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PEOPL E | T R AVE L | D E S I G N | FA S HI O N | S T Y L E | DÉCOR

EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

®

EQLiving.com

A PORTFLIO OF

FASHION

FE ATURES IN EQUESTRIAN LIVING MAGA ZINE


A FOCUS ON

FASHION

E

very now and then, a brand suf-

fers an identity crisis. Perhaps it has fallen out of favor with a new way of thinking, been dismissed by a younger generation, taken a misguided modern approach, or it is

simply struggling to find a voice that sets it apart. At Equestrian Living, we have been fortunate to have discovered, and worked with, numerous brands that not only have well-founded identities, but also continue to strengthen their vision with each passing season. From whimsical to nostalgic, simple to extravagant, earthy to magical, each designer’s past, present, and future archetypes come through in their collections.

See RĂśnner shoes and silk scarf on pages 42, 43.

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BY RENEE SPURGE | LA SADDLERY


WINSTON

Winston Equestrian's mid-blue with camel Devon Hunt Coat in a stretchy wool blend. $749.

Our brand is rooted in the nostalgia of classic hunt seat fashion, from its luxurious European fabrics to its earthy colors and textures. Winston represents a modern woman who is conservative in her style but sophisticated and sexy in the fit of her apparel. –Winston Equestrian

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Rönner represents elegant, timeless, and unique

Winston Equestrian's dark gray with camel Devon Hunt Coat in a stretchy wool blend. $749.

designs for horse and country-living enthusiasts that epitomize effortless and classic style for everyday living. –Carin Rönner

O WINSTON

Winston Equestrian's misty rose Milan V-neck sweater with light gray patches, in cotton blend. $169.

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ne of the many components of a brand’s identity is the fabric it chooses to use in its designs. For the past several years, technical fabrics have been on the rise in equestrian fashion, so much so that even once strictly Pytchley-minded riders are buying hunt coats made out of mesh. Indeed, there are many brands that are embracing modern versions of tried and true natural fabrics. Winston Equestrian, with its lightweight, sleek, and fitted coats, is changing the way people think about wool as being passé in the jumping arena. Winston remains true to its polished aesthetic in 2017, and its new pieces reinforce its representation of “a modern woman who is conservative in her style but sophisticated and sexy in the fit of her apparel.” For example, Winston’s new blue Devon Hunt Coat (page 35) puts a classic and elegant twist on the blatantly bright-blue tech coats that have flooded the market over the past two years. Similarly, Rönner continues to embrace silky-stretch cottons for its signature equine prints and buttery alpaca blends for the stunning knits in its collection. This year, while it has turned to some more athletic fabrics for the Rönner Sport line, the company’s distinctive prints and feminine cuts set it apart from the sometimes flat and all too common look of sun shirts and tech tops. The Dianella show shirt (opposite) is a clear snapshot of a Rönner woman who “epitomizes effortless and classic style for everyday living.”


RĂ–NNER

Dianella sporty, training show-shirt in gray mini-horse and gray-gingham details. $199. Classic buttondown Carla shirt in coral snaffle pattern. Floral contrast at collar, placket, and cuffs. $220.

Marigold blouse in taupe tropical equestrian pattern. Printed mix of cotton and silk. $220.

Lantana shirt in blue gingham. Contrasting placket cover with carousel embroidery. $249.


FASHION ACCESSORIES

My love for the equestrian world inspired some of my original designs with an unparalleled attention to detail. Using only the finest diamonds and gemstones, I create wearable art. –Karina Brez

The Ottavia custom-made, equestrianinspired bag by Luca’s Boutique is handmade in Italy of saddle leather. Allow four to six weeks for delivery. $1,950.

Luca's Boutique is a true artisan Italian brand creating handcrafted

Karina Brez Huggable Hooves bracelet in 18-karat rose gold and diamonds. Also available in white and yellow gold. Starting price $6,500.

Horse LUV earrings in 18-karat rose gold and diamonds by Karina Brez. Also available in white and yellow gold. $1,500.

products with each client’s passions and desires in mind. Our bags are made entirely in Italy and highly valued for their impeccable detail and innovative design—all constructed with materials of the highest standards. –Luca Papini

Mimosa Carousel slipper in hunter green by Rönner. Handcrafted and finished with leather sole. $289.

Rönner Tropical Equestrian bag in blue-tropical canvas and honeyleather combination. $329.

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Harness Bucket bag in red by Frye. Smooth, full-grain leather with suede lining and antiquedmetal hardware lend polish to this bag. $398.


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EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

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APRIL/MAY 2018

BEYOND THE BOUNDARIES

FASHION 2O18

DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 6, 2018


HUNT COUNTRY NOIR AN ALLURING AND FASCINATING BALANCE OF ELEGANCE AND PRACTICAL SIMPLICITY MERGES VICTORIAN HIGH NECKS AND LACE Contributing Editor SANDRA RANKE Photographer HEIDI NIEMALA Fashion Editor DAVID BURNETT

Coat: H&M Contributing Editor: Sandra Ranke Blouse: Equipment Paris @sandraranke.com Stock tie: Horse Country Photographer: Heidi Niemala Pin: Horse Country @heidiniemala.com Pants: Maje Fashion Editor: David Burnett @davidburnettnyc.com

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WITH FORMAL HUNTING ATTIRE.


The Aristocratic Rebel FIERCELY UNIQUE IN HER JUXTAPOSITION OF PRETTY FLORALS AND MASCULINE PLAIDS, THE FREE-SPIRITED REBEL, MUCH LIKE A NEWLY TAMED MUSTANG, EMBODIES DRAMATIC UNPREDICTABILITY.

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The Featured Mustangs I would like to acknowledge the plight of these mustangs and the importance of protecting their place in our national heritage. These intelligent, fast learners, and loyal partners are in need of support from the equestrian community. The Mustang Heritage Foundation holds events where professional trainers are given 100 days to train and compete on their mustangs. Afterwards, pre-approved bidders can purchase one of these trained mustangs at auction. The mustangs can also be purchased from the Bureau of Land Management Internet Adoption Program. Please be aware that these horses are completely wild. They should only be purchased by skilled trainers or students who are working directly with qualified mentors/training programs. —Ronda Ann Gregorio Mustang trainer and rescuer

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Blouse: Kenzo Pants: Topshop Boots: Milo Fellini Contributing editor: Sandra Ranke @sandraranke.com Fashion editor: David Burnett @davidburnettnyc.com Photographer: Heidi Niemala @heidiniemala.com Model: Maddie @modelogicmidatlantic.com Hair: Jacqui Davis @pratpartners.com Makeup: Lori Pressman @theartistagency.com Digital Tech and retouching: Kate Field @katefield.net Production assistant: Anja Schattschneider Photo assistants: Aaron Hunt and Jim Osen  Horse Country @horsecountrylife.com Mustangs: Viggo and Stryder rescued and trained by Ronda Ann Gregorio mustangheritagefoundation.org blm.gov/adoptahorse/onlinegallery.php Shot on location in Middleburg, Virginia Special thanks: Patricia Black at Albright Fashion Library @albrightnyc.com  and Barry Soorenko  For more details see: Resources on page 106.

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This page: Blouse: H&M Tie: Pendelton Vintage pin: Editor’s own Pants: Topshop Opposite page: Sweater: H&M Leather harness: Lanvin Culottes: Gaultier Vintage pin and fob: Horse Country Socks: Woolrich Shoes: Celine 44 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | APRI L / MAY | 2018


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This page: Blouse: Kenzo Skincare: Shiseido Opposite page: Dress: Valentino Leather harness: Lanvin Vintage fob: Horse Country Socks: Vintage Shoes: Celine

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COCO CHANEL I N S PI R E D B Y H O R S E S

COURTESY OF EQUISTYLE MAGAZINE, GERMANY


breeding horses. It was all about horses and riding, and she became a very good horsewoman,” explained designer Karl Lagerfeld. Since the pioneering vision of Coco Chanel, the brand has grown into an empire with an annual turnover of more than $6 billion. But Coco Chanel’s legacy lives on not only in the dizzying sales figures. Today’s modern women owe much to Chanel for freedom of fashion, confidence, and comfort, as well as the sophisticated styles that have become the foundation of fashion. CHANE L T HEN A ND NOW About 10 years after Coco Chanel’s death, the

baton was passed to German fashion designer Karl Lagerfeld, who is widely credited with the brand’s international success. In the 1980s, he helped modernize the slightly shopworn brand with somewhat unconventional interpretations of the Coco Chanel heritage, which successfully restored it to its former glory. While Lagerfeld rehabilitated the brand’s reputation by modernizing it, he let the spirit of Chanel continue to live in his collections. The Autumn/Winter 2015/16 collection is a tribute to Coco Chanel and her unmistakable style. The French Collection, quite deliberately very French in look, has reinterpreted Coco Chanel’s style icons. The collection includes the unmistakable Chanel quilting, simple tweed, and the little black dress. It is a truly successful fusion of tradition and modern.


Mark Badgley and New York’s Gold Coast country S T E E P E D I N H I S T O RY, T H I S I DY L L I C L O C AT I O N OFFERS EQUESTRIANS A TO P - C L A S S T R A I N I N G B A R N , M I L E S O F T R A I L S , A N D A S H O RT R I D E T O M A N H AT TA N .

BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS GEORGE KAMPER


THE LUR E OF LOCUS T VALLEY, N . Y.

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t would seem quite fitting that Mark Badgley, partner in the fashion-design house of Badgley Mischka, would gradually find his way to the charming village of Locust Valley, N.Y. The north shore of Long Island, also known as the Gold Coast, is steeped in a rich history that embodies the bygone Gatsby era. Locust Valley is a hamlet of gracious mansions, secluded estates, and exclusive country clubs. Horses graze on verdant hillsides, and the thunder of polo can be heard in the distance. Some of the area’s original estates from the early 1920s have been broken up and subdivided, but many still stand, preserving the valley’s heritage of understated grandeur. Badgley Mischka is primarily known for their red carpet and evening wear and it is easily possible to envision one of Badgley Mischka’s timeless gowns sweeping across the ballroom dance floors of yesteryear. Mark Badgley and his partner James Mischka are in the company of prestigious families that once resided here. These families were not necessarily the attraction of Locust Valley, but impressive nonetheless. Familiar tycoons and political families such as Roosevelt, Vanderbilt, Morgan, Phipps, and Post had homes here as did artists and socialites, including C.Z.Guest, John Lennon, and Rudyard Kipling. Mark and James’ decision to move to Locust Valley full time was a gradual process. They owned a farm in Lexington, Ky., for five years, and a home in New York City for 30 years, and rented in the Hamptons. They even chose to rent in Locust Valley before buying to see if full-time country living was right for them. It was a culmination of circumstances that helped tip the scales. The quiet home they purchased was just minutes from Mark’s horses, trainer, favorite training barn (see Hunter’s Moon Farm, page 77), and a short, 30-mile commute to Badgley Mischka’s midtown Manhattan office. Mark grew up in Oregon and started riding horses at a very young age. The demands of college, followed by building a world-class fashion business, left him little time for horses. He eventually found his way back to his beloved passion 15 years ago and has been riding and training in the hunter ring ever since. Mark was a little apprehensive about riding again after such a long hiatus. “I missed it and I was stressed at the studio,” reflected Badgley.

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1 4 1. A black-and-white painting by EEK adds drama to the dining room. 2. Inset: Mark (right) and James. 3. The spacious, light-flooded living room. 4. Mark and Rommel in the newly built walkway.

“It took one lesson and I was immediately hooked.” He currently has two hunters: Quantos, whom he rides and shows now, and Riviera whom he leases out. He also has a couple of retired horses that live in Lexington. He finds solace at the barn. For him, it is therapeutic, calming, and a total escape. “I love the people and riding with close friends, but of course it’s always about the animal,” explained Mark. During the winter months Mark and James travel to Wellington, Fla., most weekends to participate in the plethora of winter equestrian events that take place there throughout the season. L IF E IN T HE CO UNTRY

At the end of a winding, narrow, tree-lined lane edged by homes discreetly tucked into the landscape sits the carriage house of Mark and James. If one could sketch the perfect country


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LUXE NOMAD

THE FREE-SPIRITED WANDERER EXPRESSES HER STYLE WITH A KALEIDOSCOPE OF COLOR EMBELLISHED WITH LUXURIOUS TEXTURES AND VINTAGE TREASURES.

Contributing Editor SANDRA RANKE Photographer HEIDI NIEMALA Fashion Editor DAVID BURNETT

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Tasseled dress: Dodo Bar Or Denim shirt: Calvin Klein Scarf: J.W. Anderson for Uniqlo DE C E MB E R/JA NUA RY | 2018 | 20 1 9 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 1


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This page: Ruffled jacket: Givenchy Vintage denim jacket: Levis Denim jeans: Rag & Bone Suede dress: Saint Laurent Jockey goggles and racing saddle: Horse Country Opposite page: Faux fur jacket: Giambattista Valli Denim shirt: Calvin Klein Tasseled dress: Dodo Bar Or Scarf: J.W. Anderson for Uniqlo Vintage belt

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Alessandro Albanese 52 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2017


BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS JONAS MATYASSY

THE FABRIC OF A MAN Alessandro Albanese is the consummate Italian designer who remains true to his roots and understated aesthetic.

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noticed the impeccable work of Alessandro Albanese long before I met him. It was during a business lunch, where I sat across from a fashionable colleague wearing an exquisitely tailored jacket with an equestrian cut. We went our separate ways, but the cut, flawless fit, and quality of the jacket made such an

impression on me that I Googled the physical description of the logo on the pocket and discovered Italian equestrianapparel designer Alessandro Albanese.

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Alessandro collaborates with his clients throughout the custom, tailor-made process. He is meticulous in his selection of fabrics, measurements, and multiple fittings.

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“It’s very difficult to go from designing a blazer to a riding coat. You can’t go to a traditional tailor to design a riding coat. It’s impossible.”

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n interview followed, and I discovered a talented, passionate, and charismatic man with just the right balance of self-assurance and humility. He was happily immersed in the equestrian world, but it wasn’t always that way. Alessandro grew up in Turin, Italy, and embodies much of what one considers quintessentially Italian. More succinctly, he can put on a T-shirt and jeans and make them transcendent. He sees beauty everywhere—in architecture, art, fashion, and the exquisite craftsmanship and attention to detail that is rooted in Italy’s design heritage. He was an engineer for the first 10 years of his business career. “I was working as a project manager designing cars, aircraft, and that kind of thing, but it wasn’t my real destiny,” said Alessandro. “Envision this person who goes to his office every day, week after week. It’s dark when you go into the office in the morning and dark when you go home—you rarely see sunlight. This was my life for 10 years.” But quite unexpectedly, an opportunity was presented to Alessandro while he was on a beach holiday in Italy. He met a man who wanted to expand his line of equestrian riding boots outside of Italy. He was en route to a horse show in

France, but he didn’t speak the language, so he invited Alessandro, who was fluent in French, to go with him. It was there that he got his first glimpse into the equestrian world. “Imagine how I suddenly jumped into this horse show in a beautiful location, with nice people all around. I was in France, out in the open, fresh air, and I thought—this is business? This is just having fun,” Alessandro laughed. “Every night I was in a nice hotel and restaurant in Paris or Monte Carlo. It felt more like a holiday than working.” Alessandro kept his day job but started selling his friend’s riding boots during weekends. He discovered local horse shows around Milan, Genoa, and Torino—focusing most of his efforts in northwest Italy. He quickly realized how much he enjoyed the lifestyle and took six months to research what kind of business he could develop within the equestrian world. He looked into the market to see what was missing. “No one was doing a nice, Italian, tailor-made riding coat—no one,” recalled Alessandro. Most of the coats were off the rack. There were some German, British, and French brands, but no one was doing Italian tailor-made. “We have an unbelievable tradition in Italy about clothing. My father is a tailor and has been all his life. I grew up between a sewing machine and my dad

cutting fabric, with my mother alongside helping,” he added. He made a sketch of his first jacket after buying sample riding jackets in the market and studying them. He went to a tailor to make his sample and emphasized the importance of movement in a riding coat. “My dad helped me, but he is an expert in men’s suits, which have nothing to do with a riding coat,” explained Alessandro. “It’s very difficult to go from designing a blazer to a riding coat. You can’t go to a traditional tailor to design a riding coat. It’s impossible.” In May 1998, he took his first jacket sample to the small booth showing his friend’s riding boots and promoted his tailor-made jacket. Over the next few months, Alessandro designed a logo and put a company together. That September, he went to the World Equestrian Games in Rome and introduced his jackets to the world. “That’s where everything started,” explained Alessandro. “It all happened so fast. I already had a solid base of French customers, so I went back to France, then to Germany, Switzerland, Italy, and Spain. I quickly found agents all over Europe and Japan, but not in America until 10 years ago.” He began tailoring coats all over the world with the help of his agents. He then started designing shirts, breeches, sweaters, winter and summer jackets, and sweatshirts. “Some people don’t want to wait for custom shirts and breeches, so I started designing ready-to-wear collections,” he said. “For 17 years, I did a summer and winter collection, and I began to hire people to help me.” Eventually, he made his way to the U.S. after considerable persuading by Americans he had met in Europe. “I couldn’t figure out why the American business wasn’t taking off,” Alessandro admitted. “I had an agent, but business wasn’t the best, so 10 years ago I went to Florida by myself for two weeks. I sold more coats than my agent did in one year. The next year, I decided to do FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 5


CELEBRATING RALPH LAUREN’S GLOBAL IMPACT ON FASHION PHOTOS COURTESY OF RALPH LAUREN

5O RALPH LAUREN | 50 YEARS

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alph Lauren commemorated its 50th anniversary late last year with a stunning event set against New York’s famous landmark, Central Park’s Bethesda Terrace. The 50th Anniversary Collection articulated Lauren’s singular vision of American designs and exemplified those themes and inspirations throughout his career. “For my 50th anniversary, I wanted to create and share a runway experience that was deeply personal and a summation of the style I always believed in: personal, authentic, and forever in a place so quintessentially New York and so special to me— Central Park,” he said. In tandem, he published a visually captivating 50th anniversary book, showcasing iconic imagery from the world of Ralph Lauren. “Every one of the places and things in this book has to do with my life—the old plaid shirts, the tweed jackets, the

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coats, the cars, the trucks, the white clapboard farmhouses— they are everything that I have aspired to, lived with, and loved,” wrote Lauren. “Every nuance that I ever connected to is here. So I give them back to you. That’s what I do.” Over the past 50 years, Lauren has celebrated the iconography of America and defined American style, translating his vision and inspiration into one of the world’s most widely recognized brands. The sartorial appeal of his equestrian-inspired apparel within the equestrian world has been longstanding. Lauren’s homage to the palettes and textures of the American West, and his nods to the tweeds and hunt coats of the English countryside, along


“I CREATED CLOTHES FOR CHILDREN THAT HAD A FEELING OF HERITAGE AND QUALITY AND IMAGINATION.”

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“PERSONAL STYLE IS ABOUT HAVING A SENSE OF YOURSELF AND OF WHAT YOU BELIEVE IN, WHICH IS BASICALLY SELF-CONFIDENCE.” introduced the Santa Fe collection, and in 1985 the Equestrian Collection for women, inspired by the romance of traditional riding apparel, debuted.

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hroughout the last 50 years, the brand has remained true to its expression of timeless style that is recognized around the world. The Ralph Lauren Corporation now boasts a portfolio of four premium lifestyle brands, which include apparel, home, accessories, and fragrances. Additionally, Ralph Lauren has expanded into hospitality featuring restaurants and cafes in New York, Chicago, Paris, London, and Hong Kong. Over the course of his career, Ralph Lauren has accrued countless fashion awards and been the official outfitter of numerous U.S. Olympic teams, and in the last decade, he has broadened his contributions as a designer, business leader, and philanthropist. The 50th anniversary fête seems perfectly fitting for the vision and accomplishments of Ralph Lauren. CONTACT INFO | PAGE 100 46 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | FEB RUARY / MARCH | 2019


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with the classic breeches and jackets prevalent in the hunter ring, continue to resonate with those looking for timeless allure. Over the last five years, the Ralph Lauren brand has consistently been nominated to and won Equestrian Living’s annual Gold List favorite equestrian-inspired apparel and leather accessories categories.

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n 1971, the brand introduced the Polo player logo and followed a year later with the debut of the iconic polo shirt, a mainstay in any equestrian’s wardrobe and a signature choice for training. Ralph Lauren continued to integrate facets of the equestrian world into his collections. In 1978 the brand launched his Western wear for men and women, his first collection inspired by the American West. Three years later, he

“ENGLISH STYLE CAME FROM AN ATTITUDE ABOUT EVERYDAY LIVING: GARDENING, HUNTING, RIDING, CHILDREN, HORSES, AND DOGS.” FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 20 1 9 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 5


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APRIL/MAY 2019

MODERN NARRATIVES

FASHION 2O19 DISPLAY UNTIL JUNE 6, 2019

®


TO THE MANOR BORN SET AGAINST AN ANTEBELLUM FARMHOUSE, THE HITCHCOCK FILM MARNIE EVOKES THE VESTIGES OF A BYGONE ERA.

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR SANDRA RANKE PHOTOGRAPHER HEIDI NIEMALA FASHION EDITOR DAVID BURNETT 58 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | APRI D ECEMB L / MAY ER/ |J AN 2019 UARY | 2018 | 2019


Silk Trench Coat: The Row Organza Dress: Tawn C Gloves: Russell Deerskin, Horse Country Saddlery Head Scarf: Vintage Dior A PRIL/MAY | 20 1 9 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 5 9


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Opposite: Short-sleeve Shirt: Sally LaPointe Silk Pleated Pant: The Row Gold Turtleneck: Wanda Nylon Canvas Bag and Riding Crop: Horse Country Saddlery Shoe: Manolo Blahnik This Page: Dress: Victoria Beckham Suede Belt: Balmain Rings throughout: Balmain, J Fisher, Lalique, Lanvin Head Scarf: Vintage Dior Shoe: Tom Ford Fox Head Glass: Horse Country Saddlery A PRIL/MAY | 20 1 9 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 6 1


Opposite: Dress and Pant: Balenciaga Shoe: Manolo Blahnik Head Scarf: Vintage Dior Jockey Pillow: Horse Country Saddlery This Page: Silk Organza Blouse: Tawn C Patent Leather Skirt: Wanda Nylon Shoe: Tom Ford


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Opposite: Sleeveless Tailored Jacket: Givenchy Gold-Plated Bibb: Balmain Riding Pant: Horse Country Saddlery This Page: Silk Blouse: Chloe Pant: Balenciaga Gold-Plated Fox Head Belt: Horse Country Saddlery Saddle: Heythrop Prix D’or at Hunt Country Saddlery

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LE SAUT HERMÈS The ELITE world of SHOW JUMPING comes to life under the glass roof of the Grand Palais in Paris.

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T’S IMPOSSIBLE NOT TO BE visually seduced by the staggering beauty of the Saut Hermès event held in the Grand Palais in Paris. The structure—an architectural jewel of classicism and art

nouveau—renders one breathless. To see it transformed into one of the premier international show-jumping events by the house of Hermès leaves one awestruck—even on a return visit. The core of the Grand Palais is dedicated to equestrian competition during the threeday Le Saut Hermès event, but a stroll around the perimeter reinforces the grandeur and style of Hermès and its long-standing equestrian heritage. Skilled artisans are at work in the saddlery workshop, authors are signing continued on page 65 60 | EQ UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | J U N E/ J U LY | 2016

BY STEPHANIE PETERS PHOTOS BY GEORGE KAMPER


Early morning warm-up in the Grand Palais.


© FRÉDÉRIC CHÉHU / HERMÈS

Laetitia du Couëdic

Millie Allen, left, and Emma O'Dwyer Michel Robert


Hermès CEO Axel Dumas

Riders and organizers at the launch of Le Saut Hermès.


EQ S T Y L E

POP A FRESH ORANGE INTO YOUR BAG! Shades of this CHEERY HUE continue to be a FASHION FAVORITE.

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1. Halzan 31 in clemence taurillon by Hermès. $5,150. 2. The Maryann Tote, Fancy Blue Ribbon in orange by Rebecca Ray Designs. $149. 3. Evelyne Bag in clemence bull calfskin by Hermès. $1,800. 4. Nonna-Road calf leather bag with horsehair tassel by Âme Moi. $1,640. 5. The Paddock Correspondence Envelope in butter-soft leather with crème topstitching by Oughton Limited. $95. 6. Orange, Suede Fringed Envelope with tri-color horsehair tassel by Rebecca Ray Designs. $79. 7. Garden Party in cotton toile and country calfskin by Hermès. $2,323. 8. The Dressage Tweed Manor Tote in black-and-chestnut, pebble-grain leather by Tucker Tweed. $219.

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© FRÉDÉRIC CHÉHU / HERMÈS

Abdelkebir Ouddar, winner of the Hermès Grand Prix.


SPRING

FASHION FORECAST

Our diverse PANEL OF DESIGNERS gives us a hint of what to expect in 2016.

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SKETCH COURTESY OF MAKEBE

BY RENEE SPURGE | LA SADDLERY

WITH THE CHANGE OF SEASON comes the launch of exciting new forecasts in equestrian and mainstream fashion. This year, equestrian designers will embrace the abundance of technological fabrics at their creative fingertips to produce well-fitted and flattering performance and barn wear. In the hunter jumper arena we will see impeccably tailored show coats in predominantly deep navy and black over crisp white fitted shirts. The dressage crowd will continue to wow in 2016 with pops of color and eye-catching design details. While barn wear takes its lead from mainstream fashion with bold color palettes and prints, our beloved lifestyle brands remain enamored with all things equestrian—yielding new collections that are nothing short of fabulous. We recently sat down with some of our favorite equestrian and lifestyle designers to discover what excites them about our growing industry and to ask how they have evolved their 2016 collections to reflect current fashion trends and pave the way for new ones.

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OUR PANEL NOEL ASMAR NOEL ASMAR EQUESTRIAN VIVIAN BOLMAN WINSTON EQUESTRIAN USA LORNA GOODE GOODE RIDER KATHERINE HOOKER KATHERINE HOOKER LONDON ANTONELLA LAURETTI EQUILINE ITALIA KIMBERLY McCONNELL MIDDY N’ ME TARA ROEMKE ARIAT INTERNATIONAL CARIN RÖNNER RÖNNER DESIGN


Action Vest in pewter by Goode Rider. Perfect for schooling, this lightweight, streamlined vest includes reflective stripes in zipper tape and zip pockets with horse-bit pulls. $125. FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 2 0 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 3 9


Tiffany Jacket in 100 percent wool by MakeBe. Technical fabric inserts for comfort and movement. $470. Long-sleeveed Grace Shirt with blend of cotton and technical fibers. $190. White, half-grip Jessica Jump Breech. $240. BB Bag in corteccia/bark combination features beautifully designed details. Made in Italy with Tuscan calfskin. $3,115. All items listed by MakeBe.

from UV rays. They are fashionable— featuring built-in stock ties and elegant buttons. High-tech fabrics in everyday barn wear are a must. One of our most exciting new programs is our seamless designer tights and shirts for spring ‘16. Go from the barn to yoga or for a run in these most comfortable, yet stylish seamless-compression fabric tights. The fabric includes silver for anti-odor. Try them for yourself. You won’t want to take them off! Antonella Lauretti | Equiline Italia: For

E

EQU E S T RI A N A PPA R E L D E S I G N E RS What do you consider the most exciting trends in equestrian-show apparel and everyday barn wear, and how does your spring/summer or new collection showcase them? Noel Asmar | Noel Asmar Equestrian:

Every new season brings with it a burst of excitement for a new collection, colors, and styles to offer to our clients. The most exciting trend in equestrian apparel is blending functionality with urban style, and our new spring 2016 collection is our biggest yet. Our spring 2016 Sun Shirts in long- and short-sleeved styles will be featured in amazing colors and UPF (Ultraviolet Protection Factor) 50. We launched our new Italian leather two-sided belts in both gold and stainless

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hardware that are absolutely gorgeous and so well priced. Color combinations include orange/pink, navy/brown, black/ white, black patent/black matte, and midnight navy/red. Vivian Bolman | Winston Equestrian USA:

The new performance-friendly fabrics and fitted styles for show and barn apparel are exciting trends. We use lightweight, breathable, stretchy, form-flattering materials throughout our collection, and our designs are not only stylish, but also comfortable to wear and completely machine washable. Lorna Goode | Goode Rider: Technology

is king! From show shirts to breeches, we are seeing the benefits of new technologies embraced by riders everywhere. Show shirts are made from technically advanced fabrics that wick moisture and protect

spring 2016, we continue to see the use of lace overtones enhancing the femininity of sporting apparel. Elegantly embroidered crests adorn many items and add a rich, softening detail. Pastel colors evolve into brighter, bolder tones in the Equiline contemporary collection. Shiny bling gives way to subtle, matte-metal studs that highlight design lines with refined splash. Ergonomic cuts continue to be finely tuned to enhance the functionality of athletic apparel, and new fabrics that increase comfort and improve performance are always being introduced. Equiline, for the first time, has designed a signature collection in conjunction with sponsored rider, silver team medalist Helen Langehanenberg. With her own strong sense of style, Langehanenberg was delighted to work with the Equiline design team on a fashionably chic collection for female dressage enthusiasts. The collection is scheduled to debut this March. Tara Roemke | Ariat International: The

strong trend for technical fabrics is what I find most exciting these days. It keeps your show apparel looking traditional and well put together, but wicks away sweat, breathes well, and offers a lot of stretch for all the movement required in the saddle. Obviously those same features are great for everyday barn wear, too; you just have more room to play with your style and color for every day.


Our spring line showcases some of the best in technical fabric innovation. You won’t find more premium and practical fabrics for the show ring than the super, high-stretch woven fabric of our new Aero Show Shirt or our incredible Platinum Show Coat. In previous seasons, our Sunstopper one-quarter zip has been a huge hit for around the barn, and we’ve punched it up this year with some great prints and pops of color. Those in the market for something really new will have to try our seamless Odyssey one-quarter zip. It has no side seams and is body mapped for an incredibly flattering, contoured fit.

Do you follow or integrate mainstream fashion trends when designing your spring equestrian collection? Noel Asmar: Asmar Equestrian is about

respecting the traditions of our sport but infusing modern fashion into each design with technical properties that ensure each garment is made with a purpose. We are very excited to announce that our fashion label, a modern, contemporary women's brand with subtle hints of equestrian influence, will launch fall 2016. You can count on Asmar Equestrian to always be ahead of the fashion curve when it comes to equestrian apparel. Vivian Bolman: We follow our own phi-

losophy and ideas of timeless elegance and clean designs. Our main focus is using high-quality materials to create well-manufactured classic apparel. We do not follow the fashion trends of other designers but rather we stay committed to the Winston style and aesthetic and therefore carve out our own market within the equestrian world. Classic Hunter Jacket in dark blue by Winston. An elegant competition jacket with classic-wool appearance. Made from non-creasing, extra-light fabric. $560.

Lorna Goode: Goode Rider always imple-

ments the trends from the real fashion world. That’s the world our designers come from. We shop around the globe— often in Paris, Florence, London, Hong FE B RUA RY/MA RC H | 2 0 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 1

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