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EQ

E Q U E S TR I A N T HE P R E MI E R MAG A Z I N E

DISPLAY UNTIL SEPT 11, 2015

SUMMER 2015

O F C O UN TRY LI F E

Q U A R T E R L Y

CELEBRATING DRESSAGE EQUESTRIAN WEDDINGS | BARNS FOR LIVING PLUS: MEREDITH MICHAELS-BEERBAUM | STYLE | FAS H IO N | D E CO R


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MEET THE STARS OF DRESSAGE AT THE EXCITING NEW ADEQUAN GLOBAL DRESSAGE FESTIVAL IN WELLINGTON, FLORIDA PAGE 60


GO BEHIND THE SCENES AT THE GEORGE KAMPER PHOTO SHOOT ON PAGE 64. VIDEO: EQUESTRIANQUARTERLY.COM/EQ-DRESSAGE-SHOOT/


Palm Beach Point East

$7,500,000

Saddle Trail

Southfields

$3,750,000 Paddock Park

$7,250,000 Equestrian Club

$4,100,000

$2,350,000 Palm Beach Polo Club

$2,250,000

We are where our clients are. In the best locations. From a small boutique shop in Europe to more than 550 shops in the best locations around the world, we’ve delivered quality service and personal attention to the clients who’ve welcomed us. Wherever you find beautiful properties, premium service, and extraordinary living, you will find Engel & Völkers, the world leader in luxury real estate. If you’re thinking of selling your home, find out how we can help connect you with the right buyer.

Engel & Völkers Palm Beach 150 Worth Avenue, Ste 236 Palm Beach, FL 33480 +1 561-659-3872

Engel & Völkers Wellington 13501 South Shore Blvd, Ste 103 Wellington, FL 33414 +1 561-791-2220


Grand Prix Village • 6-acre Property

This huge lot in the prestigious Grand Prix Village has everything you’ll need for a great season! There’s a gorgeous 18 stall barn with two tack rooms, feed room, and lots of storage. There are also grooms’ apartments, a 2-car garage, and a lovely one bedroom owners’ lounge with an office, kitchen and living room. The property has a grass Grand Prix field and an all-weather ring already in place. Close to the show and convenient access to the bridle paths. Offered at $13,900,000 

Contemporary & Decadent Brand New Barn Situated on 4-acres of lush land, is an amazing 20-stall barn with 4 wash stalls, 2 tack rooms, a laundry room, and a feed room. Absolutely no expense was spared in the creation of this masterpiece.  The owners’ lounge has a beautiful fireplace as the focal point, as well as a kitchen with great room for entertaining and a wonderful view of the 220’ x 120’ competition ring with superior custom footing. Property also includes six paddocks and apartment. Offered at $12,950,000

+1 561-818-9476 carol.sollak@evusa.com

Elegant Renovation on Seabreeze This beautifully renovated two story home on one of the coveted “sea” streets in Palm Beach offers a 3Br, 2.5Ba main house, and a full bathroom cabana off of the pool. The gorgeous kitchen boasts top-of-the-line appliances, as well as a family room in addition to a formal living and dining area. Hardwood floors run through the home and compliment the already bright and spotless renovation which included impact doors and windows throughout. Offered at $3,985,000

Gorgeous Equestrian Property This newly constructed equestrian facility has a beautiful and spacious owners’ lounge with a large kitchen and covered patio, and also includes a four bedroom, two bathroom grooms’ quarter with storage. The property has thirty-two stalls total between two barns, and four large grass paddocks. Each barn consists of sixteen stalls, two wash stalls, a feed room, tack room, and laundry room. The outdoor ring is top-of-the-line with state-of-the-art footing. Offered at $11,000,000


Exceptional Equestrian Estate

On 7.61 acres and a short hack to either WEF or GDF, this property is perfect for anyone looking for something spectacular. The beautifully constructed home was built with the highest quality materials and a discerning eye. Four large bedrooms, 5.5 baths, and an open living area with a gourmet kitchen offer plenty of space for entertaining and relaxing. The backyard includes a large, screened-in patio with an outdoor kitchen and fireplace, and a swimming pool with hot tub and 100ft lap pool, all of which overlook the wonderful 200’ x 130’ Rizzo ring.  The property also enjoys an 11-stall, center aisle barn with 2 wash bays, tack room, laundry room, feed room, lots of storage, and a peaceful viewing lanai. Of the 7.61 acres this property has to offer, 3.91 acres are an adjacent vacant lot, leaving plenty of room for expansion. Offered at $8,800,000

Modern and Chic Las Casitas Villa

Bright and Beautiful Bungalow

This amazing villa has recently undergone a complete renovation everything from the concrete floors, appliances, impact glass doors and windows, etc. is new - and done to the highest standards of excellence. The home has 3 bedrooms (one is currently employed as a cozy den) and 2 bathrooms. Light and bright and expertly decorated, this home is offered fully furnished and has an awesome saltwater pool. Offered at $750,000

Fully renovated with two bedrooms and two bathrooms, this bungalow is an absolute must see. Gorgeous French doors leading out to the screened-in porch with lake views accentuate the open and airy floor plan. With vaulted ceilings, this home is a true showpiece with a modern design, furniture, and concrete floors. Leading into this stunning home is a lovely enclosed, private courtyard with grass and pavers. Offered at $675,000

+1 561-662-0728 amy.carr@evusa.com

Rustic and Cozy Villa This private end unit in the Las Casitas neighborhood has been fully renovated and is move-in ready. With three bedrooms, two bathrooms, and an open floor plan, this charming home is offered furnished. Beautiful wood floors flow throughout the main living areas, with carpet in the bedrooms. The kitchen is well appointed with all the tools and toys for the chef in the family. This unit also has a nice sized fenced and private backyard with a pool. Offered at $735,000


Peaceful horse farm with a 3Br/2Bth pool home in gated subdivision with 18 stall center-aisle stable, 3 wash racks, 150’ x 200’ riding arena, 7 grass paddocks and 2 RV hookups. Easy access to WEF & Global showgrounds. Situated on situated on 4.29 acres. This subdivision allows for training and boarding operations. Offered at $1,400,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Private estate home on 10.95 acres in gated equestrian subdivision. 12 Stall courtyard stable with the ability to have up to 24 stalls. There are 2 apartments, 300’ x 200’ riding arena, 10 large grass paddocks. There is an additional CBS 100’ x 60’ outbuilding for more stalls, auto collection or RV. Ample room for covered riding arena. Offered at $5,900,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Remodeled 5BR home with guest house great for entertaining, on 1 acre backing to privately owned polo fields, stunning kitchen overlooking the pool and patio with gas lanterns & a fire pit. Plus, marble & wide-plank wood floors & home gym/ spa. Private motor court & 3 car garage on gated cul-de-sac. Offered at $2,550,000 Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367

Immaculately maintained dressage farm set on over 4 acres in the prime location of Saddle Trail. The 4 bedroom, 4 bath home just underwent a complete designer remodel and offers indoor and outdoor fireplaces, a large den, separate bar area, heated pool, newly screened pool enclosure, and summer kitchen. The house and existing barn are situated in a way that allows for expansion of up to 16-stalls. Offered at $4,999,000 Travis Laas +1 561-906-7007

Located in the prestigious Palm Beach Point, this magnificent 6.45 acre Tuscan-style dressage estate perfectly balances a private and peaceful setting in a prime location. It features a new home designed for great views of the gorgeous new 16-stall facility and the property’s exceptional landscape. The 4 bedroom, 4 bathroom home is ideal for entertaining guests. Offered at $4,999,000 Travis Laas +1 561-906-7007

This light and open 5 bedroom, 4.5 bathroom home sits on a one-of-a-kind lot that backs up to Field 1 of the International Polo Club. The floor plan conveniently has the master suite and a guest bedroom on the main floor, with three additional bedrooms and a loft on the upper level. The gourmet kitchen is equipped with natural gas and stainless steel appliances. Offered at $865,000 Michelle Hall +1 713-303-7369

Competence. Exclusivity. Passion.


For the Love of the Horse


LEXINGTON, KENTUCKY 866-225-7474 WWW.LVHARKNESS.COM


EQ I N S I D E

Features

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SUMME R | 2015 IS SUE

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YO U R P E R F E C T E Q U E S T R I A N COMMUNIT Y Private equestrian communities offer the lifestyle benefits of living in an area with a plethora of equine amenities and fellow equestrians.

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BRIDLE BLISS Endless opportunities and innovative ideas abound for equestrians planning to incorporate their love of horses into their wedding day.

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D R E S S AG E The quiet elegance and beauty of a horse and rider in harmony are the ultimate expression of this steeped-in-history discipline.

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MEREDITH M I C H A E L S - B E E R B AU M Meredith rewrote history when she became the first woman under the age of 40 to reach the No. 1 position in the 2008 Rolex World Show Jumping rankings.

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A M AT T E R O F T R A D I T I O N Renee Spurge, long-time equestrian and owner of LA Saddlery, has a lot to say about the state of traditional fashion in the hunter ring.

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 H O R S E S & H O M E S A portfolio of award-winning healthy homes for horses, and beautiful barn houses for humans to call home.

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MIDDLEBURG Sheer beauty, historic architecture, and a rich tradition of equestrian sport merely skim the surface of the intoxicating charm of this quaint village.

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Meredith Michaels-Beerbaum chats candidly about her illustrious show-jumping career, family life, and finding a perfect balance.


ANDY SCOTT equine sculptor

USA studio opening 2015

steel sculptures from 10ft to 100ft commission enquiries please contact: hanneke@scottsculptures.co.uk

www.scottsculptures.co.uk www.thekelpies.co.uk


EQ I N S I D E

Departments SUMME R | 2015 IS SUE

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PEOPLE Trainer Robert McNeel is expanding his boundaries from the arena to the comedy stage, and he’s bringing huge smiles to people along the way.

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EQUINE GEAR Equestrians want their horses outfitted in tasteful, well-fitting tack and protective gear. Adding a little fashion into the function doesn’t hurt either.

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FAVO R I T E S Weathervanes are as American as apple pie. We’ve curated a page of vintage and modern takes on this timeless, folk-art icon.

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PEOPLE Harry & Snowman is the heartwarming film we almost didn’t get to see. Filmmaker Karin Offield shares her story of a rescued film about a rescued horse.

G I V I N G B AC K Jane Beshear, Kentucky governor’s first lady, shares her passion for Horses and Hope, the cancerprevention and early-detection initiative benefiting Kentucky’s equine industry.

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SCIENCE A disorder in new-born foals may offer a clue to autism in humans.

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RESOURCES (Look for

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to find the products and services in this issue.)

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STYLE Selecting the perfect wedding gift can be a daunting task. Find out what’s trending, and glean fresh ideas from our bridal professionals.

BARN DOG Meet Chili, filmmaker Karin Offield’s rescued miniature fox terrier, who is a barking force behind her drive to shut down puppy mills.

TUCCI BOOTS | EQ YOUNG RIDER PHOTO CONTEST

T ON THE COVER Dressage professionals were shot on location at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival in Wellington, Florida, by EQ Photography Director George Kamper.

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he votes are in, and the winner of EQ’s Tucci Boots Young Rider photo contest is Kate Singh of Elmhurst Illinois. Kate wins a pair of Tucci Harley tall boots. The photo is of Kate’s daughter Bridget who began riding when she was only 1 1/2 years old.” See the finalist photos at equestrianquarterly.com/ young-rider-winner/


Welcome EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

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t started on a napkin. Just simple sketches of how to include a large number of high-profile equestrians—18 to be precise—in a single, cover photograph. Team up a publisher, a creative director, a photographer, and a dressage expert, and you end up with a dynamic, barrel-fold cover. Producing the summer cover required a whirlwind of planning and pitch-perfect orchestration from concept to finish. Great people, infinite talent, and periodic splashes of champagne rendered all things possible. To assemble such a group of high-caliber riders, trainers, and owners in one location on incredibly short notice was no small feat. Maybe the stars were aligned, perhaps kismet was at play, but most likely it was Carol Cohen (page 69). Carol’s extensive knowledge of the sport and her camaraderie with the close-knit community of dressage was called to task. Everyone at the photo session would attest to her resolute and energetic attitude. We could not have pulled this off without her. EQ photography director, George Kamper, along with his talented 10-person crew brought polish and panache to the set. Watch George and his fabulous team in action in the behind-the-scenes video: equestrianquarterly. com/eq-dressage-shoot On page 60, you’ll get to meet the dressage personalities on the cover, along with other champions of the discipline. You’ll begin to appreciate why the nuances of this elegant sport of horse and rider in harmony are filling seats with spectators. In this year alone the number of competitors tripled at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival in Wellington, Florida. Dressage is on the cusp of remarkable changes—in attendance, media attention, and the level of competition.

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MORE IN THIS ISSUE

“Bridle Bliss,” our second annual feature on equestrian weddings, has expanded into a fullblown tableau of inspired ideas, offering lush images and examples of truly magical weddings. It’s beautiful, informative, and full of imaginative approaches to such momentous occasions (page 46). In “Horses & Homes,” you’ll discover a visually arresting feature of stunning barns and barn homes where horses and humans can enjoy their respective creature comforts (page 80). Our deputy editor, Jill Novotny, took to the road again to visit Middleburg, Virginia. Cricket Bedford, an active member of the equestrian community in Middleburg, generously provided Jill with a full agenda of people to meet and places to visit. Read about this idyllic town’s colorful mix of history, architecture, welcoming residents, and long-standing equestrian heritage (page 94). Watching the summer issue evolve and take form was particularly enjoyable to me. The cover heightened the excitement, and I considered meeting so many extraordinary members of the dressage community a treat and an honor. Yes, we are sometimes impulsive with our concepts and dive into things with wild abandon. In this case, I think it was worth taking the plunge. COMING UP

We are already gearing up for the fall issue. Nothing seems more in tandem with the season than fox-hunting, and we look forward to sharing the sport’s rich traditions with you. We’ll reveal the results of EQ’s second annual Gold List and treat you to so much more. Be sure to visit equestrianquarterly.com to participate in our contests and to cast your Gold List ballot.


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This could be your backyard.

EQ S U M M E R 2 0 1 5

EQUESTRIAN

®

Q U A R T E R L Y VOLUME 4 NUMBER 2

EDITOR AND CREATIVE DIRECTOR Stephanie B. Peters DEPUTY EDITOR Jill B. Novotny PHOTOGRAPHY DIRECTOR George Kamper EDITORS AT LARGE Georgina Bloomberg and Ann Leary

RECREATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES • EQUESTRIAN FACILITIES IRRIGATED LAND WITH WATER RIGHTS

DESIGN MANAGER Mar y A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve ASSISTANT EDITOR Abigail Googel EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTORS Kim McCusker, Karin Reid Offield, LA Pomeroy, Renee Spurge, Betsy Stein PUBLISHER C . W. Medinger CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle, Lane Press TECHNOLOGY Matt Tarsi NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer, Cur tis Circulation Co. GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATIONS: EQUISTYLE, Germany; HORSEMANSHIP, China ADVERTISING SALES NATIONAL SALES DIRECTOR, Debb Pyle, 434-806-6685, pyle@equestrianquar terly.com EAST-COAST SALES DIRECTOR, Linda Andersen, 978-807-7640, andersen@equestrianquar terly.com SOUTHEAST, Christian Palmer, 612-618-8216, palmer@equestrianquar terly.com MIDWEST, Dick Holcomb, 770-740-7120, dickholc@bellsouth.net WEST, Rodney Brooks, 510-695-5254, brooks@equestrianquar terly.com

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ocated in the central Rocky Mountains, near Aspen, Colorado, 600+/- acres of scenic and highly productive irrigated land with extensive water rights. Includes the Tybar Ranch Subdivision, main home, employee housing, equipment shop, three hay sheds, numerous corrals and two barns that include the 22,000 sq. ft. Prince Creek Barn with an indoor arena area. Co-listed with Rocky Whitworth of Coldwell Banker Mason Morse. $29,975,000 Robb Van Pelt (970) 948.0423 | robb@ranchland.com

www.RanchLand.com 18 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

EQ ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Carol Cohen, Wellington, Fla. Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Los Angeles, Calif. Renee Spurge, LA Saddler y, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla. EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY is published four times yearly and is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and available for home deliver y for $18.95/$33.50 Canada. Subscribe at equestrianquar terly.com/subscribe or EQ, Box One, Brownsville, VT 05037. To purchase past issues or for a list of newsstands offering EQ, visit www.equestrianquar terly.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: www.equestrianquar terly.com/manage-subscription Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor : info @ equestrianquar terly.com

© 2015. All rights reser ved, Wynnwood Media, LLC . No por tion may be reproduced in print or online without written permission. ® Equestrian Quar terly and EQ are registered trademarks of Wynnwood Media.

DON’T MISS AN ISSUE. Get EQ delivered right to your mailbox. Scan to SUBSCRIBE or visit equestrianquar terly.com/subscribe

EQ was chosen OVERALL BEST EQUESTRIAN MAGAZINE in its inaugural year by American Horse Publications.

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EQ P E O P L E

A LEG UP ON

LAUGHTER Reaching a goal is fulfilling, but to ROBERT McNEEL it’s impor tant to keep dreaming.

BY JILL NOVOTNY

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obert McNeel began riding as a child and loved it immediately. Though his family couldn’t afford the expenses associated with the sport, he worked for lessons and rode until he turned 17. “Then I went and saw my first Broadway show and I thought, I’m going to do that,” he said. He studied dance and worked in theater throughout his twenties. “I ended up getting about 10 or 12 shows over 10 years, and it was a really great time,” he remembered.

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One day, at age 31, Robert was reading the newspaper and saw an ad for a show jumping competition at the Cow Palace in San Francisco, near where he lived. “I went to watch the grand prix, and I thought, now I want to do that,” he said with a laugh. “I had no experience, no money, and no connections, but I decided I wanted to go for it.” Ten years later, he was riding competitively up and down the East Coast and in California and Canada. In 2003 he won the high-amateurs division at a show-jumping event representing

the United States in Holland. “I felt like I had arrived at my podium moment. I got a medal and they played the national anthem. It was like the Academy Awards!” he recalled. Since then, he has been teaching and training at top show stables in the Northeast. Robert had started from the bottom to become a successful rider and trainer, and he was beginning to see that he had accomplished what he had set out to do. “I was turning 50, and I decided that there had to be more. I could do more,” he said.


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Menlo Charity Horse Show Benefiting the... VISTA CENTER FOR THE BLIND AND VISUALLY IMPAIRED

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EQ P E O P L E

When one of Robert’s friends in New York City got a gift certificate for a six-week comedy course for Christmas, Robert saw an opportunity. “Her employees had bought it for her as a goof because she doesn’t have that much of a sense of humor,” he laughed. “So she tried to give it to me. I said, ‘Nope, you’re going. And I’m going with you.’” At the completion of the course, each student was invited to perform at the Gotham Comedy Club in Manhattan. Gotham is a staple of the comedy scene in a city famous for giving comedy-greats a venue, with lineups that include comedians like Jerry Seinfeld and Louis CK. As Robert stepped offstage after his first set ever, the agent for the club came to him and immediately asked how long he had been doing comedy. He now performs three or four nights a week at two of the marquee comedy clubs in the city, in addition to hosting charity events throughout the year. “I’m committed to staying in New York to get my comedy chops. I’m 22 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

Rober t aboard Serrano, who came from Spruce Meadows and has been in Rober t’s program for about eight years. Serrano, who is about to retire, has many tricolor and blue ribbons to his credit. Rober t is now training out of The Pavillion in Nor th Salem, New York.

a beginner, and I want to surround myself with the best people in the industry,” he explained. “That’s what I did in the horse world. I had a specific set of goals and I walked up to Leslie Burr Howard and asked her to help me with them.” Surprisingly, a similar skillset is required in both the equestrian and comedy industries. “You are the product, and you have to sell how good you are and your networking skills. You need to get yourself a seat at the table, and you get better the more you do it. Performing is performing, and then there’s passion,” he observed. Though he may not know it, it is obvious that Robert’s numerous journeys from dream to

accomplishment are the result of his magnetic personality. He is able to laugh at himself, enjoy what he does, and work hard toward becoming better. The qualities that make him a good trainer and a good comedian also make him great at connecting with people, which in turn propels his career forward. “I plan on staying around the horses for a long time. It’s what I do,” he declared. “I just found out about a talent show they have in Wellington that is supposed to be a huge success and a lot of fun. Just wait till I get down there... I need to come up with some new horsey material!” For Robert, it’s not about closing doors, it’s about expanding boundaries. “Just because you have found something you love doesn’t mean you can’t continue to find new things to do and feel passionate about,” he explained. “You’re as young as you feel and you can accomplish new things,” he said. “I think that if you believe it’s possible, then it’s possible. And I’m the proof of that.”


Gen-X 2™

Nelson does more than just dream about making the ultimate affordable jumping saddle. The Gen-X Series is the result of his obsession with creating professional grade saddles for riders of every level, so they can accomplish their dreams. With a Gen-X you’ll neither struggle with your two-point, nor suffer in your flatwork. With more than 50 years of savvy and horse sense packed into the design, every model has the heart and soul of a competitor. Ride better in a Pessoa. From $1950-$2295.

We are the proud sponsor of the Pessoa/USEF Hunter Seat Medal.

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EQ F A V O R I T E S

Weathervanes and inspired CONTEMPORARY DESIGNS point rooftop ornament options in all directions. VINTAGE

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ack in the 1990s, a horse-and-rider

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weathervane, designed by J. Howard and Company in the 1860s, sold

at Sothebys for $770,000. It served as an indicator that folk sculpture and the iconic

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weathervane had left an indelible impression on the art world. The purchaser of the horse-and-rider weathervane said, “If I had to send a piece of American sculpture to France or Japan to sum up what is American about American art, I’d send this weathervane.” * An assortment of rare collectibles and

COURTESY OF SKINNER, INC

purchasable items are gathered on this page.

Rare Small Rearing Arabian Horse Weathervane Offered by Skinner, c. 1860. Flattened, full-body moldedsheet copper figure with repousse mane and tail. (No longer available).

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2. Folk Art Horse by American Architectural Weathervane Company. Classic and contemporary design. $150.

MARK A. PERRY

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3. Copper Rabbit and Moon by Greensvanes. Custom repousse hammered copper. Made in England. $3600. 4. Black and White Weathervane Horse offered by 1st Dibs and Urban Country. c. 1890 *Source: 2004 Maine Antique Digest, Inc. 24

Running Horse by Mark A. Perry. Original running-horse design. A folk art conception in the style of 19th century weathervanes. Rusted iron ears, carved wood, and a distressed finish in 23k gold leaf. Price upon request.

blacksmith-made sheet iron with original paint surface. From an important Midwestern folk art collection. $4,500. 5. Antique Flying Jewel Horse by A.L. Jewel Company of Waltham, Mass. c.1869. Sold by John Sideli Fine Art. Made of copper and retains its original surface and traces of gilt. PAGE 101


Equestrian Facilities

Old World Skill & Craftsmanship

Quality isn’t a goal; it’s a way of life. At B&D Builders, we believe that the success of any building project rests on quality materials, professional service, craftsmanship and expert engineering. We are committed to bringing you quality in our attention to detail and our eye for design, giving you a building that performs for many years to come. You can depend on B&D Builders for professional planning, scheduling and management of your project.

Request a quote at 717.687.0292 or by visiting our website at

CustomBarnBuilding.com


EQ E Q U I N E G E A R

Protect in Style Craftsman-designed e QUICK HORSE BOOTS merge protection and cool factor with a new technology. BY RENEE SPURGE OWNER | LA SADDLERY

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s a vendor, the first question we ask a show manager when gearing up for the week is how many horses are expected to attend. It usually gives us an idea of the kind of foot traffic and amount of customers we can expect to frequent our shop. However, in recent years, while the stalls are filling up with an increasing number of horses, the individual riders are disappearing. For every 10 horses there seems to be only 1 rider, which explains why saddle companies are overtaking vendor row! So what’s an equestrian fashion enthusiast to do? While we sell a fair amount of Prestige saddles and some tack for good measure, LA Saddlery customers usually come to us to get themselves outfitted, not their horse, or should I say horses. However, as an avid lover of everything horse related, I couldn’t ignore the above-mentioned trend in the industry. In fact, it actually allows me to expand my business model and the opportunity to find brands that make our horses look just as stylish as we do. Funny enough, while perusing some of the shops at the Fieracavali Horse Show in Verona, Italy, last fall, I happened to stumble upon these amazing horse boots amongst a plethora of beautiful Italian clothing. The simple fact is, they demanded my attention. They were flashy, they were different, and they were downright sexy. I was pleased to find that these boots weren’t just a pretty face. They were developed, designed, and handmade by a true craftsman who has designed and manufactured horse boots for some of the top Italian boot companies for decades.

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1. Anatomically fitted design and patented, shock-absorbing liquid gel ensure top protection against injuries of the fetlock. 2. Soft edges on top and bottom of the eQuick front boots eliminate rub marks and ensure free movement of the horse’s leg over jumps. 3. Sleek design, new patented technology, and top craftsmanship separates eQuick from other brands. 4. The Tall Hind Boots provide extra protection of the fetlock joints.

But this line was his vision, his creation, and he did it with the protection of the most important feature of the horse at the forefront of his masterpiece. The blue-liquid gel is more then just an eye-catching design element. The fluid is a patented technology that has been tested and proven to greatly reduce impact on a horse’s tendons. But the cool factor does not stop there. The designer also teamed up with companies from two other extreme sports to gain access to the most innovative materials on the market. The outer shell is made from the same lightweight, durable, and temperature-resistant materials they use on ski boots, and the inside neoprene lining was born out of the same protective fabric used in motorcycle vests. The other important thing I have learned as a new student of horse tack is the importance of the shape of the boot. The eQuick boot is one of the few on the market today that is actually anatomically shaped to envelop the leg without restricting movement. I cannot tell you how many boots I see at shows that are sliding down the horse’s leg because they do not fit properly. Just as a helmet would cease to be useful in protecting our heads if it did not fit correctly, so must a horse’s boots fit properly if they are to protect ligaments and fetlocks. Not to mention that improper fit leads to discomfort, which in turn affects a horse’s performance, and that means no blue ribbon! There you have it, a bona fide fashionista turned horsetack enthusiast! My mission now is to find more products for our horses that keep them comfortable, safe, and, of PAGE 101 course, always in style.


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EQ G I V I N G B A C K

Horses and Hope

Horses and Hope, a breast-cancer initiative, was founded in 2008 and has since reached close to 1 million race-track and horse-show attendees and educated nearly 16,000 equine employees. Jane Beshear’s committment to cancer prevention and early detection in the equine community and atrisk populations is palpable. We asked Jane a few questions about what fuels her tireless efforts for this lifesaving program. Has your lifelong enthusiasm for horses and the equine community contributed to your drive to offer cancer screening and education to equine workers?

Absolutely. Kentucky first ladies have traditionally championed breast cancer awareness initiatives, but when my husband, Steve Beshear, was elected governor of Kentucky, I wanted to put my own spin on it and help

CREATIVE SERVICES

DAVE CRONEN

Kentucky’s first lady, JANE BESHEAR, continues the legacy of an organization committed to bringing BREAST-CANCER AWARENESS to the Commonwealth’s equine industry.

Top: Kentucky’s first lady, Jane Beshear, with her horses Quite a Lady/Prissy and Big Time Magic. Bottom: Jane Beshear accepts a donation for Horses and Hope at Keeneland Horses and Hope day.

those employees who are the backbone of Kentucky’s equine industry. I wanted a vehicle that could offer free screenings and education to employees and raise awareness about the need for early detection

and preventative health. I had a vision of the Kentucky Oaks race, a premiere race for 3-yearold fillies at Churchill Downs, as an all-pink, breast-cancer awareness event. After many conversations and much work with the Kentucky Cancer Program and Churchill Downs, we hosted our first Pink Out day at the Kentucky Oaks in 2009. It was very exciting to see a dream realized, and since then, we’ve just kept growing to reach more workers, families, and race and show fans. Will Horses and Hope funds eventually expand to offset costly treatments, follow-up diagnostics, and prescriptions to those who don’t qualify for Medicaid?

My husband has worked hard to make sure that Kentuckians have access to quality and affordable healthcare. As we fill the gap in coverage Continued on page 30

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EQ G I V I N G B A C K Continued from page 28

Horses and Hope

in our state, the issue becomes people not understanding the screenings and technologies that are available to them and where they can access those services. This year, we have set a goal to raise $1 million for a new screening van that is equipped to screen for seven different cancers and will also help educate Kentuckians about ways to prevent health problems. Colon cancer screening is an excellent example. By focusing on prevention and early detection, we can reduce the health care costs for both individuals and the system. This approach will enable us to use our funding to provide potentially lifesaving services to more Kentuckians.

By publishing this article, Equestrian Quarterly is helping to raise awareness of the need for preventative screenings and early detection. The more people are reminded to take charge of their own health, the more likely they are to do it. Additionally, readers can help Horses and Hope screen and educate more equine industry employees and other at-risk populations by making an online contribution at horsesandhope.org. It seems that most of Horses and Hope's great work takes place at Kentucky’s major Thoroughbred race tracks. What other group of venues would you like to target in the future?

While our services and awareness events initially served track employees and race fans, we have since expanded our programs to the Kentucky State Fair’s World’s Championship Horse Show, Rock Creek Horse Show, and the North American Championship Rodeo. We also host an annual trail ride at the Kentucky Horse Park each fall, a health fair at Keeneland Racecourse, and bi-annual survivor weekend retreats at Kentucky State Parks. This year, we were honored to be named the official charity of the Rolex Kentucky 3-Day Event and the Kentucky Reining Cup.

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DAVE CRONEN

What could Equestrian Quarterly magazine do to help?

through our screening program. One of these women, Lauren Griffith, had worked on the backside of Churchill Downs for years without access to quality health care. Kentucky Cancer Program outreach staff encouraged her to come to one of our onsite screenings; a lump was found in one of her breasts and she was referred for further treatment, guided through health care and insurance systems, and given the resources needed to complete her treatment. She survived for another four years after her treatments but eventually succumbed to this terrible disease. I’m just so happy that we could give her and her family those extra years of life. Horses and Hope also indirectly helped save a Central Kentucky farm owner and trainer. Colleen Kelly had just moved to Paris, Kentucky, from Australia when she began hearing about the Horses and Hope program and events. She told me that these public reminders encouraged her to get a mammogram. Cancer was detected in both of her breasts and she underwent a double mastectomy. She credits Horses and Hope with her recovery. These are exactly the kind of stories we hope to hear more of!

Jane Beshear and Governor Steve Beshear of Kentucky champion cancer screening, early detection, and well-being for all Kentuckians. Jane Beshear’s horse Big Time Magic looks on.

We are partnering with KentuckyOne Health, the James Graham Brown Cancer Center at the University of Louisville, and the Kentucky Cancer Program to operate the new van and to identify and serve other at-risk populations throughout the Commonwealth. We’re excited about this opportunity to reach a broader audience while continuing to serve equine industry workers and their families. We have a real opportunity to positively impact the health and well-being of all Kentuckians. Is there a particular Horses and Hope early detection and/or survival story that has had a lasting impact on you?

Since 2009, Horses and Hope has saved the lives of three women in the equine industry

Can you tell us a little bit about your history with horses? Do you prefer a particular discipline?

I have always loved horses. Growing up, I never had a horse of my own but was fortunate enough to have friends that did. As an adult, I took up fox-hunting and immediately fell in love with the sport—it combined my favorite things: horses, nature, friends, and excitement! I had several hunting friends who also competed in eventing in the off season—they got me into the sport, and I’ve been hooked ever since. Today, I still fox-hunt, compete my Connemara cross mare in dressage, and am looking forward to eventing my new horse, Mountain Light. For information about Horses and Hope, PAGE 101 please visit horsesandhope.org


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S P E C I A L - I N T E R E S T F E AT U R E : E Q U E S T R I A N C O M M U N I T I E S

F I N D YO U R P E R F E C T

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S P E C I A L - I N T E R E S T F E AT U R E : E Q U E S T R I A N C O M M U N I T I E S

EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

B

uyers searching for equestrian communities often place as much emphasis on the lifestyle as they do on the design of their home. Sharing a neighborhood with a community of equestrians is just one of the benefits typically enjoyed by horse lovers. Proximity to desirable equine amenities such as preserved open land, pastures, trail systems, barns, arenas, and dedicated staff also have tremendous appeal. Whether your horse community is nestled into a lush countryside or hugging a scenic coast with tennis, polo, golf, and other resortstyle activities, it is often neighbors who share your lifestyle that has an enduring appeal. One such special community, The Newport Beach Club (NPBC), is located on 150 spectacular acres on Aquidneck Island in Newport County, Rhode Island. The island is steeped in the tradition of horses and offers riding in an incomparable setting, on rustic trails, along the beach, and across windswept hills overlooking Narragansett Bay. There is always something to do in nearby Newport. Organized amateur and professional

“WHERE ELSE C AN YOU SPEND THE MORNING BOATING ON BEAUTIFUL NARRAGANSETT BAY, SPEND THE AFTERNOON PLAYING GOLF, AND C AP IT ALL OFF WITH A SUNSET TRAIL RIDE ON THE BEACH?”  —JODY GIDDINGS

polo thrives locally, and the legacy of elegant horse-drawn carriages is revived every summer. L IFE IN NEW P O RT

Wealth and style are Newport’s historic heritage. The Vanderbilts, Rockefellers, and Astors cherished this locale, enjoying palatial summer retreats. Excellent restaurants, museums, mansions, art galleries, shops and nightlife all combine against a backdrop of gleaming church steeples to make up the colorful swirl of legendary Newport. The Jazz Fest, Tennis Hall of Fame, and countless yachting events like the America’s Cup have long drawn visitors and celebrities alike from far and wide. With its protected waters and exceptional mooring facilities, Newport remains an international nautical destination for some of the world’s finest yachts.  EQU ESTRI A N L I FESTY L E

Expert instruction is available for riders of all skill levels. Advanced riders can enjoy stadium jumping in the sand ring or the indoor and outdoor rings, surfaced with proper footings, to

SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 33


S P E C I A L - I N T E R E S T F E AT U R E : E Q U E S T R I A N C O M M U N I T I E S

Left: Dan Palmier and his daughter, Ellie, with her horse, Hello Newman. Right: Jody Giddings takes to the trails on Captain.

accommodate all equestrian disciplines. Horses enjoy professional care at the full-service boarding stables.

“For all of us, and in particular for Ellie, the

“FOR ALL OF US, AND IN PARTICULAR

T H E G O O D L IFE

Resident, Dan Palmier, says, “We were first introduced to the Newport Beach Club equestrian facility back in 2011. I wanted to show my now 16-year-old daughter, Ellie, a long time hunter jumper competitor, what the best in an equestrian experience was all about. The staff, headed by Cara McSoley, the location, and the impeccable physical plant—all adjacent to private world-class golf, beaches, and tennis are spectacular. We met and immediately fell in love with our next family member at the Newport Beach Club equestrian facility. His name is Hello Newman, and he’s a big gentle Warmblood (thoroughbred/Percheron mix).

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FOR [OUR DAUGHTER,] THE NEWPORT BEACH CLUB EXPERIENCE HAS BEEN ETHEREAL.” —DAN PALMIER

NPBC experience has been ethereal.”

Jody Giddings, her husband, Mark, and two young boys sought to find a sporting club that would fulfill their enjoyment of water sports, golf, and equestrian activities for their active family. For Jody and her family, everything is right in their backyard. Being a lifelong equestrian, she recently purchased a horse to share her passion with her husband and boys. “It has been a wonderful experience being a part of the equestrian center. The facilities are beautiful, the staff is great, and I love that my boys can grow up riding like I did. “Where else on the East Coast,” Jody asks, “can you spend the morning boating on beautiful Narragansett Bay, spend the afternoon playing a round of golf at Carnegie Abbey, and cap it all off with a sunset trail ride on the beach?” 


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SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 35


EQ S C I E N C E

Foals and Autism A disorder in new-born foals may offer a clue to AUTISM IN HUMANS.

V

eterinary researchers at the University of California, Davis, are teaming up with their colleagues in human medicine to investigate a troubling disorder in newborn horses and to explore its possible connections to childhood autism. The common link, the researchers suggest, may be abnormal levels of naturally occurring neurosteroids. The horse disorder, known as neonatal maladjustment syndrome, has puzzled horse owners and veterinarians for a century. Foals affected by the disorder seem detached, fail to recognize their mothers, and have no interest in nursing. With around-the-clock bottle or tube feeding, plus intensive care in a veterinary clinic for up to a week or 10 days, 80 percent of the foals recover. But for horse owners, that level of care is grueling and costly. “The behavioral abnormalities in these foals seem to resemble some of the symptoms in children with autism,” said John Madigan, a UC Davis veterinary professor and expert in equine neonatal health. The maladjustment syndrome in foals also caught the attention of Isaac Pessah, a professor of molecular biosciences at the UC Davis School of Veterinary Medicine who investigates environmental factors that may play a role in the development of autism in children. “There are thousands of potential causes for autism, but the one thing that all autistic children have in common is that they are detached,” Pessah said. Madigan, Pessah, and other researchers in veterinary and human medicine recently formed a joint research group and secured funding to investigate links between the two conditions.

possible, he explains, by neurosteroids that act as sedatives for the unborn foal. However, immediately after birth, the infant horse must make an equally important transition to consciousness. In nature, a baby horse would be easy prey for many natural enemies, so the foal must be ready to run just a few hours after it is born. In short, somewhere between the time a foal enters the birth canal and the moment it emerges from the womb, a biochemical “on switch” must be flicked that enables the foal to recognize the mare, nurse, and become mobile. Madigan and Aleman suspect that the physical pressure of the birthing process may be that important signal. “We believe that the pressure of the birth canal during the second stage of labor, which is supposed to last 20 to 40 minutes, is an important signal that tells the foal to quit producing the sedative neurosteroids and wake up,” Madigan said.

QUIET INSIDE

“Foals don’t gallop in utero,” Madigan said, pointing out the dangers to the mare if a fourlegged, hoofed fetus were to suddenly become active in the womb. The prenatal calm is made 36 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

WAK IN G U P

Amazingly, the veterinary researchers have found that they can reduce maladjustment symptoms in foals by using several loops of

a soft rope to gently squeeze the foal’s upper torso and mimic the pressure normally experienced in the birth canal. After 20 minutes, about the same time a foal would spend in the birth canal, the rope is loosened and the squeeze pressure released. In initial cases, the foals have responded well to the procedure and recovered, some rising to their feet within minutes and then bounding over to join the mare and nurse. The researchers suspect that the pressure triggers biochemical changes in the central nervous system that are critical for transitioning the foal from a sleeplike state in the womb to wakefulness at birth. While larger studies are underway, the researchers have presented their results at national and international meetings of equine veterinarians, and many veterinarians and clinics are treating maladjusted foals with the squeeze procedure—now called the Madigan foal squeeze procedure. Madigan cautions that, in spite of the strong observational effects, a larger, controlled clinical trial of national and international scope is now needed to reproduce those observed results and provide a better understanding of the mechanisms at work in the foals. POSSIB L E L I NKS TO AU TI S M

The early findings have compelling implications for the health of newborn foals and have caused the researchers to also explore possible links to autism, which includes a group of complex brain-development disorders. “The concept that a disruption in the transition of fetal consciousness may be related to children with autism is intriguing,” said Pessah. He and colleagues will look to see whether there are alterations in blood levels of certain neurosteroids that may serve as a marker for the disorder. They caution, however, that the relationship right now is just a theory that remains PAGE 101 to be validated or disproven.


Download the Layar app, and scan with your phone.

WI N N I NG doesn’t happen by

A C C I D E N T.

A rub. It’s all that separates a flawless round from “better luck next time.” But you’re not depending on luck. You’re depending on countless hours in and out of the saddle. And you didn’t come here for just a ribbon. You came for the championship ribbon. So ask yourself, does your horse have the stomach to win?

Time for a gut check. TheStomachToWin.com

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IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION: ULCERGARD can be used in horses that weigh at least 600 pounds. Safety in pregnant mares has not been determined.


EQ P E O P L E

SAVING SNOWMAN The rescue story of a FILM ABOUT A RESCUED HORSE.

TOM MARTIN

H

arry deLeyer had arrived late to the Pennsylvania horse auction. In fact, it had just ended. The remaining unclaimed horses were being loaded onto a truck en route to their final destination, the slaughterhouse. A beat-up, dirty plow horse, about eight years old, was just being loaded as Harry approached the truck. “He had the kindest eyes I’d ever seen,” recounts Harry, “so I bought him.” Harry named the horse Snowman as he led him off of the truck in the falling snow. The Long Island riding instructor had only been seeking to acquire another horse for his students to ride, but he didn’t know that he was literally in for the ride of his life. Harry perceived his new horse as just another horse in

Top: Harry deLeyer and Snowman. Above: Karin Reid Offield, dressage sponsor at the Las Vegas world cup in 2005.

his stable, but the gray perceived Harry as his savior. A year later when Harry sold the gelding to a neighboring farm for one of his students, the horse would have none of it, and he jumped the fences to return to deLeyer’s barn. His years under the plow as a beast of burden had clearly led to the development of exceptionally powerful hindquarters. He was a natural jumper! When Harry originally bought the horse for $80 and ultimately purchased him back from his neighbor, he could have never dreamed the extent to which his life would be enriched. Snowman became champion of the national horse show in New York City just two years later in 1958. The story of Snowman is legend. He eventually earned three more championships, Continued on page 40

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b l e n h e i m

e q u i s p o r t s


EQ P E O P L E

Continued from page 38 A portion of the recovered film from Jumpers.

culminating in his induction into the Show Jumping Hall Of Fame, an appearance on the Johnny Carson Show, two books, a Breyer horse model, and finally the new featurelength documentary movie in his honor, Harry and Snowman. Within this tale lies another story that connects lives across decades through a shared love of both film and horses. A P RO J E C T OF PA S S I O N

Karin Offield’s film Jumpers was an unreleased documentary filmed in the late 1970s and early 80s about equestrian show jumping. The film focused on three of the top grand-prix riders and the top jumping horses of the day. As fate would have it, one rider was Harry deLeyer, among the winning competitors on the circuit at the age of 53. Offield knew of Harry’s success with Snowman having heard the story as a little girl, and she captured him telling it on film. Combined with her competition show-jumping footage, Offield effectively created a timecapsule featuring Harry’s first-person account of the Snowman story. Offield’s desire was to capture the action of her sport in slow motion to show the power and grace of a horse and rider as never seen before. This required shooting film at a high rate of speed through the camera, the most costly approach to filmmaking in that day. She spent the year traveling, resulting in 40,000 feet of film in the can, a seven-mile trail of celluloid. Filmmaking may seem glamorous to some, but the life of an independent filmmaker is a life spent raising money, with only occasional shooting and editing, governed it seems by Murphy’s Law. By 1982, Offield had run headlong into the money trap of post-production. Throughout her years living in New York City, she knocked on every door, meeting with the highest level 40 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

THE DEATH OF A DREAM IS A SLOW PROCESS TO ACCEPT. of advertising, corporate, and television executives. Offield found only “future interest” and “good luck” in their responses. This horse girl from Aspen, Colorado, just couldn’t close the distribution deal. T HE DEAT H OF A DR EAM

The death of a dream is a slow process to accept. Some never fully do, and they hold onto it for a lifetime. The loyal and dedicated film crew who poured heart and soul into Offield’s vision were faced with the reality that money had run out, and their work would not be seen. All of that beautiful footage and priceless interviews were now held hostage to the lack of funding. Reality hit when an equine-industry veteran admonished, “If you ever hope to finish your film, you’re going to have to pay for it yourself.” Jumpers was shelved as Offield continued with her truest passion, riding horses. For years the footage languished in a Manhattan film-storage vault. In the early 1990s, she wrote to the vault asking about the possibility of digitizing the 16mm footage. She received the letter back unopened.

She eventually discovered that the storage vault had declared bankruptcy. All of her original Jumpers footage stored there had gone missing. Finding the locations of the boxes and recovering her footage became an immense undertaking. Apparently, multiple unnamed creditors from five different states had confiscated the stored films. Over the years, she ran ads in magazines in search of anyone willing to take on the task of tracking down and returning her footage. Eventually, with her unwavering determination and the help of an investigative production manager, she recovered her film footage. “I remember the exact day they called and said the films had all been found,” Offield exclaimed. “What a St. Anthony moment that was for me!” T HE FINA L E

At last, all the pieces came together in the winter of 2012. Partnering with former equestrian and filmmaker Ron Davis, Offield became the executive producer of Docutainment’s Harry & Snowman. “Being able to finish the film with the story of Harry deLeyer and the legendary Snowman is an absolutely perfect ending,” said Offield. She feels the story of a rescued film about a rescued horse is more relatable to a wider audience, beyond the equestrian world. “For me, as a promoter of grand-prix jumping, dressage, and all things ‘horse,’ this is a dream come true,” she added. The film has screened at various film festivals throughout the country and plans for a wider release are being set. “Audiences of all ages will be moved by this nags to riches tale,” said Indiewire film critic Jake Jacobson. “This love story between a man and his horse will move and excite the most devoted cynic.” Watch for news on the film’s release and view the trailer at harryandsnowman.com.


EQ S T Y L E

GIFT HINTS Today’s brides are marrying TRADITIONAL STYLE with MODERN ENTERTAINING. This Dinner Plate from L’Objet is part of the Perlée Platinum collection, made of Limoges porcelain with meticulously handpainted detail. $280. L’Objet crafts this fine Perlée Footed Vase with hand-painted platinum details, a lovely wedding gift on its own or as part of the Perlée Platinum Collection. $1080.

On EQ’s recent trip to Lexington, Kentucky, we had the good fortune of discovering L.V. Harkness, a gorgeous, luxury gift and home-décor store with considerable focus on a full range of bridal details. Their professional bridal team graciously answered a few of our questions about selecting the perfect gift for the modern-day bride. What would you consider to be the hottest trend in wedding gifts? The biggest trend we see

is brides mixing and matching their dinnerware. It is not the canned five-piece place setting anymore— they are mixing patterns, designers, and more. Do you see a significant shift in gifts that would be considered more appropriate for casual lifestyles? In what used to be considered casual

dinnerware, there are so many more options—better patterns and endless possibilities. But that being said, our brides are still registering for formal dinnerware. Is formal dinnerware still a popular choice for bridal registries? Yes, for us it most certainly is.  What would some of those casual lifestyle items include? A huge range in serving pieces and pieces for

entertaining, such as the depth and variety that the

42 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

fabulous company Juliska is offering. They are truly leading the industry in the casual lifestyle. People from all over the country purchase gifts from L.V. Harkness. Do you find distinct trends or traditions that are particular to geographic regions?

Yes, certainly the South is more conservative and traditional. They love monograms and are not afraid of color on their table. And in our experience, when people from other areas call to shop for a bride, they almost always buy from their registries. So in the bridal/wedding department, certainly the southern aesthetic rules here for us! Are new brides still entertaining formally?

Yes, absolutely! What would be considered a universal, classic wedding gift? Really, anything off of the bride’s registry,

particularly their formal dinnerware. This is really the time for brides to begin their collections of what they will have forever—how they will entertain and celebrate the holidays with family—and people understand that. If a couple is not registered, some universal gifts are a lovely glass or crystal Continued on page 44


EQ S T Y L E

GIFT HINTS

Mark and Graham have created the Typographer’s Linen Dinner Napkins to soften with age and use. The grosgrain ribbon borders offer a pop of color on the flax-toned linen. Multi-colored set of 6: $69, monogramming included.

The folds of the large Shelburne Bowl by Simon Pearce capture and brilliantly refract light. This classic centerpiece bowl is a popular and timeless gift. Available at L.V. Harkness. $200.

Juliska’s 5-piece Berry and Thread Collection in Whitewash. Each piece is bordered in Juliska’s signature berry and thread motif. Elegant, yet casual enough for everyday use. Ceramic stoneware is made in Por tugal. Dishwasher safe. Available at L.V. Harkness. $161.

This Defile Tray by GioBagnara is handmade in Italy from ivory-grained calfskin and styled with an aged bronze border and handles. $488.

Continued from page 42 bowl, a picture frame, a nice throw, or something for the house that is not too style specific. What unique or unexpected wedding gift items are being registered at L.V. Harkness? We have the

unique capability of doing a lot of custom work for our brides. We have done custom monograms on items—even custom farm and jockey silk colors! Can you suggest a few great gift ideas for bridesmaids and groomsmen? Here at L.V.

Harkness, we do a lot of “Kentucky proud” items. We have done a number of monogrammed julep cups for both bridesmaids and groomsmen. We have also done jewelry, lovely wraps, boxes, cufflinks, and PAGE 101 monogrammed barware.

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The M’150 Copper Rondeau is handcrafted in France by Mauviel, a company celebrating its 185th birthday. The pot is 90 percent copper and 10 percent stainless steel and comes with a lifetime guarantee. $460.


You want elegant. Or sophisticated. Or intimate. Or one for the ages.

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For a private consultation, call us today at 561.282.5333. | InternationalPoloClub.com International Polo Club, Winner of Best Venue on TLC’s Four Weddings. Krystal Zaskey Photography • Event Planning and Styling: The Majestic Vision


PHOTO BY FOCUSED ON FOREVER

BRIDLE BLISS W E D D I N G S W I T H I M A G I N AT I V E S T Y L E

T BY JILL NOVOTNY

THOUGH THERE IS ALWAYS PRESSURE WITH A wedding to get every detail right, the best are often

symbolize something different for each person, from the single most important day of your life to a simple bookmark placed to acknowledge the beginning of a new chapter. Whether a couple chooses a fairy-tale dreams-

those that don’t. It can be hard to make so many

cape or an informal ranch retreat, the celebration

choices about things like napkins and music while fully

is an opportunity to reflect the values you and your

grasping the deeper meaning of the day. A wedding can

new spouse hold. For equestrians, this means ample

46 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015


opportunity to incorporate their love of horses, from

of all kinds, but it is no longer required. In a way, this

horse-drawn carriages to small details in the decor or

has given brides and grooms more decisions to make

invitations.

than ever before.

As for planning, the days of etiquette books and

Still, many couples recognize that not everything

strict traditions are past. Now, it is up to each couple

can be controlled. Sometimes, a rain shower or a late

to mix and match, choosing traditions and styles that

change in plans is a way of coming back down to earth

are important to them, leaving constrained or rigid

and realizing that it is the love behind the wedding that

rituals behind. Formality can still be found in weddings

is cause for celebration. SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 47


WEDDING COUPLES

LAURA MURRAY PHOTOGRAPHY

ANNALEIGH AND JOE DEVIL’S THUMB RANCH, COLORADO DESTINATION RUSTIC CHARM

ERIN AND STEVE SALAMANDER RESORT, VIRGINIA

NATHAN MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHY

E

48 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

rin and Steve, both high-level professionals in Washington, D.C., chose a May wedding in Virginia horse country. The rehearsal dinner was held in the equestrian center at Salamander Resor t, where a band played from the hayloft and tables were set up in the barn aisles. Small trophies adorned the tables, and fun drink-holders had printed logos with the couple’s names and horseshoes. The following day, an elegant ceremony was held at the Middleburg United Methodist Church, after which the par ty headed back to Salamander. The photographer took por traits of the wedding par ty and the couple in front of the black, board fences and green fields. Afterwards, the reception began in the ballroom, where dim lights and delicious foods surrounded lively dancing. Guests were given sunglasses and glow stick necklaces, and at the end of the evening, several guests stepped outside to enjoy a fine cigar.

NATHAN MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHY

CLASS AND FUN IN HUNT COUNTRY

NATHAN MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHY

NATHAN MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHY

LAURA MURRAY PHOTOGRAPHY

LAURA MURRAY PHOTOGRAPHY

T

his couple of theater actors from New York City chose a July destination wedding in the idyllic mountains of Colorado. While taking portraits of the couple, photographer Laura Murray found the horses wouldn’t leave Annaleigh alone. Joe told Laura, “It’s exactly the effect Annaleigh has on people.They have to be around her as much as possible.” Held outside under burlap bunting made by Annaleigh’s grandparents, the ceremony was led by a friend of Joe’s and accompanied on a ukulele by a singersongwriter friend of the bride. The day alternated between sunshine and rain, which didn’t bother the bride at all. “It felt like God’s reminder that not everything is supposed to be perfect,” she said. The reception was held inside the ranch’s Broad Ace Barn, which was decorated with natural elements and personal touches, many of which were handmade by the bride herself. Love This Day Events, who helped design the look, draped bay leaves and seasonal flowers from the tables and accented the warm space with apothecary bottles and marquee-style letters spelling “love.”


KATE AND SETH KING FAMILY VINEYARDS, VIRGINIA WINTER WARMTH

ALL PHOTOS THIS PAGE AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY

O

ften overlooked as a time for weddings, the winter can be a season of romance and elegance. This wedding combined the sparkling frostiness of January with the warm beauty of the bride’s plush wrap and a glowing fire inside the reception hall. With a chilly fog falling on the Virginia countryside, the wedding reflected the winter wonderland with simple white flowers and sparkling candles, a look designed by Blue Ridge Floral Design and wedding coordinator Colleen Miller. Small equestrian details, including a small diamond horseshoe on the cake by Paradox Pastry, were inspired by the couple’s common love of horses. Kate has loved horses her entire life, and Seth is a farrier. “What a neat way to incorporate that aspect of their lives into their wedding,” said Aaron Watson Photography. A dessert table with chocolate-covered pretzels, a rocking disc jockey, and a fun photo booth made for a warm and unforgettable evening.


ALL PHOTOS THIS SPREAD: FOCUSED ON FOREVER

JACQUELINE AND CHRIS THE INTERNATIONAL POLO CLUB (IPC), FLORIDA EXTRAVAGANT ELEGANCE

T

his young professional couple chose the theme for their October wedding by combining their nicknames; Gatsby, a nickname given to the groom by his college roommates and groomsmen, and Princess, the father of the bride’s nickname for her as a little girl. The result was a fairy-tale wedding with classic elegance. The neutral and plush colors accented with ice blue and pale pinks were tied together by feathers, to symbolize the ascension of two souls. The groom is a polo player and son of Outback Steakhouse founding partner Tim Gannon, who was also a founding member of the IPC. His Outback Polo Team has seen much success, including winning the U.S. Open in 1991. As such, the polo club seemed the ideal location for the couple to realize their vision of a faiy-tale wedding. “My favorite moment of the day was when my husband secretly arranged to surprise me with a horse-drawn Cinderella carriage to escort me to our ceremony,” remembers Jacqueline. “Just when I thought it couldn’t get any better, the second surprise came when he concluded the ceremony by lifting me back up into the carriage, taking the reins, and single-handedly driving both of us to our beautiful reception. He is truly my Prince Charming.”

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WEDDING VENUES THE INTERNATIONAL POLO CLUB, WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

T

he International Polo Club (IPC) is nestled into 230 acres of equestrian preserve that includes nine polo fields, trails, manicured landscaping, and exceptional club facilities. In addition, the surrounding area is home to several of the the country’s most prestigious equestrian events of all disciplines. An entire staff of planners and experts is on hand to help create and execute whatever your vision might be. The club provides a list of well-vetted vendors to ensure you achieve only the highest-quality event. There is a wide assortment of outdoor settings and indoor venues, each lavish and romantic. The lush green of the polo field can be adorned with an arch or gazebo with more than enough room for even the largest wedding party, and elegant poolside parties at the Mallet Grille allow for intimacy. An 11,000-square-foot pavilion, located field-side, houses International Polo Club Catering, headed by Aaron Menitoff. Menitoff had catered weddings, polo matches, and other events at IPC with great success for years before moving to the current facility in 2010, where he now creates exquisite dishes for large parties and weddings. His wife, Julie Larson, manages catering on the club side, where a wide variety of weddings are fed in style as well.

SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 51


WEDDING VENUES SOGNO DEL FIORE SANTA YNEZ, CALIFORNIA

ALL PHOTOS THIS PAGE ANNA J PHOTOGRAPHY

P

DEERHURST RANCH SANTA MARGARITA, CALIFORNIA

T

he charming Deerhurst Ranch is located near Saint Luis Obispo and sits on nearly 3,000 acres bordering Los Padres National Forest. Though its natural beauty is the obvious attraction, a variety of accommodations allows couples to tailor the experience their guests will have at this secluded ranch. Before the ceremony, many couples choose to have guests relax by the Cobble Cottage Cellar, an enchanting stone cottage housing casks and bottles of wine. A stone pathway descends through a series of pergolas draped in roses, where wedding ceremonies are held in front of the breathtaking mountain backdrop. Receptions can be held in the vintage red barn, which offers plenty of room for dancing and makes for great photos. The ranch offers catering packages by Popolo Catering, from a traditional prime rib or grilled salmon to a relaxed barbecue-style meal. The rental includes overnight accommodations for the bride and groom in two of the cozy cabins, which are decorated in fun, colorful ways and accented by various vintage ranch items, such as horseshoe towel racks and cast-iron wood stoves. The feeling of the place is rustic and down home. Couples looking for a comfortable escape and unbeatable vistas will no doubt find their perfect wedding here.

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anoramic mountain views surround this private vineyard, lined with Italian olive trees and accented with rose trellises. The warm California nights allow for open-air par ties under the night sky and string lights, transpor ting guests to the vine-studded hills of Italy. In addition to wining, dining, and dancing, cocktail receptions here include fire pits and bocce cour ts. This exclusive setting hosts just a handful of weddings each year, making it a sought-after and unique venue. A special aspect of Sogno del Fiore is the private bridal suite, where the bride and her par ty can relax and prepare in a luxurious and pampering space while the gentlemen enjoy some horseshoes on the lawn outside. Proper ty rentals give couples eight hours and include outdoor lighting and furniture. Located in the wine country of Santa Ynez, just 10 minutes from the charming town of Solvang, the authentic vineyard is a destination wedding location that guests can easily access. A picturesque road leads to the vineyard, which hosts wine tastings of local varieties (though none are actually made on the premises). Two cozy cottages are available for rent, both as par t of the wedding package or separately, which makes it a venue you can return to on your anniversaries to come.


STUDIO JK

CROOKED WILLOW RANCH LARKSPUR, COLORADO

ALL PHOTOS THIS PAGE BY PAIGE EDEN

A

wide variety of lawns, courtyards, alluring buildings, and gorgeous scenery are offered to couples looking to marry in a warm atmosphere of rustic elegance. The Events Lawn is a huge, manicured open space that welcomes visitors and seats up to 2,000 guests under incredible views of the Colorado Rocky Mountains. But extravagance is complemented by warm charm, as spaces on the proper ty range from magnificent to quaint. Lola’s Loft, for example, is a small space suitable for par ties under 100 guests. Designed with hammeredsteel railings, cathedral windows, and circular stairs, the hand-crafted turret entrance is as grand as the entire proper ty. Sconces provide soft illumination as you travel to the second-floor loft that delivers a warm and rustic setting for any event layout. Original red oak floors are accented by a soft glow emanating from wagon-wheel chandeliers suspended above. For added atmosphere, the barn doors can be opened for star gazing and refreshing Colorado evening air. A full-service list of caterers is provided to those renting space at Crooked Willow, and the venue also suggests incorporating a few ancillary activities for your guests into your event, such as carriage rides and equestrian tours.


ALL PHOTOS THIS SPREAD CHRISTIANNE TAYLOR

54 | E Q U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015


WEDDING STYLE

PHOTOGRAPHY BY

CHRISTIANNE TAYLOR On Location at WHISPERING ROSE RANCH *

E

very bride is more than her wedding por traits, whether she considers herself a spirited cow girl, an esteemed professional, or a glamorous trendsetter. Many couples become overwhelmed by the wide variety of gorgeous wedding ideas available online and in magazines and books and lose track of their own personal tastes. One way to assure you find a wedding style that you will love is to look inside your own closet. What fabrics, cuts, and colors do you lean toward? Is your closet full of clean lines and modern looks, or do you find yourself choosing soft fabrics and romantic pastels? The décor of your home can be of similar use. Let the styles you have always enjoyed inform your decisions, from the venue to the dress.

ENVISION YOUR WEDDING It’s also a good idea to make some big decisions before getting bogged down by the details. Working with a wedding stylist and meeting with a few photographers will help you develop a visual image of what your special day will look like. Find a setting that suits your style, has meaning, and presents the perfect backdrop for you and your fiance/e, and the smaller decisions will come more naturally. A wedding at Whispering Rose Ranch, for example, offers numerous ways to exhibit your unique style, from glamorous to casual. One of the most elegant ranch estates in the world, Whispering Rose is set on over 100 acres in the Santa Ynez Valley of California.The Vista offers incredible views for bridal por traits, after which the bride may choose to arrive at the Park for the ceremony in a vintage horsedrawn carriage. Other par ties may choose to set up a long farm table on the outdoor Sycamore Lane, with chandeliers strung from the sycamore trees while horses graze on either side. Creating your wedding requires planning and patience. Keep it fun, keep it imaginative, and keep it your own. The secret to having the wedding you’ve always wanted can be as easy as following your hear t.

PAGE 101

*Photo this page bottom right and page 57 shot at a different location.


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ALL PHOTOS THIS PAGE LAURA MURRAY

WEDDING DETAILS

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SEAN O’KEEFE EVENT

AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY

AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY

NATHAN MITCHELL PHOTOGRAPHY

AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY

AARON WATSON PHOTOGRAPHY

ROWELL PHOTOGRAPHY

FOCUSED ON FOREVER


WITH CAROL COHEN AND CARLY NEILSON.

60 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015


EQ VI SI T S T HE EXCI T I NG NEW A D EQUAN GLO B AL DR ESSAGE FEST I VAL I N WELLI NGTO N

DR E S S A G E The Ultimate Harmony Between Horse and Rider THE QUIET ELEGANCE AND BEAUTY of dressage, with

some of the movements being taught specifically as battle

its pirouettes and piaffes (a cadenced trot in place), is one

techniques.

of the most breathtaking sights in today’s Olympic com-

Today, fine dressage demonstrates the ultimate in

petitions. Who would ever have thought that the calm and

harmony between horse and rider. It is one of the three

beautiful sport was originally developed to give mounted

equestrian Olympic disciplines: dressage, eventing,

soldiers an advantage in battle? In fact, the word dressage—

and jumping. Dressage is also one portion of a three-

a French term meaning “training”—was used to increase

part event competition, combined with jumping and

the maneuverability and obedience of cavalry horses, with

cross-country.

Continued on page 65

SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 61


DRESSAGE AL GUDEN and his late wife, Judy, moved from Thoroughbred race horses to dressage when they purchased Sagacious HF and won team gold and silver individual medals at the 2007 Pan Am Games. Al sponsors the Judy Guden Memorial Trophy.

CHASE HICKOK is the rider of Sagacious (owned by Al Guden). Chase and Sagacious are ranked second internationally in the under-25 division. Chase is a graduate of Stanford University and lives in Wellington with her fiancé, Kevin Kohmann, a dressage rider/trainer.

KIMBERLY HERSLOW travels to Wellington from her Upper Creek Farm in Stockton, New Jersey. She has been riding since she was 9 years old. Kim and her horse Rosmarin or “Reno” are vying for a spot to represent the U.S. at the Pan-Am Games this summer in Toronto.

JUAN MATUTE JR. comes from an equestrian family—his father, Juan Senior, is his trainer and mentor. At just 16-years-of-age, “Juanito” is competing against top riders internationally and holds his own. He will be a force in the future.

62 | EQ U E S T RI A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

TINA KONYOT comes from a family history of more than 80 years of horse trainers. Some of her credits include the world equestrian games in 2010 and 2014, the 2012 Olympic games, the 2013 world cup. In 2010, Calecto V and Tina won a stunning eight grand prixs, seven of them consecutively, and were named USEF national champions.

TERRI KANE, along with her husband, Richard, purchased Diamonte Farms when their daughter, Devon, was quite young. As one of the founding sponsors of AGDF and an integral part of the series, the Kanes are dedicated not only to dressage but to the community as a whole.

MIKALA GUNDERSEN, from Denmark, is an integral part of dressage in Wellington and in Europe. She rides Janne Rumbough’s My Lady and has had international success at AGDF, 2014 WEG, and the 2015 FEI World Cup in Las Vegas.

DEVON KANE is head trainer at Diamonte Farms. She and her horse, Destiny, spend summers in Germany training with Hubertus Schmidt, an Olympic gold medalist and U.S. team developing coach, and Olympic bronze medalist Debbie McDonald.

KIMBERLY VAN KAMPEN BOYER of Hampton Green Farm, Wellington and Michigan, is a partner in Wellington Equestrian Partners and a founding sponsor of AGDF. Through her foundation, Kim built Van Kampen Arena at AGDF. She is president of the U.S. P.R.E. Association and integral to dressage youth programs, classes, and mentoring.


DRESSAGE LISA WILCOX started her success on Relevant at 2002 WEG with a team silver and a 2004 Olympics team bronze. She is the only American to compete in the Open European Championships, winning individual silver in 2003 and rising to No. 2 in the world. Lisa continues to have many successful horses, including Galant, Denzello, and Pikko del Cerro.

JANNE RUMBOUGH might be called the first lady of dressage in Wellington. She owns the mare My Lady and is an adult-amateur grand-prix rider of her horse, Junior. Janne is a founding sponsor of AGDF. She sponsors her own MTICA Farm series.

ELIZABETH JULIANO, of Havensafe Farm, Wellington and Ohio, is an entrepreneur known for her commitment to dressage and her philanthropy. She is a trustee and secretary of the USET board.  “Betsy” created and funded the Pipeline Clinics to identify and develop future riders and horses. She is a founding and yearly class sponsor of AGDF.

CHRIS VON MARTELS an international rider from Canada who competes at AGDF on his amazing horse, Zilverstar. Chris is trained by both Olympian Ashley Holzer and the famous coach Sjef Janssen. Chris and Zilver have been getting ready for the Pan Am Games.

JACQUELINE SHEAR trains regularly with Lisa Wilcox, who rides and competes her horse, Galant. The duo had great success this year at AGDF. Jacqueline’s family are all passionate about horses and supportive of her son’s jumping discipline and her dressage.

ARLENE “TUNY” PAGE and her Stillpoint Farm are anchors in the Wellington dressage community. Tuny and her husband, Dave, are among the first founding sponsors of AGDF and the nations cup. She is on the USET Foundation Board of Trustees and

a competitor on her grand prix horses. Dave, who is well known for his philanthropy as well as his wine collection, is always on the sidelines when his wife canters down center line.

MARCIA PEPPER has a unique partnership with Lars and Mariett (at right). She purchased the mare for herself, but after a stall accident, it took two years to get Mariett back in the ring. By then, Marcia and Lars realized they had an international level horse and formed what they feel is the perfect union of owner, rider and horse.

LARS PETERSEN is the former rider for Blu Hors Stud, where he trained horses to win the Danish national championship five times, the 1996 Olympic games, three world equestrian games, and three world cups, including the most recent in Las Vegas, riding Mariett.

SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 63


DRESSAGE Much happens BEHIND THE SCENES in creating a photograph like EQ’s cover this issue. Advisor Carol Cohen (top right, at right) organized the shoot, which took about two weeks from planning to photography. Special thanks to Adequan Global Dressage for the use of their VIP facility, Veuve Cliquot for champagne, and Albion for saddles. SEE A VIDEO OF THE SHOOT AT: equestrianquarterly.com/eq-dressage-shoot/

THE EQ 12-PERSON PHOTO CREW: Back Row: C. Wynn Medinger, EQ publisher; Tim Detert, digital technician; Huston Ochoa, first assistant; Leslie Munsell, make-up artist (seated); Stephanie Giles, hair assistant; Carol Cohen, EQ advisor and photograph producer (seated); Stephanie B. Peters, EQ editor and creative director; Marcela Velasquez, wardrobe assistant; Sherryl Kamper, production assistant; Chad Tucker, wardrobe and props manager; Tara O’Leary, Veuve Clicquot champagne specialist. Front: George Kamper, EQ photography director.

64 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015


DRESSAGE Continued from page 61

PART OF THE BEAUTY OF DRESSAGE IS THE FORMALITY. RIDERS, LIKE THEIR HORSES, ARE DRESSED FORMALLY.

As with many sports including figure skating and even equitation, it takes knowledge to appreciate a dressage performance to the fullest. Here’s a primer. THE ARENA

Most equestrians know a dressage arena by the white letters that mark points on its borders, but few outside the dressage world know the letters’ meaning or use. Actually, even among experts it isn’t certain where the letters originated. One theory is that in the old imperial German court, the walls of the stable yard were marked with letters indicating where each rider’s horse was to stand while awaiting its rider. The yard may also have been used for schooling, training, and exercising horses, evolving to the current use of the letters in the dressage arena. A typical arena is either 20 meters by 40 meters (approximately 65 by 131 feet) or 20 by 60 meters (approximately 65 by 197 feet). F O R M A L E L E GANCE

Part of the beauty of dressage is the formality. Riders, like their horses, are dressed formally. In competition, they wear white or cream breeches, white shirt, and stock tie with a small pin. Gloves are typically white. The coat is usually solid black with metal buttons, although solid navy blue is sometimes worn. In some classes, the riders wear a tailed jacket (shadbelly) with a yellow vest or vest points instead of a plain dressage coat. Riders usually wear tall dress boots, and at the upper levels a top hat that matches the rider’s coat is traditional, although helmets are increasing in popularity. At Fédération Equestre International (FEI) competitions, members of the military, police, national studs, national schools, and national institutes retain the right to wear their service dress.

D T HE COMPET IT ION

ressage tests are divided by graduated levels, from the most basic walk/trot to the grand prix test. Currently, there are nine progressive levels of competition where the horse and rider perform compulsory exercises. Other classes, such as musical freestyle, offer creativity and individual expression for exhibitors and have become spectator favorites. Competitive dressage is open to any breed of horse and all levels of riders. At the international level, dressage tests governed by the FEI are Prix St. Georges, Intermédiare I, Intermédiare II, and Grand Prix. The tests performed at the Olympics are Grand Prix. This highest level of test demands the most skill and concentration from both horse and rider. T HE MOV EMENT S The U.S. Dressage Federation explains that

each horse competes individually at each level. Each level has several tests that involve variations of patterns of the same movements. Movements for each level are prerequisites for the next level. For example, if a horse cannot perform a 20-meter trot circle, as required in training level, it should not be ridden on a 10-meter circle, which is smaller and more difficult and which is required at the second level.

Every test has an associated score sheet in which the judge assigns a score and often a comment for the movement performed. There are also marks (called collective marks) given at the end of each test: Gaits. A sound dressage horse has only three correct rhythms—a four-beat walk, a two-beat trot, and a three-beat canter. Impulsion. Desire to move forward, elasticity of the steps, suppleness of the back, engagement of the hindquarters. Submission. The horse’s attention and confidence, lightness and ease of movements, acceptance of the bridle, lightness of the forehand, and straightness. Rider’s seat and position. The horse’s movement is controlled by the rider’s seat which is the most influential and “unseen” aid. Rider’s correct and effective use of aids.

The less you see the rider do, the better. That means he/she is communicating with the horse quietly, and the horse is attentive. Harmony between horse and rider.

Each movement is scored on a scale of 0 (not performed) to 10 (excellent). Total points for the test are added up and noted as a percentage of the total possible number of points for that test. A percentage of 65% or higher is generally thought to mean the horse is ready to move up a level. While the intricacies and technical aspects of dressage may seem intimidating, it is a sport that can be enjoyed by all levels of equestrians—both as viewers and as participants. An audience favorite is the freestyle, where riders and horses perform specially choreographed patterns to music. But every event will amaze. You can find a listing of events near you at usdf.org/calendar/competitions Sources: The U.S. Dressage Federation (USDF), Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI), United States Equestrian Federation (USEF)

SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 65


DRESSAGE

Let’s Talk Dressage. THE CHAMPAGNE FLOWED, AND WE HEARD FROM THE EXPERTS.

asked a group of experts, many of them featured on the cover, to chat about their love of dressage. Four contributors who could not attend the photo shoot also joined our panel:

CAROL COHEN

HOPE GREENFIELD was an event rider for 30 years until switching to dressage. When not wintering in Florida, she is home with her horses at 16 Hands Farm in New Jersey, which the U.S. team uses for training.

ROBERT DOVER’S career began when he was 13 and took his Bar Mitzvah money to buy his first horse. That passion turned him into U.S. dressage’s most celebrated athlete. Beginning at age19, he competed in six Olympics between1984 and 2004 earning four team bronze medals as well as a team bronze in the 1994 world equestrian games. He also competed in seven world cup finals. Rober t has been inducted into the U.S. Dressage Federation Hall of Fame, the Jewish Sports Hall of Fame and was named technical advisor/chef d’equipe for the U.S. National Dressage Team.

What advice would you give a young person who is about to choose dressage as their discipline of focus? WILCOX: I would suggest to kids to ride

for pleasure—pony club—that is what we did growing up. Learn about horses and learn about how to take care of horses, which was something my father was strict about. We didn’t get to have breakfast until our horses were taken care of. We wanted to have the horses, so that was fine with us. We would go out and take care of them, clean things up, have breakfast, and then go to school. It taught us about responsibility early on. I think that is a great way for kids to start. DUPREY: Don’t give up. Dressage is hard

work. It requires consistency, patience, a partnership between horse and rider, and you are not going to become an overnight success. There are going to be days when you are frustrated, and there are going to be days when you are over the moon with how your ride went. 66 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

MARGARET DUPREY, a visionary leader of dressage, owns the Wellington-based Cherry Knoll Farm, where she has been fulfilling her childhood dream for over 20 years. She is a grand-prix rider and performancehorse owner, and sits on numerous industry boards, including the ­­ Board of Trustees of the USET Foundation in Gladstone, New Jersey. Recently, Margaret and her horse Pericles placed second in the FEI Intermediate I at AGDF.

GEORGE WILLIAMS is president of the United States Dressage Federation (USDF) and shares coaching efforts with Charlotte Bredahl as USEF Youth Coach. Well known as a competitor and international grand-prix rider, George competed the crowd-favorite mare, Rocher, to become three-time champion at Devon, reached the 2003 FEI World Cup Final and won USEF Horse of the Year. He was 2005 grand prix national champion, and 2005 team bronze at CHIO Aachen.

DOVER: When I was a young kid living in the

WILLIAMS: I think the most important

Bahamas, I did everything. I would tell kids today, join a pony club. The most important thing is to have a well-balanced seat. Do everything possible with a pony: ride, jump, swim, race, gymkhana, trail ride. First, develop your balance and have lots of fun.

thing really is to just start riding and enjoy riding. Develop a feel for the horse’s natural balance.

GUDEN: This isn’t a sport for those without

WILCOX: Through pony club, I became very

patience.

interested in eventing. And I realized relatively early on that if you didn’t have a good dressage test, it didn’t matter if you were clean crosscountry and stadium. So I took dressage lessons to improve my dressage score. And that’s when I realized how technical it was, and I became very interested in the detail of dressage.

SHEAR: Follow your heart and then lift

weights and build your core. JULIANO: Be patient. Competence in dres-

sage takes many years to achieve. I would also tell a young person, regardless of the discipline, that maintaining a good reputation is critical. This means being careful about how you conduct yourself in public or on social media. Inappropriate pictures or comments could create an unfavorable image that could affect you when applying for college, looking for jobs, or seeking a sponsor.  

What made you decide to focus on dressage?

DUPREY: One day you wake up and realize

that you don’t bounce as well anymore. I have always had an appreciation for dressage—it is the basis for all riding. Dressage requires the execution by a trained horse of precision movements in response to barely perceptible signals from its rider. This is the same in the hunters, the jumpers, and beyond. I became passionate


DRESSAGE

SUSAN STICKLE.COM

about the discipline, and most of all, I loved the connection between the horse and rider.

Above: Laura Graves and Verdades at the Adequan Global Dressage Festival this year.

GREENFIELD: I was an event rider for about

30 years. I always liked the dressage aspect of it, and I got to a certain point where I knew I couldn’t event anymore the way I wanted to.

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ressage was a natural next step for me. I had done some hunters and competitive trail riding when I was younger, so I had a lot to compare it with. What surprised me is how challenging and how rewarding it is.  DOVER: I did all sorts of riding: three-day

eventing, endurance, even polo. By 19 years old I started to focus on dressage. It was my special talent. GUDEN: I saw Reiner Klimke on Ahlerich at

the national horse show in 1985. They did a

freestyle, and when they came out of the ring, they did one tempis completely around the ring, with Klimke holding his top hat in one hand and his reins in the other. I was hooked. SHEAR: Back in Bedford, New York, I

watched, mesmerized, Ashley Holzer riding for many days, and then I trained with her for 12 years. Since relocating to Wellington, I am equally mesmerized training with Lisa Wilcox. WILLIAMS: I saw the Spanish riding school

and their thank-you tour in 1964, and I was very inspired by that. I always found the artistic side to be very appealing. The approach in training horses and the whole approach to horsemanship was appealing to me early on. What has changed in the sport during your career?

DOVER: The sport has changed by leaps and

bounds! When I started, the Germans were always the powerhouse, along with Russia and Sweden. U.S.A. was not on the radar. We won one medal in 1976 and then nothing until 1992. Breeding became more specific, and the horses have become the best of the best. They have become superb athletes, and the judging has changed along with it. You saw at the world cup in Las Vegas, Charlotte Du Jardin winning with an over-85-percent score—this was unheard of 10 years ago, when breaking 70 percent was huge. GUDEN: I have seen an incredible change in

the ability of the horses to perform the movements. The breeding programs in Holland and Germany have done an unbelievable job.  JULIANO: I am sure many people will say

that judging has changed. There is an effort to make it more equitable. However, I also think we are seeing good riding, classical training, and humane treatment of horses rewarded on the international stage. This was not always the SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 67


DRESSAGE

Let’s Talk Dressage. WHAT ARE AMERIC A’S BEST COMPETITIONS? HAS THE GLOBAL DRESSAGE FESTIVAL IMPACTED DRESSAGE OVERALL?

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case, even as recently as a few years ago. It is refreshing and inspiring. WILLIAMS: It has changed tremendously

both within this country and internationally. First off, it has grown in popularity at an unbelievable rate. The general knowledge within the horse community about dressage is far greater than it ever was. Do you think the new Wellington Global Dressage venue, being a season-long winter home, will have an effect on dressage overall?

Above left: California’s Del Mar National Horse Show is a national favorite and is as beautiful as the Southern California weather. Above right: Ashley Holzer, riding Tiva Nana at Dressage at Devon in Devon, Pennsylvania, which takes place this year beginning September 29.

next job at Global will go into perfecting our venue! All winter long the European jumpers and dressage riders have been riding indoors, and we need to take our covered arena, generously donated by Kimberly VanKampen Boyer, and create an environment for them like riding in an indoor. GUDEN: Just check the list of international

WILCOX: It already has had a positive effect.

It’s a beautiful place to come and vacation in the winter, and at the same time compete. I see it drawing top Europeans more and more every year.

dressage stars who make Wellington their winter home. We have more Concours Dressage International (CDI) competitions and more prize money than anywhere in the world and the climate to make dressage a pleasure all winter.

DOVER: Absolutely! Singularly in our hemi-

JULIANO: I believe that Mark [Bellissimo] and

sphere, the dedication and devotion to every aspect of bringing in more competition and the best competitors from Europe for the entire winter has been a huge game changer. Our

his team have achieved their goal of making this festival the largest and perhaps best place for dressage in the world during the winter months.

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WILLIAMS: The level of competition, the

quality of competition, and the quality of the venue is terrific. From an international point of view, it has raised awareness of what is going on here, certainly having some of the European riders come. Which do you consider to be the premier dressage competitions in North America? DUPREY: To me, the premier dressage competitions in North America are the FEI Nations Cup in Wellington; the world cup finals in Las Vegas; the NEDA Fall Festival in Saugerties, New York; and Dressage at Devon, in Devon, Pennsylvania. DOVER: The standouts are Adequan Global

Dressage, Reem Acra World Cup Las Vegas at the Thomas and Mack Center, and the PanAm Games in Toronto this summer. On the West Coast, California Dreaming Productions has done a wonderful job and is only getting better. The Del Mar venue is just awesome and so beautiful. Our own


DRESSAGE

CAROLE MACDONALD

Above left: The New England Dressage Association (NEDA) Fall Festival begins on September 17. Here Bobby Murray handles Dakesa HM, owned by Linda Mendenhall. Above right: The 60-acre Wellington AGDF venue consists of four arenas. 900 stadium seats surround the main ring. There are 200 permanent stalls and one of the world’s largest covered arenas. Left: The U.S. Dressage Finals at the Kentucky Horse Park in Lexington, opens this year on November 5.

West-Coast training center at Epona Farm hosts a CDI W in Hidden Valley. WILLIAMS: Of course AGDF, but in my mind there is no doubt that Saturday night at Devon is such a special occasion. Devon has that electric atmosphere that is similar to what you see at the indoor shows. I’m very proud of what we have created at the U.S. dressage finals, especially our ability to showcase adult amateurs. I’d like to mention the enthusiasm and commitment of California Dreaming Productions. They are re-energizing the Southern California shows. Also the Del Mar venue and the Festival of Champions. JULIANO: I’d say the Global Dressage Festival

shows, Dressage at Devon, the Young Horse Finals, and the Festival of Champions. CAROL F. COHEN first came to Wellington in 1999, and her Two Swans Farm hosted yearly junior/young rider clinics featuring elite international riders. It was Steffen Peters’ Wellington Clinic Series’ home. Carol is a founding sponsor of AGDF and a well-known supporter of USET Foundation. She is trained by the up-and-coming rider Hannah Michaels. Her young stallion Abacus is trained and competed by Hannah, who is trained by Lisa Wilcox. SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 69


COURTESY OF EQUISTYLE MAGAZINE (GERMANY) WITH L.A. POMEROY PHOTOS: MICHAEL GUETH/EQUISTYLE

MEREDITH MICHAELS-BEERB AUM Meredith was not yet 40 when she rewrote riding history as the first woman ever to reach the No. 1 position in the 2008 Rolex World Show Jumping rankings.

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he would hold that ranking for 11 consecutive months, lifting the daughter of director Richard Michaels and actor Kristina Hansen to the equestrian equivalent of movie-star status. Photogenic and fearless, she dispelled presumptions about gender and ability with each new victory gallop and went on to become

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the first woman to win three (2005, 2008, 2009) world cup finals. Her illustrious career, begun as a pony equitation rider growing up in Los Angeles, California, has included team gold at the 1999 European championships, gold medals from the 1999 and 2001 ladies German championships, and eight nations cup victories. At the recent 2015 Winter Equestrian Festival, Meredith took the $372,000 Suncast CSI 5* Grand Prix with her newest equine partner, Fibonacci 17—Artemis Equestrian Farms’ 10-year-old Swedish Warmblood gelding. The

victory helped her earn the title of overall leading lady grand prix rider for 2015. “He has a style different from most horses. It can be difficult to sit as a rider. He jumps with his head up and a little straight in the back,” she said after the Wellington win. “That’s something I have decided I cannot change, and that’s why I try to finesse the bridle a little so I can help him without interrupting his jump.” IT ’S ABO U T B A L A NC E

Taking leaps of faith and over fences requires a keen sense of balance. To better understand Continued on page 75


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where this petite powerhouse finds hers, we spent a day at the Michaels-Beerbaum home in Thedinghausen, Germany. “We are not just man and woman, but business partners, friends, teachers, and students to each other. Of course we experience varying degrees of success, but we never see one another as competition,” Meredith says, referring to her relationship with husband Markus Beerbaum, a team gold medalist on both the 1997 European championship and 1998 world championship squads. In 1991, after studying political science at Princeton University, Meredith went to Germany—initially for only a summer—to further her equestrian education with Paul Schockemohle. She never left. Meeting a certain handsome rider while both were competing in Neumunster—and finding a more vibrant show-jumping industry compared to the one back home in the U.S.—helped convince her to stay.

SPORTFOT

Continued from page 70

Michaels-Beerbaum riding Fibonacci 17 to win the 2015 $372,000 Suncast Grand Prix CSI 5* in Wellington, Florida.

USING FORCE ACCOMPLISHES NOTHING. A HORSE HAS TO WANT TO BE ON YOUR SIDE, TO  TRUST YOU. OTHERWISE EVERYTHING ELSE IS

PA RT N E R S H I P AND MARRIAGE

By 1995, Meredith and Markus were

IMPOSSIBLE.

working together and had leased a barn in Balve. Two years later, they bought a farm in Thedinghausen and got married in 1998. “We have a lot of respect for one another. That’s very important to a relationship,” says Meredith, now a German citizen ranked seventh on that country’s national-rider standings, “Once we lived together, founded a company together, and bought a farm, we thought maybe it was time to get married.” In 2010, they welcomed the arrival of the next generation of Beerbaums: daughter Brianne Victoria. “I was extremely lucky to have my team. I had as much support as a new Mami from my grooms and barn staff as from family,” she adds. By the time Brianne was 6 months old, the baby’s ‘grooming kit’ could be packed as efficiently as a tack trunk, and Meredith was back to competing at the Kentucky Horse Park, anchoring Germany’s team gold medal at the 2010 World Equestrian Games. T HE N EX T G ENERATI O N

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medalist and no stranger to the view from atop the FEI world rankings. And there’s Magic at home—a willing pony available for Brianne to ride when not serving as a pasture mate for one of Meredith’s oldest and best friends. E Q U I N E L E G ENDS

You can’t talk about Meredith without mentioning some of the horses she helped make into legends. Like Shutterfly or Checkmate. This year she sees the same potential for greatness unfolding in Fibonacci 17 (dubbed ‘Nacho’ by Brianne). Now a relaxed and robust retiree, Shutterfly, 21, will go down in show-jumping history as one of its greats: “He’s been enjoying every minute of a well-deserved retirement since 2011 and has Brianne’s pony as a buddy,” Meredith says. Meredith and Petey, as she calls him, won countless grandprix classes, including the 2005 grand prix of Aachen, three world cup finals and individual bronze at the 2006 FEI World Equestrian Games. Her 2010 WEG gold medal show-jumping partner, Checkmate, now 19, still makes it

ONCE WE LIVED TOGETHER, FOUNDED A COMPANY TOGETHER, AND BOUGHT A FARM, WE THOUGHT MAYBE IT WAS TIME TO GET MARRIED.

amply clear that he’s not ready to become a pensioner. “If it were up to him, he would be at every tournament,” Meredith laughs. “When the trailer leaves without him, he makes his displeasure known about staying on the farm. He gets downright insulted.” NOT READY TO R ET IR E

Checkmate might be jealous of Fibonacci 17 who, after their win in Wellington, is certainly thrilling new legions of fans. “Nacho

is a very special mixture of Checkmate and Shutterfly,” Meredith observes. “Like Shutterfly, he has an intense work ethic, and when he gallops he feels like Checkmate. He loves big audiences and stays really cool under pressure. “Using force,” the petite equestrienne says of her equine partners, “accomplishes nothing. A horse has to want to be on your side, to trust you. Otherwise everything else is impossible.” TO WIN O R TO L EA RN

In 2012, Elmar Pollmann-Schweckhorst published a book looking at Meredith’s philosophy towards training and riding. The book’s title, No Fear of Big Goals, is equally apropos of the groundbreaking horsewoman herself and her approach to life as an athlete and mother. Whether competing, making breakfast for Brianne before kindergarten, or schooling students like American rider Lucy Davis into world cup competition at the Stuttgart German Masters, Meredith sees only two outcomes for every leap taken: to win or to learn. That’s finding perfect balance. SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 77


Above left: 1960 photo of Frank Chapot, George Morris, Hugh Wiley, and Bill Steinkraus; USET Archive. Below left: George Morris, USET Archive. Below: Carol Hoffman, USET Archive.

BY RENEE SPURGE OWNER | LA SADDLERY

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A Matter of Tradition A PERSONAL QU E ST TO D IS COV E R WH Y IND IV ID UAL STYLE H AS BE E N RE PLACE D WITH CO NFO RMIT Y.

one is the day of beautiful earthy-colored hunt coats, classic-plaid shirts, velvet collars, cognac-topped boots, and rustcolored riding breeches. Gone is the expression of individual style, grace, and tradition of a hunter equitation rider. The fashion of the hunter sport at one time was directly tied into the ritual of discipline and class that riders exemplified on and off their mounts. What happened to the archetypal hunter look that still continues to inspire fashion designers all over the world? Why have we replaced a century old tradition of individual style with a sterile uniform? Being an avid lover of riding apparel as well as an advocate of the commitment and discipline it takes to be a true equestrian, my quest to find answers to these questions has been years in the making. It all started with a phone call.

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What happened to the archetypal hunter look that continues to inspire fashion designers all over the world? Why have we replaced a century-old tradition of individual style with a sterile uniform?

A few years ago I had a lovely conversation with a woman whose daughter was on the equitation circuit in California. She called my store to inquire about a specific brand of equitation boots. The woman listened politely, and when I was finished with my best sales pitch, said, “Well, I need to buy these specific boots because my trainer explained the reason my daughter was not placing in her classes was because she didn’t have the correct equitation boots.” Being an honest and direct person by nature, I explained to her that I was happy to sell her these particular boots, as they were definitely a great product, but she needed to understand that they weren’t magic boots, and when worn they don’t come with a ribbon guarantee. The customer laughed lightly and said she understood and made the purchase. How did it become the norm for trainers to decide what a rider can and cannot wear in the hunter and equitation arena? The answer to this question is a bit tricky because,


I have since spoken with several judges, and the consensus seems to be a bit split. Most expect riders to be polished and well tailored in their apparel and are unconcerned if the coat is navy or green, the shirt white or light blue, or the boots have laces or no laces. They just want the riders to get into the arena on time. There are also those judges who have said they want all the riders to look the same so they can focus on their riding, not their apparel.

A CHAN GE IN FO C U S

Left: Mary Chapot, USET Archive. Above: Bertalan de Nemethy by Frank Jones

I believe, over the past few decades the horse-show community has drastically shifted its focus. I am uncertain of the chicken or the egg, trainer or student, or perhaps Pony Mom scenario, but somewhere there was a shift from riding with discipline and true horsemanship to chasing points and titles. I have spoken with several hunter and equitation trainers about this phenomenon, and a good majority of them agrees with this shift and have succumbed to it being just a fact of the business.

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nd this is exactly where riding apparel fits into the new equation. It seems that the plainer and more uniform the outfit, the less likely riders with mediocre skills will stand out to a judge, possibly ensuring them a place above a similarly qualified rider who perhaps has a few silver buttons. The trainers are simply catering to their clients’ wishes to win, and if they can’t improve their riding skills, then the only thing they can control is their apparel. Almost daily now, I have a trainer in front of me with her client saying no to almost every detail on a coat or shirt or breech or boot ad nauseum. These buttons are too shiny, this coat is too short, this shirt has a faint tone of blue in it, or this navy is just not navy enough. (Yes, I actually did have a trainer say that!) Let’s not forget that the United States Equestrian Federation (USEF) rulebook makes it very clear that a participant’s riding apparel cannot be judged. This to me is an essential part of this discussion, because if judges choose to ignore this rule, what’s to say that riders could choose to ignore any other USEF rule they deem obsolete. But trainers are convinced that judges are, in fact, ignoring this rule and have made appearance a key factor of winning and losing.

There has been a subtle shift from riding with discipline and true horsemanship to chasing points and titles.

One judge went so far as to admit that “yes, we absolutely judge a rider on their apparel.” A well-known East-Coast judge recalled an anecdote where she and another judge watched a rider enter the arena with what she described as a bright plaid coat and immediately crossed out her number and replaced it with DOA (dead on arrival). Hunter and equitation riders are first and foremost about discipline, form, and style: style of horse, style of riding, and yes, style of clothing. I firmly believe the focus should be on improving in the saddle, not finding the perfect shade of navy coat. True horsemanship is a dying art, and the discipline required to become a marquee rider is a faint memory. The grooms have replaced the need for riders to learn the sport from the ground up, and the six-figure horses have replaced the need for riders to improve their craft. Little by little our standards have been chipped away, compromised by trainers who are not qualified to be trainers, and riders whose only motivating factors are collecting points and ribbons. The judges who seem to ignore rules and judge on personal style preferences need to recognize that a plaid coat does not affect what a rider’s position looks like. It is my hope that hunter and equitation riders, trainers, and judges take notes from the dressage community, who has fully embraced color and personal style in their riding wardrobe. When visiting Wellington, Florida, this past winter, it was so refreshing to see a formerly black-and-white sketch transform into a colorful masterpiece. And this is a sport where the rider is being judged all the time. Kudos to these men and women who have chosen to bring life into their sport with a little flair, and hats off to the judges who can tell the difference between form and fashion. Just for a moment, imagine what it would it be like watching figure skating if all the skaters used the same music and wore the same navy leotard? I actually think it would not only kill the spectator factor but also ruin the individual spirit of each performer. With the loss of our beautiful, traditional components of hunter clothing has also come a loss of the fundamental elements of good riding. These new hunter equitation uniforms have become a detriment to the character and charm of the sport. Uniforms are meant to suppress individuality, to camouflage imperfections in an otherwise homogenous group, and to command obedience from a selected authority. For me, this idea goes against everything that is unique and enchanting about the hunter world. Scratch that, about the horse world. SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 79


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MARYLAND

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ith nearly 20 years of success in the training of top-class stallions, Scott and Susanne Hassler of Hassler Dressage anticipated the creation of Riveredge, a campus-like setting with facilities for training, breeding, and sport—much like those found at the great European equestrian centers. The 600-acre, park-like property already included 16- and 20-stall horse barns. Extensive renovations, thanks to the vision of owner Leslie Malone, transformed one of the barns into a 28-stall training center with an indoor arena equipped with built-in seating. Special detail went into the design of each stall so the warmblood horses would be given utmost comfort. PAGE 101

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HOMES AN EQ PORTFOLIO: A healthy home for your horses. A beautiful home you. See more photographs and inter views with the architects: equestrianquar terly.com/barns-and-homes

P H OTO S : M A RT I N G A R D N E R

E NG L AND anor House stable in the small village of Headbourne Worthy, near Winchester, was once a beautiful barn and the home of the winner of the 1946 Grand National, the UK’s greatest horse race. Sadly, the stable then remained unused and fell into a state of dilapidation. Fortunately, architect Andy Ramus recognised its potential while refurbishing the property’s manor house. Using the concept of preserving history while making any new additions simple and pure, he transformed the decrepit building into an elegant and contemporary three-bedroom family home. An innovative arrangement of spaces uses the stable’s

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existing layout and maintains many of the original exposed-timber interior walls. These were cleaned, stripped, and restored to reveal an exquisite amount of detailing and craftsmanship. Many of the existing features were refurbished and re-purposed for use in a home: the original horse troughs were cleaned and converted as sink basins, the old horse ties act as towel rings in the bathrooms, and original doors were preserved where possible to give a sense of period character. The building has superior insulation, and the heated, polished-concrete floor is highly functional, yet still recounts the stable’s agricultural history. PAGE 101

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SOUTH CAROLINA his beautiful cutting-horse farm features a 10-stall horse barn with an office, wash and veterinary areas, feed and tack rooms, toilet and laundry areas, a 16-foot center aisle, and 16- by 16-foot stalls with inner and outer doors. Also included near the 100- by 200-foot indoor arena are large tack-up areas. Covered cattle pens along one end of the indoor arena and a covered connection between the barn and arena allow for safe loading and unloading in any kind of weather. A 3,000-square-foot second-story residence above the barn offers magnificent views of the farm and a balcony overlooking the indoor arena. PAGE 101

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NEW HAMPSHIRE he owners of this beautiful, 7,655-square-foot entertainment barn were inspired by a bank barn they saw in Pennsylvania and added one to their waterfront estate on Lake Winnipesaukee. The lakeside gable end is made of stone, and large glass doors open wide enough to allow the owners to drive their antique cars in for special occasions. An impressive 41- by 77-foot great room is centered by a massive stone fireplace. Lots of multi-paned windows with transoms and French doors, which open to the tennis court, give the barn a bright, spacious feel. An adjoining caterer’s kitchen, bath, laundry, and a one and one-half story two-bedroom apartment have been incorporated into the barn. PAGE 101

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PHOTO:CESAR LUJAN OF BLACKBURN ARCHITECTS

VIRGINIA ocated in the idyllic center of northern Virginia’s hunt country, this new equestrian property blends traditional shinglestyle architecture with a New England influence, in reference to the owners’ origins. An eight-stall barn with a tack room and lounge connects to an enclosed dressage arena. The arena features an attached and slightly elevated observation lounge off the tack room to provide space for relaxing, lounging, and observing the indoor arena. The design incorporates environmentally friendly materials and techniques.

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CALIFORNIA n a rural area just south of Sacramento lies the small town of Wilton, home to Wandering Horse Ranch. Owned by Cathy Vidas and Ken Wong, this sprawling, 20-acre property features a 5,000-square-foot horse barn with integrated 4,000-square-foot luxury guest quarters, office, recreation room, and bar. The barn features seven horse stalls with rubber floors, Dutch doors in-filled with exotic hardwood, and top-of-the-line barn accessories. The upstairs living areas have balconies overlooking the stalls and the gorgeously landscaped property and pastures beyond.

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PHOTOS: BOB WINSETT

COLORADO he heated area of this western Colorado barn is approximately 46,000 square feet. It is unique because the owners wanted it to be utilized for more than just riding horses.  They wanted to have their family spend quality time together in the barn and thought that features such as pool and jungle pong tables, game tables, a library, a large bar, and other items often found in a rec room would suit them well.  The barn also includes a golf simulator, a target practice area, and climbing wall.  Every room has a view into the arena.

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HOMES

PHOTOS: CESAR LUJAN OF BLACKBURN ARCHITECTS

OHIO

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n historic German-style bank barn that fell into serious decay was salvaged and became a family’s private entertainment space. The barn reuses the original lumber, and traditional details juxtapose with modern amenities, including two bedrooms, two loft-style dayrooms, a large kitchen for entertaining, a dining room, and a family room with stone fireplace. A highlight is a two-level porch: one covered, and one screened. The backside of the barn provides privacy and the perfect place to relax and enjoy full, unobstructed views of the property. PAGE 101

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AUSTRALIA ocated amid farmland and vineyards on the beautiful Mornington Peninsula south of Melbourne, this complex houses a warmblood breeding and training center, where horses are bred for dressage, show jumping, and eventing. Merricks Stables is arranged in a crescent plan that provides enclosed stalls for six horses, wash, tack, laundry, workshop, and feed areas, as well as a small office and groom’s apartment. The facility includes a covered colonnade that overlooks central, semi-circular paddocks. The outer perimeter wall is constructed from ‘rammed earth’—a method of natural earth and concrete construction found in the region. This wall continues

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beyond the main enclosure to encompass the day pens and culminates in a shallow pool served by a fountain that offers horses a cool drink. The plan’s orientation provides shelter from the prevailing winds and solar shading in the summer months. A single-pitch roof profile and narrow cross section provides natural cross ventilation, assisted by automated timber vent panels at a high level. Rainwater is collected, with the overflow supplying a new lake. This region is subject to prolonged seasons of little rainfall, so the ability to conserve and collect water was a key factor in the design of the facility. PAGE 101 P H OTO S : L I S B E T H G RO S M A N N

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HOMES

P H OTO S : K E N W Y N E R

VIRGINIA ocated on the banks of the Potomac River, this renovated historic bank barn at River Farm is host to receptions, parties, and festivities for a family and their special guests. Originally built in the late 1800s, much of the structure was preserved but reclad in structural insulated panels and a new boardand-batten skin. The existing corncrib was converted into a sundeck with views of the horse farm. The northeast facade was replaced with floor-to-ceiling glass, providing panoramic views of the Potomac from the main floor and loft. The project received an AIA Merit Award in Historic Resources and Southern Living Magazine’s Home Award in Historic Restoration. PAGE 101

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P H OTO S : K E N W Y N E R

MASSACHUSETTS eechwood Stables is bordered by 200 acres of conservation land, creating an intimate, private setting for the family-owned farm. The12-stall barn is equipped with a half bath, wash/groom stall, feed room, tool and equipment storage, and a partial hayloft. Nestled into a hill, a new bank barn provides storage for vehicles and equipment. An enclosed riding arena has a mounting area, an observation lounge with a small kitchen, an office, tack room, and laundry. An outdoor patio creates an inviting atmosphere for the owners to enjoy the beautiful surroundings with friends and family. PAGE 101

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HOMES

VERMONT eaver Brook Farm is owned by one of Bill Gates’s managers from the early days of Microsoft. The property includes an impressive three-story, 8,000-square-foot restored barn that dates to the 1880s. It is cleverly connected to the main house by a finished, heated tunnel and serves a multitude of purposes, including guest accommodations with beautiful stream views, garaging, meeting and storage space, dance hall, golf driving range, greenhouse, and studio space currently used for wood working. The relaxed, country lifestyle Beaver Brook offers is one of the finest examples of what makes living in Vermont so appealing. 

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NEW YORK verlooking the water on the north shore of Long Island, this breathtaking farm hosts a private, state-of-the-art equestrian facility. The horse farm consists of a horse stable, indoor riding ring, large outdoor riding ring, hay barn, maintenance building, and caretaker’s cottage.  The horse barn contains 14 stalls, 2 wash stalls, a groom stall, tack room, lounge, and farm office.  The interior boasts open space with high ceilings magnificently finished with wood paneling.  The light-filled 80- by180-foot indoor riding ring was constructed with glulam arches, wood-paneled ceiling and walls, steel-framed sliding doors, and a worldclass footing.  PAGE 101

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HOMES

MASSACHUSETTS riscilla Endicott, founder of the New England Dressage Association, repurposed a Connecticut River tobacco barn as an extension of her early 18th-century farmhouse, providing grand open living space and a ground-floor master suite with a contemporary, yet vernacular sensibility.  The house and barn complex overlook the outdoor arena, ponds, and paddocks, with the indoor arena set discreetly into the hillside.  From Walter Cristensen to Sue Blinks, excellence in dressage training and riding permeate this historic farm near Boston.   

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MIDDLEBURG PHOTO

DOUGLAS LEES

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SALAMANDER RESORT

1. 2. Everyone is welcome at the spring and fall races, held each April and October at Glenwood Park. 3. 4. Kinross Farm is a breathtaking example of the area’s beautiful farms. 5. Middleburg’s charming downtown. 6. The National Sporting Museum’s collection is a treasure for Middleburg.

KIM McCUSKER As editor of THE SCOUT GUIDE HUNT COUNTRY, VIRGINIA, I have been able to meet some of the most interesting people in our area. It has been my honor to share their stories and celebrate the contribution they make to our local narrative. The Scout Guide, currently found in more than 60 cities across the country, is a collection of locally focused publications that feature the premier independently owned businesses, artists, artisans, and entrepreneurs in their area. thescoutguide.com 94 | EQ U E S T R I A N Q UA RT E RLY | S U MMER | 2015


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JILL NOVOTNY

NATIONAL SPORTING LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

Middleburg BY KIM McCUSKER

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he first thing you’ll notice is its sheer beauty: the carefully preserved architecture of a distant time, tree-lined streets cradled in lush open space, the endless rolling hills of its charming countryside. It is truly captivating. But, while the setting is breathtaking, it is the spirit of its people that beckons visitors to return and sometimes lay roots down of their own. Our residents are well-known actors, authors, artists, artisans, and even an Olympian or two. Jacqueline Kennedy spent much of her time here with John and Caroline while her husband was president, and she continued to spend many a hunting season here later in life. Elizabeth Taylor was a regular during her courtship and eventual marriage to local gentleman and Virginia senator John Warner. Of course, many Middleburg residents have lived here all their lives, and some enjoy the distinction of generations of family members

AN IDYLLIC VILLAGE IN VIRGINIA HUNT COUNTRY

calling the village home. Immediately you sense the camaraderie of this place—everyone knows one another, most attended grade school together (the Hill School to be precise, founded in 1926). It is a very close-knit community of incredibly interesting people, several of whom can be credited with tirelessly working to

preserve this place, its history, and its rich tradition of equestrian sport. George L. Ohrstrom Sr. and Alexander Mackay-Smith, for example, founded the National Sporting Library and Museum in 1954. While its understated exterior may be misleading, inside is an impressive display of history, culture, literature, and fine art celebrating equestrian, angling, and field sport. The list of patrons that have backed this cherished endeavor is a list of influence, power, and hunt country legend—George L. Ohrstrom Jr., Forrest E. Mars Sr., Paul Mellon, and John and Martha Daniels just to name a few. Today, Jacqueline Mars, Mrs. George L. Ohrstrom Jr., and Clarke Ohrstrom continue their families’ dedication to what is now a cultural epicenter of turf and field sport. It is the Reuter family that is responsible for the preservation of one of our town’s most cherished historical landmarks, the Red Fox Inn. It is the oldest established inn in America, SUM M E R | 2 0 1 5 | EQ U ES TRIA N Q UA RTERLY | 95


SASKIA P.

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YVONNE ROCK

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road to Boyce, Virginia’s, Other Elizabeth­—the flagship, world headquarters of Elizabeth Locke Jewels. 42 21 $2.0M 87 63 9 MOS. Finally, a quick trip to Marshall, AV E R AG E AV E R AG E MONTHS OF DINING, AVERAGE J A N UA RY J U LY DAY COMFORTABLE A RT S , H O R S E FA R M Virginia, offers Tri-County Feeds, DAY RIDING C U LT U R E PRICE Fashions, and Finds—an impressive HORSINESS 70 95 12,000-square-foot, big white barn 70 INDEX BALTIMORE stocked with the very best in equesMIDDLEBURG trian style and decor. 50 ANNAPOLIS 50 66 Of course, add to all of this the WASHINGTON, DC P O P U L AT I O N 700 fact that on any given Saturday or 95 NEAREST AIRPORT WASH./DULLES, 15 MI. Sunday in the spring or fall, you can find a thrilling horse race somewhere experienced, one reminiscent of a fine antique in the area. The Middleburg Spring market in Europe, the other a walk through an Races at Glenwood Park (soon to celebrate its f course, alongside the Red Fox Ernest Hemingway novel. 100th anniversary) is a must experience. Or, Inn, you’ll find some of our arJust down the road in Millwood, Virginia, if polo is your sport, we have that, too, every ea’s most sought-after boutique the Locke Store, currently owned by Juliet Friday evening May through August at Great shopping. A few of the spots Mackay-Smith, is well worth the short drive. Meadow in the Plains. Furthermore, our longnot to be missed include Tully Serving in its current capacity as a mercantile standing tradition of fox hunting continues to Rector, Duchessa of Middleburg, Richard Allen since 1836, the structure of the store has hardly Clothing, and Highcliffe Clothiers; all offer thrive. Many of those residents associated with changed. Its modern inventory includes a wine impeccable style and flawless service. English equestrian sport in our area are the same famiselection from the finest vineyards of Europe Country Classics will wow with their custom lies who have worked so tirelessly to protect and the U.S., and a host of housemade lunch, line of fine country clothing, featuring beautithe open space and way of life that we all cherdinner, and baked goods that offer farm-toful fabrics procured exclusively from the finest ish. Have no doubt that they will continue to weavers in the British Isles. For the home, table decadence in every bite. Then, entice press hard and preserve this place we all hold Foxfire Antiques and the Outpost are to be your inner princess with a short trip up the PAGE 101 dear. with the original structure built in 1728. A young surveyor, George Washington, once visited the inn, and during the Civil War, it is said the tap room counter was a surgical table. A meal or stay at the inn is an essential—as it truly embodies hunt country. The inn offers lovely cuisine and a compelling collection of fine art that beautifully tells the story of the area and its rich history of fox hunting, thoroughbred breeding, and horse racing.

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$$$$

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GLINT STUDIOS

GEORGE KAMPER

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KERRI SALTER

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1. Cricket Bedford, a real estate agent and active member of Middleburg’s equestrian community was EQ’s tour guide. 2. Scruffy’s Ice Cream Parlor in the center of town. 3. Melvin Poe, a fixture in Nor th American foxhunting for more than 60 years,

14

died last year at 94. 4. Middleburg Tack Exchange owner Jo Motion was one of the first female race trainers in the country. 5. Neil R. Morris trains racehorses at Kinross Farm and is joint master of the Orange County Hounds. 6. Will O’Keefe has been the voice of the race meets for 35 years as an announcer at Glenwood Park. 7. Punkin Lee is a cornerstone of the Middleburg community and owner of (8.) Journeymen Saddlers, a leather workshop that serves

some of the top riders in the country. 9. David Greenhill, owner of (10.) Greenhill Vineyard and Winery just outside of downtown Middleburg. 11. Mark Metzger of (12.) Highcliffe Clothiers, a shop full of wonderful colors, patterns, and classic styles. 13. Tri-County Feeds of Marshall, Virginia. 14, 15, 16. The historic Red Fox Inn was established in1728.

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OBJECT PHOTOS: NATIONAL SPORTING LIBRARY AND MUSEUM

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THE NATIONAL SPORTING LIBRARY AND MUSEUM is a treasure of the community with an expansive (1, 3, 7, 8.) collection relating to horse and field spor ts. The museum’s collection of spor ting paintings and sculptures from around the world dates from the 1850s. 2. A handwritten manuscript by Theodore Roosevelt

on hunting. 4. The National Sporting Museum was added to the library in 2011 and holds a permanent collection and many impressive temporary exhibits throughout the year. 5. Librarian John Connolly shows EQ several of the library’s rare books, followed by a tour of the museum led by (6.) Nicole Stribling and Claudia Pfieffer.


SALAMANDER RESORT

LEARNING TO LISTEN

D

WITH SHERYL JORDAN

BY JILL NOVOTNY

riving through the center of Middleburg, one feels a unique sense of history. The town’s melding of elegant tradition and stylish dynamism is embodied by its relatively new addition, the Salamander Resort. It is a posh resort, full of luxurious accommodations and the highest level of service. The hotel is adorned with equestrian details, from room numbers in helmet-shaped signs to bits and buckles on chairs and in paintings throughout. Unlike most resorts, especially one located just an hour from downtown Washington, Salamander allows guests to ride, to board, and to enjoy horses beyond a simple trail ride. Sheryl Jordan, a horsewoman with over 20 year’s experience, has been director of the equestrian program at Salamander since its opening in 2013 and has created the program from scratch. Over her career, she has trained show jumpers, managed equestrian programs at resorts, and offered educational, therapeutic, and team-building programs for all types of groups, from at-risk youth to corporate employees. In addition to traditional riding activities, Jordan offers a unique program known as EquiSpective, a half-seminar and half-horsemanship lesson. Jordan radiates a natural warmth that permeates the Equi-Spective workshop and invites feedback and interaction. While in Middleberg, we had a chance to attend a workshop. Jordan’s introduction and the lecture that followed were informal and personal, ranging from corporate management to energy and auras. Participants gathered by the round pen—which she referred to as the think-tank—where a gorgeous pony stood patiently watching Jordan’s every move.

SALAMANDER RESORT’S EQUESTRIAN PROGRAM OFFERS A PRIMER INTO THE LANGUAGE OF HORSES.

Equestrian yoga and the barns at Salamander. The spa and pool are world-class. Harriman’s, one of the resor t’s fine restaurants, is modeled after a stallion barn.

“I hope that this experience is useful to you as a journey of self-awareness, and that it helps you to look at yourself in a new way,” she began. Throughout the session, she encouraged awareness of the environment, of others, and of nature. She emphasized the importance of respect, empathy, and authenticity when communicating with horses—as with interacting with people. At one point she described a posture in which one’s feet are firmly planted on the ground and the ribcage lifted. After everyone tried it, each participant described the change that they experienced in their confidence, their

mood, their ability to project their voice, and their physical stability. Throughout the session, Jordan carried a small book filled with quotations and what she calls nuggets of wisdom that reinforced her points with poetic, witty, or simply memorable aphorisms. She used a minute of silence to demonstrate the value of attention and focus and explained that being aware and attuned to one’s surroundings is paramount in being able to work with horses, to read their body language, and to return their communications in a sensitive way. “You want to be in a position to respond rather than to react,” she explained, and extended this point by applying it to situations in the workplace, where understanding co-workers is the first step to gaining their respect, building a good team, and successfully leading. Following the discussion, everyone entered the ring and practiced engaging with the pony by experimenting with body language and movement in what was essentially a basic lesson in natural horsemanship, or what people commonly refer to as horse whispering. Without ever mounting a horse, Equi-Spective participants are able to experience what most equestrians already know: the benefits gained by working with horses. Even seasoned equestrians can find the workshop helpful, as Jordan herself has found. “I had a group of five prominent horsewomen come to take part in Equi-Spective,” she explained. “They each told me that they had learned something about themselves or about how they interact with their horses.” As the session ended and the group discussed their discoveries, Jordan walked over to grab the pitchfork to pick up a new pile and laughed, “I may be in the New York Times, but I’m still scooping poop!”

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EQ R E S O U R C E S

Where to Find It Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

FAVO R I T E S Page 24

ST Y LE Page 42

Jewelry

Deerhurst Ranch

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National Sporting Library

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WE DDI N GS Page 46

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Photoshoot, Page 54 Photography/Styling

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Colorado, Page 86

Greenhill Winery

GE A R Page 26

Christianne Taylor

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Stan Grella GH2

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Horses and Hope

Gowns

internationalpoloclub.com

LO@LOequine.com

Australia, Page 88

Middleburg Tack Exchange

horsesandhope.org

The White Peacock Bridal

Devil’s Thumb Ranch

New Hampshire, Page 83

Seth Stein Architects

middleburgtack.com

Model

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tinyurl.com/LVonWinn

London, UK

Highcliffe Clothiers

SCI E N CE Page 36

Leila Thomas for DT

King Family Vineyards

Vermont, Page 90

sethstein.com

highcliffeclothiers.com

University of California

Models

kingfamilyvineyards.com

tinyurl.com/BeaverBrookFarm

New York, Page 92

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Hair/Makeup

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EQ B A R N D O G S

One Dog at a Time A movie about adopting a horse gave KARIN REID OFFIELD insight into adopting a dog.

I

had never considered adopting a horse. I had always purchased my own horses until I began looking into the subject of horse rescue. I’ve also bred my own. Yet now, after making Harry and Snowman (see page 38), I feel really differently about the subject. I will definitely adopt my next horse! I also feel differently since adopting my puppy, Chili, from our local humane society. She was found running loose in the St. Louis, Missouri, area, and rescue people brought her all the way to the Little Traverse Bay Humane Society in northern Michigan to save her life! Unless I become interested in showing dogs and become a handler that shows dogs in Madison Square Garden, I may never buy a dog again. As for dogs, I adore them. When I was younger, I think that instead of having children, I chose dog babies. I eventually had seven dogs, but I found out I couldn’t be a good mother to all of them. I just didn’t have enough love to go around. They were each so unique. One wanted to live outside with the coyotes, and another loved hanging out in closets. I guess he just felt at home there. Each of those pups came to me through a breeder, but never a show-quality breeder. I purchased puppies from families that may have started off breeding their females to their males to create some extra income. I bet as the years go by, lots of inbreeding takes place this way. For example, I know that I chose to buy Jack Russell terriers because they are famous for being great with children. Mine certainly 10 2 | E Q U E S T RI A N Q UART E RLY | S U MMER | 2015

After all, puppy mills are legal and there are approximately 10,000 in the United States. I learned that most of the dogs that are sold online and in pet stores come from some type of puppy mill.

were not. They had uneven gaits, they barked, and they would bite whether provoked or not. Now, many of my friends are involved with dog rescue and shutting down puppy mills. They are asking families not to breed and sell their dogs, and are having some success. After all, puppy mills are legal and there are approximately 10,000 of them in the United States. I learned that most of the dogs that are sold online and in pet stores come from some type of puppy mill. Educating consumers is the fastest way to end the cruelty that imprisoned breeding dogs endure. Most people would not want to contribute to this cruelty by buying a dog this way, once they know the full story. So, I say, do your homework before adding a pet to your family. Better yet, consider adoption. Shelters and rescues are full of wonderful dogs waiting to be loved. As they say, it’s one dog at a time. Here’s my one rescue dog, so far—Chili. We adopted this miniature fox terrier just before Christmas 2014. Four days later she traveled in a small airline bag to Tennessee, then to Florida, then to a kennel during our New Year’s vacation. But unlike her first owners, we came back for her after our vacation, and we have loved her ever since. Karin Reid Offield is the executive producer of the movie Harry & Snowman as well as a dressage rider and equestrian. Her unreleased documentary about the world of equestrian show jumping, Jumpers, was the source of much of the material used in creating Harry & Snowman. Karin suggests learning more about puppy mills at thepuppymillproject.org and stoponlinepuppymills.org


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HERMÈS CAVALE, JUMPING WITH FREEDOM Both technical and athletic, the new Hermès Cavale saddle was designed for top level show jumping with the help of our partner rider, Simon Delestre. With its wide gullet, angled foam-injected panels, and its seamless medium-deep seat, Hermès Cavale combines balance, comfort for horse and rider, and close contact riding. It offers an innovative answer to the search for the perfect feel over fences. Hermes.com

Official USEF riding apparel supplier

Equestrian Quarterly, Vol 4. Issue 2  

Summer 2015

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