlimited Bags are truly a labor of love and represent exactly what those words mean—time spent together, looking

Jennie Turner Garlington, right, and her daughter Hope with their uniquely designed bags sourced from eclectic collector’s items.

forward to a positive future, and appreciating that everything has a place, a use, and its own unique potential.” Jennie and Hope find inspiration for Hope Unlimited Bags in nature and from exploring new shops and locations when they travel. They may find a silver concho belt buckle while visiting Dad/ Granddad, Ted Turner, in Montana, pick up a beautiful kilim rug at an antique shop in Jennie’s hometown of Atlanta, or come across an outstanding leather remnant at a farrier’s shop in their home state of Kentucky.

16 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

“These bags are real works of art and very personal,” Jennie said. “After Hope and I find the perfect way to accessorize and design them, we work in lockstep with a local craftsman who actually hand-sews the bag on an antique Singer machine. It’s a dying art.” Each bag is completely unique and can take up to three months to design and produce. They are satchel-sized, perfect for easy travel or toting an iPad. “They are at once eclectic and a combination of objects that hold special meaning,” Jennie said. “And Hope’s input is incredibly valuable because she’s so creative and has that child’s pure eye. She sees things that adults can’t, gives me ideas, and, together, we go with it.” CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

MEET THE EXPERT MARTHA JOLICOEUR

understands WELLINGTON REAL ESTATE from an equestrian’s viewpoint.

M

ERIN GILMORE

artha Jolicoeur first became involved in the equestrian world as a show-jumping athlete. Training under the legendary George Morris, she competed throughout North America and Europe and was named the American Grand Prix Association Rookie of the Year in 1985. A licensed broker since 1991, Martha applied to real estate the same principles that made her successful in the show ring. After moving to Wellington, Florida, 13 years ago, Jolicoeur quickly established herself as one of the area’s most successful brokers and a member of the elite Douglas Elliman Real Estate sports and entertainment division. Deeply involved in the equestrian community, Martha has presented the weekly Leading Lady Rider Award at the Winter Equestrian Festival for the past eight years. Martha explains, “I have been working in the Wellington real estate community since 2005, but I have been in love with the location since first showing here myself as a junior rider. For me, Wellington is a unique and fabulously special place because it is not dedicated to one discipline. It is the winter horse capital of the world because you can find show jumping, dressage, polo, racing, and everything in between here.” Wellington equestrian properties

typically have less acreage than elsewhere, but they are carefully laid out so that there is ample room for luxurious homes for horses and humans alike. As an example, Martha notes, “I really love the listing I have on Palma Lane (below). It is a French-chateau-inspired estate in Palm Beach Point that includes five turn-out paddocks, a 120by 230-foot all-weather Riso arena, and a 12-stall barn with a luxurious owner’s lounge, on 5.44 immaculately landscaped acres. It’s an ideal retreat for any professional equestrian, their family, and their string of horses. The main house boasts four bedrooms, four baths, a billiard room, and a divine pool and patio area overlooking the barn and arena.” When asked why both buyers and sellers choose to work with her, Martha says, “I feel the same passion for equestrian real estate that I did when I was in the ring, jumping fences. I’m an equestrian. I understand what horsemen and -women need and want for their horses and their families. That understanding, as well as my involvement with equestrian events like the Winter Equestrian Festival and the Adequan Global Dressage Festival, put me in front of a target audience every day. A lot of times people focus on the buyer’s experience when referring to real estate, but I take pride in dedicating myself to both buyers and sellers. I try to provide an excellent experience to every client, which has rewarded me with a loyal base of buyers and sellers.” CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

18 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR PROVIDING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE SERVICE FOR THE GLOBAL EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY | WELLINGTON, FL

LUXURY HOME IN MIZNER ESTATES | $2,895,000 | RX10316148 | This secluded estate home features the best view in Palm Beach Polo & Country Club. With an infinity edge pool that seamlessly blends with views of the lake, golf course, and the 92-acre wildlife preserve, the 4 bedroom 5.5 bath home features pocket glass sliders in the kitchen and family room that allow for an outstanding indoor/outdoor living experience. The full-length frameless windows bring light, openness, and sophistication to this opulent residence.

LAKEFIELD WEST HOME | $799,000 | RX10386309 | Within a private gated community, this 4 bedroom, 4 bath home boasts modern finishes with a stylistic nod to rustic charm. Meticulous renovations have yielded a 2-car garage, hardwood floors throughout the home, a striking gourmet kitchen, and walk-in closets. Custom stone detailing flows from inside the residence through to the outdoor patio, centered around a pristine pool. With views overlooking the 18th fairway of The Wanderers Club Golf Course, this spacious lot is the ideal place to call home.

ISLAND LAKE NORTH | $765,000 | RX10392751 | Don’t miss the opportunity to own this impeccably renovated and aesthetically decorated bungalow in the much sought-after Golf and Tennis Village situated in the Palm Beach Polo & Country Club. Remodeled completely from Restoration Hardware, this well-appointed 2 bedroom, 2 bath bungalow boasts new wood floors, a new kitchen, and all-new baths. An additional bedroom and bathroom can be found in the guest cottage located in the bungalow’s private courtyard.

SHADY OAKS | $975,000 | RX10398184 | This stunning new renovation by Camille Branca Designs combines rustic and contemporary style within Palm Beach Polo & Country Club. The 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom home overlooks the Dunes golf course and features exposed beams, wide plank hardwood flooring, and a gourmet kitchen with exceptional architectural details. Large sliding glass doors lead to a private courtyard, guest house, and back patio centered around a large soaking pool with fountains, an elevated hot tub, and southwestern sunset views.

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR, PA BROKER ASSOCIATE 561 797 8040 www.marthasproperties.com 1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

THE SOFTER SIDE OF CARINA HILDEBRANDT This skillful designer has created a LUXURY ALPACA LABEL known for its understated style, unique combination of textures, and rich color palettes.

D

esigner Carina Hildebrandt established her eponymous label of luxury, 100 percent baby-alpaca and organic cotton knits in 2006. All of her refined pieces are sustainably and ethically produced in her artisanal workshop in Peru. Today, the collection is known for its understated style, rich color palette, and unique combination of textures. Carina’s love affair with textiles and color began at an early age. She grew up in the vibrant hub of Hong Kong and spent summers trolling fabric markets in Rajasthan, India, and travelling across the Far East and South America with her mother, where they discovered and treasured different cultures and their rich heritages. With a mathematics degree under her belt and an astute head for business on her shoulders, Carina had headed into a finance career in London, England. At age 32 in Paris, a chance encounter with the unique alpaca fiber at Maison & Objet, an international authority on home dÊcor, design, and lifestyle trends, sparked the idea for a luxury-knits business that Carina pursued with characteristic determination 20 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

The long-belted jacket is a versatile and high-quality piece that will add a stylish layer to any outfit. Two large front pockets, a thick alpaca belt with hidden crochet loops at the waist, and the beautiful rectangular horn buckle closing the belt are stunning details. A discrete, rectangular horn button at the neck closes the naturally draping neckline into a smarter yet still soft collar. $579.

and which is now celebrating its 10th anniversary. Trusting her instincts, Carina travelled to Peru and began experimenting. By 2010, she single-handedly set up her own workshop in Lima. With sustainability and ethical work practices at the core of her business, Carina and her team developed a unique finishing technique for the highestgrade raw baby-alpaca and organic-cotton fibers used in her collection. This labor-intensive, hands-on process allowed Carina to experiment on the yarns, giving them an incredibly soft, textured touch that lasts. Carina’s collection has grown organically since its launch, and she now sells globally to a dedicated clientele spanning the U.S., Germany, and Scandinavia. She plans to extend her collection to include homeware for the first time, a development that nods to the interior design diploma she recently earned. Carina designs from her studio by the river in Barnes, London. Every season she visits the dedicated and highly skilled women she supports there and who work with her to finalize the carefully considered and often unique details on each CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102 piece.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

Made from a warm, felted, double-faced baby alpaca with a touch of wool, this above-theknee car coat has a structured, gently fitted shape that is smart and stylish. The doublebreasted crossover with vintage-style bronze hooks and hand-crocheted loops are embedded into the felt to fasten. $1,068.

Using the brand’s luxury 100 percent babyalpaca yarn, these silky soft, super thick, yet light-to-wear hand-knit loop scarves are created for Carina by artisan knitters in their homes outside Lima, Peru. Nothing will keep your neck warmer while providing the perfect colorful accessory to every winter coat. $304.

The ideal travel companion, this long-sleeved shrug cocoon is an incredibly versatile coat that can be worn in a variety of ways: as a jacket with a beautifully draped front, as a shrug-styled jacket, or turned completely upside down to become a long, cocoon-shaped coat. $649.

This long striped coat is made from felted 100 percent baby alpaca. Substantial enough to keep you warm outdoors from spring through fall, the double-height neck drapes smoothly when open, then folds over and fastens with bespoke bronze hooks and discrete crochet loops for a smart-looking funnel neck. $1,520.

Carina‘s renowned and sometimes unexpected color combinations make this cozy, 100 percent baby alpaca poncho sweater truly special. The cowl neck and long cuffs with thumbhole are in a silky, double-weight knit. The added pockets will undoubtedly make it your favorite go-to winter throw-over. $649.

The long felt coat with hood is the ultimate in winter chic. Made from the brand’s unique felted 100 percent baby alpaca, it’s warm enough for spring and fall and can be worn as a duster indoors during the winter. The coat features wide contasting color stripes at the bottom, a gently fitted shape, and discreet side pockets. $1,520. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 2 1


+1 561-313-4367

Private 10 Acre Farm - 4 bedroom main residence with a beautifully landscaped pool & patio area. 1Br/1Bth guest house. 12 Stall barn with 2 wash stalls, grooms apartment, feed, tack & laundry rooms. Oversized riding arena with mirrors, 3 acre grass riding field, 8 grass paddocks, hot-walker and round pen. Plenty of room to expand or build a covered arena. Offered at $2,200,000

Saddle Trail - Lovely pool home with 4Br/5Bths plus den/office - situated on 2.9 acres with 4 stall center-aisle stable with feed & tack rooms. The home boasts center-island kitchen, granite counters, breakfast area and large family room with French doors leading out to the screened pool & hot tub. Great outdoor entertaining areas with built-in grill, cabana with full bath and walk-up bar. Offered at $1,980,000

Loxahatchee Groves - 11 Acre equestrian property with a 3-bedroom home all with ensuite baths & walk-in closets. There are 2 stables totaling 17 stalls, air conditioned feed and tack room, fly system, filtered water to each stall, 12 paddocks & oversized riding arena, 4 RV hookups. Prime location, 1 block over the Wellington line. Offered at $1,950,000

Las Palmas Equestrian - 5.16 acres, this is the last vacant lot left in this premiere gated enclave of equestrian estates. The lot is Located at the cul de sac of the street and the perimeter is already fenced. A private location, yet just minutes to all of Wellington's equestrian competition venues. A great escape for both you and your horses. Offered at $1,200,000

Versailles - Lovely 2 story lakefront home with the master and 1 guest bedroom on the ground floor. 3 bedrooms, loft area and theatre upstairs. Large cook’s kitchen with center-island kitchen with prep sink, Viking gas cooking, Wolf double ovens, warming drawer, subzero refrigerator and two dishwashers. Stunning pool and patio with summer kitchen - perfect for entertaining. Offered at $999,000

Equestrian Club - Beautiful 6BR lakefront home with a large backyard & private resort style pool. Center-island kitchen with new stainless steel appliances & gas cooking. Freshly painted inside & out and new tile floors. Large master suite with screened balcony overlooking the pool and lake. The home also boasts a whole house generator & 6 infrared security cameras. Gated subdivision in a prime Wellington location with great schools. Offered at $825,000

Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com

Download Matt Johnson’s mobile real estate app To get FREE access to all local listings from your smartphone or tablet

©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


MattJohnson.evusa.com

Natures Point - 10 Acre equestrian estate with direct bridle path access & within true hacking distance to WEF. 5 BR, 7 BA pool home with top quality detail & finishes. 14 stall center-aisle stable with 3 staff apts, 10 grass paddocks, round pen, sand riding arena & grass grand prix field. Offered at $11,900,000

Aspen Glen - Private 15 acre custom designed home with top equestrian facilities, 11 stalls, riding arena, underground watering system, hot walker & round pen. The main residence features cathedral ceilings, fireplaces with floor to ceiling stone chimney, wood & marble floors, elevator, screened balconies & infinity pool with private water vistas. Offered at $11,000,000

Southfields - Perfect equestrian enclave on 3.74 acres in a prime location, easy access to bridle paths & within hacking distance to the IPC & WEF showgrounds. Immaculate 4BR, 4.5 Bth home boasting a cabana guest suite. 12 Stall courtyard barn complete with 8 paddocks & riding arena, brick pavered aisle-ways, tongue and groove ceilings. Adjacent 11 acres available. Offered at $4,950,000

Palm Beach Point - 5 acre contemporary 4BR, 4.5BA home with beautiful natural light, new impact windows & doors, center island kitchen, gas cooking, fireplace, private outdoor entertaining areas, herb garden & 65" lap pool. Stunning half-circle, courtyard barn with riding arena, grass turnout paddocks and up to 12 stalls allowed. Offered at $4,750,000

40 Acre Equestrian Facility- This property has every amenity a horse person could desire: 3 BR owner's residence with pool, 58 Stalls, covered 90' x 225' arena, 2 outdoor arenas, round pen, exercise walker, large paddocks and room for a stick & ball field or grand prix field. Plus, 4Br/2Bth guest cottage and a club house with meeting room, dining and locker facilities. Prime location just minutes to downtown Stuart, the beaches and 1 hour to Wellington. Offered at $3,950,000

Loxahatchee Groves - This 13.5 acre equestrian property consists of nine buildable deeded parcels with 2 single family residences and a stable that needs the interior built out. Located in Loxahatchee Groves on F Road, 2 blocks off of Southern Blvd. across from Wellington's Big Blue Trace. Surrounded by premium equestrian estates such as Cypress Creek Polo, Oak Tree Farm Stables, Vinceramos Riding Center and Quail Farm Stables. Offered at $2,300,000

Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com

Download Matt Johnson’s mobile real estate app To get FREE access to all local listings from your smartphone or tablet

©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

BIJOU AND BANGLES FOR THE ACTIVELY CHIC 1

4 2

3

Jewelry designers are ramping up their 5

MODERN OPTIONS

for today’s active equestrian.

6

9

7 8 1. Charriol’s Forever necklace reflects bespoke fashion inspired by Celtic torque adornments. It features a stainless steel chain and a yellow gold PVD stainless cable ring. $155. 2. The large-model Attelage bracelet, in noir by Hermès is constructed of silver and swift calfskin. $1,300. 3, 7. Charriol’s Forever earrings, a young-at-heart favorite, are constructed of yellow-gold steel and steel cable. $245. The matching Forever bangle is made of stainless steel PVD yellow and stainless steel cable. $260. 4. David Yurman’s sterling silver Crossover X bracelet with diamonds showcases the collection’s entwined range of smooth and cabled cords. $875. 5. The Hermès Coup de Fouet au bloc hinged bracelet in rayon is constructed of enamel, palladium-plated hardware. $830.

10

6. Hiho Silver’s sterling silver Saddle Rider on double-wrap leather boasts bridle-inspired leather and fastens with a sterling-silver stirrup buckle. $114. 8. Equestrian crystal earrings by Ralph Lauren. The equestrianinspired brass chains cascade from crystal pearl studs, giving the fourinch drop, Italian-made earrings dynamic movement. $295. 9. The waterproof Blake bracelet by ZadehNY is made of yellow gold and woven in their signature parachute cord. Ambiguously equestrian, it can be worn in the shower and while horsing around. $1,600. 10. The leather cuff Oldenburg Stirrup bracelet by Atelier CG is hand crafted out of Dakota skin and finished with a bridal stitch. It features a silver-plated stirrup and a solid, custom-bar closure. $90. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

24 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


EQUESTRIAN LIVING

FO L LOW US :

SUBSCRIBE NOW GET THE MAGAZINE

EQ L I V I N G MAGAZINE | HOME VISITS | PEOPLE | DESIGN | STYLE | TRAVEL | REAL ESTATE | ARTS | VIDEO | MORE

T H E P R E M I E R M AG A Z I N E O F CO U N T RY L I F E

HOMES/BARNS

TRAVEL

T H E B E S T O F E Q UE STR I AN LI VI N G MAGA Z I N E O N YO UR P HON E, TAB L E T, OR COMP U TER . www.eqliving.com


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | A R T S

THE QUEEN AND THE KELPIES BY ANDY SCOTT

T

PETER SANDGROUND

his summer, on an unusually sunny July 5th, the Kelpies received an exceptional accolade: they were visited by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth. The queen had been invited to officially open the canal along which the Kelpies are located. Along with many of the team behind the project, my wife, Hanneke, and I were invited to come and meet her. As we walked towards the sculptures, we heard the distant thumping of an approaching helicopter and turned to see the royal aircraft approaching. Just above the 100-foot head height of the Kelpies and almost directly over our heads, it stopped and hovered motionless in the perfectly blue sky. There was the queen, looking down at my sculptures and us. The helicopter banked and was on its way. We took our position below the Kelpies with two handsome Clydesdales and waited. The queen disembarked, and she and Prince Philip were introduced to Hanneke, me, and Steve Dunlop, the director of Scottish Canals. We were then told—to our surprise—that instead of a quick handshake, we would visit and take the queen and prince on a tour inside the sculptures and explain the project. I was walking with the queen, taking her inside the colossal structure and answering her many well-informed and searching questions. Decorum dictates that I won’t share that conversation in detail, but let’s say that she knows a thing or two about horses! What I thought would be a twominute meet-and-greet extended into

Artist Andy Scott’s giant horse sculptures, known as the Kelpies, have been widely covered in many horse magazines, including twice in Equestrian Living. Ferrari used the Kelpies in ads for a new sports car, and the horses have even appeared on posters in the Shanghai subway. They’ve drawn over 2 million visitors to the small Scottish town where they stand, and they’ve brought Scott no fewer than four honorary doctorates and numerous other awards. Here, Scott tells about a rare visitor to his giant works.

26 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

a 30-minute chat, and our premeeting nerves were alleviated by her personable manner and good humor. We walked out of the towering Kelpies structure blinking into the gleaming sunlight with the cheering crowds in the distance and approached the inauguration plaque and dignitaries, where Elizabeth performed the official unveiling. As this ceremony unfolded, we were all aware of a distant aerial buzzing, which grew in intensity. The queen and I looked upwards and saw two propeller planes buzzing around in the clear sky to the southwest. As we watched, they banked and headed towards the Kelpies. They aimed straight towards each other, then at the very last moment shot upward, then veered away from each other. And as they did so, they turned on smoke dispensers and soared in great arcs back toward the earth, leaving behind them in the clear blue sky, hundreds of feet high and wide, a perfectly formed love-heart. The Kelpies have brought me many unexpected joys. But to stand there, in front of the sculptures I’d sketched on little scraps of paper 12 years previously, watching skywriters draw a love-heart in the Scottish skies—with the queen! Well, what can I say? I am humbled to have been a part of that amazing day, and I owe a huge debt of thanks to my colleagues at Scottish Canals and Falkirk Council for placing Hanneke and me center stage. It wasn’t just a treat for us; it was the ultimate accolade for the whole Kelpies team. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


TINTED MOISTURIZER BROAD SPECTRUM SPF25 AND CONCEALER Revolutionary five in one, long-wear product, featuring a tinted moisturizer perfectly paired with an intensely pigmented concealer creatively hidden with a mirror in the cap. Designed by Celebrity Makeup Artist and Equestrian Leslie Munsell, it’s the ultimate in beauty for the active woman on the go, a carefully chosen product selection of high performing items that women can use everyday to effortlessly look their very best!

★★★★★

“Ever since I’ve been using your MVP, I’ve been getting so many compliments on my skin - literally several times a day!!” Justine Wilson Photo credits: George Kamper - Model: Louisa Raske - Beauty For Real Copyrights 2018


CarolSollak.evusa.com

Grand Prix Village - The only 8 acre parcel available. Just a stone’s throw from the Winter Equestrian Festival, this recently built barn is absolutely stunning. With 20-stalls, four wash/grooming stalls, two tack rooms, two feed rooms, one large storage room, two powder rooms, and two offices (one of which includes a kitchenette) – “spacious” is an understatement! The private owners’ lounge is just up the elevator and includes a gorgeous custom kitchen and bathroom, as well as a covered, screened-in balcony. In a separate building, there are grooms’ quarters and a garage. Situated on 8-acres, the property includes a covered arena with state of the art footing and underground watering system, ten paddocks, and full property generator. Offered at $16,500,000

Carol A. Sollak, P.A. • Phone +1 561-818-9476 • Fax +1 561-791-2221 www.carolsollak.evusa.com • Wellington, Florida • Carol.Sollak@evusa.com

©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


Portfolio of Fine Properties in Wellington

Grand Prix Village - Exceptional equestrian facility located in the esteemed Grand Prix Village of Wellington. With 6.4-acres of land across two lots, this farm is well planned with a single-story 30-stall barn, that also houses an owners’ lounge, manager’s apartment, commercial laundry, tack and feed rooms, and plenty of storage. The grounds include eight paddocks, a world-class riding arena, and walker. Mature landscaping adorns the boundary lines providing privacy and shade. This custom facility was designed by top-notch horsemen and took every detail into consideration. On the market for the first time since being built in 2007, this property is an equestrian’s dream and enjoys the rare advantage of touching the Winter Equestrian Festival’s show grounds; be within steps of the world-renowned PBIEC. Offered at $16,000,000

Equestrian Club Estates - If you want to be steps from the Winter Equestrian Festival you won’t want to miss this

home. Fabulous total renovation in sought after Equestrian Club with new roof, all new impact doors and windows, cabinets, appliances...like new! Offered at $1,450,000

Amy Carr • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-662-0728 Amy.Carr@evusa.com

Download Amy Carr’s mobile real estate app

To get FREE access to all local listings from your smartphone or tablet

©2018 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


EQ S C I E N C E

VETERINARY INNOVATIONS Advances in horse care at PALM BEACH EQUINE CLINIC in Wellington, Florida. BY LINDSAY BROCK

P

JUMP MEDIA

JUMP MEDIA

EQUES SOLUTIONS

alm Beach Equine Clinic (PBEC) veterinarians start their mornings early, and their days are long as they change the landscape of veterinary medicine. PBEC recently unveiled the new face of its Wellington, Florida, facility following a year of improvements. The result? One of the most distinguished equine clinics operating in the heart of the winter horse capital of the world. As the caliber of horses and riders calling Wellington home has risen exponentially in recent years, so too has PBEC’s ability to provide inspired care to all horses, from backyard trail mounts to Olympic champions. Founded by Dr. Paul Wollenman in 1981, PBEC was a one-man show until Dr. Scott Swerdlin joined forces with Wollenman two years later. “From only the two of us, the clinic has grown to over 80 employees, including 40 veterinarians (including six boarded specialists), making it one of the largest sport-horse practices in the world,” said Swerdlin, a South Florida native who graduated from the University of Miami before attending veterinary school at Auburn University. “When I was graduating from vet school, I never imagined I would be leading a facility with a group of people with the skills like those at PBEC today. It’s a dream come true. “Our industry improves each and every year. Whether it is diagnostics, treatment regimes, results, or alternative

Above: Palm Beach Equine Clinic facilities in Wellington, Florida. Dr. Scott Swerdlin joined PBEC in 1983; Dr. Richard Wheeler specializes in the treatment of sport horses.

therapies, they have all made huge advances in the last 10 years,” continued Swerdlin, who set a goal nearly two years ago to be one of the first equine clinics to add a computed tomography (CT) machine to the arsenal of advanced imaging equipment at PBEC. “I would say the work that has been done with CT scans is among the newest and most exciting advances that we have experienced lately.” With the debut of its new CT machine, PBEC veterinarians have a whole new way to diagnose lameness, solve problems of decreased performance in the sport horse, and more. More specifically, the technology has allowed PBEC to delve into a relatively unexplored part of equine anatomy: the neck. Essentially a mystery before the use of CT scans, the equine neck is now something that can be intricately examined while the horse is in a standing position. “You can think of the spinal cord and the nerves in the neck like an interstate, with the spinal cord itself acting as the major highway,” explained PBEC veterinarian Dr. Richard Wheeler, who specializes in the treatment of sport horses. “As you are ‘driving’ along the interstate, every so often there are exits, which is where the other nerves come out. Should there be impingement on the nerves coming off of the spinal cord, it will likely present itself like an accident on the ramp of an exit, not affecting the interstate itself, but possibly causing problems that spread elsewhere. That is continued on page 98

30 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

THE HOME HORSE A new EXERCISE TOOL for equestrians.

F

BY ALLIE LAYOS

OR CHRIS COSMA, fam-

ily and horses have always been closely tied. His mother and grandfather kept saddlebreds, eventers, and plenty of project horses that Chris would ride growing up. “There’s an expectation that everyone in the family is a competent rider,” he said. When he had a family of his own, he thought his two boys should be no exception. As an artist and sculptor, Chris had created works displayed in public buildings around the country, including Rockefeller Center in New York City. With creativity and hands-on building experience, he was well-equipped to work on a tool to help him and his family get a leg up in the ring. What he created is a fun and challenging fitness tool designed specifically for equestrians and called the Home Horse. Chris created the first child-sized Home Horse in 1996. While his kids enjoyed it, he never really considered using it. But one day, as he was working on a large sculpture, he found himself in need of a stool. “I got it from their room, and I sat on it all day, working for eight hours,” Chris said. By the end of the day, he found that all of the muscles he used for riding had gotten a great workout, so he decided to make more Home Horses. “Your body is not as symmetrical as it was before you turned 15,” Chris said. “Every body up to age 15 is pretty much right on; after that it just gets worse and worse.” Before riders mount the Home Horse, Chris weighs them. By using two scales and having them place a foot on each, he is able to check how they carry their weight. In doing this, he has found

astounding asymmetrical differences, as much as 35 pounds off. “Trainers generally don’t go to the gym with their riders and fix them,” Chris said. “Only riders that do Pilates and yoga are perfectly straight. Even advanced dressage riders are sometimes 10 pounds off.” The Home Horse is a wooden saddle atop a pole attached to a rounded wooden base. Using balance, riders hold their position as they swivel around the base, activating their core muscles, pelvic floor, and hip abductors. Chris believes that, with help from the Home Horse, riders can strengthen weak zones and regain the symmetry they’ve lost. “The beauty of this is the centrifugal force of going around and through your motions; the movement force kind of pushes you through those weak zones,” he said. “This allows your weak quadrant to be activated exactly the same way as your stronger quadrant.” There is a bridle attachment for the Home Horse, for both single and double

32 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

bridles, so riders can practice using their hands correctly as they work through the different motions and gaits. This helps trainers correct problems they’ve been trying to correct in the ring. “It allows for quicker fixes in the arena on the horse,” Chris said. “Without the interaction of the actual horse, you are able to pinpoint and work on specific things. When you mount back up, you already have a little memory of that.” The Home Horse also works as an assessment tool. “Most people can’t get it to go all the way around the first three or four times,” Chris said. “The Home Horse never lies. You can’t trick it.” In fact, some trainers won’t get on the Home Horse in front of their students. “I have to take it to a private room, because it’s a little revealing,” Chris said. Several farms already use the Home Horse for their riders. “At DeLovely Farm, instead of bringing an extra school horse to horse shows, they’ll bring a Home Horse and everyone warms up on that,” Chris said. It was even used in practice by a world cup team before their last major competition. “They’re made for the abuse of the barn, but are also fine enough and safe for the house,” Chris said. The device can also be used in the office at a standing desk, and Chris is designing a lower version that can be used with a sitting desk. The Home Horse has different base configurations for different ages, abilities, and disciplines, and Chris believes all riders can benefit from what it has to teach. “It watches over you, because as soon as you go off position it goes off center,” Chris said. “It’s its own trainer in a way.” CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


EQ P E O P L E

The U.S. Reining Team, led by Chef d’Equipe Jeff Petska, became the first in the history of world championships to win a gold medal in reining at the 2002 World Equestrian Games (WEG) in Jerez de la Frontera, Spain. The team also won gold and silver in individual competition. Petska spoke with Equestrian Living magazine from on the road in Las Vegas.

me ever since. So, we took our top-placing riders, and that year it was Shawn Flarida, Scott McCutcheon, Tom McCutcheon, Craig Schmersal, and Craig Johnson was our alternate. How would you compare reining events in other countries to those in the U.S.?

Obviously, the logistics are more difficult when we take a team overseas. We’ve got a tremendous amount At birth. I of things to grew up on cover, and a ranch in we’ve got a Nebraska, and phenomenal we always had staff. That’s a lot of horses the great around. So, Meet the CHEF D’EQUIPE of the United States thing about I’ve had a pasdoing what I Reining Team. sion for them do: the group ever since I I do it with. INTERVIEW BY COLLEEN McQUAY AND C.W. MEDINGER can remember. I actually I was fortuprefer to be nate enough that I always had access to them. I did overseas. When I can get the team a little more isosome high school rodeo, and I think I trained my lated, there aren’t as many distractions. They’re not as first horse for the public when I was probably 13. I familiar with their surroundings, so they’re more apt didn’t get exposed to the actual horse-show world to listen to me. We also go a little early, and it allows until I was about 20. us a little bit of time to start to mesh together. My group goes from being individuals—which is how we How did you become the Chef d’Equipe of the U.S. compete in this sport— and becomes a team. They team? watch each other, they get a little more familiar with I had moved to Texas to train rope horses and ride each other’s horses in schooling, and they talk to each colts. While I was there, I started dabbling with other about what they’re doing and seeing. For me, reining and had a little success. Then, as the reining that’s probably the most enjoyable part of it, just seeprogressed, we had the opportunity to go to internaing them as they start to become the U.S. team. tional competitions. Around 2001 when we started cranking up for the world games, Colleen McQuay Is there a team strategy, or is it left up to the indiput my name forward to be a possibility to become viduals to determine their own plan? the chef. Each individual. These riders are pros; they’ve been When did you begin your life with horses?

MEET THE CHEF D’EQUIPE Part Three of a Series.

Each United States Equestrian Team is led by a Chef d’Equipe who is a combination leader, coach, and manager. Meet them in this series of features created in collaboration with US Equestrian.

JEFF PETSKA

2002 was the first time reining was in the World Equestrian Games, and the U.S. won the first gold medal. How did you put that team together?

At that time it was new to everybody. We had a finals at Gladstone, and that’s how we chose the team, purely on the competition aspect of it. As far as selection of the team, I didn’t have much involvement at that point, because it was all so new. Even up to the day we picked the team, we were still in a state of flux with who was going to be chef, and then the riders had a meeting, and they said that they decided they wanted me to do it, and they’ve been stuck with

34 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

doing this a long time. They know the horses intimately, they know what it takes to get them ready. They work closely with United States Equestrian Team’s veterinarian, Dr. John Newcomb, who is phenomenal. He’s a huge, huge part of our team and very instrumental in our success. Our main thing is keeping the horses sound and happy and comfortable. How will you select a team for WEG in Tryon?

We’ve already started the process. We’ve had qualifiers where our riders go across the country and show to meet their minimum requirements. Then in Tryon, we’ll have a kind of test event, but it will be our final.


EQ P E O P L E

Once we get there, it’s a two go-around. There’s the first go-around and then a final, and those two combined scores will determine who will make the team. What countries are your toughest competitors?

opportunity to go to WEG and win the gold medal. A team gold medal—that is always our top priority. What are some of the difficulties reining has experienced, and what would you tell people about the sport?

All of them, I think now! We won with any the first WEG association, by a country there are mile. It wasn’t growing even close. pains tryWe’ve been ing to keep fortunate to it current win gold at and keep all of them so people far, but every involved. year it just gets A lot of tougher and that—and tougher and for any tougher. There judged are countries sport— out there that The gold medal-winning reining team at the 2010 World Equestrian revolves around the are really working hard Games. From left: Tim McQuay, Tom McCutcheon, Craig Schmersal, judging. So, there’s at it; it’s a real focus for Shawn Flarida, Chef d’Equipe Jeff Petska. always discussion and them. The Canadians work to be done there. The thing with reining is have been in it from the beginning, so they’ve always that it’s just so competitive, and it takes such a good been good competitors. As far as the Europeans, just horse. I think it’s just horse recognition, getting that start ticking them off. The Italians, they’re always a right horse for that right rider, and having enough very talented bunch; they’re always a threat. Belgium, good ones. Austria, Germany, the Brazilians, they’re going to I’ve never had a rider who was on one of our teams field a good team this year. So many of those riders and didn’t try to get back on another one. That tells have either worked in the U.S. or have come here and you a lot about just how much that experience means learned from our people, and so the level of competito them. I have not had a rider yet, no matter how tion is tough. What’s always been an advantage for us much they’ve won, that the first time that they go is that we’ve always had a bit bigger pool of riders and through the gate under the flag, they’re not a little horses, and that allows us to pick a strong team. But bit nervous—or a lot nervous. I really try to remind those other countries are good. They’re not just good, my riders to enjoy the moment, to recognize where they’re excellent. They’ve really come a long way. we are, to really relish it, and not get too wrapped up in just the competition part. What will be the restrictions on the horses once the When things come together and we’re successful, team has established? and we have the opportunity to stand on the podium Once they make the team, our riders and owners sign and see our flag raised and hear the national anthem, a lease agreement where that horse comes under the and know that I had a small part in it… there are not control of the USEF and myself as the chef. It isn’t many people that ever get an opportunity like that, like we take possession or micromanage what they and it’s never wasted on me. I mean, I’m a coundo, but they sign an agreement stating that they try kid from the sand hills of Nebraska. Because of understand that the horse is under our control and horses and the opportunities that they’ve allowed me, his purpose from then on, with everything that’s I’ve been able to do some amazing things and meet done with him, is to prepare him to give us the best some amazing people.

I’ve never had a rider who was on one of our teams and didn’t try to get back on another one. That tells you a lot about just how much that experience means to them.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 5


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

LUXE LIBATIONS

F L AVO

LOC

L

R

A

Spring Island’s RON DIETRICH shares two of his favorite cocktails.

Y

TOM JENKINS

TR UN CO TES SE ORI R H O FAV

SPRING ISLAND MANHATTAN AND TABBY TODDY Spring Island Manhattan Ingredients 1 ½ ounces Michter’s Small Batch Bourbon 1 ½ ounces Carpano Antica 8 drops Xocolatl Mole Bitters Preparation Shake ingredients and strain into a chilled martini glass. Garnish with Luxardo cherry. Tabby Toddy Ingredients 1 ounce B&B 1 ounce Bulleit Rye Whiskey Juice of half a lemon ½ ounce honey syrup (60% honey, 40% water. Simmer in sauce pan until honey is dissolved.) 8 drops Tiki Ginger Bitters 4 ounces hot kettle water Preparation Combine ingredients into snifter minus hot water. Garnish with lemon skin peeled long using potato peeler skewered with three pieces of clove all on a bamboo pick or stirrer. Top off with hot water. (See the recipe for Spring Island Tilefish in EQLiving Oct/Nov 2017.)

RON DIETRICH

Beverage Manager and Sommelier for Spring Island Ron started his career at the age of 12 as a dishwasher, quickly rising through the ranks of the restaurant business. He worked as a bartender in the French Quarter while studying at the University of New Orleans, crafting new cocktails and pursuing a particular interest in wine. After college, Ron worked at various clubs and resorts throughout the East gaining experience as he went. Ron achieved Level-One Sommelier certification in 2016 and has built an extensive wine program—both in devising educational events and an exclusive wine-buying program —in his current position as beverage manager and sommelier for Spring Island in Okatie, South Carolina. Making use of the community’s four-acre farm, Ron has put his focus on crafting new cocktails highlighted by the variety of fresh produce. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

36 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


35 Y E AR S O F MO RTG AG E F IN AN C IN G E X PER IEN C E .

F OR E I G N N AT I O N A L RES I D E N T IA L M O RTG AG E LOA N S M A D E E A SY ! C A L L J I M D O U GLA S F O R A FA S T R ES P O N S E 561-315-3839 j doug la s@Gro u pO n eM o r t gage . us M O RTG AG E LOAN OR I GI NATOR NML S #84130

GROU P ONE MORTGAGE , I N C . 900 E A ST IN DIANTOWN RD. S UITE 1 1 0, JUPITER , FL 33477

EQ UA L H OUSING LE ND E R NM L S#53185


r Yo w Ne


rk

A P R 2 6 – 2 9, 2 0 1 8 N YC B L I V E HOME OF THE NASSAU VETERANS MEMORIAL COLISEUM

W W W. LO N G I N E S M A S T E R S .C O M


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

OUR HORSES, OURSELVES OK

CL

U

EQ

O

B

B

A dancer, choreographer, writer, visual artist, and movement educator, PAULA JOSA-JONES is known for her visually rich, emotionally charged dance theater.

B

ET

TH N S EE ER W V O C

E

For years horse trainers and equine experts have sought new ways to tap into that which for many remains elusive: the ability to use the human body and our often neglected power of intent to explain to the horse what we want, as well as receive and understand his answer. We have used various areas of study—from yoga to the marshal arts—that are seemingly unrelated to horses and riding to gain new insight as to how to achieve a soft, fluid connection with our equine partners. Now in this fascinating book, dancer and choreographer Paula Josa-Jones examines this age-old conundrum from a whole new angle, combining her two greatest passions: movement and horses. Through stories, strategies, and over 65 meditations and gentle exercises, Josa-Jones shows us how we can develop greater somatic awareness away from the horse, as well as how being with the horse can help this consciousness continue to evolve. The result is we not only have a closer, more intuitive connection with our horses, but we are more trustworthy, more comfortable in our own skin, and better prepared to act with balance, sensitivity, and kindness in all our relationships.

W

hat constitutes a limit? Is it the body, the mind, the stall, the bridle and reins? Is it our belief that we are separate entities; living lives essentially independent of each other, unable to feel ourselves part of a larger whole? How can we listen more deeply and hear what is being communicated by the natural world—an oak tree, a horse, a singing wren, a friend? How do we negotiate these limits of body, mind, heart, and spirit? Except for wild herds in places like the American West or Chincoteague, the Camargue in France or Mongolia, horses live within 40 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

In 1998, Paula JosaJones created an inter-species dance company with horses, dancers, and riders. She is an avid student of dressage and a guild-certified Tellington TTEAM Practitioner. She has been called “one of the country’s leading choreographic conceptualists” by the Boston Globe.

the confines of stalls, paddocks, and work. They inhabit the spaces we permit, their freedom cut to fit our needs and demands, completely dependent upon our care and feeding. Like our horses, our bodies express our limits: habitual postures, aches and pains, and a lack of feeling, expression, and imagination are all part of the boundaries that we expect and endure. Habits of mind become engraved in our tissue, cells lose elasticity and fluidity, and our bodies become little stalls instead of open pastures. These physical, mental, and emotional contractions can be reflected in our work, relationships, and health, impeding our ability to live joyfully. The good news is that our bodies can also help us feel and release these limiting beliefs, tensions, and anxieties, and horses can play a crucial role in this process of moving toward greater freedom of body and mind. According to anthropologist David M. Guss, in tribal societies, “A system of reciprocity existed in which all living things took part.” In other words, what many think of as more “primitive” cultures were not limited by dualism—the “them and us” worldview that is deeply rooted in many aspects of contemporary thinking, particularly in relation to other species. Guss observes that in tribal societies, connections with other humans, the natural world, and all nonhuman forms of life, were continually reaffirmed by song, dance, dress, and other cultural forms. “This ceremonial life of the tribal person was a constant dialogue, with interspecies communication both ordering and transforming it. This was the magical ingredient that seasoned every action, dissolving the individual into Continued on page 100


EQ F A V O R I T E S

GALLOPING LIBRARIANS

T

The women who rode miles on horseback to deliver LIBRARY BOOKS.

hey were known as the “book women.” They would saddle up, usually at dawn, to pick their way along snowy hillsides and through muddy creeks with a simple goal: to deliver reading material to Kentucky’s isolated mountain communities. The Pack Horse Library initiative was part of President Franklin Roosevelt’s Works Progress Administration (WPA), created to help lift America out of the Great Depression, during which, by 1933, unemployment had risen to 40 percent in Appalachia. Roving horseback libraries weren’t entirely new to Kentucky, but this initiative was an opportunity to boost both employment and literacy at the same time. The WPA paid the salaries of the book carriers—almost all the employees were women— making the initiative unusual among WPA programs, but it paid very little else. Counties had to have their own base libraries from which the mounted librarians would travel. Local schools helped cover those costs, and the reading materials—books, magazines, and newspapers—were all donated. In December 1940, a notice in the Mountain Eagle newspaper announced that the Letcher County library “needs donations of books and magazines regardless of how old or worn they may be.” Old magazines and newspapers were cut and pasted into scrapbooks with particular themes—recipes, for example, or crafts. One such scrapbook, which is still held today at the FDR Presidential Library and Museum in Hyde Park, New York, contains recipes pasted into a notebook with the following introduction: “Cook books are popular. Anything to do with canning or preserving is welcomed.”

BY ANIKA BURGESS ATLAS OBSCURA

Books were repaired in the libraries and, as historian Donald C. Boyd notes, old Christmas cards were circulated to use as bookmarks and prevent damage from dog-eared pages. The book women rode 100 to 120 miles a week on their own horses or mules, along designated routes, regardless of the weather. If the destination was too remote even for horses, they dismounted and went on foot. According to Boyd, in most cases they were recruited locally, “to have a familiar face to otherwise distrustful mountain folk.”

B

WPA Pack Horse Librarian Photo Collection, Archives and Records Management Division – Kentucky Department for Libraries and Archives.

y the end of 1938, there were 274 librarians riding out across 29 Kentucky counties. In total, the program employed nearly 1,000 riding librarians. Funding ended in 1943, the same year the WPA was dissolved as unemployment plummeted during wartime. It wasn’t until the following decade that mobile book services in the area resumed in the form of the bookmobile, which had been steadily increasing in popularity across the country. In addition to providing reading materials, the book women served as touchstones for these communities. They tried to fill book requests, sometimes stopped to read to those who couldn’t, and helped nurture local pride. As one recipient said, “Them books you brought us saved our lives.” In the same year as the call for books, the Mountain Eagle exalted the Letcher County library: “The library belongs to our community and to our county and is here to serve us. ... It is our duty to visit the library and to help in every way that we can, that we may keep it as an active factor in our community.”

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 1


FIFTH ANNUAL EQ TRAVEL GUIDE

SERENITY OR ADVENTURE: FIND YOUR ESCAPE

ASCOT, ENGLAND See Page 44

A M A Z IN G E S C A P E S BALTIMORE, MARYLAND See Page 52

42 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


PROVENCE, FRANCE See Page 49

F O R H O R S E LOV E R S NICARAGUA See Page 56

| PAGE CONTACT | 4 3102 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NGINFO .CO M


44 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


A Mansion House junior suite.

Guards Polo Academy.

A PERSONAL

I

TRAVEL DIARY

A LUXURIOUS COUNTRY HOUSE

converting the butter-colored buildf the walls of Coworth Park ing into an elegant 70-bedroom hotel. could talk, they’d certainly (That took place in 2010.) In fact, have a lot to say. Tucked away calling Coworth Park a hotel is reducon the outskirts of Great tive, as today the world-renowned Windsor Park just an hour grounds play host to more than 600 from London, this 240-acre polo matches each season from late estate, and now hotel, has a storied April to mid-September. It’s the only past. First a stately home and then a hotel in the U.K. to have its own poloRoman Catholic convent school, this training field on its grounds. And it’s Herculean Georgian building dates to not uncommon to see Princes William 1776 and has been owned and visited and Harry thwacking balls across the by earls, lords, ladies, and kings. Its pristine lawns, or to see a huddle of equestrian heritage also runs deep, with satin-coated ponies trotting across the Prince and Princess of Wales, the the grass only to later learn they all future King Edward VII, and Queen BY BRIDGET ARSENAULT belong to a Saudi king. The academy Alexandra all staying at the property in COWORTH is managed by professional players Ebe Sievwright 1879 and 1883 to enjoy the races at nearby Ascot. PARK HOTEL, and Philip Meadows, each with over two decades Royalty is a thread that runs through the ASCOT, of experience both playing in and managing clubs. Coworth Park story. It was Queen Elizabeth II who ENGLAND Sievwright grew up in Argentina, arguably the capifirst suggested using the central lawn as a polo tal of polo, where he began as a pony clubber and ground for the Guards Polo Club. That was as far rose to be an internationally ranked player. And, as back as the 1950s—far before its current owner, one of the most well-equipped equestrian enclaves in the Dorchester Collection, had set its sights on FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 5


The summer room.

A PERSONAL

the country, it’s no surprise that Adolfo Cambiaso, the world’s top-ranked player, calls this club home. Here, the stables are as five-star as the venue itself, with box stalls for up to 40 horses—each stall fitted with rubber-matted floors and organic bedding. It’s not simply a polo facility; the club offers boarding, hosts a pony club, and teaches jumping and dressage with private lessons and spectacular hacks on its acre-after-acre of meadows and forests. And for horse aficionados who want to take the experience up a notch and bring their own horse, Coworth Park offers the ultimate horse check-in, which includes a name plaque on your horse’s stall door; a personalized horse-and-owner-welcome; a customized program taking into consideration your horse’s bedding and dietary preferences; arrival treats such as a Himalayan rock-salt lick and delicacies made by Lucy Jones, the hotel’s pastry chef; a Coworth Park pure-cotton numnah; and an equine manicure—all followed by a post-ride bubble bath and aromatherapy oil massage and rubdown. The equestrian theme runs through more than just the stables; it’s a motif found in everything 46 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

The bath of a junior suite.

TRAVEL DIARY

The spa and swimming pool.


from the horseshoe hooks on room walls, to horse-themed art, to the conversion of the former stables into what is now a block of luxury rooms and suites fitted with every modern amenity, from heated floors to copper roll-top tubs. In fact, all the rooms are designed with every modern convenience one could dream of, such as the latest Bang and Olufsen TVs and practically telepathic coffee machines.

A

s with any good hotel, food here is a priority. The skill and consideration of chef Adam Smith have been noted by more than just guests; the restaurant garnered a Michelin star at the end of 2017. Guests can enjoy fine dining with modern British flair in the main restaurant. Star dishes include herb-crusted local lamb and beef tartare served with house-made brioche. For more relaxed fare, there’s the

BRIDGET ARSENAULT holds a master’s degree from Oxford University. A longtime journalist, she was the associate editor for print and digital at Vanity Fair U.K., and she is the London correspondent for VanityFair.com. She has also freelanced for a variety of publications, including British Vogue, DuJour, House & Garden, Departures, and Travel and Leisure.

brasserie-style Barn, where guests can discover their inner John Wayne and leave their horses briefly tethered outside while stopping in for a pint of beer or a coupe of Champagne. Portions are ample and the menu is comforting, featuring favorites like sizzling pork croquettes and whole-baked Tunworth cheese served with sourdough bread and chutney. In winter, guests can cozy up by the fire, and in spring and summer, it’s possible to enjoy a live-action polo match through the full wall of windows. There is, of course, a stand-alone spa and gym moments from the main building. This two-floor oasis is a prime stopping ground post-hack for a cosseting massage or body wrap in one of the eight treatment rooms. In all, Coworth Park charms. This stylish equestrian-focused hotel befits the most discerning clientele the world over. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 7


The Atacama Desert in Chile is the driest place on Earth.

A HORSEB ACK DESERT ADVENTURE

A

landmark of the El Norte Grande in Chile, the Atacama Desert boasts an incredible landscape of ragged mountains and ravines that are interspersed by striking white salt pans and surrounded by towering volcanoes. As the world’s driest desert, some areas of the immense Atacama have recorded not a single raindrop in more than 150 years. Led by a tour partner of andBeyond, a luxury experiential-travel company that hosts exclusive safaris and tours in Africa, South America, and Asia, guests can horseback ride or cycle the paths of the arid desert. Travelers awaken with the sun and marvel at the scenery on a half-day ride that begins at an oasis and continues on to Chile’s Death Valley. Huge clay formations, large dunes, and the salt range serve as

48 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

TIERRA ATACAMA BOUTIQUE HOTEL AND SPA, ANTOFAGASTA REGION, CHILE

the backdrop. In the evenings, fires are lit where deep silence and wide, dark skies offer unparalleled stargazing. En route to your desert adventure, stop for a luxurious night at the Tierra Atacama Boutique Hotel and Spa. Built on the site of an ancient cattle corral at the edge of San Pedro de Atacama, the hotel offers opulent architecture and interiors created by some of Chile’s leading designers and is an ideal gateway to explore the region. Features include a terrace with a fire pit, handmade local furniture and textiles, and incredible views of the Licancabur volcano. Centered on the concept of an adventure spa, the hotel offers excursions to Salar de Tara, El Tatio geyser, the Atacama salt flat, Moon Valley, the Altiplanic lagoons, and the Puritama Hot Springs, followed by relaxing, post-adventure spa treatments. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


L

ocated in France’s Baux de Provence close to the Luberon region, Domaine de Manville was once devoted to agriculture and sheep herding. The farm’s restoration and conversion into a premier resort property was diligently handled by heritage architect Mireille Pellen and a team of specialty landscape designers. Today, agriculture remains an intrinsic part of the property, which includes vegetable gardens and fruit orchards as well as a 40-room hotel. Even the 18-hole golf course was created in harmony with the natural landscape, with olive trees that serve as obstacles and grass bunkers. For holidays with family or friends in the heart of Provence, the Domaine de Manville welcomes guests with nine luxury villas that combine independence and comfort. Guests can visit a wide range of historic treasures including the Roman amphitheater in Arles, the Saint Bénezet Bridge in Avignon, and the beautiful and famous town of St. Remy de Provence.

DOMAINE DE MANVILLE, PROVENCE, FRANCE

Guests can also enjoy outings with the hotel’s private nature guide to learn about the the nearby Camargue, a vast wetland and UNESCO World Heritage Site known for its population of majestic white horses and over 400 species of birds, including flocks of flamingos. The resort owns 48 horses and offers riding and carriage rides. The hotel coordinates horseback riding through the Camargue or along the beaches in Saintes Maries de la Mer. There are plentiful beautiful calanques (coves) between Marseille and Cassis for sailors or beachgoers. Situated above a natural mineral spring, the spa incorporates the healing benefits of hot baths and various treatments in its 28 private rooms. The spa’s river reflexology walk, which is fed by the hot springs, boasts a naturally pressurized deluge shower. Thomas Jefferson sought relief for his rheumatism in them. He described the springs as “of the first merit.” High praise, indeed. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

LUXURY IN PROVENCE

It took years for Patrick and Edith Saut to transform the 250-acre working farm into an idyllic country retreat.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 9


AN EXOTIC RETRE AT IN ENGLAND

50 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


T

he Port Lympne Reserve, Kent’s largest wildanimal park, is home to over 700 rare and endangered animals on more than 600 acres, including the largest herd of black rhinos in the U.K. With a wide array of accommodations, there are many ways to visit the park, including luxury glamping at the Livingstone Lodge, pine camping pods, and longer stays at Bear Lodge. Unique treehouse accommodations are set high above the reserve and offer minimalism blended with upscale luxury. Awardwinning suites have two spacious double bedrooms, open-plan living and kitchen area, and a full bathroom. At the heart of the reserve, the four-star Port Lympne Hotel offers a luxurious retreat with a historic twist. Built by Sir Herbert Baker in 1912, the Edwardian mansion played host to elegant parties and society gatherings organized by the owner,

PORT LYMPNE RESERVE AND HOTEL, HYTHE, SOUTH KENT, ENGLAND

Sir Philip Sassoon, a scion of the Rothschild family and member of parliament from 1912 until his death in 1939. The lavishly decorated ground-floor rooms have been the backdrop to festive weekends and star-studded parties with guests including Sir Winston Churchill, Prince Edward and Mrs. Simpson, Lawrence of Arabia, and Charlie Chaplin. Today, the eight-bedroom hotel provides guests a rural retreat that is perfect for a weekend escape. The dramatically decorated restaurant (open for breakfast, lunch, and dinner every day) is run by a team of chefs who are passionate about local produce. The hotel bar offers views of 15 acres of landscaped gardens and the Kent Coast across Romney Marsh. It is the ideal retreat for relaxing with a drink after a day exploring the reserve. CONTACT INFO | 102

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 1


A CHARMING MANSION IN B ALTIMORE

52 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


Everything offered by the Ivy, except dinner and spa treatments, is included, from lavish chef-made breakfasts and on-site activities to cocktails and private car service.

A

n urban oasis in a private Baltimore mansion, the Ivy Hotel is Maryland’s first and only Relais & Châteaux property. The 19th-century mansion has been fully restored to its former glory and is leading the luxury resurgence in Baltimore’s Mount Vernon neighborhood. In addition, it’s only a stone’s throw from some of the region’s equestrian areas, filled with beautiful horse farms and estates. The Ivy is romantic and welcoming, and it embodies the soul of the city—it’s a magical amalgam of Baltimore, old and new. The city unfurls just beyond the Ivy’s doors: the charming streets of historic Mount Vernon, the vibrant waterfront, boutiques, restaurants, galleries, theaters, bars, and coffee shops. The hotel’s car and driver will take you anywhere in the city you’d like to go without charge. Take your morning coffee into the ivy-walled

THE IVY HOTEL, BALTIMORE, MARYLAND

courtyard, choose a book from the library, try your hand at the piano in the sunlit music room, or enjoy afternoon tea served by the fire. Invite a friend to dine with you at Magdalena, a new star among Baltimore’s restaurants, or have a private meal at Upstairs at the Ivy. Each of the hotel’s 18 rooms and suites has a four-poster bed, a gas fireplace, and a grand bathroom with heated limestone floor. Some accommodations offer a corner turret with a view of Mount Vernon, others a balcony over the courtyard. The local equestrian tradition originated at the Maryland Jockey Club in 1743, and it continues to thrive in the area today with the National Steeplechase Association in nearby Elkton and the Preakness Stakes at Pimlico Race Track (the second leg of the Triple Crown). It’s your choice. Simply enjoy the horses or place a wager. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 3


RUGGED LUXURY IN MONTANA

Y

ellowstone Club is a 15,200-acre members-only community and destination set amidst the grandeur of the Rocky Mountains. Montana’s natural beauty presents an opportunity for year-round recreation, mountain living, and the creation of family traditions that will last for generations. Lodges, cabins, condos, and duplexes offer options to enjoy rugged luxury. The club has seven dining options, which offer a variety of experiences from gourmet to pub fare. Many of the chefs incorporate authentic Montana cuisine, including wild-game and farm-to-table dishes. Other amenities include a movie theater, store, ski rentals, and a wide variety of lodges and clubhouses, sited from the community village to the top of the ski mountain. Whether you’ve spent the day skiing, golfing, hiking, or fishing, you’ll most likely find yourself taking a rest in one of the bright lodges, warming huts, or comfort stations around the property.

54 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

THE YELLOWSTONE CLUB, BIG SKY, MONTANA

The Yellowstone Club has three state-of-the art athletic facilities, which include a collection of cardio and strength-training equipment, a 75-foot heated pool, several spas, tennis courts, basketball courts, yoga instruction, personal training, and therapeutic massage. Most notably, the club encompasses both a private ski mountain and an 18-hole golf course. With no crowds, 2,700 skiable acres, and a peak elevation of almost 10,000 feet, the mountain sees an average of 300 inches of snowfall each year. An hour from the entrance to Yellowstone National Park in Big Sky, Montana, the club serves as a base camp for both summer and winter excursions, including whitewater adventures, trout streams, and backcountry hikes and skiing. Horseback riding is a popular way to enjoy the beautiful scenery that surrounds Yellowstone Club. Skilled outfitters arrange a variety of riding experiences, including guided day and overnight backcountry trips. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


P

iiholo Ranch is an 820-acre working cattle ranch located in Makawao, Maui, Hawaii, and home to upcountry Maui’s premier horsebackriding experience. Part of a property originally founded over 100 years ago by Maui’s pre-eminent ranching family, the Baldwins, Piiholo Ranch is situated on the edge of a rainforest 2,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean. Today, it is owned and operated by the Baldwin family’s fifth-generation paniolo, or Hawaiian cowboy, Peter. Piiholo Ranch recently partnered with Blue Hawaiian Helicopters—the only helicopter service serving all four of the major Hawaiian islands— to offer guests the opportunity to experience the beauty of Maui from another perspective. Imagine being whisked from your resort to Blue Hawaiian

PIIHOLO RANCH AND BLUE HAWAIIAN HELICOPTERS, MAUI, HAWAII

Helicopters’ base, where you’ll board a private helicopter that will take you on the adventure of a lifetime. Guests who book the Heli-Ranch Experience fly from Kahului up the north side of the massive 10,000foot volcano, Haleakala, to Hana Town and view East Maui waterfalls. They land at Piiholo Ranch, which is tucked in 2,000 feet up the slopes of Haleakala. Then, complimentary pastries and coffee are served at the Baldwin family cabins before guests embark on a two-hour horseback ride through lush green pastures and fragrant eucalyptus forests, where they enjoy both ocean and mountain views. The package includes roundtrip SUV limo transportation from guest’s hotel to the heliport in Kahului and from Piiholo Ranch back to the guest’s hotel. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

MAUI HELI-RANCH LOS CABOS E XPERIENCE

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 5


A PERSONAL

N

TRAVEL DIARY

LUXURY AND ADVENTURE

icaragua wasn’t anywhere I ever expected to visit, but the opportunity presented itself, and I traveled there a few months ago. Now, if I ever had the chance to return, I’d be on a plane in a flash and head back to Rancho Santana, a world-class resort and residential community located on the Pacific coast of Nicaragua. It boasts 2,700 acres of rolling hills and two miles of rocky and dramatic shoreline, broken up by five distinct beaches. I have told friends who like to travel—and especially those who like to eat well and ride horses in beautiful places—that Rancho Santana is a destination they would love. From the minute I stepped off the plane, I was greeted by some of the happiest people and brightest smiles I’ve ever seen. The ride to the hotel took 56 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

BY BETSY STEIN

NICARAGUA’S RANCHO SANTANA IS FILLED WITH WONDERFUL SURPRISES.

us on streets lined with small, colorful, tidy homes and an unfenced menagerie of horses, hens, and hogs calmly grazing along the road. We passed bicycles and horses, loaded with multiple passengers and packages, going about their daily routines. There was no hurry here. As our driver waited patiently for cows and chickens to amble across the road, he welcomed me to his country and proudly listed places he hoped I would see and enjoy. The drive to the resort winds through Rancho Santana’s farmland and leads to a beautiful stone complex that beckons you to enter and explore. Greeted once again by welcoming smiles, I was escorted inside. The open-air spaces and huge common rooms instilled a sense of calm and comfort. Gardens and ocean views were a part of the decor; archways and high ceilings were adorned with iron


12 miles of marked trails are shared by horses and hikers.

Inviting courtyards and gardens connect the different areas of the inn. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 7


A PERSONAL

fixtures forged in-house. The entire facility serves as a gallery for local artisans to display their creations. Every staircase, nook, and cranny is decorated with vases, pots, sculptures, and paintings by local artists. The staff at a gallery off the lobby are eager to help with any questions about Nicaraguan arts and culture. Rancho Santana succeeds in its goal of providing residents and guests with the services expected of world-class living while maintaining the peaceful and rustic appeal of the property. The ranch offers four types of accommodations: the main inn, ocean-view homes, garden-view casitas, and luxury villas. Properties are available for long- and short-term rental, or as investments. I began my stay in the main inn. My room was spacious and comfortable, with a private, oceanview terrace that was more like an outdoor living room than a balcony. A few days later, some friends came to join me from Connecticut and Panama, and we moved to one of the garden casitas. The private 58 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

TRAVEL DIARY

BETSY STEIN is a life-long rider, trainer, competitor, and equestrian professional with varied experience in in the hunter jumper, eventing, and therapeutic riding worlds.

cottage, with a well-equipped kitchen, comfortable living room, bedrooms, and porch, was surrounded by beautiful flowering plants. Guests can dine in their choice of four restaurants, or they can use the private-chef service. We found the food to be delicious and surprisingly inexpensive. Everything is prepared with fresh, local ingredients, most of which are grown on site. (A guided tour or walk through the huge vegetable and herb gardens is a must.) And of course, there is the freshest of fish, directly from the sea. Menus are varied and inviting, with a blending of unique Nicaraguan flavors. After I tasted the lemon-grass lobster soup at my first dinner, I had to have it again each night. The house-made Burrata cheese is also not to be missed. It begins as mozzarella, which is prepared fresh daily using milk from their dairy cows. Then the cheese is molded and filled with a creamy stracciatella, or lightly shredded mozzarella and cream. Other homemade cheeses include cotija, creole, feta, and ricotta.


Rancho Santana’s signature drink, Hortelano, became our nightly treat. It is an infusion of silver tequila with fresh jalapeno peppers, muddled cucumber, cilantro, lime juice, and Cointreau. A great beginning to my days were classes in the beautiful open-air yoga studio. Even the walk to the studio, set high into a hill overlooking the ocean, was a treat. Other amenities include multiple pools and clubhouses, a surfing club, Pura Spa, and a kids club. In addition, there are 12 miles of marked trails to explore. I enjoyed evening swims and sunsets in the company of hundreds of green parakeets, chasing and calling to each other in the tree tops. Now, for the most important part of the trip for me! As an experienced rider, I have been spoiled by the high quality of horses and horsemanship I have been exposed to, and therefore I can be a bit of a

Top: The ranch’s fine Iberoamericana horses go for a dance along the beach. Above: The Rancho Santana team stands out in the Hipica Parade.

critic. The riding program at Rancho Santana is exemplary. It is professionally run with carefully chosen, well-cared-for horses that are suitable for their jobs. They are a Nicaraguan breed called Iberoamericana, from a breeding program started in the early 1990s. Known as dancing horses, the well-trained Rancho Santana mounts are happy to show off their skills to Chichero music. The trainers at the ranch are extremely proud of these horses and take great care to give you the best equestrian experience suited to your level of riding. I found it interesting that the horses are a mixed herd of stallions and mares that coexist without issues. I was treated to a variety of rides. My first outing was with the director of the program. As we rode, I learned how she had developed the stable to what it is today. She explained the selection of horses, customizing tack, and securing veterinary care. Continued on page 96 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 9


FROM PREVIOUS

EQLIVING FEATURES

60 MORE FAVORITES KAKSLAUT TANEN FINLAND Sleep under the Nor thern Lights in your glass igloo.

ST. MORITZ SWITZERLAND The famous winter resor t with snow racing and polo.

TWIN FARMS VERMONT A 5-star exclusive inn in Vermont horse countr y.

TENAYA LODGE CALIFORNIA The place to stay at Yosemite, winter or summer.

HOME RANCH COLORADO A gorgeous ranch in a stunning Rock y Mountain set ting.

SQUAW CREEK CALIFORNIA A world-class resor t near beautiful Nor th Lake Tahoe.

*Winter 2015/16

*Winter 2015/16

*Winter 2015/16

*Winter 2015/16

*Winter 2015/16

*Winter 2015/16

LODGE AT GLENDORN PENNSYLVANIA 1,500 acres of nature at your door.

ST. REGIS ASPEN COLORADO Polo, mountains, and the lavish lifestyle of Aspen.

DOS BRISAS TEXAS A winning blend of a beautiful set ting and rustic flavor.

GLENEAGLES SCOTLAND Golf, horses, and much more at this timeless resor t.

SELMAN MARRAKECH MOROCCO A unique palace of alluring charm.

RANCH AT ROCK CREEK MONTANA A private stream-side cabin.

*Winter 2015/16

*Winter 2015/16

*Spring 2015

*Spring 2015

*Spring 2015

*Spring 2015

IL BORRO TUSCANY The Ferragamo family’s restored 700-acre estate and villa.

GRAND OAKS FLORIDA Bring your horse with you for a long winter getaway.

TANQUE VERDE** ARIZONA 150 horses wait to take you on a ranch experience.

BLANCANEAUX LODGE BELIZE A getaway in a tropical paradise.

CASTLE LESLIE** IRELAND Live the good equestrian life in an Irish castle.

DOMAINE DE LA BAUME FRANCE Provence, with horses and pampering.

*Spring 2015

*Spring 2015

*Spring 2015

*Spring 2015

PATAGONIA CHILE Explore the amazing landscape on horseback .

GIRAFFE MANOR KENYA Giraffes vie for your attention at the breakfast table.

CASA DE CAMPO DOMINICAN REPUBLIC A golf and equestrian resor t.

LUXURY AT SEA Make an unbridled escape aboard an equestrian-themed yacht.

ELEPHANT POLO INDIA Join in a chukker of unforget table polo in Jaipur, India.

DOHA** QATAR Horses have been par t of the culture for many centuries.

*Spring 2014

*Spring 2014

*Spring 2014

*Spring 2014

*Spring 2014

*Spring 2014

PALM BEACH** FLORIDA An unequaled array of equestrian events, shopping, and beaches.

MIRAVAL ARIZONA A spa that promotes a healthy lifestyle through horses.

SALAMANDER** VIRGINIA A distinctive equestrian resor t in Middleburg.

DOG MOUNTAIN VERMONT An ar tist’s chapel dedicated to man’s best friend, the dog.

RED HORSE INN NORTH CAROLINA A small foothills inn per fect for horse lovers near Tr yon.

WOODSTOCK** VERMONT Horses are the stars of this beautiful New England village.

*Winter 2013/14

*Spring 2013

*Fall 2014

*Spring 2014 *Spring 2014 *Fall 2013 60 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

*Spring 2014


FROM PREVIOUS

EQ LIVING FEATURES

*EQLiving issue date: visit eqliving.com/categor y/newsstand

**Personal travel diar y or full feature.

COWDRAY ESTATE** ENGLAND A polo estate with elegance and tradition.

MA Z AGAN MOROCCO This resor t near Casablanca boasts three miles of beaches.

HELENA BAY NEW ZEALAND Only 10 guests arrive by helicopter at this private resor t.

SALAMANDER** VIRGINIA A self-discover y program that unites humans and horses.

CHEWTON GLEN TREEHOUSES ENGLAND Opulent living in the treetops.

B&B RANCH NE W YORK This small countr y inn is a working livestock ranch and farm.

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

FAIRMONT GRAND DEL MAR CALIFORNA A luxurious base for racing, jumping, polo.

GOLDEN OCALA FLORIDA Home of the World Equestrian Center in Ocala.

UXUA CASA HOTEL & SPA BRA ZIL A unique 500-year-old casa on the beach.

CLIMATE MAP It’s per fect weather for riding somewhere—all year round.

BG POLO RESORT** FLORIDA Bobby Genovese’s polo resor t in Ocala.

EDEN ROC** DOMINCAN REP. High-level equestrian ac tivities in a tropical paradise.

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

*April/May 2017

*Feb/March 2016

*Feb/March 2016

*Feb/March 2017

SAFARI ON HORSEBACK SOUTH AFRICA Being on a horse is the best vantage point.

TRAVERSE CITY** MICHIGAN A summer equestrian destination for the whole family.

SOTOGRANDE** SPAIN This Costa del Sol resor t is the largest polo club in Europe.

WASHINGTON, DC The Washing ton International horse show is a great reason to visit the capital.

SANTA YNEZ** CALIFORNIA EQ tours wine countr y in a huge GMC 3500 truck .

MOUNT JULIET** IRELAND An ultimate escape and a spor ts-lover’s paradise.

*June/July 2016

*June/July 2017

*Aug/Sept 2017

*Aug/Sept 2017

*Oct/Nov 2017

*Oc t/Nov 2017

THE HAMPTONS NE W YORK The Hampton Classic makes for a great summer beach weekend.

NASHVILLE** TENNESSEE The Music City is home to horse activities galore.

ICELAND See glaciers and volcanoes on this “women-only” odyssey.

HOMESTEAD RESORT VIRGINIA Guests enjoy 48 horses and relaxation.

DESERT PALM DUB AI A unique mix of European and Arabian style and opulence.

CONNEMARA IRELAND For many, this is the mecca of horsemanship.

*Aug/Sept. 2017

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

4 SEASON LANAI HAWAII An untouched island, just 9 miles from Maui, is the “old Hawaii.”

AMANGIRI UTAH A unique, dramatic, and beautifully designed deser t oasis.

LA BAMBA DE ARECO** ARGENTINA Working gauchos and polo.

NAYARA SPRINGS COSTA RICA Escape to the rainforest for adventure and seculsion.

BENGUERRA MOZ AMBIQUE Ride bareback in the azure waters of the Indian Ocean.

TURTLE ISLAND** FIJI Leave hoofprints on the beach of a blue lagoon in Fiji.

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016

*April/May 2016 *April/May 2016 FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 1


BY CAROL COHEN HODESS WITH STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS GEORGE KAMPER

AT H O M E W I T H

ODED SHIMONI

O

The dressage master and his life partner are living “a dream come true.”

ded Shimoni is considered a dressage master, an honorific that is rooted in skill, respect, and dignity and earned over time. While many of today’s top riders have enjoyed the luxury of learning from dressage masters early on, riding in fine apparel and in manicured rings, Oded began his riding career in a public park in Tel Aviv, Israel, wearing jeans and sneakers. When he began in dressage, a unique sport in Israel at the time, he was 13 years old in a local, government-sponsored riding school led by an ex-policeman. He was taught about the importance of discipline in riding and about taking care of horses. Oded claims that within the first two weeks of riding, he knew that was what he was going to do for a living. His intuition was astute, and he went on to compete on the international stage, including three World Equestrian Games and continued on page 66 62 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


Chiseled limestone on the fireplace chimney in the great room provides texture while emphasizing the 12-foot ceilings. A custom, satin-nickel chandelier adds a sculptural element.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 3


64 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


Oded Shimoni is the owner of OS Dressage, a training and teaching farm in Wellington, Florida, which he manages with his life partner, Nataly Leibovitz (above), a champion show jumper.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 5


continued from page 62

two European championships. His travels gradually led him to the U.S., initially in the Maryland/Virginia area. From there, he began to go to Wellington, Florida, for three months, which quickly grew to six months, and by 2009 he began staying year round.

O

ded is now the owner of OS Dressage, a training and teaching farm in Wellington, which he manages with his life partner, Nataly Leibovitz. A champion show jumper, Nataly first met Oded at her father’s jumper-dressage facility in Israel. The two maintained a long-distance relationship until Nataly decided to vacation in, and eventually move to, Wellington. It is a successful partnership on so many levels, but in particular, it is their shared desire to dedicate their lives to horses. When asking Oded whether having his own farm has changed him as a rider, coach, and trainer, he admitted it has changed him immensely. “Maybe because I am older, I find I have more time and more patience to understand the horses’ and the riders’ needs,” Oded mused. “The number one thing is the horse. It’s taking care of what they need, spending time with them, and not rushing them. Each horse is different; some learn quickly, and others, although they may be very talented, need time mentally to adapt to the structure. Here, I feel I have the time and patience versus going from farm to farm to teach and not being involved in their everyday care. Knowing what is going on with the horses and the riders has been a huge change for me. It’s made me happier, calmer, and a better horseman for sure.” Nataly is extremely involved in the nutrition of the horses. She monitors the condition of their coats, hooves, eyes, and teeth, along with the quality of their feed, hay, and shavings. She finds

66 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

it imperative to stay up-to-date on the latest horse-welfare programs and directs the staff accordingly in the management and care of the horses. Robert Dover, the chef d’equipe of the U.S. Dressage Team, is based at OS Dressage, as well as U.S. rider Olivia LaGoy-Weltz; top young riders such as Chase Shipka and Kerrigan Gluch; high-level, small-tour riders; and top international riders and horses. The farm also serves as the home of Robert Dover’s scholarship and Future Stars program. A HOM E/FARM BASED ON CONCEP T AN D COLLABORATION

Oded and Nataly designed their farm together and started construction in 2013. Nataly especially wanted to ensure that the barn was simple, yet professional and well-made. This year, they installed a round pen and changed the footing in the hot walker. The farm is now equipped with an indoor arena with kickboards; an outdoor, oversized arena; and a jump field. Their footing and drainage is also top notch. The indoor and covered arenas and all buildings at the farm meet Miami/Dade County hurricane codes. What impresses Oded, Nataly, and their clients is that the horses are very happy at the farm. “Sometimes you can have the most beautiful facility but the horses are not happy,” Oded explained.

T

heir house is also located on the farm because one of Oded and Nataly’s greatest delights is to be able to see the horses while relaxing at home. “Designing the house was fun,” they both admitted. Oded has very modern taste and Nataly had to keep reminding him that it was a farmhouse. Ultimately, designer Vance Burke (see EQLiving, June/July 2017 issue), helped them bring their visions together. “When they approached me to work on their


Above: An open floor plan allows a view from the kitchen through to the great room. Left: In the guest suite, key-lime walls are complemented by chartreuse upholstery in a nod to the Florida climate. Mondrian-influenced pillows finish the bed. Opposite, bottom: Lucky, their groom’s Chihuahua.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 7


Wellington home, I was instantly drawn to the dynamic couple,” said Burke. “Together, we developed a sophisticated yet thoroughly modern approach to an open-concept farmhouse.” The home is warm, airy, and inviting, with tasteful nods to their love of horses throughout. There’s also room for dogs in this happy household, which is

68 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


Balance and symmetry are repeated and reinforced in the architecture as well as the seating groups. The color scheme of crisp cream and gray are fashionably classic. An alfresco shower is accessed through the master bath or from the pool area.

good news for Shekel, their Jack Russell terrier, and Stella, the Rhodesian ridgeback. hen Oded and Nataly lived in a beautiful apartment at the Polo Club in Wellington, they worried that they would lose their

W

privacy if they both lived and worked at the farm. But, they say, no one ever bothers them. Everyone, including clients, recognize the unspoken regard for boundaries. Because they have created such a professional yet warm and inviting atmosphere at OS Dressage, there is a respect that flows between them and their clients. They both love their home;

it’s their oasis, and they completely enjoy it. “I never thought in all my life that I would ever have a home or a farm like this,” said Oded. “I did not know then how to get it; I did not know how to think to get it. It wasn’t even in my wildest dreams. I am thankful and I am humbled to have Nataly with me, and to have this dream come true.” FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 9


HUNT COUNTRY NOIR AN ALLURING AND FASCINATING BALANCE OF ELEGANCE AND PRACTICAL SIMPLICITY MERGES VICTORIAN HIGH NECKS AND LACE WITH FORMAL HUNTING ATTIRE.

Contributing Editor: Sandra Ranke @sandraranke.com Photographer: Heidi Niemala @heidiniemala.com Fashion Editor: David Burnett @davidburnettnyc.com

70 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


Jacket: J. W. Anderson Skirt: Thierry Mugler Ankle Boot: Giambattista Valli Fly Whisk: Horse Country @horsecountrycarrot.com

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 1


72 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


This page: Vintage Victorian Lace Blouse sheer top: Wolford Skirt: Gaultier Necklace: Free People Opposite page: Lace Blouse and Leather Double Belt: Alexander McQueen Skirt: Alberta Ferretti

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 3


Dress: Alexander McQueen Belt: Fendi Jewelry: Nina Fox @thevintagefoxonline.com

Models: Bentley@modelogic.com, Kathleen@modelogic.com Hair: Jacqui Davis @pratpartners.com Makeup: Lori Pressman @theartistagency.com Digital Tech and retouching: Kate Field @katefield.net Stylists assistant: Anja Schattschneider Photo assistants: Aaron Hunt and Jim Osen  Horses courtesy of Daphne Alcock Shot on location in Middleburg, Virginia Special thanks: Patricia Black at Albright Fashion Library @albrightnyc.com  and Barry Soorenko 

74 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 5


76 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


This page: Sleeveless Jacket: Balenciaga, Pants: Zara Sheer Mesh Top: Wolford Shoe: Celine, Spats: Vintage Opposite page: Pants: Zara Shoe: Celine, Spats: Vintage Frock Coat: Horse Country @horsecountrycarrot.com

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 7


78 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


This page: Sheer Blouse: Lanvin Silk Culottes: Saint Laurent Belt: Giambattista Valli Opposite page: Jacket: Ungaro Skirt: Gaultier Ankle Boot: Giambattista Valli

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 7 9


80 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


This page: Lace Dress: Tom Ford Frock Coat and Top Hat: Horse Country @horsecountrycarrot.com Opposite page: Sheer Blouse: Rochas Corset: Dolce & Gabbana Satin Skirt: Saint Laurent Belt: Nina Fox @thevintagefoxonline.com

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 1


MANHATTAN SADDLERY An equestrian’s oasis in NEW YORK CITY since 1912. BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS BY C.W.MEDINGER

Manhattan Saddlery’s store manager, Jessie Lochrie, above an original Millers Harness & Saddlery sign. 82 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


M

anhattan Saddlery is a jewel amidst the harness shop on East 24th Street, then a hub of horse auctions metropolitan landscape of New York City. and markets selling equestrian equipment. In 1939, Miller’s Tucked quietly just off of Park Avenue on moved down the street to No. 123, joining H. Kauffman & Sons, Old Stable Row—more commonly known another venerable tack shop on the block. Mayer’s son, Joseph, as 24th Street—it is considered the “equi- eventually took over the company, and the Miller Harness center” for the city’s Company thrived, filling five floors and and surrounding area’s equestrians. Today, establishing a huge catalog business. They EVEN THOUGH NEW it remains the only tack shop in all five employed dozens of salespeople and had YORK CITY DOESN’T boroughs. More than just a source for tack factories and suppliers in England, Europe, and apparel, the saddlery serves as the hub Asia, and India. SEEM LIKE A HORSEY for all things horse. Equestrians in the U.S. and around AREA BECAUSE WE ARE “If you live in New York City, there’s no the world eagerly anticipated receiving IN A HUGE METROPOLIS, place to go to talk about horse life, or spend Miller’s catalogs with its recognizable IT ACTUALLY IS. an afternoon as you would at the barn,” LL English boot logo. At various times says store manager Jessie Lochrie. “It’s sort the catalog featured illustrations by Sam of fractured, as people are riding all over or flying to Florida on Savitt, and in the 1980s they incorporated artistic design from the weekends, so this is a central gathering place. We encour- the now legendary horseman and artist, Ronnie Mutch. age people to come and hang out.” Suggestions about where to As Miller’s products became more upscale, carrying equestake riding lessons, see a great horse show, or what would be the trian haute couture for foxhunters, polo, dressage, and other perfect gift for the enthusiastic pony-club rider are all part of the English disciplines, so came the high-profile customers such as tack shop’s experience. the Rockefellers and Kennedys. East 24th Street had established As with most successful businesses, behind Manhattan itself as the mecca for equine haberdashery and accoutrements. Saddlery lies a unique evolutionary backstory. In 1907, RussianOver the years ownership changed hands several times. born master harness maker Mayer Miller opened Miller’s, a Finally, a long-time Miller’s customer came forward. A dressage


enthusiast from New Jersey, June Tsang had encouraged riding in her family as a means of fostering skill development for her autistic son. In 2002, she and her husband, Ben, purchased the 6,000-square-foot shop and changed its name to Manhattan Saddlery. After June suffered a long illness, her son Nick, a new Harvard graduate whose day job was in real estate, took over running the store in 2007. He remains in that role today. In a recent interview, he told The New York Times, “I’m never closing this store; it has such an emotional connection.”

Trends often start in Wellington, Florida, in the winter and move up the coast and become big by the summer.” Products made in the U.S., and by small businesses and women-owned companies are also a huge focus for Lochrie. One only has to glance around the store to spot a Casa Borrell jacket made in New York City or one of Amanda Hood’s Boy-OBoy Bridlework ribbon belts to recognize Lochrie’s targeted selections. In addition to its impressive apparel offerings, Manhattan Saddlery is devoted to keeping the tack in tack shop. Retaining its reputation as a full-service saddlery, the shop offers equestrians everything from leather goods, cleaners, equipment, and services such as blanket and pad embroidery to custom boots and jackets, and embellished helmets.

FO RMU L A F O R SU CCE SS

Today’s Manhattan Saddlery is attracting a new generation of equestrians of all levels and disciplines. “There are a lot of young riders in the city right now,” says Lochrie. “A surprising amount. I have a lot of customers who are in the ponies now and moving into the horses. We have once-a-week riders and women getting back into riding. Access to the sport is challenging, especially in the city, but there are so many wonderful barns with great trainers and programs just outside of the city, in New Jersey, Connecticut, Westchester County, and Long Island.” Even as a new clutch of riders shop for the latest in equestrian gear, the store continues to imbue the timeless ambiance of its heritage. The bell-boot lamps, horseshoe checkout counter, and historical photos scattered about are every bit as fitting in the store’s refreshed décor. It is a paradise for those seeking the ultimate tactile and olfactory experience of enticing tweeds and rich, buttery leather emanating from the displays of apparel, boots, and saddles. The saddlery’s curated mix of refined products reflects a commitment to

COM M UNITY M AT T ER S

remaining current and competitive, from pony club to grand prix. “I don’t buy anything I wouldn’t wear or use on my own horse,” says Lochrie, who also does the purchasing. “I place a huge emphasis on the buying, and I hunt for really unique things. I attend the major trade shows such as Spoga in Europe and the AETA International Trade Show in the U.S., and I try to go to WEF every year.

84 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

“The community aspect is really important to us,” smiles Lochrie. “We are very aware that we are the only tack shop in New York City. We have events like wine and cheese nights if we have cool new products coming in, and we also do bigger events. We had a book signing with George Morris, and Bernie Traurig recently did a talk on the history of the forward-riding system, with old footage of the U.S. Equestrian Team. We’ve also done fundraisers for organizations such as Brooke USA and Gallop NYC.” The Saddlery’s clientele is 60 percent local. “It’s New Yorkers who live and work in the city or come in from Millbrook, New York, and work in the city and keep their horses elsewhere,” Lochrie explains. “There’s a predictable big lunch and after-work rush every day. On Friday afternoons, people come in to get all their gear for the horse show or fox hunting on the weekend. Even though it doesn’t seem like a horsey area because we are in a huge metropolis, it actually is.” CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


This page: The saddlery showcases its curated mix of products in rich, visual displays throughout the store. Opposite, from top: Two vintage Miller’s catalogs, one of which features a Sam Savitt illustration; a 1960s interior photo of Miller’s; the 1913 National Horse Show in New York City.

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 5


Line of Sight, acrylic on canvas, 30 inches by 40 inches

86 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018


A FINE B AL ANCE OF POWER AND PALE T TE SUSAN EASTON BURNS’ vivid canvases are alive with energy, passion, and equine mystique.

New Horizon Acrylic on canvas 24 inches by 24 inches

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 7


“IT’S NOT AS CHALLENGING TO CAPTURE A RANGE OF EMOTIONS IN AN ANIMAL AS IT IS EXCITING TO SEE WHAT EMOTIONS ARISE IN A PAINTING.”

A BR IEF IN T E RVIE W WITH S US A N E AS TO N B URNS

Tremendous energy is a common element in your paintings. Do you attribute that to your technique or is it part of the criteria?

Susan Easton Burns was born and educated in upstate New York and now lives and paints on a small farm in rural Georgia. Spontaneity and intuition are the two most important concepts she aims to convey in her art. A spontaneous underpainting gives way to an image that appears intuitively, and once she sees something emerge, the painting quickly comes to life. Susan’s passion for art had a profound effect on her daughter, Julia Burns, who works in ceramics. Susan is honored to have her daughter follow in her footsteps, and the two were featured in a mother/daughter show at Dk Gallery in Marietta, Georgia, in May 2017. Susan was the official 140th Kentucky Derby artist in 2014 and the Windsor Polo Charity Cup artist in 2018. Her art can be seen in several galleries in Georgia, including Dk Gallery in Marietta and Timpson Creek Gallery in Clayton, as well as at Beverly McNeil Gallery in Birmingham, Alabama, and Bennett Gallery in Nashville, Tennessee.

The energy comes from the technique, which is to paint abstractly until an image appears. This is about my fear of a blank canvas and having nothing to say. There is a need to connect with only paint and canvas, while questioning whether what I’m saying is relevant. The energy is the most important part of any painting. It’s what brings the energy of the viewer into the light. It brings a consciousness to the viewer that they did not have before they saw the painting. How do you find a comfortable balance between kinetic energy and chaos in a painting?

The chaos might be a result of the kinetic energy. I don’t make a judgment on the chaos, only on the value of it as an artistic element. Chaos is a part of nature. It seems to be in everything or in the creation of everything. For instance, if there is an area of shadow, and there is chaos there, it adds to the piece because we don’t expect to see things clearly that are in shadow. Everything is moving all of the time. Everything has energy. Do you work in the field, in your studio, or both?

I work in the field and the studio. What is your medium of choice? What determines your palette?

I work in acrylic. The lighting of the day and the colors I’ve seen in the past few days are relevant to what color I pick up to use. I’m not judgmental about the

88 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

color. Color is everywhere and finds its own order. How challenging is it to capture the range of emotions that horses generate?

It’s not as challenging to capture a range of emotions in an animal as it is exciting to see what emotions arise in a painting. The emotions arise out of the energy available in the artist and what images are stored in memory. Do particular emotions inspire you more than others?

All emotions are inspirational, but some have more energy than others. There are warm and cool emotions like the colors. Even in the realm of gray colors, there are some days it is difficult to mix a warm gray. Have you had any unique discoveries about horses after spending considerable time observing and painting them?

Horses know immediately how conscious you are when you are near them. They are incredibly forgiving and willing to communicate relative to their recent experiences. Can you share a little bit about your first experience with a horse and how it impacted your lifelong relationship with them?

My first relationship with a horse was purely visual. A large, dark, fearful horse running across my front yard as a storm approached was a powerful image. I happened to be looking out a window and saw this vision and held it for years before being conscious of it.


Left: Name It Acrylic on canvas 48 inches by 48 inches Below: Cultivate Acrylic on canvas 24 inches by 24 inches

You are often referred to as an equestrian artist. Is that how you would describe yourself?

I do not refer to myself as an equestrian artist. I enjoy painting horses, but the representation of an image in a painting is not what makes a good painting. I might say that some of my better paintings have had horses in them. I see horses every day, so I paint horses. Their powerful, dynamic forms are in my brain. Nature, in many forms, is a prominent theme in your work. Do you consider it a great motivator in your work?

Nature is everything to me. When we respect and exist in harmony with nature, we are the best possible example of human beings. Have you developed a particular affinity for any particular horse breed?

All horse breeds are interesting to me. In figure drawing, it was much more fun to draw the larger models than the small because the lines easily traveled around the figure, allowing them to stand out on the page. This is also true of horses. The warmbloods and Quarter Horses are so massive and might stand out on a page, whereas the Thoroughbreds, mustangs, and Arabians blend into nature and are a little more difficult to draw, but no less interesting. The heavier horses sometimes make a better composition because they are round. All horses are interesting to me, and I love mules and donkeys as well. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102

FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 8 9


Burst Acrylic on canvas 30 inches by 30 inches

Looking for You Acrylic on canvas 48 inches by 48 inches

90 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

I Can’t Exactly See Where I’m Going Acrylic on canvas 48 inches by 48 inches


T H E F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM E Q U E ST R I A N L I V I N G

EQ U E STR IAN EQLiving.com

FEB R UA RY / MARC H 2 0 1 8

PRO PERTI ES

W E L L I NGTON, FLOR IDA

WINDING TRAILS PAGE 92

®


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

WINDING TRAILS WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

| EQ | OC I VGI N| GFEB TOB/ ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016 | EQU | 2018 92 92 E SUE T RSITARNI ALNI VLI N RUARY MARCH


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

PROPERTY HIGHLIGHTS: –4.99 Acres –Private Gated Entrance –Underground Utilities –Bridle Path To Show Grounds –Owner’s Quarters/Staff Apartments –Up To 10 Stalls

W

inding Trails is Wellington’s new exclusive equestrian community located close to all horse show venues including the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF), Global Dressage Festival (GDF) and the International Polo Club (IPC). Each of the nine (9) 4.99 acre lots offered are designed for your custom

designed stables with luxurious owner’s living quarters, large riding arena, paddocks and staff housing. Perfect for the hunter/jumpers and dressage enthusiast each gated property will have up to 10 stalls. Access Wellington’s bridle path system and hack or golf cart to the show grounds. Come and enjoy Winding Trails and build your dream equestrian compound.

DAVID WELLES, P.A. Founding Associate 561.313.9123 dwelles@equestriansir.com www.wellesrealestate.com

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 3


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Thomas Baldwin tbaldwin@equestriansir.com 561.714.3098

La Lechuza caracas | $28,900,000

Pr

ic eR

ed uc ed

62 Acres | 72 stAlls | 2 regulAtion size Polo Fields | 160’x300’ grAss ring | 160’x255’ sAnd ring | 22 PAddocks | 1/2-Mile exercise trAck | Fitness center | 6 tAck rooMs | 9 stAFF APArtMents | lArge cAr collector’s gArAge

White Birch Farm | $27,000,000

Grand Prix ViLLaGe s | $9,950,000

36.8 Acres oF PriMe reAl estAte on Pierson rd | HoMe to legendAry Polo teAM WHite BircH | coMPlete WitH 2 Full sized Polo Fields | gAted PAved roAd Access | Hedges For tHe uPMost PrivAcy | cAn Be develoPed & suBdivided | close ProxiMity to All equestriAn venues

3Br / 2BA grooM’s APArtMent WitH Full kitcHen | oWner’s lounge | All-WeAtHer ring | Five-Horse WAlker | gAted driveWAy entrAnce | tWo tAck & Feed rooMs | Four grooMing/WAsH stAlls | HurricAne-ProoF doors | 26 12’x12’ stAlls | sHort HAck to WeF

94 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

Thomas B aldwin tbaldwin@equestriansir.com

N ew

Li st i

ng

561.714.3098

Palm Beach Polo | $4,199,000

oVeR 10 AcReS | 12-StAll BARn | 2 Feed RoomS | 4 WASh StAllS | 160’ x 255’ SAnd Ring | 160’ x 300’ gRAnd pRix gRASS Ring | 4-6 hoRSe WAlKeR

4 BedRoomS | 6.5 BAthRoomS | cul-de-SAc locAtion | tuRKiSh mARBle FlooRing | expAnSiVe pool /pAtio AReA | gouRmet Kitchen | geneRAtoR

Pr

ic eR

ed uc ed

south road adjacent to WeF | $8,900,000

Palm Beach Polo | $2,699,000

Palm Beach Polo | $2,200,000

6 BR | 7 BA & 2 hAlF BA | l ARge pool AReA | golF couRSe VieWS | completelY RenoVAted | top-oF-the-line AppliAnceS

6 BR | 7.5 BA | FiReplAce | pool & SpA | coRneR lot With l Agoon VieWS & luSh l AndScAping | outdooR Kitchen | expAnSiVe pAtio

Palm Beach Polo | $1,399,000

Paddock Park | $1,299,000

4 BedRoomS | 5 BAthRoomS | neW A/c unitS | neW l AndScAping | neW pool heAteR | ScReened pool & SpA | golF & l AKe VieWS

2.15 AcReS | 4 BR | 2.5 BA | 2,574 Sq.Ft. | on BRidle pAth | cloSe to ShoW gRoundS | Fenced YARd | Build YouR cuStom BARn

WIndsor Way | $695,000

Polo Island condo | $610,000

4 BedRoomS | 5.5 BAthRoomS | RenoVAted Kitchen & BAthRoomS | l ARge pool | RenoVAted decK oVeRlooKing 8th hold oF the duneS couRSe

3 BedRoomS | 3 BAthRoomS | VAulted ceilingS | open Kitchen | oFFice | OC TOB E R/NOVE MB EtRo | WeF 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 5 pRoximitY cloSe


RANCHO SANTANA Continued from page 59

We went for a leisurely stroll through the nearby village. While she waved to friends, she explained how horses were such an important part of the local culture. When we got back to the barn, I was treated to a show by Nicaraguan fatherand-son trainers. These horses truly do dance! Stepping high in place with beautiful balance and ease, they seem to enjoy the music and respond to the rhythms. After lunch, I was back at the barn for a lesson. I was given patient instruction on how to ask the horses to do this dancing movement. It was not as easy as it looked, but I eventually got it—what a feeling! The next evening I met the full team at the barn, and we set out for a sunset ride along a wooded path to the beach. From somewhere music began, and the horses were immediately alert. We danced our way down the shoreline. Our four white horses traveled in a row against the darkening sky, manes flowing, feet and breathing synchronized. It was a ride I will always remember. My final excursion was a breakfast ride. This scenic trip took us through farm fields, along sand roads lined with tidy, simple homesteads, and to a beach. Then, a climb brought us to a hilltop restaurant with a beautiful cliff view of the many surfers in the waves below. After breakfast, we again climbed on the

A PERSONAL

TRAVEL DIARY

Top: Rancho Santana consulting equineprogram director Beverly Bean introduces her Iberoamericana stallion, RB Festival; bands in trucks blare music as they ride alongside horses in the parade; a sunset ride on the beach. Above: A horse demonstrates its dancing skills. These are the same well-schooled horses ridden by guests.

horses and set off at a faster pace back to the stables. ll week, I had been hearing about the upcoming Hipica horse festival. I felt the staff’s excitement mount as they bustled about preparing. Hipicas are huge parades with marching bands

A

96 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

and festivities that take place in various cities each month around the country, held to bring international awareness of Nicaraguan horse culture. Our trip to get to the parade was an experience. We traveled through busy towns with narrow streets, passed colorful markets and animals grazing roadside. Next we boarded a ferry across San Jorge Lake towards two looming volcanoes on the island of Ometepe. From the top deck of the ferry we could look down on a large open truck with the horses standing side-by-side, looking out over the railing. An hour and a half later, we disembarked onto the small island and were welcomed by decorated streets and blaring music. We joined the crowds lining the streets as group after group of horses passed by, along with trucks and trailers loaded with multi-piece bands. Music from all corners added to the excitement. There was a fun anticipation waiting for the Rancho Santana team to arrive. When they did, they clearly stood out from the crowd. Splendidly turned out in their matching deep-yellow outfits and coordinated tack, horses gleaming and in step, they proudly marched along. I couldn’t help but feel a thrill as they went by, because I felt a connection to their home. That same connection has stayed with me since. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

1000 Brandywine Creek Rd, West Brandywine, PA 19320

Here is the opportunity you have been waiting for- country living while still being close to Philadelphia and Wilmington! This 141 Acre farm offers the space, utility and most importantly, the view to make your equestrian dreams come true! Nestled within the picturesque countryside of Cheshire Hunt and bordered by the Brandywine River, this amazing property is protected under conservancy and provides three approved building sites to build your dream home-all with views overlooking the tranquil Brandywine. This equestrian facility is one of the only in the area to offer a nine acre polo field with irrigation hookup and attached outdoor riding ring with lights and sprinkler system- this spectacular amenity has possible commercial and private club use. For the horse enthusiast, there are ten turn out fields all with running water, five turn out sheds, and three well appointed barns. With miles upon miles of riding trails, a tennis court with sprinkler system and a breath taking outside dining pavilion- this is your chance to own your little piece of heaven! Opportunities like this do not come often; call today for more information! 1000BRANDYWINECREEKRD.go2frr.com Meghan Chorin Associate Broker, REALTOR (610) 299-9504 (Direct) (610) 651-2700 (Office Main) Email: Meghan.Chorin@foxroach.com www.meghanchorin.com 431 West Lancaster Avenue Devon, PA 19333

$3,475,000 1000 Brandywine Creek Rd, West Brandywine, PA 19320 OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 7


EQ S C I E N C E

VETERINARY INNOVATION

O

ne type of sport horse that has directly benefited from the PBEC surgery pit is the Thoroughbred race horse, which commonly experience repetitive strain injuries such as a condylar fracture, which is a fracture to the cannon bone. Once a career-ending diagnosis, condylar fracture repairs are now returning Thoroughbreds to the track and show jumpers to the competition ring. “Doing these procedures while the horse is standing and not under general anesthesia takes away a lot of the risk,

PBEC

where we see lameness issues arise. “Our CT machine takes 3-D images of a horse’s neck and gives us the ability to see things we would not be able to detect otherwise,” continued Dr. Wheeler, a graduate of the Royal Veterinary College in London, England. “It is a really unique technology that we are very excited to incorporate into our pre-purchase exams.” While PBEC is well-known for its advanced imaging capabilities that also include nuclear scintigraphy and a standing MRI, the clinic also boasts a renowned group of talented surgeons. The most extensive recent improvement at PBEC included an overhaul of its surgical suite, giving the three boarded surgeons, Dr. Robert Brusie, Dr. Weston Davis, and Dr. Jorge Gomez, a state-ofthe-art workspace to show off their skills. The surgery pit has made surgical procedures more comfortable for veterinarians, owners, and, ultimately, the horses themselves. Recessed to a depth of 4 ½ feet, the pit allows surgeons to perform procedures on a horse’s hock or anything below it from a standing position. Since the horses are standing, they can forgo general anesthesia in favor of a mild sedative and local nerve blocks, which has drastically improved outcomes.

JUMP MEDIA

Continued from page 30

Above: Imaging, and the surgical pit.

and it also means a faster surgery from the time the horse comes in to the time it recovers,” said Gomez, who hails from Colombia and graduated from the University of Caldas. “Amazingly, horses tolerate it really well, and it is very convenient for us as surgeons. Condylar fractures can spiral all the way up through the cannon bone, and they have a tendency to develop complete catastrophic fractures. That risk can be significantly increased by the recovery from general anesthesia. Our goal is always to have the best result for the horse, trainers, and us as veterinarians.” PBEC also made significant improvement to its on-site reproductive center and welcomed Dr. Katie Atwood as a resident reproductive specialist. As a result of new talent and top-of-the-line equipment, PBEC is helping to revolutionize how polo ponies are bred by sending frozen embryos from polo horses in work in the U.S. to Argentina, where they are fertilized by some of the best polo stallions in the world. “In the past, owners were forced to send their horses back to Argentina at 12

98 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

or 13 years of age to breed, but thanks to veterinary science improving their health and longevity, these horses are now on the polo field until they are 17 or 18, and that is not the best reproductive age,” said Swerdlin, himself a polo player who keeps a special place in his heart for polo ponies having grown up with a father who played as well. “We are now breeding younger horses still in training in the U.S. with stallions in Argentina, implanting the embryos into recipient mares in Argentina, and having healthy, talented foals as a result.” When the concentration of horses is as high as it is in Wellington, especially during the winter months, biosecurity threats are always a concern. To that end, PBEC has dedicated itself to curbing the spread of disease. Following an outbreak of equine herpes in Wellington four years ago, the PBEC team immediately began planning for the addition of an isolation facility. Now complete, that facility features individual isolation stalls with separate air and cleaning systems for each horse, all under the care of internal medicine specialist, Dr. Peter Heidmann, who is a Diplomate of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine. “We are establishing new goals every month,” said Swerdlin. He credits progress in equine veterinary studies for aiding in human health advances, noting, “As veterinarians, we provide solutions and services to maintain the health and safety of horses first and foremost. Today, we are seeing 16- and 17-year-old horses winning at competition, and a lot of that has to do with innovations in veterinary science. After those innovations are successful with horses, others bring the technology and ideas for human treatment. We are the testing ground for human innovations, and the future is a bright and exciting one for both industries.” CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

JUPITER EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

Situated on 50 acres in the gated community of Ranch Colony in Jupiter, Florida, the YZ Ranch is one of the most fantastic equestrian properties in all of South Florida. The main house consists of 5 bedrooms, 5 full baths, and 3 half baths overlooking a beautiful four acre private lake and a fully equipped eight or ten stall stable. The main house is complete with a heated saltwater pool, a chef ’s kitchen, a 1,000-bottle wine room, a safe room vault, a ground floor master, and an observation lounge and terrace with incredible views of the property. All three structures, the main house, guest house, and barn with living quarters were built to exceed Miami/Dade hurricane specifications with impact glass, roll-up hurricane shutters and reinforced rebar concrete roofs, walls, and floors, and two commercial Caterpillar full facility generators. In addition to the stable, the equestrian facilities include a riding and jumping arena, eight turnout paddocks, three turn-out structures, and beautiful riding trails that wind through cypress and pine trees and pass by the internationally acclaimed Dye Preserve Golf Course on the western boundary of the property. Ranch Colony is surrounded by over 20,000 acres of nature preserves with plenty of access to riding trails, parks, and community trails for horseback riding enthusiasts. $18,900,000 | jupiterequestrianestate.com

TO D D P E T E R | 561. 2 81.0 03 1 todd.peter@sothebyshomes.com

F RA N C E S P E T E R | 561. 273.612 8 frances.peter@sothebyshomes.com FrancesandTodd.com PALM BEACH BROKERAGE | 340 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, FL 33480

Sotheby’s International Realty and the Sotheby’s International Realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International | Sotheby’s OC TOB E R/NOVE E R of 20 1 6 |International EQ L I VRealty, I NG Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not MB employees Inc..CO M

| 99


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

OUR HORSES, OURSELVES

CL

U

One winter she decided that living inside was preferable to the cold, and she hid in our living room.

EQ

O

OK

B

B

Continued from page 40

E

JEFFREY ANDERSON PHOTOS

TH N S EE ER W V T O E C B

the greater reality while at the same time defining his relationship and responsibility to it.” Perhaps this is the most devastating limit we experience: the loss of an embodied, numinous relationship with nature in all its forms. Is there a reliable, readily available way to dissolve our limits, to deepen connection to the larger whole? In an article in The New York Times, David DeSteno, a professor of psychology at Northeastern University, states, “Meditation fosters a view that all beings are interconnected.” In his work with psychologist Piercarlo Valdesolo he has found that “any marker of affiliation between two people, even something as subtle as tapping their hands together in synchrony, causes them to feel more compassion for each other when distressed. The increased compassion in meditators, then, might stem directly from meditation’s ability to dissolve the artificial social distinctions—ethnicity, religion, ideology, and the like—that divide us.” For a time, we lived across from a farm. People would drop off cats, and several of them made their way into our yard, which is how we expanded our population of cat companions. One day a young mother cat appeared in our garden

with three kittens. While we kept the kittens, the mother was very feral, so we spayed her and then released her. I named her Mamacita. We built a little shelter outside our door with a heated pad where we would feed her daily. It seemed that she wanted to stay, but we could not

10 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

touch her, and she would flee if she saw us. I spent many hours, and soon many years, sitting quietly, waiting, allowing Mamacita to sniff my fingers, then eventually she let me touch her head. One winter she decided that living inside was preferable to the cold, and she hid in our living room, declining to leave when we offered her the outdoors. Again, I would enter, lie down nearby or sit quietly and wait. After perhaps six years, I was able to hold her. It is now 10 years since Mamacita first appeared. She lives in a small room off my studio with a cat door. When I come in to feed her, she calls plaintively to me, and does not eat until we have had a luxurious long snuggle. She still has her spooky, fearful, hiding moments, but for the most part she has overcome the limits of her wildness. I tell this story to demonstrate that meditation is not only sitting on a cushion. It includes moments that invite awareness and a quiet, receptive mind. Touching and being touched, dancing, singing, and writing can all be forms of meditation when we bring intention and conscious focus into the heart of each moment. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 102


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

The Maya Group Sp e c i a l i z i n g i n E q u e s t r i a n R e a l E s tat e

15725 Sunset Lane | Palm Beach Point An incomparable equine facility

2860 Long Meadow Drive | Palm Beach Polo This completely

4915 Stables Way | Palm Beach Point East Built in 2015, this

2735 Polo Island Drive | Palm Beach Polo This spacious open floorplan

12545 Equine Lane | Equestrian Club Conveniently located to the International Polo Club, WEF, and Global Dressage, this lovely home features a private pool with screened loggia overlooking the lake. Furnishings optional. $819,000

1140 A RD | Loxahatchee Excellent location just 1/3 mile north of Southern

on over sixteen acres with a 20-stall barn, 3 riding arenas, and a climate controlled viewing lounge with a 360-degree view of each ring. The stylish and modern estate home has been fully renovated. $16,000,000

professionally designed facility fully utilizes its 5 acres. Main barn has 16 stalls, cedar tack rooms, 2/2 owner’s and 2/1 staff apartments. Property has additional 4-stall barn, all-weather irrigated arena, round pen, and 8 paddocks. $3,950,000

RODOLFO MAYA

954.588.8882 | rmllc@me.com MYWELLINGTONFARM.COM

renovated contemporary estate home is set on a quiet 1-acre lot and features golf and water views, 5 bedrooms, 6.2 baths, custom furnishings, Thermador appliances, hardwood and marble flooring, newer roof and impact windows. $4,500,000

includes a custom kitchen with white shaker style cabinets, quartz countertops and Frigidaire stainless steel appliances. The three bedrooms offer two with ensuite bathrooms with a third currently utilized as an office and gym. $600,000

behind the new Publix shopping center. Listing is for two 5 acre parcels cleared and filled, ready for your new farm! Front 5 acres may be purchased by itself for $389,000. Electric and water available. $699,999

V I S I T M y We l l i n g t o n Fa r m . c o m F O R M O R E I N F O R M AT I O N N D | EQ NE WI NGL.CO I SM T I| N1 0G1 S | 2016 OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E RA LIV


EQ R E S O U R C E S

WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

PEOPLE Page 8 Whispering Angel Rosé esclans.com/product/ whispering-angel FOOD+DRINK Page 14 Eau Palm Beach Resort and Spa eaupalmbeach.com Page 36 Spring Island Club springisland.com STYLE Page 16 Hope Unlimited Bags jenniegarlington.com/ hope Page 24 Jewelry David Yurman davidyurman.com Hermès hermès.com Zadeh NY zadehny.com Charriol charriol.com Ralph Lauren ralphlauren.com Hiho Silver hihosilver.co.uk AtelierCG ateliercg.com FAVORITES Page 18 Martha W. Jolicoeur Martha’s Properties/ Douglas Elliman Real Estate marthasproperties.com Martha@ marthasproperties.com 561-797-8040 Page 32 Home Horse homehorse.com

10 2 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I VIN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH 2018

Page 40 Book: Our Horses, Ourselves: Discovering the Common Body by Paula Josa-Jones Trafalgar Books, 2017 horseandriderbooks.com FASHION Page 20 Carina Hildebrandt carinahildebrandt.com ARTS Page 26 Andy Scott/Kelpies andyscottsculptor.com SCIENCE Page 30 Palm Beach Equine Clinic equineclinic.com 561-793-1599 HUNT COUNTRY NOIR Page 70 Albright fashion library albrightnyc.com J. W. Anderson j-w-anderson.com Balenciaga balenciaga.com/us Céline celine.com/en-us/home Dolce & Gabbana dolcegabbana.com Fendi fendi.com/us Alberta Ferretti albertaferretti.com/us Tom Ford tomford.com Free People freepeople.com Nina Fox/The Vintage Fox thevintagefoxonline.com Jean Paul Gaultier jeanpaulgaultier.com/en-us Horse Country horsecountrycarrot.com

Alexander McQueen alexandermcqueen.com Thierry Mugler muglerusa.com Rochas rochas.com Saint Laurent ysl.com/us Ungaro ungaro.com Wolford wolfordshop.com Zara zara.com/us TRAVEL Page 42 Coworth Park dorchestercollection.com/ en/ascot/coworth-park Atacama Boutique Hotel tierrahotels.com/ tierra-atacama-hotelboutique-amp-spa andBeyond andbeyond.com Domaine de Manville domainedemanville.fr/en/ Port Lympne Hotel aspinallfoundation.org/ port-lympne The Ivy Hotel theivybaltimore.com Yellowstone Club yellowstoneclub.com Piiholo Ranch piiholo.com Blue Hawaiian Helicopters bluehawaiian.com Rancho Santana ranchosantana.com MANHATTAN SADDLERY Page 82 manhattansaddlery.com GALLERY Page 86 Susan Easton Burns susaneastonburns.com


EQ B A R N D O G S

MEET ODIN Continued from page 106

checked again that all eight goats were accounted for, every single one, and they were healthy, but covered in soot. I checked their noses and their hooves, and they were fine. Odie looked good, but he was limping. He has long white fur, and his coat had been singed orange, so he looked quite a bit smaller than usual. But he didn’t have any burns. His whiskers were melted and his eyes were squinting from all the smoke, but he lay down on his back and wanted us to rub his belly, so I looked him over and he seemed to be in fairly good health. He was obviously so exhausted, he could only stand for a few minutes at a time. But he wasn’t so tired that he didn’t try to jump up, you know, with his paws on us, which he isn’t allowed to do. But I didn’t mind! We were crying, telling him what a good boy he was, how brave he was, and, you know, he really looked quite pleased with himself.” Roland and Ariel got the goats onto the trailer and lifted Odin into the back of the truck. As soon as they had driven enough to get cellphone service, they called the Sonoma County Fairgrounds, who gave them instructions on where to go. “We pulled up to the fairgrounds, and the volunteers there gave me a hug,” he said. “I could barely stand, mostly from the emotional weight of everything. They recognized that and kind of held me up and gave me water. They were so kind, and they knew exactly what to do.” A barn was set up for them, and Ariel brought Odin to lie down inside. They

, Ariel, Roland Odin, Tessa, s. and the goat

unloaded the goats, who filed in to join him. “That was the first time we knew they were safe,” added Roland. “That night might have been the best night’s sleep I ever had.” Odin, Tessa, and the goats have since been taken together (Odin refuses to leave the goats at all since the fire) to a temporary home, thanks Odin and Roland to Goatlandia, an animal at the Sonoma Fairgroun sanctuary in Santa Rosa, ds . California. As with many tragedies, the California wildfires have brought the community together. “There’s just a sense that everybody is so glad to be alive,” Roland said. “When what you’re feeling is gratitude, it doesn’t occur to you to be anything but kind to one another. The community has come together in every way I could imagine, and across social media there’s been an outpouring of love and e th support. Odin e er trucks w The charred n o up d un fo has become a Odin and his goat s, first thing Roland propert y. e th source of inspirato g in after arriving at the return shelter at Sonoma tion and hope to County Fairgrounds. people at a time when we really need it. “We lost all of our property except for what was in our pockets, but we didn’t lose our lives, and I don’t know that I’ve ever felt more joyful. The last time I felt so strongly was probably when my daughter was born,” said Roland. Writing on his Facebook page, he explained, “I feel tremendous gratitude. To think, in the aftermath of the firestorm, the loss of our material things hardly means a thing, for Odin somehow saved those ned r u b four-dollar goats.” on his ts.

10 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

s t and e goa ing th ed to t ir c t e t o o pro wa s t ys of Odin ter da f a t e fe


GEORGE KAMPER

DON’T MISS A SINGLE ISSUE!

EQU E S TR I A N L I V I N G

®

eqliving.com

A LO NG S T RI D E B E YOND T H E E XP EC TE D Planning and Strategy Public Relations Marketing Branding Event Promotions Event Press Centers Email Marketing Social Media Websites Graphic Design Video Production Podcasts Sponsorship Support Product Launches Book Tours

EQ M E D I A SUE WEAKLEY

S T YL E | FAS HI ON | D EC OR

T R AV EL | D ES IG N | P EOP L E

The full-service media agency with an equestrian focus

I have included a check for: (USA only; other countries please use website) $39.95 FOR 2 YEARS | 12 ISSUES

SAVE $46*

$24.95 FOR 1 YEAR | 6 ISSUES

NEW SUBSCRIPTION RENEWAL

NAME

ADDRESS

STATE

CITY

ZIP

EMAIL (Required for subscription updates and gift giveaways.)

TELEPHONE (Only in case of problems.)

*Off newsstand price. To pay by CREDIT CARD, please go to www.EQliving.com/subscribe

Mail coupon with your check to: EQ LIVING MAGAZINE BOX ONE BROWNSVILLE, VT 05037 Or use your credit card online: EQliving.com/subscribe

EQmedia.agency 612-209-0310

DE C E MB E R/JA NUA RY | 2017 | 201 8 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 5


EQ B A R N D O G S

MEET ODIN

This young GREAT PYRENEES refused to leave his herd of goats in the face of the Tubbs fire in northern California.

R

BY JILL NOVOTNY

oland Tembo Hendel and his daughter, Ariel, got Odin and his sister, Tessa, as puppies about a year and a half ago. They chose the Great Pyrenees as livestock guardian dogs for the little herd of rescued goats on their California farm. The eight goats, rejects from the goat cheese industry, were set to be slaughtered when Roland bought them at the Petaluma animal auction for just four dollars each. Roland and Ariel bottle-fed the day-old goats, who not only survived but thrived to become a beloved part of the family. The dogs instinctively began to care for the goats, growing from clumsy puppies to strong guardians. On a Sunday night in October, the family got a call from a neighbor who said that he smelled smoke. Roland checked online for active fires and found none, but he woke his daughter to let her know they might need to leave. “The sky began to turn orange,” Roland said in an interview with Positive TV. “Then, I could see flames, and they were getting bigger. So I ran downstairs to Ariel, who had already started loading our pets. When I made it outside, the winds were wild and large bits of ash were falling. At that point it was clear that we needed to leave immediately.” Roland went out to tend the goats and get Odin. “There was no time to try to corral the goats into a trailer and hitch it to the truck—that takes 20 minutes in the best circumstances,” continued Roland. “The goats were in a tight group, which is what they do when Odin

Roland, Tessa, and Odin enjoy the safety of the Sonoma fairgrounds; Before the fire, Odin would round the goats towards rocks in a large clearing, which is most likely how the animals survived. Everything on the property was burned completely, including their three-story home.

10 6 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2018

or Tessa warns them of danger. Odin was walking back and forth in front of them, clearly on alert. I said, ‘Odin, let’s go.’ He’s a very good dog—it would be incorrect to call him disobedient—but he’s his own dog. They’re not bred to do tricks, they are specifically bred to guard livestock. He sat down squarely and looked at me, and I knew he wasn’t moving. I said, ‘Ok, Odin. Take care of the goats and we’ll be back to get you.’” Roland ran down the hill to open the gate so the goats would have an escape path, and then ran back to the car. They drove off around 11:30 p.m. and spent the next several hours looking for safety. When they were finally able to return two days later, Roland was unsure of what they would find. “As we got to the front gate, it was very clear that our forest didn’t survive,” he recalled. “Everything was black. There was smoke coming up from pockets on the land, and some of the trees were still on fire.” The family home, a three-story house handbuilt by the previous owner, was a pile of rubble. “Out in the pasture, we could just make out the white and brown and black shapes of the goats,” said Roland. “As we kept driving, we could see Odin’s tail wagging.” They sped to the pasture and jumped out of the car, where they found Odin and all eight goats, plus some baby deer who had joined the herd. “I had to ask myself ‘Is this really happening?’” admitted Roland. “I Continued on page 104


! A US

d s an m a es Te ian Gam r n t s ia que uestr E s e q Stat orld E d e W nit 018 rU 2 u e o Y th ort ess at p p su cc elp r Su H o e f t as ues Ple Q r i the

m a e T o G

Photos by Shannon Brinkman, Phelps Media Group, McMillen Photography, Waltenberry, Jon Stroud, Cealy Tetley, Becky Pearman Photography

U S ET FOUN D AT ION

Dressage

Jumping

Driving

Para-Dressage

Endurance

Reining

Eventing

Supporting Athletes Promoting International Excellence Building for the Future

Vaulting Join the Team at USET.org (908) 234-1251


Hermès Allegro jumping saddle flat seat

SUPER SOX, LILLIE KEENAN AND THEIR HERMÈS ALLEGRO SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR

Profile for Equestrian Living

February/March 2018  

The Feb/Mar issue of Equestrian Living showcases 68 fabulous getaways in our fifth annual Travel issue, as well as a visit with interior des...

February/March 2018  

The Feb/Mar issue of Equestrian Living showcases 68 fabulous getaways in our fifth annual Travel issue, as well as a visit with interior des...

Profile for wynnwood

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded

Recommendations could not be loaded