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EQ

P E OPLE | TR AVE L | D ESI G N | FA SH I O N | ST Y L E | DÉ COR

EQUESTRIAN LIVING

EQ U E S TR I A N LIVING

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EQLiving.com

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017

THE 2017

GOLD LIST READERS VOTE FOR THE BEST OF EQUESTRIAN LIFE BEST PLACES TO LIVE | TO VISIT | TO DINE | TO SHOP FAVORITE FASHION BRANDS | PEOPLE | EVENTS, AND MANY MORE!

AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017

DISPLAY UNTIL OCT. 8, 2017

Lyle Lovett, Readers' Favorite Celebrity Equestrian


Exclusive Woodside Equestrian Estate Located on 4.93 acres in the exclusive town of Woodside, CA, in the heart of the Silicon Valley, this rare and exclusive estate is an equestrian’s dream. A state of the art equestrian center, perimeter riding trails, and easy access to the extensive Woodside trail system make it a complete package for the ultimate equestrian lifestyle. The gorgeous, 5,200sf main barn consists of eight fully matted 12x12 stalls, an extra-wide “cross breezeway” center aisle, and a large rubber matted wash rack, equipped with a hot and cold mounted shower. All stalls are elegantly lit and have interior sliding doors and exterior Dutch doors with separate feed doors. The main barn also offers an integrated fly spray system and the entire barn’s interior is finished with natural hardwood and redwood siding. The 2,200sf second level of the barn offers a large office and bathroom suite, equipped with heat and a beautiful view that overlooks the arena containing riding rigs and paddocks. The remaining square footage allows for hay storage up to 40 tons with drop down feed doors and exterior access to grain elevators.

Adjacent to the barn is an impressive 18,000sf arena, offering a rolled oiled Class 2 base with top dress footing appropriate to jumping or dressage. The automatic watering system is supported by an adjacent in-ground well and 5,000 gallon storage tanks. The strategically attached breezeway offers two bonus stalls or a storage area along with a large utility room finished with wood flooring. The caretaker’s cottage provides a comfortable two-story apartment-style residence with full kitchen, 1.5 baths, a laundry room, living room, wood burning stove, electric heating and a separate den/office area. Completing this extensive equestrian facility is the two stall foaling barn with attached turnout paddock. Additional buildings include a 30 x 50 storage shed (for shavings or hay) or RV/BOAT storage and an adjacent enclosed tractor or vehicle storage space. The estate’s main house is a 6,886sf three bedroom, 4.5 bath (plus 1 bedroom and 1 bath guest house) postmodern masterpiece designed by iconic Italian designer Ettore Sottsass.. It is a home built to challenge your sense of convention while still providing an intimate and functional dwelling.


Woodside Estate Offered at $14,995,000 | 1250canada.com

Michael Dreyfus Golden Gate Sotheby’s International Realty 650.485.3476 / m.dreyfus@ggsir.com CalBRE 01121795

Sean Foley Coldwell Banker Real Estate 650.207.6005 / seanfoleycb@gmail.com CalBRE 00870112

Each Office is Independently Owned and Operated.


EQ I N S I D E

FEATURES AU G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 7

50

EQ’S ANNUAL GOLD LIST

TWO FAVORITE HORSE SHOWS

40

Mark your calendars for these two competitive events on the East Coast, which could each become a vacation that lasts a few days. 1. THE HAMPTON CLASSIC This high-level competition is held in a stylish beach town, with boutique vendors and A-list celebrities. 2. THE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW A diverse and exciting equestrian event held in the nation’s capital. EQ’S ANNUAL GOLD LIST Ariat was voted an EQ readers’ favorite in five categories.

66

THE ALLURE OF SOTOGRANDE

50

In the fourth installment of this popular feature, EQ readers voted for their favorites in a wide range of categories. THE ALLURE OF SOTOGRANDE

66

This resort on Spain’s Costa Del Sol boasts views of the Rock of Gibraltar and nine polo fields. MEET THE BELLISSIMOS

76

In his own words, Mark Bellissimo shares his thoughts on horse shows and the industry as a whole. A BARN IN THE BACKYARD

84

This restored timber-frame hay barn from the 1850s is now a Connecticut guesthouse. HORSES AWASH IN COLOR AND LIGHT

88

Artist Stan Fellows finds inspiration in his new American West home.

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EQ I N S I D E

DEPARTMENTS AU G U S T | S E P T E M B E R 2 0 1 7

16

EQ ESSENTIALS

STYLE

12

Launer of London handbags are crafted with refined style. FAVORITES

16

These five apps bring technology into the barn.

12

30

Ten ways US Equestrian enriches your life.

22

36

Actor William Shatner shares a chapter of his book The Spirit of the Horse. DESIGN

18

Designers and architects incorporate practical spaces for dogs. FOOD+DRINK

22

Kathleen and Andrew Tow combine their passions into The Withers Winery.

18 24

106

106

The Huckleberry Hound is a favorite cocktail at Paws Up resort.

108

Almond’s Jason Weiner offers French bistro fare in the Hamptons. FASHION

24

Lisa Nelle California Show Couture crafts one-of-a-kind jackets for the Western show ring. TRAVEL

34

Visit Vienna to see the Lipizzaners and the Spanish Riding School.

ON THE COVER

IN EACH ISSUE Lyle Lovett, voted favorite equestrian celebrity in EQ’s Gold List, is the only equestrian to appear on EQ’s cover twice. Lyle was shot on location in Katy, Texas, by George Kamper.

EDITOR’S NOTE 10 Welcome to Equestrian Living. RESOURCES 113 Look for to find the products and services in this issue. BARN DOGS 114 Renowned trainer Bill Schaub talks about adding Roofo and Homer to his pack.

GIVING BACK

26

Animals at the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation are in good hands. PEOPLE

32

Author Courtney Maum recalls learning to play polo at age 38. EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES

95

Fabulous farms and ranches plus advice for managing trails. 8 | EQU E S T R I A N L I V I NG | AU GU S T/ S EP TEMB ER | 2017


EQ F R O M T H E E D I T O R

PHOTO GEORGE KAMPER

WELCOME

I

was recently lured in by yet another online quiz—this one measuring the balance between left- and right-brain tendencies. The results, which are surely lacking in scientific validity, pointed decidedly toward right-brain dominance. While I happily embrace the right-brain characteristics as artistic, innovative, and imaginative, I do admit to falling somewhat short in the area of mathematics that looms largely in the left hemisphere. I recognize the value of numbers, and am aware that in some circles they are venerated for spiritual qualities, but I was never one to delve into the magic and mystery of them. However, I’m generally capable of deciphering trends, patterns, and analytical diagrams depicting up or down trajectories, or even the status quo.

In this issue, numbers are referenced in myriad ways to add interest, facts, and fascination to our articles. Our fourth annual Gold List is a testament to their magic. It is the largest list yet, with more categories, more nominees within the categories, and twice as many voters. Each day, like moths drawn to a flame, we monitored the results in real time, as voters cast their ballots for the best of equestrian life. This year, we’ve added two EQLiving editor’s awards to the Gold List. One was awarded to the legendary three-time Olympian, Pan Am individual gold medalist, and career show jumper McLain Ward, who has enjoyed another solid year of wins. His win at the Longines Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) World Cup Final and an impressive ninth win at Devon’s $225,000 Sapphire Grand Prix were precursors to the string of victories he is racking up at Spruce Meadows as we go to press. The other recipient of the editor’s award went to Danny and Ron’s Rescue, which has been voted overwhelmingly as the favorite dog rescue four years in a row. Over the years, they have turned their home into a safe haven for hundreds of injured and abused dogs until they are prepared for adoption. We encountered great optimism for equestrian sport when we met Shanette Barth Cohen, the executive director of the Hampton Classic, and Vicki Lowell, the president of the Washington International Horse Show. Entries are up, attendance is up, and prize money continues to climb. With charity at the core of each of these time-honored shows, we recognize that the upward trajectory in enthusiasm will be a benefit to all.

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A visit with Mark and Katherine Bellissimo at Far Niente, their Wellington, Florida, farm, shed considerable light on their views about the current status and developing trends in equestrian sport and competition. Our interview demonstrates that Mark’s acumen for statistics about any number of horse-related facts is both staggering and eye-opening. Tryon International Equestrian Center in Tryon, North Carolina, is merely one example of Mark’s determination and ability to direct an impassioned vision into fruition. And, on the softer side, you’ll also meet the adorable menagerie residing at Far Niente. And finally, we showcase the vibrant paintings of artist Stan Fellows, follow writer Courtney Maum as she learns to play polo at age 38, and travel vicariously through Bridget Arsenault’s trip to Sotogrande, the world-class community and polo-players’ mecca located in Andalusia, Spain. Coming up in future issues, we’ll focus on philanthropy, meet high-profile equestrians at home and on the field, explore the colorful history of a lesser-known horse breed, and showcase a fascinating mix of art, design, fashion, and everything we love about equestrian life. Lastly, be sure to enter our two new contests. Win VIP tickets to the Hampton Classic or win a Cowboy Cauldron, a sleek outdoor fire pit and grill. Get the latest contest information on our Facebook page: facebook.com/ EquestrianLivingMagazine/


The Ride of Your Life. SeCure YOur pLACe nOw in AnTiCipATiOn Of The wOrLd equeSTriAn CenTer premierinG in 2018. CuSTOm eSTATe hOmeS fOr SALe And STAbLeS fOr LeASe.

GoldenOcala.com | 855-80-OCALA Golf | Tennis | Equestrian | Fitness | Pool | Spa | Dining | Events


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | S T Y L E

LAUNER OF LONDON Craftsmanship, BRITISH HERITAGE, and REFINED STYLE are woven into every handbag.

The dual-tone Sally is striking, practical, and flexible. It can be carried as a large clutch or worn with the detachable strap. $1,152.

The Turandot is an elegant Peggy-style bag encased in the finest soft calf leather and lined in silk. $2,404.

The perfect form and elegant curves of the two-colored calf leather Stella combine to create a beautiful compact bag. $1,186.

The slim, understated Rosina bag blends python with tan and orange calf leather, invigorating a style ideal for the current trends. $2,247.

Queen Elizabeth II is purported to have over 200 Launer purses in a variety of models and colors. She is often seen carrying the bags with the brand’s signature rope emblem at special events and public appearances, including the Duchess Kate and Prince William’s wedding. She’s admired the bags since receiveing one in 1968 and granted Launer the Royal Warrant in response.

Crafted of the finest calf leather, the spacious Gloria handbag adds a contemporary twist with a stylish chain strap. $2,191.

PAGE 113

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DECEMBER/JANUARY | 2016/2017

AT HOME WITH JILL RAPPAPORT:

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EDITOR AT LARGE Carol Cohen Hodess CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Rebecca Baldridge, Sue Weakley DESIGN MANAGER Mary A. Stroup SPECIAL PROJECTS MANAGER Carly Neilson SOCIAL MEDIA & WEB CONTENT Maggie Carty EDITORIAL MANAGER Rose DeNeve EQ SPECIAL EVENTS Jennifer Pearman Lammer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Bridget Arsenault, Caroline Blaha-Black, Chelle Grald, Emily Holowczak, Courtney Maum, Bill Schaub, Carrie Wirth

PLUS:

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INTERN Emily Holowczak PUBLISHER C.W. Medinger CONSULTANT George Fuller PRINT John Spittle PUBLIC RELATIONS Carrie Wirth, EQmedia.agency NEWSSTAND DISTRIBUTION Richard Trummer GLOBAL PARTNER PUBLICATION HORSEMANSHIP, China

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EQ LIVING ADVISORY BOARD Bob Cacchione, Founder IHSA Deborah Deutsch, Polo, Beverly Hills, Calif. Melissa Ganzi, Polo, Wellington, Fla. Peter Leone, Lionshare Farm, Greenwich, Conn. Colleen and Tim McQuay, Reining, Tioga, Texas Mindy Peters, Arabians, Los Alamos, Calif. Chris Pratt, Hunter Jumper West, Rancho Santa Fe, Calif. David Sloan, Conceptual Advisor, Millbrook, N.Y. Renee Spurge, Fashion | LA Saddlery, Los Angeles, Calif. Chester Weber, Combined Driving, Ocala, Fla.

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EQUESTRIAN QUARTERLY (EQ) became EQUESTRIAN LIVING magazine in 2016 and is published six times yearly. It is distributed at selected equestrian locations, newsstands, and is available for home delivery for $24.95 | Canada $39.95. SUBSCRIBE AT eqliving.com/subscribe To purchase past issues or find newsstands offering EQLiving, visit eqliving.com/where-to-buy Subscription management and address changes: Web: eqliving.com/manage-subscription Tel: 212-699-3636 Editorial inquiries and letters to the editor: info@eqliving.com or mail to 41 East 11th St., 11th Flr., New York, NY 10003

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

FIVE APPS FOR EQUESTRIANS A lot is new since we last looked at phone apps two years ago. They keep getting BETTER AND BETTER.

COACH MY VIDEO Why not use the latest technology to improve your riding? Video has long been used to help trainers and athletes pinpoint and analyze every aspect of a performance, but this app also includes the ability to make sketches and notes on each frame. (Free, Available on iTunes)

HORSEBOX Keep all of your horse’s information in one easy-to-reference place, including insurance details, essential contact information, appointments, photos, awards, and much more. ($2.99, Available on iTunes and GooglePlay)

5 EQUITRACK Customize your training plan with this mobile and web-based app that includes everything from forecasting weather to measuring your horse’s heart rate. Track each ride to see how far, fast, and where you’ve ridden, and set up audio cues to follow as you ride. ($7.99, Available on iTunes and GooglePlay)

SMARTPAK BLANKETING Add your horse’s age, coat length, location, and living situation to the app and get customized recommendations for whether to blanket or not, with a forecast for planning ahead. (Free, Available on iTunes and GooglePlay)

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NBC SPORTS View top equestrian events live on your phone. This free app offers HD-quality videos, highlights, and reminders about upcoming events. (Free, Available on iTunes and GooglePlay)


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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | D E S I G N

CREATURE COMFORTS

PHOTO COURTESY OF TERRACOTTA DESIGN BUILD

PHOTO BY JOHN WILBANKS

PHOTOGRAPHY CHRISTINA WEDGE

Designers and architects incorporate PRACTICAL and PLAYFUL SPACES for our favorite four-legged friends.

Above: Harrison Designs created this laundry room with ample space for a dog to keep you company while you do the wash. This kennel designed by Board & Vellum Architecture and Design saves space while allowing your dog a view of the whole room.

Above: Another of Board & Vellum’s designs, this kitchen island, installed in a home in Seattle, keeps dog bowls out from underfoot. This DIY pet bed and side table makes a lovely and comfortable accent piece in your living room, by Flynnside Out Productions.

PHOTO BY JOHN WILBANKS

PHOTO BY JOHN WILBANKS

SCRIPPS NETWORKS INTERACTIVE

When designing and building your home, choose an interior designer that will consider the small details that will make your home the perfect fit for you and your pets.

Above: Terracotta Design Build created an innovative way to keep dog dishes out of the way when not in use. Board & Vellum integrated this dog house into the wall of the staircase, offering your pooch privacy and a dog’s-eye view of happenings around the house. PAGE 113

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Buying or Selling contact: Matt Johnson +1 561-313-4367 • Fax +1 561-828-2761 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com • www.mattjohnson.evusa.com

©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


New Listings by Matt Johnson

Natures Point - 10 Acre equestrian estate with direct bridle path access & within true hacking distance to WEF. 5 bedroom, 7 bath pool home with top quality detail & finishes. 12 stall center-aisle stable with 3 staff apartments, 10 grass paddocks, round pen, sand riding arena and grass grand prix field. Offered at $11,900,000

Gentleman’s Farm - 3Br, 3Bth pool home with attached studio apartment. Situated on 5 acres with 4 stall stable, riding arena, grass paddocks and warmup track. Located in the heart of Wellington within true hacking distance to the showgrounds. Offered at $2,585,000

Private 10 Acre Farm - Nicely updated 4 bedroom main residence with a beautifully landscaped pool & patio area. 1Br/1Bth detached guest house. 12 Stall courtyard style barn with 2 wash stalls, grooms apartment, feed, tack & laundry rooms. Oversized riding arena with mirrors, 3 acre grass riding field, 8 large grass paddocks, hot-walker and round pen. Plenty of room to expand or build a covered arena. Offered at $2,400,000

Loxahatchee Groves - 10 Acre equestrian facility with single family residence, two stables totaling 17 stalls, oversized riding arena, grass turnout paddocks and 2 grooms apartment. Prime location, just minutes to all of Wellington's equestrian venues. Offered at $2,100,000

Matt Johnson • Engel & Völkers Wellington Licensee of Engel & Völkers Florida Residential, LLC 10620 W. Forest Hill Blvd • Suite 40 • Wellington • FL 33414 Mobile +1 561-313-4367 Matt.Johnson@evusa.com

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©2017 Engel & Völkers. All rights reserved. Each brokerage independently owned and operated. Carr Sollak Realty, LLC licensee of Engel & Voelkers Florida Residential, LLC. All information provided is deemed reliable but is not guaranteed and should be independently verified. Engel & Völkers and its independent License Partners are Equal Opportunity Employers and fully support the principles of the Fair Housing Act.


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

BLENDED PASSIONS Kathleen and Andrew Tow pour themselves into a serendipitous beginning.

THE WITHERS WINERY’S

A

ndrew Tow searched for a name for his newly created winery, seeking to meld the love his wife, Kathleen, has for horses with their combined passion for wine. He had heard her mention the word “withers,” and knew he had a blueribbon winner. “It just sounded beautiful to me,” he said. “I know to an equestrian it’s a body part, but it was the lyrical nature of the word. I was struck by the intersection of the place of height measurement of horses and the reaching for height in the quality of wine.” Hence, the name The Withers Winery was born. Kathleen was honored. “I feel very blessed to have a husband who is so romantic,” she said. The image on their label is of Mr. Burgess, a now 20-year-old Connemara pony who was given to the couple 16 years ago. He continues to compete in dressage with Kathleen, who recently took him out at third level. “He’s been an integral part of our family,” Andrew said. “He’s always wanting to try something new. He’s inspiring.” Not only is Mr. Burgess the muse for the label imagery, but one of the wine varieties, a syrah blend, is named after him. “It turns out that wine is about to be rated very highly by one of the prestigious wine magazines,” Andrew said proudly. “It’s going to get one of the highest ratings of any syrah made in the United States.” The Withers Winery had its serendipitous beginning as a Brooklyn teenager’s interest in wine.

BY CARRIE WIRTH AND SUE WEAKLEY

Top: Andrew and Kathleen Tow. Above: Kathleen with Mr. Burgess, their Connemara pony.

“I started collecting wine probably before I was legally allowed,” Andrew admitted. He attended college in Oregon and drove his Dodge Dart to Napa Valley to meet some of the iconic winemakers. There, he met David Low, a young winemaker who agreed to trade Andrew’s fly-fishing lessons for David’s knowledge of grapes and winemaking. With David’s help, Andrew produced a “home brew”

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for personal consumption. “We started giving it away and sharing it, and people started asking us about it,” he said. “I took it to restaurants where I knew the owners or sommeliers. I knew they would give me an honest answer about the quality.” To his amazement, 100 percent of them said they would sell the wine in their restaurants. In 2013, Withers became a commercial entity, and the wines were introduced in 2014. Six weeks later, its wine was featured as one of the five best rosés in the world in the Wall Street Journal. The wines became wildly popular. The Withers Winery tripled in size in three years and is regarded as a hot, upand-coming winery. Kathleen and Andrew built philanthropy into their business model and focus their giving on the arts, the environment, and equine-related charities. During the Wellington, Florida, show season, they hosted a wine tasting to benefit the Equestrian Aid Foundation (EAF), a non-profit that helps horse people deal with catastrophic injury or illness or financial crisis. “When the EAF described how they deploy funds, it struck close to home,” Andrew said, adding that they are friends with Courtney King-Dye, who suffered an equestrian-related traumatic brain injury. Helping others and making highquality wine guide their moral compass. “Withers all started by accident, but about the happiest accident I could think about,” he said. “We make wines we love to drink ourselves. It’s surreal to see something you care about creating a positive response, and watching people enjoy what we pour our hearts and souls into.” PAGE 113


EQUESTRIAN ART & FINE JEWELRY

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A S H I O N

WESTERN CHIC

LISA NELLE CALIFORNIA SHOW COUTURE

is recognized for its unmistakable quality and one-of-a-kind originality.

Most of the Lisa Nelle couture jackets (as shown) are one-of-a-kind and individually unique. Prices range from $375 for simple, elegant styles, to $1,700 for ornately detailed creations. 24 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017

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A SAFE HAVEN

MAJOR PHOTOS ANNELIE

The animals at the SOUTHAMPTON ANIMAL SHELTER FOUNDATION are in good care, in part due to JONATHAN McCANN, the board of directors’ president.

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When did you become involved with the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation?

Above, clockwise: Jonathan holding Dino, a recently adopted chihuahua; with Molly, an Australian cattle dog, at the Southampton Animal Shelter; Molly and Dobby enjoying communal play time at the shelter.

As a concerned citizen and staunch animal advocate, I began to address the Southampton town’s decision to close its shelter through the media. The momentum built, and by December 2009, a group of animal supporters drafted an agreement with the town to privatize the shelter. The town would retain ownership of the facility and the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation (SASF) would manage the shelter. I was asked to act as founding president of the board of directors in December 2009, and by January 2010 the shelter was officially reopened by the foundation. Due to the improved services that we provided, the adoption rate grew by 43 percent in the first year. We offered a training department, which included a program called Playing For Life, where the dogs

he Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation (SASF) in Hampton Bays, New York, was originally a municipal animal shelter that operated out of a cinder-block building in East Quogue, New York. After it appeared that the shelter would close, it became privatized in 2010 with the goal of enhancing the quality of services and cultivating a bond between people and animals through adoption, education, and community outreach. Whether caring for strays found wandering the streets, rescuing neglected and abandoned animals, or saving dogs from the horrors of the puppy-mill industry, the shelter is a safe haven for all animals and, for some, a last resort. Equestrian Living had the opportunity to visit Jonathan McCann at his waterfront farm in New York’s Hamptons. McCann currently serves as the president of the board of directors of the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation. We had heard about the impressive inroads taking place at the shelter and wanted to learn more about their innovative programs.

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continued on page 28


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EQ G I V I N G B A C K continued from page 26

GEORGE KAMPER

would be allowed to play in a communal yard. This ongoing policy eliminates the stress of kennel life and makes dogs more sociable and adoptable. The program is now widely used by shelters across the country. In addition, we created a low-cost wellness clinic. The overall picture of life for the shelter animals has improved radically. In September 2014, the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA) donated a grant to SASF to build a low-cost spay and neuter van to be run in New York State. The van is in high demand all year. This year, it has gone out 88 times and completed 1,425 procedures for dogs and cats. It is a costly venture but a dire necessity in reducing the overpopulation of animals in the area. In addition, it cuts down on the ever-growing population of feral cat colonies. The program is called “op cat” and practices spay, neuter, and release.

You have great adoption rates. What do you attribute this to?

The shelter is rated among the top 10 percent of shelters nationally because of our high, 94 percent live-release rate. It is the only open-admissions shelter on Long Island’s East End, so all homeless animals in Southampton township, regardless of age, are accepted at the shelter. Our dedication to animal welfare and to the community is only limited by the ability to seek successful funding.  Are you making inroads in discouraging people from patronizing pet shops that sell dogs from puppy mills?

Were you always an animal person? Did you ride horses as a kid?

The sheltering business is like swimming upstream. While puppy mills continue to proliferate, there will always be an abundance of dogs. Many of them end up in shelters. SASF is an open and no-kill shelter; therefore, space becomes very limited. We are not a sanctuary—there is simply no room for that luxury. Backyard breeders also contribute to the over abundance, as witnessed by the four German shepherd pups that we recently housed. They were adopted very quickly. The three important words at our shelter are: adopt, donate, and volunteer. Those words are the essence of the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation. GEORGE KAMPER

Animals have been the fiber of my life. I sat on a horse for the first time at the age of 3 and I continue to ride, but I don’t compete. I have been lucky enough to always have horses, and my devotion to them has run the gamut from farm animals to competition dressage horses and, more recently, the rescue of neglected horses in need. Presently, I am looking for the right home for a jumper prospect, which is homegrown from a Thoroughbred mare that I rescued over a year ago. The shelter facility is too small to house horses so, as luck would have it, I have had room in my barn. What is the biggest challenge in getting people to adopt shelter animals?

The biggest challenge in the sheltering business is to find suitable homes for the long-term dogs and cats. Many of them are older and may have medical or emotional quirks. At times, the best solution has been to find a job for them other than

simply being a house pet. Last year, we trained two long-term dogs as detection animals, which were immediately adopted by a police department. I wish all the dogs had the same capabilities and opportunities. Long-term cats can be fostered by stables, landscapers, or nurseries to help keep rodent populations in check.

Top to bottom: Jonathan with Jude, who is up for adoption. Jean Shafiroff, Jonathan, and Georgina Bloomberg at a SASF gala. Kate McEntee (left) and Carol Bausch at Fresh Air Home, a camp for physically-challenged children. Jonathan with Midnight Madness.

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What can people do to help?

SASF is a 501(3)(c) nonprofit organization that relies on the generosity of its donors and volunteers. Tax-deductible contributions can be made by contacting adrienne@sasf.org or 631-728-7387, PAGE 113 ext. 240.


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EQ F A V O R I T E S

BRINGING THE JOY 10 ways US EQUESTRIAN enriches your equestrian life.

OMAHA EQUESTRIAN FOUNDATION

Steffen Peters autograph session.

US Equestrian helps you make the most of your equestrian lifestyle, whether you’re a hands-on horseman or a ringside spectator. Do you thrive on the thrill of equestrian competition? Or is the quiet, bucolic farm life more your speed? Either way, US Equestrian helps you enjoy everything equestrian life has to offer—and support horse sports from the grassroots to the Olympics, too. Here are 10 ways US Equestrian brings joy to members every day: US E Q U E S T RI A N BU I L D S C O MMU N I T Y

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Share your passion with US Equestrian’s 100,000-member community. US Equestrian recognizes a total of 29 breeds and disciplines. So whether you’re an active para-equestrian; a show jumping, eventing, or dressage athlete with Olympic dreams; an experienced driver; a beginning vaulter; or simply a horse fan, there’s a place for you at US Equestrian.

U S EQUESTRIAN M EM BERS GE T GRE AT PERK S

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Join as a fan member ($25) or a competing member ($55) at USequestrian.org and take advantage of members-only benefits, including: • access to live and on-demand video from the USEF Network, with competition live streams from around the equestrian world • access to the new online Learning Center, teaching you everything from preparing for your first lesson to how to walk a show jumping course • discounts on products and services through our exclusive MemberPerks program.

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US EQUESTRIAN MA K ES FINDING A SHOW E A SY

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Visit USequestrian.org/compete/competitions to view our events calendar and Competition Search. At USequestrian.org, you can also scan rankings and results, find useful forms, browse the Rule Book, and more. US EQUESTRIAN BRINGS SHOWS TO YOU

Can’t be ringside in person? Catch the action from home. From the USequestrian.org homepage, you can access USEF Network’s live and ondemand coverage of horse shows from across the country, featuring an enticing array of breeds and disciplines, from


EQ F A V O R I T E S

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U S EQUESTRIAN IS SOCIAL

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Hit the Network & News tab on the USequestrian.org homepage to sign up for the Equestrian Weekly digital newsletter, your weekly guide to upcoming USEF Network live streams, Learning Center video premieres, practical horse- and horse business-related tips, and engaging stories from every corner of the equestrian community. US Equestrian members also get access to our quarterly magazine, US Equestrian, with colorful features, training tips, and news from US Equestrian. U S E Q U E S T RI A N PROVI D E S K N OWL E D G E

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SHANNON BRINKMAN

Whether you’re new to equestrian sport, an experienced competitor, or someone who

McLain Ward

rides, drives, or vaults purely for fun, US Equestrian’s online Learning Center is your source for knowledge and information from top athletes and equestrian experts. US Equestrian members can access more than 35 educational videos and supplemental resources—with more in production—and insider tips on a wide range of topics, including horse care, training, safety and welfare, the 29 breeds and disciplines that US Equestrian recognizes, and more. To start exploring, click the Learning Center tab on USequestrian.org.

Experience unique content and get a behind-the-scenes peek at competitions by following @USequestrian on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat. Use #JoinTheJoy when you share your photos for a chance to be featured in our Equestrian Weekly digital newsletter’s Member Spotlight. U S EQUESTRIAN IS SPRE ADING THE JOY OF HORSE SPORTS

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Our “Discover the Joy Tour” is traveling to competitions around the country, engaging fans through athlete meetand-greets, merchandise giveaways, fan membership sign-ups, and a chance to sample the online Learning Center. Look for the US Equestrian booth at competitions including: • USEF Pony Finals presented by Collecting Gaits Farm at the Kentucky Horse Park (Aug. 8-13) • U.S. Dressage Festival of Champions and USEF Young & Developing Horse Dressage National Championships at the Lamplight Equestrian Center in Illinois (Aug. 24-27) • Platinum Performance/USEF Show Jumping Talent Search Finals – East at the United States Equestrian Team Foundation headquarters in Gladstone, N.J. (Oct. 6-8) • Washington International Horse Show in Washington, D.C. (Oct. 24-29)

US EQUESTRIAN E NCOURAGES YOUNG E QUESTRIANS

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From our high-school Lettering Program to our programs for emerging and developing athletes, we’re helping young riders, drivers, and vaulters get involved and stay involved in horse sports. The Start Riding tab on the USequestrian. org homepage takes you to our Youth Programs page for information about

scholarships, our affiliates and alliance partners’ programs for young equestrians, and interscholastic and intercollegiate equestrian opportunities, too. US EQUESTRIAN H EL PS HORSES

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US Equestrian’s Equine Disaster Relief Fund helps ensure horses’ safety and well-being during catastrophe. Donations help horses and ponies of any breed (as well as donkeys and mules) who are victims of disasters such as hurricanes, floods, blizzards, fires, and tornadoes. US Equestrian holds donations in a dedicated account and disburses funds only on the authorization of US Equestrian’s chief executive officer. These funds support local emergency response teams, veterinary hospitals, humane centers, and other organizations directly involved in helping horses affected by natural disaster.

PICS OF YOU

Arabians to Welsh ponies, from grand prix show jumping to carriage driving. With our on-demand videos, you can watch anytime.

Chester Weber

Contributions have supported disaster relief and care efforts by such organizations as Louisiana State University’s School of Veterinary Medicine, the University of Pennsylvania’s New Bolton Center, Habitat for Horses, and the Mississippi Animal Disaster Relief Fund, among others. For more information, click the Donate tab on the USequestrian.org homepage.

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EQ P E O P L E

A WOMAN WITH A MALLET Author COURTNEY MAUM recalls learning polo at age 38.

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rowing up, I lived near a polo field, and on weekends I would bike out to the field’s edge and look on from a distance, too shy, too young, and too unsure of how much of my allowance it would sap to join the spectators with their fancy hats. I wanted to get closer to the action, but even more, I was dying to know what it felt like to be out there on the field. From what I could tell from my faraway spot on the tree line, you had to be male, South American, and totally fearless to play polo. I did ride horses, but decent hunter jumper though I was, I didn’t fulfill any of these other requirements. I stopped riding as a preteen, but by the time I was 38, I was as overworked and overburdened as any modern professional, and the thought of cellphone-free barns and the single-minded focus of being on horseback made me eager to return to the sport that used to bring me so much joy. But if I was getting back on a horse after all these years, went my reasoning, I might as well go big. I decided to try polo. I saw a man about a horse and another man about another horse, until I finally found a trainer who offered to give me a free polo lesson. The sport needed recruits, he said, especially women. In the pen where he broke in polo ponies, I sat on a squat and sleepy quarter horse and tried to connect the mallet with the

I WASN’T A SEDENTARY WRITER WITH RAPIDLY DIMINISHING EYESIGHT. I WAS AN ATHLETE. Courtney Maum is the author of two novels, I Am Having So Much Fun Here Without You and the forthcoming Touch.

ball. Ninety minutes later, my wrist was shot, but I was hooked. Holding reins one-handed, hearing the sharp splat of a smacked ball, seeing the pony’s nostrils flaring as I charged forward with steely intent—surely, I felt, I was only several lessons away from going pro. Encouraged by my enthusiasm, the trainer suggested I track down a man named Felix, the club umpire at a prominent polo club in Upstate New York. Felix could help me progress, I was assured. I scheduled a lesson with him for a late September morning, but when I showed up, it turned out that the club was shut down for the season. Felix was there, but he was leaving for the Dominican Republic the next day. Too proud—or chivalrous—to admit his mistake, Felix scrambled to arrange a lesson. He put me on the only horse left at the barn: an indignant, pregnant mare, who seemed about as pleased to have me on her back as you would think. In the end, it wasn’t a lesson so much as a cheerleading session in which Felix applauded my ability to stay on the horse. I was sent away with an invitation to return eight months later when the club reopened in May. Impatient, I took to the internet and found a polo club with an indoor arena 45 minutes from my house: the Simsbury Polo Club at Folly Farm, in Connecticut. During my first lesson there, the instructor judged my stick-and-ball game redeemable; she said that after two more Continued on page 104

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | T R A V E L

KICK UP YOUR HEELS

RENE VAN BAKEL

Visiting Vienna is an opportunity to enjoy the famous LIPIZZANERS and maybe even enroll in the Spanish Riding School.

BY CAROLINE BLAHA-BLACK

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ou may have seen majestic Lipizzaner horses in action in the World Famous Lipizzaner Stallions World Tour that came to the U.S. a few years ago. Who can forget a white stallion performing a Courbette or a Levade for an eager audience? These noble stallions come from the same breeding stock as those at the Spanish Riding School in Vienna (SRS), a centuries-old riding institution that teaches the art of haute ecole, which is the highest level of dressage. Their history goes back as far as 1580, when Archduke Charles II of Austria founded the Court Stud Lipizza near Triest, Italy. Later, the Piber Stud Farm was founded in 1798, where these horses are still bred today. In 2015, the SRS celebrated its 450th anniversary.

The predecessors of Lipizzaners were mixed with Berbers and Arabians. They are long-lived, intelligent horses with an average life span of 30 to 35 years. Piber is the only stud farm in Austria that breeds Lipizzaners and cooperates closely with the SRS. Some Piber foals are for sale to horse lovers around the world, and each horse is documented from its birth. The Piber brand features a crown above a capital “P,” and it is located on the horse’s lower haunch. This tells the buyer that the horse comes from Piber. Training of the young stallions starts at about four years of age. They leave Piber at that time and travel to the Center Heldenberg, where they become accustomed to training routines and handlers. Only the best stallions get to perform at the SRS. It takes about six years for a stallion to participate in the

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School Quadrille performance, and only the most talented horses will learn the difficult “airs above the ground.” There are many requirements for young human riders who want to enter the school, too. Among other things, they must have exceptional talent with horses and be fluent in German. If young riders make it to assistant rider, they will have a young stallion entrusted to their care and may ride in the School Quadrille performance when the horse is trained. The stallions perform at various events throughout the year at the SRS. In addition to big events like the Tribute to Vienna in May or the Fête Impériale in June, visitors can take guided tours and watch morning exercises. At Heldenberg, visitors can tour the stables, see the horses up close, and watch morning exercises. PAGE 113


Kasey Perry-Glass and Goerklintgaards Dublet, 2017 USEF Grand Prix Dressage National Champions


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F A V O R I T E S

SPIRIT OF THE HORSE

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Actor WILLIAM SHATNER shares his seven decades with horses.

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William Shatner is an award-winning actor, director, producer, musician, and celebrity pitchman and a New York Times bestselling author. After a successful Broadway and international stage career, Mr. Shatner is best known for the film role of James T. Kirk in the Star Trek movie series, as Kirk in the original Star Trek television series, as T.J. Hooker on Hooker, and as Denny Crane on Boston Legal. A lifelong love affair of horses and his amazing charity work may surprise many of his fans. For those unaware of this aspect of Mr. Shatner’s life and work with horses, his new book Spirit of the Horse: A Celebration in Fact and Fable with Jeff Rovin, will be both an eye-opening experience and even more so, a heartwarming one. Mr. Shatner approached the book from a unique perspective. He combined the horse-related writings of legendary literary figures with his own tales and experiences throughout the decades, both as a rider and as someone who has seen the great restorative effects of horses. Mr. Shatner first rode on horseback more than seven decades ago. There was an instant connection. Riding came naturally to him, and a passion and fascination for these magnificent creatures was born. To this day, he remains heavily involved in horses and their ability to change people’s lives; hence, he continues to spearhead the annual Hollywood Charity Horse Show.

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Excerpted from SPIRIT OF THE HORSE, A Celebration in Fact and Fable, by William Shatner with Jeff Rovin. Thomas Dunne Books, published on May 23rd, 2017.

Look for PART TWO in the October 2017 issue of Equestrian Living magazine.

ost of us take some kind of risk or other. A new relationship; changing jobs; not studying as hard as we should for an exam; skydiving. Of course, some of us are a little crazier than others. If my life were a movie or a TV series, what I’m about to tell you would be the precipitating event that caused me to look back at how I got here. Sort of like Sunset Boulevard, only without the swimming pool... and I’m also still alive! Miraculously. Since you’re reading this book, you’ve already gathered that horses are a huge part of my life. They have been for more than thirty years. Without a doubt, horses are magnificent animals. Since almost everyone has seen one on-screen, or in a stable, or being ridden through city streets by a police officer, or even performing in a rodeo or a circus, you know that already. Perhaps you’ve ridden one. But, as with most sports, there is also an inherent danger when riding. I want to talk about that for a moment, the appeal of danger to me personally. It comes with the pro forma “Don’t try this at home, kids.” Continued on page 38

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When I do road races like the celebrity Grand Prix in which everybody is riding a powerful, souped-up vehicle and trying to kill each other—figuratively speaking, of course; it’s more like bumper cars for thrill-seeking adults—I think, at 150 miles an hour, when I’m going into a right-hand turn, “Man, I’m going to lose it here.” In that moment, I am euphoric. I took flying lessons where my opening class was conducted by this military adviser who put the plane in a tail-over-nose, wingover-wing maneuver. You are, quite literally, tumbling

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in the air, and I thought, “I’m gonna die.” In 2015, I partnered with American Wrench on TV for a crosscountry motorcycle ride to benefit the American Legion. A 2,400-mile journey on a wonderful, custom-built but untested machine. Like a horse, there was a lot of power under my butt. A lot of that employed at high speeds on sharp turns that I wasn’t always sure I could hold. But you never know until you try. The bottom line is, I’ve been “going to die” at a variety of sports, from riding horses to racing cars. In fact, you drive high-performance cars with your ass, the way


you drive a horse. Movement is felt in your butt and communicated to the rest of the body; it tells your arms, legs, and spine what to do and how to move. Which is a roundabout way of saying a good horseman will make a good driver. And vice versa...though, unlike cars, horses have a mind and will of their own and the musculature to enforce both. We are, after all, talking about animals that can stand up to 17 hands high—which is over five and a half feet and weigh on average slightly more than half a ton. Animals who are spirited by nature. That’s a lot of strength and temperament to try to overcome. I try—I try hard, try diligently—to do that and am mostly successful. But not always. The natural reaction of non–horse people, when I talk about some of the horse-riding accidents I’ve had, is, “Bill, why would any sane, reasonable person want to pursue this?” And they have a point. If I’m injured,

Every Stable Deserves a Winner

acting is not something I can easily do from a hospital bed. But when you love something— anything—sanity and practicality are not always your guiding principles. And I love horses. As the poet says—let me count the ways! This book was inspired by my desire not only to give my perspective on the excitement of the race and my love of horses, but to share the thoughts and experiences of others. I have selected some of my favorite equine nonfiction and fiction, myth and folktale, prose and verse. While all of these selections stand on their own as entertaining, informative, and/or quaint narratives, I have also written extensively about my own experiences to provide context for them. Together, I hope, these works will illuminate the experiences and joys, setbacks and triumphs of those who spend time in the company of horses. PAGE 113

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© 2017 Lynn Mara

THE HAMPTON CLASSIC AUGUST 27 - SEPTEMBER 3, 2017

SNAKE HOLLOW ROAD, BRIDGEHAMPTON, NY

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THESE TWO FAVORITE

SHOWS IN E TH Y CIT

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wo of Equestrian Living’s favorite events share the same unique qualities. They are both in the top tier of America’s finest and most competitive events. And they are both located in special places that can easily turn a few-days’ visit to the show into a great family vacation. Late summer’s HAMPTON CLASSIC is surrounded by beaches, villages, and restaurants that make the Hamptons one of the country’s most famous celebrity playgrounds. A month later, the WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW is staged in the center of the nation’s capital, within walking distance of the endless attractions the city has to offer. AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 1


BY EMILY HOLOWCZAK

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he Hampton Classic Horse Edwin M. Schwenk Jr. officially revitalShow boasts immaculate ized the show in 1971. The event was showgrounds, stiff competilater dubbed the Hampton Classic in tion, and some of the best 1977. The classic continued to grow riders from around the world. every year by adding more grand prix The classic is an essential stop on the classes and offering a wide array of summer horse show tour and draws in showing divisions. In turn, the event crowds of everyone from local spectators grew in its popularity and became more to A-list celebrities. Situated in scenic competitive every year. Most recently, Bridgehampton, New York, the show the show introduced a fourth FEI class is just minutes away from local beaches and an open jumper class in 2016. and fashionable boutiques. The 65-acre Additionally, prize money was increased AUGUST 27 - SEPTEMBER 3, 2017 showgrounds feature four grass rings and for three grand prix jumping classes. SNAKE HOLLOW ROAD, BRIDGEHAMPTON, NY classes for all skill levels. At the classic, The Hampton Classic continually the infamous lead line class is often just prides itself as an event that listens to THE CLASSIC as competitive as the grand prix show all of its constituents, from riders and DRAWS IN jumping. spectators to sponsors and advertisers. As a result, CROWDS OF The Hampton Classic evolved from the original the show has grown exponentially and has earned its EVERYONE Southampton Horse Show, which dates back to the place as one of the most beloved horse shows in the FROM LOCAL early twentieth century. The equestrian lifestyle has United States. In 2009, the United States Equestrian SPECTATORS always played an integral role in the history of the Federation (USEF) awarded the Hampton Classic TO A-LIST Hamptons, and the show served as a unique celebrathe status of Heritage Competition, only the second CELEBRITIES. tion of horses and riding. The Southampton Horse show to ever receive the prestigious standing. Show was held on and off for many years, until Mrs. PAGE 113 Š 2017 Lynn Mara

THE HAMPTON CLASSIC

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Š HAMPTON CLASSIC HORSE SHOW

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Clockwise, from top left: Katherine Strauss and Capacity; leadline class; McLain Ward and Tina La Boheme; shopping row; Jilliana Jiminez, leadline winner; grandstands 2008; VIP table-decor contest.

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hat is your personal history with horses? Did you start riding as a kid? I grew up riding. I have a twin sister, and the two of us rode. We were those kids who, if we went to a party with a pony ride, we’d do it, and then go to the back of the line and do it over and over. We were obsessed. When we were six, my mom finally caved, and we started riding lessons. We began riding with Kris Ward, show jumper McLain Ward’s mom, when we were eight and rode with her until we went to college. I did the ponies, and by age 12 I moved up to horses and did the junior hunters and equitation. While at Mount Holyoke College, I rode on the equestrian team and competed in International Student Riding Association events and ended up running the U.S. organization for 10 years. I still ride for recreation, but I haven’t competed in many years.

How did you become involved with the Hampton Classic? Tony Hitchcock and Jean Lundgren, a married couple, were the executive directors of the classic for about 30 years. After the 2004 show, they decided to retire, and the board started the process to find a new executive director. I had worked with Tony a little on the national horse show, and he asked if I was interested in applying. I was running my own event-marketing business at the time, but the Hampton Classic had always been my absolute favorite horse show, so I decided it was the perfect combination of what I wanted to do and what I was doing. It was a long process of interviews, but I was offered the position in July 2005. Tony and Jean stayed through March 2006 to help with the changeover period. I technically started just before the 2005 horse show and shadowed them and learned from them during the show. It was helpful in making a smooth transition. They are still here every year and a part of the Hampton Classic family.

MEET THE EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR, SHANETTE BARTH COHEN

partner, and generally donate about $100,000 each year. We’ve donated to about 100 other charitable events each year. We help the Sag Harbor food pantry in a fun way. If people bring three or more food items to donate on Tuesday or Wednesday, their carload gets in free. Monday is rescue adoption day, where organizations bring animals—dogs, cats, rabbits, even horses—for adoption.

GEORGE KAMPER

W

What is your primary role as executive director? I oversee all the different elements of the show, but I have a really great team of people who take on huge chunks of it. We work with the town on our event permits and on the contracts with all of the vendors. A big part of my job is working with sponsors. I work closely with my marketing director, Reyna Stein, in making sure we deliver what we promise from a branding standpoint and hospitality and being responsive to their needs. In the last few years we have had more than 100 corporate sponsors.

example, the prize money for the grand-prix qualifier this year is going from $75,000 to $86,000, and the reason behind this is the committee noted that riders would get higher bonus points in Fédération Equestre Internationale (FEI) world ranking if it was $86,000 or more. Things like that come up all the time because they are out there in the horse world, and that has a direct impact. The grand prix is at $300,000, which started in 2016. We try to offer good prize money to attract the best riders and their top horses. We want the best sport we can, and that’s part of what plays into it.

What are the challenges of setting up the show each year? We start construction about four weeks ahead. We have very little permanent infrastructure, so everything has to come in—the tents, the grandstands, the stabling, the bleachers, the Jumbotron, and all of the shopping areas. Most of the competition rings are grass and that takes a lot of year-round maintenance. There are more than 80 shops around the grounds, ranging from vendors selling apparel, jewelry, saddle, and equestrian products to a variety of food vendors.

What makes the Hampton Classic such a unique event? One of the things that makes the classic unique is that we attract an audience that’s not just horse people. It gives the event an exciting feel. On grand-prix Sunday, the grandstands and VIP tents are packed, but during the jump-off you can hear a pin drop, and then the crowd goes nuts. We’ve had 12,000 people on the grounds on grandprix day. We also consistently have big crowds in our outer rings.

What is the role of the classic’s horsemen’s advisory committee? We have a really robust horsemen's advisory committee that we rely on to give feedback and advice. For

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What is the economic and charitable impact of the classic? The classic is a nonprofit, and we support charities that either have a tie to the sport or to the Hamptons. We support Southampton Hospital, that is our official community

Want to talk about Hollywood in the Hamptons? Having so many celebrity attendees has just sort of happened. Often it’s because their kids ride. We generally don’t know who is coming in advance. Jennifer Lopez came a few years ago, and we didn’t know she was coming. I also think they come here because it is common in the Hamptons to see famous people, so they aren’t harassed here. Do you have accommodation suggestions other than house rentals? Housing accommodations are our single biggest challenge. There are a few hotels, such as the Atlantic Southampton Hotel, Southampton Inn, Sag Harbor Inn, Baron’s Cove, and Topping Rose House. It really depends on your budget. It’s Labor Day weekend in the Hamptons, so it’s a very busy time. I tell people to check our website for hotels, homes, and to try Airbnb. What are some of your favorite local places to dine or visit? East Hampton Grill is my favorite. Their grilled artichokes are out of this world, and the French dip is amazing. Almond (see page 108) in Bridgehampton is another favorite. I love the Brussels sprouts salad. Going to Wölffer Estate Vineyards is one of my favorite things to do when I have houseguests. We get some wine and a cheese plate and overlook the vines, and it’s just stunning. We also take house guests on a sightseeing boat tour that leaves from the wharf in Sag Harbor. There’s also the Sag Harbor Customs House next to the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum.


LENNY STUCKER

VICTOR CANGRO

LENNY STUCKER

LINDSAY MORRIS

WÖLFFER ESTATE VINEYARD

LISA TAMBURINI

Clockwise, from top left: Sarah Jessica Parker; Almond restaurant; Wölffer Estate Vineyard; Jessica Springsteen; Topping Rose House; East Hampton Grill; Baron’s Cove; Georgina Bloomberg and son, Jasper; Christie Brinkley and Jill Rappaport; Brooke Shields.

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BY EMILY HOLOWCZAK

T

he Verizon Center in Washington, D.C., is home to one of the most diverse and exciting events in the world of equestrian sport. The Washington International Horse Show (WIHS) draws crowds from all over the globe, including non-equestrians, political figures, celebrities, and even curious passers-by on the street. From Kid’s Day and Barn Night to world cup showjumping and special events for military families, the show truly has something for everyone. The WIHS is held every October and features over 500 of the top riders and horses from around the world, including Olympic veterans. The event hosts numerous high-caliber classes, including the $130,000 Longines FEI World Cup Jumping, Puissance, and the WIHS Equitation Finals. Additionally, one of the most exciting events of the show is the everpopular Shetland Pony Steeplechase Championship Series. The Washington Post calls the race, D.C.’s newest and cutest sport. 46 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017

At the WIHS, the plentiful daytime horse-show activities are equally met by glamorous parties and VIP events in the evenings. These include the Buck Breast Cancer Benefit, the Armed Forces Reception, and the President’s Cup Party. The parties are hosted by the PwC Club on the sky-box level of the Verizon Center. The club offers a fantastic view of the show ring. Spectators can easily socialize with friends while enjoying the sophisticated hospitality in which the WIHS prides itself. When a high-quality horse show meets a bustling city such as Washington, D.C., the options for activities outside the show ring are endless. The city’s rich history and political significance offer a unique YOU CAN WATCH backdrop for the four-star event. Where else can you GRAND-PRIX witness grand-prix show jumping firsthand, and SHOW JUMPING tour the White House in the same afternoon? Over AND TOUR THE the years, the WIHS has become an integral piece of WHITE HOUSE Washington culture, and the show continues to entertain and inspire people within the city ON THE SAME each year. PAGE 113 DAY.

ALDEN CORRIGAN

WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW


ALDEN CORRIGAN JUMP MEDIA

ALDEN CORRIGAN ALDEN CORRIGAN

JUMP MEDIA

ALDEN CORRIGAN JUMP MEDIA

JUMP MEDIA

ALDEN CORRIGAN

REX REED

Clockwise, from top left: Verizon Center arena; Hunter Holloway victory gallop; Kama Godek and De Grande; Lauren Hough and Ohala; Olympic team recognition; Karen Godek in the city; equitation top three; Daily and Spanky high five; Kathryn Tyree; Beezie Madden and Quister. AUGUST /SE PT E M B E R | 20 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 4 7


H

ow long have you been running this show? I’ve been president for four years, and before that I was the secretary, and before that I was on the board. So, I’ve been involved with it for 8 or 10 years. Is this similar to what the show in Madison Square Garden used to be like—with all the horses out on the street? It’s such a surprise for everybody in the city. People come up out of the Metro and they cross the street and their faces are just amazed. To be able to touch and pet and experience the horses firsthand in the city is just amazing. People are really friendly and welcoming. I think the exhibitors really enjoy the opportunity to interact with people that aren’t around horses all the time.

Do you get a different audience that would never be exposed to horses in the city? Yes, absolutely! On Saturday during the day session, we open up for free for kids and families to come in. We shut down one more street and we have free pony rides, grooming stations, and a horseless jumping opportunity during Kids Day.

MEET THE PRESIDENT, VICKI LOWELL

JUMP MEDIA

Before becoming president of the Washington International Horse Show, Vicki Lowell spent 15 years at Discovery Communications, where she led brand strategy and creative development for Animal Planet and TLC. On the equestrian-sport content side, Lowell helped produce the Animal Planet series Horse Power Road to the Maclay, the Animal Planet sporthorse series Jockeys, and two FEI World Cup Finals. Earlier this year, she joined the United States Equestrian Federation (US Equestrian) as chief marketing and content officer. She will also continue in her volunteer role as president of the Washington International Horse Show, which she has helped build into one of the most popular and entertaining horse shows in the U.S. Lowell also competes successfully as an adult amateur jumper rider.

There’s face painting and horseshoe painting. We really want to make it accessible for everyone to come in and be able to experience the horses. There are so many people that you come across who are experiencing this for the first time, and people that are coming back to the show year after year because of their first experience at Washington. There are so few horse shows where the horses come to the people. They come to where the people are. That’s what we do here. The reception is amazing, whether it’s the local media, or the security in the building, or kids walking down the street on their way to school. Everybody loves the horses. We have a military ticket program that was created in 2010 and is returning in 2017. The 2016 first responders ticket program will also be back this year, so that reaches out to a lot of people who may not have otherwise known about the show. Who are the beneficiaries? The Tragedy Assistance Program for Survivors (TAPS) supports family members of fallen heroes. When someone is lost in the military, they provide support services for the family. We have a jump called Jump Clear for TAPS. It’s an American flag jump, and it will be the last jump in the speed class on Friday night. Every time that jump is cleared, $1,000 will go to TAPS. Capital Breast Care Center is another beneficiary of WIHS. It is a local organization that provides

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mammograms and care to people who cannot afford to receive services. We have a money-raising pink breast cancer ribbon jump in Thursday’s open jumper class, along with a host of parties that benefit the U.S. Equestrian Team Foundation and our other respective charities. Is there pressure to move the show out of the city, like there was in New York? No, the city actually really embraces the horse show. Events D.C. is a big sponsor and partner of ours, and the Verizon Center loves having us. So, we plan to be here for a while. We continue to bring in more sponsors, and our entries are up. It’s a lot of work for everybody involved, whether you’re an exhibitor or on the board or you do PR. We really try to make it positive and as enjoyable and as much of a celebration and a party in the city as we can. It’s the end of a long year of competing, and we just really try to make it as wonderful as we can for people. Is part of the mission to promote the sport for a younger group to keep the sport vital? Yes. Barn night is our big night. We do group ticket sales to local barns, and they compete for prizes. They might compete for a golf cart or for a clinic from one of the top riders. This year’s clinician will be an exciting announcement. We also have a junior committee of about 20 local kids, and it’s a very competitive process to become a member. We put

them to work, they volunteer all week long, and they love it! What are fun things to do while you’re here? We’re just blocks from the Capitol, and the National Portrait Gallery and the Spy Museum are right across the street. Everybody loves the Spy Museum, especially the kids. I personally love the Air and Space Museum. A lot of people take a tour of the White House while they’re here. My favorite hotel is the Monaco because it is so close to the show and it’s pet friendly. Other hotel suggestions are the Hay Adams. It is amazing if you want an authentic D.C. experience overlooking the White House. The Four Seasons is first class all the way if you want to be in Georgetown, which is another one of my favorite areas in D.C. If you are looking to stay outside of the city in horse country, you can’t beat Salamander Resort. Some favorite bars are the Graham Rooftop Bar in Georgetown, Barmini, by José Andrés, if you can get in, and Oyamel. My top restaurants include Zaytinya, Cafe Milano, Fiola Mare, Le Diplomate, Tail Up Goat, Jettie’s or Luke’s Lobster for a sandwich, and Carmine’s. As far as shopping, a beautiful, sophisticated open mall with Hermès and Dior has opened a couple blocks from the Verizon Center. What woud you say makes the show special? I think what’s really special about this show is that there’s something for everyone. From the exhibitor’s standpoint, we have everything from small ponies to regional competitors, childrens’ and adults’ events, to FEI top international riders. For the spectator, we have everything from a free opportunity to come in and experience pony rides and get into the Verizon Center to watch a horse show for the first time, or to enjoy the highest-level VIP experience that you can have at a horse show in the U.S. I feel that “something for everyone” is what we’re trying to be, that we want to put on a show that’s not just a horse show. It’s a show!


FOSTER & PARTNERS ALDEN CORRIGAN

PEXELS PHOTO WIKIMEDIA

Clockwise, from top left: Hotel Monaco; the National Portrait Gallery; Kids visit horses in the city; Le Diplomate restaurant; Barmini by José Andrés; Cafe Milano; the Four Seasons, Georgetown; Air and Space Museum; the Washington Monument.

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THE 2017 EQ

GOLD LIST R E A D E R S VOT E FOR T HE B ES T O F EQU ES T RIAN LIFE .

T

he fourth annual EQ Gold List continues its amazing growth. This spring, readers were invited to nominate their favorites in various equestrian-centric categories. Asking

readers for nominations ensures that lesser-known local favorites are included. From the list of nominees, we created the final ballot, and you voted in record numbers. The competition was tight, with several ties, many new additions, and some old favorites. Did your choices make the list?

● Gold Winner ● Silver Winner ● Bronze Winner 5 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017


● Readers chose famed Texan singer and dedicated horseman LYLE LOVETT as their favorite celebrity, no doubt for his successful reining career, his passion for horses, and his crooning, bluesy singing voice.

His palomino stallion, Smart and Shiney, is Lyle’s pride and joy. Read about Equestrian Living’s visit with Lyle in the Winter 2013 issue.

GEORGE KAMPER

F AV O R I T E C E L E B R I T Y E Q U E S T R I A N S

● ROBERT REDFORD was voted one of Equestrian Living’s readers’ favorite celebrities for the second year in a row. The world-famous actor is well known for his environmental activism and his work to protect wild horses and to end horse slaughter.

● KALEY CUOCO stars on TV’s wildly popular, long-running series, the Big Bang Theory, while also making a name for herself in the show-jumping world with her horse, Poker Face.   SHUTTERSTOCK

COURTESY KALEY CUOCO


THE BOOK LLC


EVENTING RIDERS

Olympian Charlotte Dujardin continues to dominate the sport, having earned nearly every title and award possible. Other reader favorites include three-time Olympian Laura Graves and chef d’équipe of the U.S. dressage team, Robert Dover.

Philip Dutton won individual bronze at the Rio Olympics and is at the top of his sport. Boyd Martin represented the U.S. two times each at the Olympics and the World Equestrian Games, and William FoxPitt represented Great Britain at three Olympics.

● CHARLOTTE DUJARDIN

● PHILIP DUTTON

● BOYD MARTIN

MICHAELLE DUNN

● ROBERT DOVER

● WILLIAM FOX-PITT

BEN RADVANI

● LAURA GRAVES

GEORGE KAMPER

Fan favorite and three-time Olympian McLAIN WARD (left with daughter, Lilly, and wife, Lauren) is the winner of Equestrian Living’s special Editor’s Award. Ward’s phenomenal year already includes a blistering win at the Longines FEI World Cup Final, a ninth-time win at Devon’s $225,000 Sapphire Grand Prix, and victory after victory at Spruce Meadows. EQ Living selected McLain for this special award because of his legendary career, which began when he won both the USEF Medal Finals and the USEF Show Jumping Derby at the age of 14, the youngest rider ever to do so. In the years since,PETERS STEFFAN McLain has won the highest levels of competition, including team gold at the Olympic Games in both Athens and Beijing and a team silver at Rio last year. He won individual gold at the Pan Am Games in Toronto in 2015. His famous mount, Sapphire, was retired in 2012, and his current rides, HH Azure and Rothchild, have become favorites of audiences around the world.

JUMPER RIDERS

REINING RIDERS

P O L O P L AY E R S

Readers chose Olympic team members Beezie Madden, McLain Ward, and Laura Kraut as their favorite show jumpers. All three have long and accomplished careers in international competition aboard world-famous horses.

Winners are a family affair in the reining category, as Mandy McCutcheon wins gold, followed by her father Tim McQuay, and husband Tom McCutcheon. Mandy is the first woman and nonpro in NRHA history to become a $2 million rider.

Nacho Figueras is a renowned polo player, Ralph Lauren model, and entrepreneur. Nic Roldan is one of the best Americans players in the sport, and Adolfo Cambiaso is a 10-goal-handicap Argentine player widely considered the greatest of all time.

BFA FOR VEUVE CLICQUOT

● NIC ROLDAN

● ADOLFO CAMBIASO

WIKICOMMONS

● TOM MCCUTCHEON

GEORGE KAMPER

● TIM MCQUAY

GEORGE KAMPER

CARRIE WIRTH

● LAURA KRAUT

● McLAIN WARD

● NACHO FIGUERAS

CHANCELLOR VAN PELT

● MANDY MCCUTCHEON

● BEEZIE MADDEN

JENNIFER WOOD

OPPOSITE PAGE: THE BOOK LLC

EDITOR’S AWARD

DRESSAGE RIDERS

SUSAN STICKLE

EQ LIVING

MICHAELLE DUNN

ATHLETES


COMPETITIONS DRESSAGE

F AV O R I T E D I S C I P L I N E S

EVENTING

● ROLEX 3-DAY KENTUCKY

GLOBAL DRESSAGE FESTIVAL, WELLINGTON

Equestrian Living voters enjoy A DIVERSE MIX OF DISCIPLINES. While the majority of our readers enjoy hunter-jumper riding, there are many others that enjoy trail riding, eventing, dressage, and the western disciplines, as well as less common sports such as timber racing and fox hunting. Hunter Jumper 52% Trail Riding 24.2%

SUSAN STICKLE

Eventing 13.5%

MICHAELLE DUNN

Dressage 18.9%

Western/Reining 7.4% Polo 5.1%

● U.S. DRESSAGE FINALS ● DRESSAGE AT DEVON

Racing 4.9%

● EVENTING SHOWCASE ● BURGHLEY, U.K. WELLINGTON

STEFFAN PETERS

Specialized Breeds 4.5% Driving 3.8%

Also Foxhunting, Saddleseat, and Timber Racing

HUNTER JUMPER

REINING

● DEVON

● NRHA FUTURITY

REBECCA WALTON

CP NATIONAL HORSE SHOW

● QUARTER HORSE CONGRESS, OHIO

SPORTFOT

● WINTER EQUESTRIAN FESTIVAL, WELLINGTON

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NATIONAL REINING BREEDER’S CLASSIC

SUSAN STICKLE

STACY LYNNE

Endurance 2.2%

POLO

● INTERNATIONAL POLO CLUB, WELLINGTON

● AIKEN

● SANTA BARBARA


● RODNEY JENKINS is a legend of the sport, with a career marked by consistency and longevity, topping the ranks of the hunterjumper show circuit for more than 30 years. He was inducted into the show-jumping hall of fame, and has since enjoyed a successful career training racehorses. ● Considered a founding father of hunt seat equitation, GEORGE MORRIS has represented the U.S. in many international competitions including the Pan American Games in 1959 and the 1960 Rome Olympics. Today, he is best known as a clinician, trainer, acting as chef d’equipe for numerous winning teams, and training students that have reached the very top of the industry.

GEORGE KAMPER

JAMES PARKER/THE BOOK LLC

G R E AT E S T E Q U E S T R I A N S

● McLAIN WARD (Tie) is arguably one of the greatest show-jumping athletes competing today. His countless wins and consistency make him a powerful force in the industry.

THE BOOK LLC

THE BOOK LLC

● BEEZIE MADDEN’S (Tie) career includes numerous international wins, including two Olympic gold team medals, individual gold at World Cup Final in 2013, individual and team silver at the two World Equestrian Games, double-digit Nations Cup wins, and many World Cup qualifier wins.


PLACES FAVO R I T E P L AC E S TO M E E T F R I E N D S – E A S T

● WELLINGTON, FLORIDA

● DUDLEY’S ON SHORT, Lexington, KY

● RED FOX INN, Middleburg, VA

● BACKSTREETS, Wellington, FL

● IN-N-OUT (Tie), Indio, CA

● JAKE’S, Del Mar, CA

● TACKERIA, Wellington, FL

● BEVAL SADDLERY, Various Locations

FAVO R I T E P L AC E S TO M E E T F R I E N D S –W E S T

● MILLE FLEURS (Tie) Rancho Santa Fe, CA F AV O R I T E TA C K S H O P S

● DOVER SADDLERY, Various Locations 5 6 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017


F A V O R I T E R E A LT O R S

BEST PLACES TO LIVE

● LEXINGTON, Kentucky, offers an equestrian paradise for all kinds of horse-sport enthusiasts. The Kentucky Horse Park is a 1200-acre facility that showcases various breeds and disciplines, and its stadium and arena host all types of exciting events.

GEORGE KAMPER

● Home to the Winter Equestrian Festival, WELLINGTON, Florida, is known as the equestrian capital of the country. During the season, thousands of riders come from all around the world to compete in high-level competitions in nearly every discipline.

BEST YEAR ROUND

● Wellington, Florida ● Lexington, Kentucky ● Middleburg, Virginia (Tie) ● Santa Ynez, California (Tie) BEST FOR WINTERS

● Robert Ross, Florida

● Wellington, Florida ● Ocala, Florida ● Aiken, South Carolina BEST FOR SUMMERS

● Zach Davis, Kentucky (Tie)

● Visse Wedell, Kentucky and Florida (Tie)

● Martha Jolicoeur, Florida

● Lexington, Kentucky ● Woodstock, Vermont ● The Hamptons, New York (Tie) ● Connecticut (Tie)


FASHION

FASHION FOR THE STREET

● ARIAT (top) was voted by EQLiving readers as their favorite fashion brand for equestrian-style street wear. The company makes comfortable, durable, and fashionable clothes in both English and Western styles that make it easy to go from the barn to almost anywhere your day takes you. ● RALPH LAUREN (lower left) is a brand that has long mastered the art of seamlessly integrating equestrian style into everyday clothing. Its evocative equestrian style encompasses the rich textures of rustic western ranches, stately English manors, and exhilarating hunts, with riders decked out in requisite tall boots and tweeds. ● BARBOUR (lower right) was rated highly by readers and is a favorite of equestrians for its classic, on-point look that defines the essence of true British style. A favorite of Kate Middleton, the brand is a perfect blend of practical and stylish sensibility.


FASHION E Q U E S T R I A N -T H E M E D J E W E L R Y

● The height of luxury,

HERMÈS was chosen by Equestrian Living readers as their favorite jewelry brand. The fine craftsmanship used to make saddles and bridles is carried over to some of the finest jewelry available.

● Jewelry from RALPH

● DAVID YURMAN’S

jewelry, with its sense of effortless American luxury, landed on the Gold List as a reader favorite. The company designs jewelry that is both a fashion statement and a work of art.

LAUREN has a sophisticated simplicity, often imbued with equestrian details, which makes its inclusion on our list of reader favorites an obvious choice.

E Q U E S T R I A N -T H E M E D L E AT H E R G O O D S

● HERMÈS leather goods are the pinnacle of style, class, and quality. Its handmade goods are crafted in France using the company’s signature saddle stitching. The coveted Birkin bag, designed in the 1980s is a leather tote that is a favorite of luxury collectors. One recently sold for $380,000 at auction.

● COACH is known for its classic look. The neutral-toned leathers and elegant styles make Coach bags a great choice for any occasion, from toting around your day-to-day items to functioning as an evening-wear accessory.

● RALPH LAUREN has repeatedly topped the Gold List for its clothing, and this year Equestrian Living readers also chose its leather goods as one of their favorites. The classic sophistication of the company’s style comes through in their fine leather bags.


SHOWING ENGLISH SADDLES

HELMETS

● Charles Owen tops the list again as the favorite helmet of Equestrian Living readers. Their helmets are the result of innovation in technology and design. The company designs products with attention to security and comfort.

● Designed to meet the needs of high-level show jumpers, Hermès saddles are the finest quality, handmade, and custom-designed to offer maximum comfort, balance, and close contact with the horse.

● CWD saddles are favored by top riders such as McLain Ward and Kent Farrington. CWD also makes a line of Mademoiselle saddles specifically for women with a lightweight, slimline design.

● Devoucoux takes craftsmanship to the next level, using 3D scanners and the latest modeling software to devise the sophisticated padding in their D3D saddles to improve performance and comfort for horse and rider.

● Inspired by premium motorcycle helmet technology, Samshield helmets are made of materials designed for comfort and safety, including a polycarbonate shell, shape-memory comfort foam, and an adjustable inner layer for perfect fit.

PA D D O C K B O OT S

FIELD BOOTS

● Ariat ● Dubarry (Tie) ● Vogel (Tie)

● Ariat

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● Vogel

● GPA has a well-earned, worldwide reputation as one of the leading manufacturers of riding helmets. They were a readers’ favorite for utilizing exceptionally sophisticated technology that combines comfort, safety, and style.

TA L L B O O T S

● Parlanti

● Ariat

● Vogel


SHOWING F AV O R I T E B R A N D S F O R E N G L I S H S H O W C L O T H E S

● Four-time winner TAILORED SPORTSMAN’S iconic English breeches epitomize classic equestrian style. The timeless quality of its fashion makes them a continuing readers’ favorite. ● ARIAT combines sports technology and classic equestrian style to give riders comfort and poise in the show ring. ●

● ARIAT

TAILORED SPORTSMAN

● PIKEUR

WESTERN BOOTS

● Parlanti

● Ariat

● Lucchese

● PIKEUR English show clothes are comfortable and high-tech. For half of a century, Pikeur riding apparel has been at the forefront of functional equestrian fashion, due in large part to their respect for the high level of sports performance required by equestrians.

W E T W E AT H E R B O O T S

● Tony Lama

● Hunter

● Dubarry

● L.L.Bean


● CONNEMERA,

● CASTLE LESLIE,

IRELAND

IRELAND

T R AV E L F AV O R I T E S Voters chose the favorite destinations they want to visit from those seen in the pages of Equestrian Living magzine:

SUMMER

● Connemera, Ireland ● Castle Leslie, Ireland ● Giraffe Manor, Kenya WINTERS

● GIRAFFE MANOR, KENYA

● St Moritz Snow Polo, Switzerland ● Home Ranch, Colorado ● Twin Farms, Vermont Voters also named their personal favorite hotels:

HOTELS

● Breakers, Palm Beach, Florida ● Inn at Biltmore, Asheville, N.C. ● Castle Leslie, Ireland

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● THE BREAKERS, PALM BEACH, FLA


TRAVEL HOTEL BRANDS

●● WELLINGTON, MARRIOTT FLORIDA

● HILTON/CONRAD

● FOUR SEASONS

P R I VAT E J E T S E R V I C E S

● NETJETS

● WHEELS UP

DOMESTIC AIRLINE

● JET BLUE

● DELTA

HORSE EVENT WISH LIST When readers voted for the horse event they would most like to attend, their top choice was the ● WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES, which are the major international championships for equestrian sport. Second place was a tie between the ● DUBLIN HORSE SHOW and the ● OLYMPIC GAMES. 

● WORLD EQUESTRIAN GAMES ●

SOUTHWEST

I N T E R N AT I O N A L A I R L I N E

● EMIRATES

● VIRGIN ATLANTIC

● NICHOLAS AIR

● BRITISH AIR


GIVING BACK DOG RESCUE

EQ LIVING

EDITOR’S AWARD

MICHAEL SCHOFIELD

● DANNY & RON’S RESCUE, located in South Carolina and Wellington, Florida, has been chosen by Equestrian Living readers as their favorite dog rescue by a huge margin every year since the first Gold List. They began their mission in 2005 by aiding dogs that were left homeless by Hurricane Katrina. Since then, their mission has grown to include delivering dog food to elderly owners and helping to pay vet bills. Because an abused or neglected dog can only recover and learn to trust again when it is in a loving home, Danny and Ron have turned their own house into the ultimate safe haven. There, they personally care for injured and abused animals until they are ready for adoption. The opportunity to live with humans and other dogs in a real home is the secret to Danny and Ron’s success homing hundreds of dogs throughout the equestrian community. EQUESTRIAN CHARITY

THERAPEUTIC RIDING

● MAKER’S MARK SECRETARIAT CENTER’S premier reschooling facility showcases adoptable Thoroughbreds at the world-famous Kentucky Horse Park, where horses experience a one-of-a-kind education and emerge to become ambassadors for racehorses in new careers. The ● EQUESTRIAN AID FOUNDATION assists people from all corners of the horse world deal with catastrophic injury or illness. ● RETURN TO FREEDOM works to save the wild horses and burros of America by spreading awareness, rescuing herds from slaughter, and protecting their habitats.

● BUFFALO THERAPEUTIC RIDING CENTER, the only indoor riding facility in the heart of Buffalo, NY, has hosted a therapeutic riding program for 10 years. It currently offers programs for mentally and emotionally impaired, learning disabled, and developmentally challenged children. ● VINCEREMOS, in Loxahatchee, FL, means “to overcome” in Latin, and offers therapeutic riding, driving, hippotherapy, and equine-assisted learning. ● PEGASUS THERAPEUTIC RIDING in Brewster, NY, has provided equine-assisted activities to students of all ages with a variety of disabilities for over 40 years.

● MAKER’S MARK SECRETARIAT CENTER

● EQUESTRIAN AID FOUNDATION

● RETURN TO FREEDOM

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● BUFFALO THERAPEUTIC RIDING

● VINCEREMOS

● PEGASUS


FAVORITES BARN DOG

● WHO KNOWS? IT’S A RESCUE

JOYCE JONES

JILL NOVOTNY

Once again rescues won the favorite barn dog category by a large margin. Jack Russells held second place, however, this year the Corgi has been replaced as the third-favorite barn dog by the Labrador retriever.

● JACK RUSSELL TERRIER

● LABRADOR RETRIEVER

F AV O R I T E C A R S A N D T R U C K S Truck owners often have strongly held loyalties to their favorite brand, and sales figures echo Gold List votes.

● The FORD F-150 has been America’s best-selling pickup truck for 40 consecutive years. It rates highly for durability, safety, comfort, and power. ● CHEVY and ● DODGE RAM are popular as well, both handily beating the up-and-coming Toyota, Nissan, and Honda trucks.

Automobiles from ● BMW, ● MERCEDES, and ● AUDI made it a clean sweep for Germany in 2017. And once again, the winning SUV brand by a large margin was the vehicles that are synonymous with rugged luxury and English horse-country style, ● RANGE ROVER.

F AV O R I T E T R A I L E R S

● Featherlight ● Sundowner ● 4-Star


S

otogrande looks like a Slim Aarons photograph. Sedate cerulean swimming pools and vibrant green landscaping meet one’s eye from practically every angle. So it’s little surprise that the 20th century Manhattanite photographer spent time on this southwestern coast of Spain. As Andalusia’s largest privately owned residential space—an eightsquare-mile stretch of land that skirts the Mediterranean Sea—the allure of Sotogrande is twofold. It’s a mix of natural beauty and unpretentious luxury. There’s no Nobu here, and that’s on purpose. With views reaching as far as Morocco and Gibraltar, its surrounds are a rich tangle of centuries of discoveries. History reveals itself in the Continued on page 70

BRIDGET ARSENAULT holds a master’s degree from Oxford University. A longtime journalist, she was the associate editor for print and digital at Vanity Fair U.K., and she is the London correspondent for VanityFair.com. She has also freelanced for a variety of publications, including British Vogue, DuJour, House & Garden, Departures, and Travel and Leisure.

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AN ANDALUSIAN TRAVEL DIARY BY BRIDGET ARSENAULT

THE ALLURE OF

SOTOGRANDE This resort on Spain’s COSTA DEL SOL boasts views of the Rock of Gibraltar and Morocco and, with nine polo fields, is the largest and most prestigious polo club in Europe.

La Reserva clubhouse and golf course.

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Almenara Hotel Sotogrande.

La Reserva El Mirador infinity pool. 68 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017


PHILIPPE PERDEREAU / ULMER

Jean Mus-designed gardens.

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Continued from page 67

landscape, where Herculean cypresses once imported from ancient Greece are paired with indigenous plant life such as orange blossom, lavender, myrtle, and thyme. Sotogrande is somewhere you can get lunch for 20 Euros, and, unbeknownst to you, you might do that while sitting next to Prince Jefri of Brunei.

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egacy is a word you often hear when in Sotogrande. In 1962 its founder, Joseph McMicking, set out to do something different. The idea behind Sotogrande was to take a group of like-minded people and bring them together. McMicking was brought up in Scotland before spending time in the United States and the Philippines, where he met and married Mercedes Zobel. McMicking was a self-made businessman and Mercedes a glamorous potential heiress—her family owned the multi-billion dollar Ayala 70 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V I N G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017

Top left: The Santa Maria Polo Club is the most prestigious and largest in Europe, with nine polo fields and a one-million-squaremeter garden. Top right: Facundo Pieres (Ayala) and Adolfo Cambiaso (Dubai). Sotogrande is the August stop on the international polo circuit and the stats are impressive, with more than 25 tournaments, 75,000 visitors, 220 teams, 800 players, and 2,500 horses making their way through the grounds each year. Bottom: The polo school.

Corporation, the largest company in the Philippines. Where some businesses mine their history for a laudable moment, for McMicking history truly was a part of his DNA. A valued soldier during World War II, he finished his United States military career as a colonel; throughout his life, he was known across continents as a kind, conscientious, and gracious businessman. That thread is felt throughout Sotogrande. When it all began, McMicking was quoted as saying, “To have Sotogrande based on money would be the most horrible society I can imagine. It was first suggested that only landowners could join the Club de Gold. I said ‘That’s crazy.’ A club is a thing people join because they are friends, or potential friends.” He was not looking to replicate another Paris, Madrid, or London. Instead, it was a place created to reconnect people to themselves, their friends, and family.


The geographic beauty and laissezfaire attitude it imbued meant the area quickly became punctuated by Spain’s richest families as well as by leaders from around the world—princes, politicians, playboys, you name it. The reason it looks like somewhere you might have found Jackie Onassis supine on a sun lounger is because at one point, you could have. And in more recent years, Sotogrande has been visited by the likes of Mariah Carey, Antonio Banderas, and Tony Blair.

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ast forward to right now. The Zobels still rein king. In August 2016, Paola Zobel wed the Argentinean polo player Santiago Laborde. The 500-person-plus wedding was held on the family’s Ayala polo grounds. Young and unfathomably glamorous, the couple is keeping up with tradition, currently building their residence in San

There are also a number of public and private equestrian facilities throughout Sotogrande. The best-known stables and lesson barn are the Sotogrande Equestrian Centre Hipica, with 103 stalls, a dressage and show-jumping ring, a cross-country course, and a pleasant restaurant. The smaller San Roque club, with 22 stalls, is also popular with locals and visitors alike.

Enrique, moments from the estate house where Joseph McMicking and Mercedes Zobel once lived. They are also maintaining, or more aptly, growing, the region’s equestrian scene—a valued piece of the Sotogrande puzzle since the beginning. Year-round sun and rich natural surroundings make for the ideal equestrian equation. The most vibrant scene in Sotogrande is polo, followed by show jumping and more casual hacking and trail rides. Paola and Santiago are the ideal conductors of the next phase. She a personable and pert blond whose showjumping career has taken her to Palm Beach and across Europe. Santiago is a tall, dark, and handsome internationally ranked polo player. There’s a Disney movie in there. The Santa Maria Polo Club is the most prestigious and largest in Europe, with nine polo fields and a one-millionsquare-meter garden. Sotogrande is the Continued on page 74

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Riding with Endurance Equestrian in Alcaidesa Andalucia pine forests Sotogrande marina.

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Racing off Sotogrande.

Trocadero Sotogrande beach club.

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Continued from page 71

August stop on the international polo circuit, and Santa Maria helps host the majority. The stats are impressive, with more than 25 tournaments, 75,000 visitors, 220 teams, 800 players, and 2,500 horses making their way through the grounds each year. And as equestrian circuits so often are, polo is the hub for social connectivity. The evening matches are events in themselves, with Veuve Clicquot practically on tap, lithe young men and women with model pouts traipsing about, and DJs spinning into the wee hours. It’s a touch point for the community.

opened in 1987, and the more recent Ribiera del Marlin. The waterfront is alive with apartments, shops, and restaurants. In the summer there’s a meandering Sunday market and evening alfresco pop-ups. The food is predominately Spanish—plump olives, freshly charred octopus where a delightful smokiness permeates your mouth, and cured meats colored a deep-maroon. Elsewhere, palm trees fan the poolside at the Trocadero Sotogrande, an all-day and -night beach club, restaurant, and bar. The entire resort is personified by Gigi’s Beach, a laid-back beach bar set on the warm caramel sand. The menu is casual—heaping salads and fresh-off-thegrill fish and meats, and the ambiance and natural soundtrack is such that any five-star spa would want to come by and record them.

SOPHIE TRIAY

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here’s also amateur show jumping aplenty, and Paola is working hard to bring a grand-prix tour to the area once a new set of facilities are completed. There are also a number of public and private facilities throughout Sotogrande, the best-known stables and lesson barn being the Sotogrande Equestrian Centre Hipica. With 103 stalls, a dressage and show-jumping ring, a cross-country course, and a pleasant restaurant onsite, Hipica is a bustling riding school. It’s commonplace to find pigtailed pony-club children tugging their obstinate ponies through the yard, and grooms busy clipping and primping clients’ horses for show season. The smaller San Roque club, with 22 stalls, is also popular with locals and visitors alike and formerly hosted the Asprey Cup, a renowned dressage and show-jumping weekend currently on hiatus. The area’s other huge draw is its trails and beaches. With natural assets in abundance, Sotogrande is a popular spot for hacking and leisurely rides. The onsite firm Endurance Equestrian is run by Dutch equestrian expert Ferdy Coopman, who is fluent in English, German, Spanish, and his native Dutch. Ferdy has worked with polo ponies in Argentina

La Reserva chef Cristina Gutierres Bergue.

and Belgium, race horses in Mijas, and endurance horses in Estepona (both not far from Sotogrande), and is a guide certified by the Royal Spanish Equestrian Federation. From the unspoiled Guadalquiton beach with soaring views of the Strait of Gibraltar and Africa to wooded paths and mountain ranges, he’ll lead riders through over 3,700 acres of trails. Partway through the ride, guests can stop beneath a canopy of pines and cork trees, where, like a mirage, Ferdy’s wife, Cristina Sempere, appears with a picnic basket teeming with rich cheeses, meats, and freshly made salads. There is of course a world beyond the equestrian offerings. Golf courses account for much of area; there are restaurants aplenty and a resplendent marina. Silver and white masts line both the original Marina Puerto Deportivo de Sotogrande,

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a Reserva is the pièce de résistance of the area and is set to take Sotogrande into the next century. What started as a well-designed golf course and clubhouse is growing to encompass a vast parkland and a new series of design-focused villas. The green spaces are overseen by the celebrated French landscape artist, Jean Mus, whose aim is to blend the rich natural environment with traditional Spanish marble, slate, and granite pathways and footbridges. Seven different architects will leave their imprint on one of each of the seven new villas set to open in 2018. “The villas are interpretations of each architect’s vision of the family home as a personal journey,” explains Marc Topiol, Sotogrande’s current CEO. “They will be a place for comfort, serenity, balance, protection, joy, freedom, and adventure.” If Joseph McMicking were alive today, this is surely just the kind of next step PAGE 113 he’d be taking.


PAWS UP PHOTO

Ocean view the guests gardens. The reception barnthrough welcomes to the resort’s village.

PHILIPPE PERDEREAU / ULMER

The decor of each guest room on the huge property is hand-selected by owner Nadine Lipson.

Garden with lavendar plants olive and cypress trees. A “pop-up” banquet awaited us out and on the range.

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Paige, Katherine, and Mark Bellissimo with one of their rescue minihorses at their Far Niente farm in Wellington, Florida.

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INTERVIEW WITH EQUESTRIAN LIVING MAJOR PHOTOGRAPHY BY T. PERRY

MEET THE BELLISSIMOS In his own words, Mark Bellissimo shares his thoughts on horse shows, Wellington, Florida, and the FEI World Equestrian Games in Tryon, North Carolina.

W

hen you bought the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF) in Wellington, did you have any idea what it was going to turn into?

I didn’t, but I will say this. As a pony father, I observed the passion my children and my wife had for horse sports. You can tell when they’ve been on a horse. It’s very amazing to see the impact that horses have on humans. So, I knew there was a great opportunity. I believed that if you created a product that was much more respectful to the exhibitors and competitors in terms of quality of the experience, quality of footing, quality of prize

Mark and Katherine Bellissimo serve as managing partners for many of the world’s largest and most prominent equestrian venues located in North America. Their current properties include the Colorado Horse Park in Parker, Colorado; International Polo Club and Palm Beach International Equestrian Center in Wellington, Florida; and Tryon International Equestrian Center at Tryon Resort in Mill Spring, North Carolina. Their

company, International Equestrian Group, also operates and manages the Rolex Central Park Horse Show in New York City. The biggest project for the team to date will be the FEI World Equestrian Games, which will be hosted at Tryon International Equestrian Center at Tryon Resort in September 2018. The event, which will last two weeks in September, will welcome more than 500,000 spectators over its duration.

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As long as we own (WEF), admission will be free.

money—that the sport could grow. I felt confident that we could repackage it to a point where it could be much more interesting to a mainstream audience. The former owners charged money, from my understanding, as a way to keep people out. I think that Wellington was a private club for the privileged few. Our fundamental goal from the start was to really try to highlight the passion that people have for horses. You don’t have to be an Olympic rider. The connection point is so very powerful and very strong. For example, each year 8 million people will snow ski, 23 million people will pick up a tennis racket, 25 million people will pick up a golf club, but the largest number, 27 million people, will ride a horse. People don’t understand that. That’s a very important element of our success. But from a sport perspective, it’s hard to get an audience. When you look at our events, we’ll have anywhere from 6,000 to 8,000 people at them. Most other equestrian events don’t, so if you go to an event, the organizer has no incentive to increase the spectator base or the sponsor base. We’ve opened it up to a much broader audience. Part of the reason for the carousel that sits in the front of the stadium was a statement to say, “As long as we own it the admission will be free, and the carousel will be free.” Anyone who wants to experience equestrian sport, whether it’s riding on a carousel or observing an Olympic rider, is welcome here. I think that has changed a lot of the dynamics within the community in the acceptance of the sport as something that’s very inclusive, versus very exclusive.

Above: Mark Bellissimo with minihorses, Starsky and Hutch. Right: Mark and Katherine with Daisy, their Great Pyrenees.

What happens when you open it up to this broader audience? Does the sport lose its mystique?

There was a group of people—they’re a much smaller minority now than they were—that felt my approach was disruptive to the status quo and tradition. The reality is that equestrian sports is a challenge right now. It hasn’t grown in 10 years, and in some areas, it’s in decline. My fundamental view is that you can change that trajectory, but you have to be innovative, and you have to start thinking about how this industry should evolve. Unfortunately, I think there’s much more effort and energy put into preserving the status quo. There’s nothing that has killed more companies or industries or organizations than preserving the status quo, because it really comes down to evolution versus revolution. I think there’s been an evolution that has taken the sport in a different direction. I think there needs to be some new energy that allows it to be much more accessible to a mainstream audience. If it’s not accessible to a mainstream audience, it will always be a fringe sport. Sports like golf and tennis made their transitions in the ‘70s, ‘80s, and ‘90s from country-club sports that were rarely seen by the public. Are you going to follow the same philosophy in Tryon?

Tryon will be built from the start to be more of a Disney-like experience. At Disney, if you want to stay at the luxury Grand Floridian and you want to spend a lot of money per night, you can do that. If you want to stay in a cabin, or a more moderately priced hotel, you can do that, Continued on page 82

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Both pages: The Franklin, Tennessee, home of Christian’s parents, Agneta and Brownlee Currey. At right, a portrait of Robert Brownlee Currey, the first mayor of Nashville. Lower left, Agneta Currey.


I

I’m not a developer. My background is fundamentally centered around business turnarounds. Continued from page 78

too. So, our whole goal there is to try to introduce equestrian sports to an even broader audience.

changeover from the former council. I think that people spoke up. The reality is that most communities in America need jobs. Unfortunately, With the FEI World Equestrian there’s a small group of people who Games coming to Tryon next year, believe that preserving the status quo is you’re going to have to get accommore important than building an indusmodations quickly! try first and foremost for this community. I just started a construction factory to People personalized it to me as, “He’s build hotels, condos, and apartments. a developer.” In reality, I’m not a developer. That’s not my background. My How is Tryon taking to the changes background is fundamentally centered and the development? around business turnarounds. I’ve worked We have the largest support in Polk in areas from health care to manufacturCounty. We have over 500 employees. ing. I’ve worked in software technology. Everyone has been absolutely spectacular. I’ve worked in the airline industry. This I think in general that has probably been venue was a struggling business. WEF one of the most rewarding experiences. was very small compared to what it is The textile industry had decimated that now. It was losing a ton of money every whole area, and it had some of the tough- year, and we turned it around. Our ecoest unemployment within the state. We nomic impact to Palm Beach County is came in there and have really changed over $200 million a year now. We generpeople’s thinking on the county’s trajecated 150,000 hotel room nights. tory. People are much more hopeful than they were, because they were in a place And there is basically only the where nothing was happening, and it was Hampton Inn in Wellington? just in decline. Kids were moving out Only 8,000 in Wellington for the and families were struggling. Now, we’ve Hampton Inn, and, by the way, it’s the had a very significant impact, and very, most expensive Hampton Inn in the very quickly. We spent $150 million in United States. You don’t understand the 16 months. That has employed thouimpact of that. Right now, it’s very hard sands of people. It’s all privately funded. to stay in Wellington. Renters are requirIt’s a group of families that we are work- ing four-month stays. That’s a structural ing with who really believe in and love problem that has a long-term impact. equestrian sport and also have become I’m making movements towards changvery engaged at transforming a commuing that and hopefully being successful. nity around equestrian sport. We’ll be introducing a lot of people to the sport. How will your new eventing and gladiator polo be part of WEF? And the climate here in Wellington?

Wellington needs to evolve in terms of its thinking about things. Now, with the recent local elections, there was a big

Those events have brought new owners and are bringing new energy into the sport. I think eventing is an important part of our philosophy. Polo, eventing,

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jumping, dressage, and I’ve been trying to do two steeplechases. Our business is around promoting the equestrian lifestyle. I think that’s what a lot of people missed. It’s not about a show-jumping competition, it’s not about dressage, it’s not about polo. It’s about how you build an environment that is respectful to the connection between horses and humans from a lifestyle perspective. Are the sponsors of gladiator polo different?

They’re all over the place. Bank of America, U.S. Trust, Merrill Lynch, we’ve got four beer companies, we’ve got spirits companies. We’ve got some equestrian companies that sponsor at WEF, some go to polo, some to dressage. Some are just in the community. The model is different. This will be a transition point for the industry. In lieu of going out and trying to get massive sponsorships, we put these jerseys on them with logos of all the sponsors. So it’s much more of a NASCAR model, and we are able to get a tremendous amount of revenue. It’s unprecedented in total. We are creating a professional league in polo. Lastly about this farm. How did it get its name?

Far Niente is Italian for “without a care.” It’s also a wine. We had a summer home in New Hampshire near Lake Winnipesaukee that was sort of our special place. We were drinking the wine one time and just said, “What a great name for a wine! What a great name for a farm!” So, our farm up north is Far Niente, and so is our farm here, and in South Carolina too.


ROBERT HANSEN

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A

BARN IN THE

BACKYARD This huge, timber-frame hay barn, originally built circa 1850 in New York’s Hudson River Valley, traveled to Texas and now lives in Greenwich, Connecticut.


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his barn-turned-guesthouse in Greenwich, Connecticut, began life in 1850 as a pine and hemlock barn from New Scotland, New York. The Hudson River Valley structure was found and purchased by Kevin Durkin and his team at Heritage Barns, who shipped it to their workshop in Texas, where it was refinished and fumigated for insects. The structure is an English-framed hay barn from an era when barns began to get larger following the opening of the Erie Canal in 1825. The canal transformed agriculture in New England and New York. With a new ability to ship products by the water, hay was becoming a cash crop. Farmers began specializing—growing all corn or all hay, for example—rather than continuing the diverse agriculture that was prevalent in the The original upstate Hudson Valley, New York, barn before restoration. 1700s. Historically, the original barn was remarkable in that it was both large and hand-hewn. With the advent of sawmills, such hand-hewn, timber-frame structures died out. Luckily, this barn’s beauty lives on today, enhanced by new finishes and furnishings as well as a solarium and a wine cellar. PAGE 113


Horse in abstracted landscape 21, acrylic on panel, 16 inches by 20 inches


HOR SES AWA SH IN COLOR AND LIGHT Artist STAN FELLOWS finds inspiration in his new American West surroundings.

Horse in abstracted landscape 12 Oil on canvas 48 inches by 36 inches

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I understand your background is in watercolors. Is that still your preferred medium?

Watercolor was a first love and I still enjoy it as a medium for journaling, but of late I've been more interested in oils, in part because of the ability to work larger. The small, 8-by-10 inch oils are studies for pieces that may be rendered on a grander scale.

A SH ORT IN T E RVIEW W ITH S TAN F E LLOWS

PHOTO JASON HOUSTON

A lot of your painting is done on location. What are some of the challenges you encounter?

Following a lifetime career as an illustrator, artist Stan Fellows has for the last 10 years increasingly dedicated his creative focus to personal work. His illustrations have appeared in national publications such as Harper’s, Atlantic Monthly, Sports Illustrated, Martha Stewart Living, and The New York Times, as well as design firm and children’s book projects. His range of media and approaches is evidence of a curious mind—perfection and repetition being less interesting to him than exploration. A decade of personal challenge and loss motivated Fellows to start anew in Colorado, resulting in a consciously simplified lifestyle. “I’m fortunate to live in a place where getting outside to paint sounds like a good idea most days of the year,” Fellows says, “and it obviates the need for a studio.” Clearly this is no impediment to his prolific production.

Painting afield is tough but comes with its own set of rewards. There's an immediacy to on-location work due to the difficulty of heat, cold, sun, wind, and fatigue that forces one to concentrate and be decisive. One of the best paintings I made during my Iowa years was in a howling sleet storm. I figured if I could paint in those conditions, no future outing would be a problem. When in the field, do you sketch an idea and rely on memory for details when you get back to the studio?

Working from life is invaluable. The concentration required to memorize what you're seeing, particularly in the case of a subject that is moving, sharpens your ability to take mental snapshots. In my approach, it doesn't look like the classic plein-air scene of a person at an easel copying a subject. I generally just stand there observing, and this can go on for a long time, and then I'll see something that clicks and I'll quickly do a small, primitive drawing with written notes and then paint when I'm back in the truck or at home. This removal from the actual scene allows time for minutiae to drift away and the essence of the painting to solidify in my mind. What draws you to horses as subjects?

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accurate. I've always enjoyed gestural drawings of people, and my abstracted landscapes in recent years have become a fascinating puzzle of shapes. In both cases my interest is not in detail but in shape and composition. One day, a private watercolor student took me to her horse farm, and I fell in love with the ambiance there and returned many times. Along the way I started to become familiar with the anatomy of horses and realized this subject would satisfy my interest in capturing gesture. Are horses difficult subjects?

Oh my, yes. I can draw pretty well, but the first time I tried a horse I swore it had 7 legs and 35 joints. The breakthrough for me came when, to my great surprise, I got one right, and from that day forward I changed my mindset from “this is impossible” to “I can do this.” I shrugged off bad drawings as anomalous, and I relaxed and quit trying so hard. Eventually I was able to see them better. Many of your horses are in abstract settings. Can you elaborate on how that evolved?

I enjoy the form of horses, but I’m not interested in making a portrait. The abstracted elements are particularly interesting to me, so the horse in a painting is simply an element and part of the puzzle. When these two are combined, there's a multiplying effect—it becomes more engaging to me than just an abstracted landscape or just a horse. How does the light and climate of Colorado impact your palettes?

Moving to Colorado after a lifetime in the Midwest was like relief from chronic pain—you get used to the pain and no longer notice that life is somewhat diminished by it. I had no idea how much clear, dry light mattered to me until I left the milky, humid light of the Midwest and began to enjoy seeing crisp shapes and compositions every day. continued on page 94


Horse amid the quadrants Oil on panel 8 inches by 10 inches

Watercolor study 8 inches by 10 inches

Watercolor study 6 inches by 6 inches

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Equine at wood’s edge, watercolor, 8 inches by 10 inches


“I CAN DRAW PRETTY WELL, BUT THE FIRST TIME I TRIED A HORSE I SWORE IT HAD 7 LEGS AND 35 JOINTS.”

Equine study Oil on panel 8 inches by 10 inches

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continued from page 90

Out here, a drive can be a fascinating torrent of compositions—sharply defined trees casting shadows that articulate the musculature of the lawns, or a bright sidewalk meeting the dark street. Upon return I'm filled with ideas for paintings. Are you a horse person?

I'm actually a little afraid of horses, not having been exposed to them in my youth. I’ve always been intimidated by their power, so what’s been happening recently is a near miracle in my mind. I’ve become interested in learning to ride, but for an unusual reason. I love painting horses, and I know from other subjects—hockey for example—that if I rode, my understanding of the subject would expand enormously. What have you learned from your time observing horses?

My favorite part of any subject has to do with reduction and looking for the fewest number of strokes that will convey the essence of the scene. There's no substitute for spending lots of time observing without preconceptions about what you'll see and simply learning by osmosis. A landscape will be cooperative and stand still while you do this. Not so with horses. The patience required to gain an understanding of them was critical. I had to relax, observe, and not be afraid to go home empty-handed.

Horse in abstracted landscape 17 Oil on panel 8 inches by 10 inches

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Can you tell us what someone might discover on the back of your paintings?

Like many people, I find preliminary studies and notes compelling and informative, so I’ve gotten in the habit of doing those on the back of the panel I’m painting. These notes organize my thinking before painting, but if done in a sketchbook they are often misplaced or thrown away, which is frustrating when I’m ready to start a painting. By jotting and sketching directly on the panel back I know where they are, and they may be PAGE 113 interesting to a buyer.


T H E F I N E S T H O M E S , FA R M S , A N D

RANCHES FROM E Q U E ST R I A N L I V I N G

EQ U E STR IAN EQLiving.com

PRO PERTI ES AUGUST/SEPTEMBER 2017

STEEPLE CHASE FARM WE L L I NGTON, FLOR IDA PAGE 96

®


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

STEEPLE CHASE FARM Wellington, Florida

W

elcome to Steeple Chase Farm. This rarely offered world class 10-acre equestrian estate is located in the heart of Wellington, the Winter Equestrian and Polo Capital of the World. Centrally located Steeple Chase Farm is only

minutes from all equestrian venues including the Winter Equestrian Festival (WEF), Global Dressage Festival (GDF) and the International Polo Club (IPC). No detail has been overlooked when it comes to the rider and the horse. The main stable has 14 stalls with water, wide aisles, Chicago brick, tack room, feed storage, tongue and groove wood

| EQ I VGI N| GAU| GU OCSTOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016 | EQU 96 96 E SUE T RSITARNI ALNI VLI N T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017

work, 130’ x 210’ riding arena prepared with sand, silica and GGT fiber with full irrigation, 11 oversized paddocks, exercise track, horse walker, fly spray system and laundry. A breezeway connects the main stable to a separate riders lounge that overlooks the paddocks and riding arena. There are two additional stables with 6 and 4 stalls


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

– – – – – – – – – –

respectively. The equipment storage and staff housing are located here as well. The main residence is exquisite with nearly 5,000 square feet under air. The open floor plan flows throughout with spacious living, dining and professional gourmet kitchen areas. The 4 bedrooms all have en-suite baths with an additional 2 – half baths. The private pool is

PROPERTY HIGHLIGHTS: 10 Acre Equestrian Estate Exquisite 4 Bedroom - 4.2 Bath Home Spectacular Open Floor Plan Private Pool & Patio with Florida Kitchen 2 Stables with 24 Stalls Separate Riders Lounge 11 Lush Oversized Paddocks  130’ X 210’ Riding Arena 12’ x 12’ Stalls with Water 2 Private Gated Entrances

just off the main house and master suite with partial paddock views. The screened Florida kitchen is perfect for entertaining at poolside. This one of a kind property is accessed through 2 gated entrances providing privacy for the main residence while allowing direct access to the stables for guests and deliveries. $6,950,000

DAVID WELLES, P.A. Founding Associate 561.313.9123 dwelles@equestriansir.com www.wellesrealestate.com

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 7


E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

GETTING REAL ABOUT HORSES ON TRAILS Educating landowners about the perceptions and realities of equestrian trails. BY CHELLE GRALD, GMHA TRAILS AND RIDES MANAGER

V

ermont’s Green Mountain Horse Association (GMHA) is at the center of a rich network of multiuse trails that roam over 117 square miles. GMHA accesses close to 400 miles of trail and dirt roads, which span the four towns of Woodstock, Hartland, Reading, and West Windsor. If you were determined to ride all of them, it would take you about 19 days at a rate of 20 miles per day. Because the trails cross a mosaic of private and municipal lands, educating landowners about the reality of equestrian trails on their land is paramount for both goodwill and trail easements, and is an issue of interest to trail organizations nationwide. The paradox of living in a trail-rich environment is that the more trail users there are, the bigger the potential for conflict. At the root of this conflict are varying goals for the trail. Hikers, bikers, snowmobilers, ATV operators, and equestrians all have different versions of the perfect trail experience. Landowners may or may not share the vision of all users but may favor one or two. One group may be more active and involved than another, causing its voice to be heard and its wishes to be met to the detriment of other users. In short, it can get ugly. As equestrians, we have a responsibility to be involved in local trail-use issues wherever they crop up. A spirit of cooperation and compromise and a willingness to put our hands and backs into the solution will go a long way for the overall health

Perception: Trail horses pollute water. Reality: Piles of manure

of our trails. We need to step up—not just as organizations, but as individuals. When we do, it is helpful to arm ourselves with knowledge about horses and trail use. There are perceptions and realities. It pays to know the difference. The Equestrian Land Conservation Resource in Lexington, Kentucky, is dedicated to helping horse people like us preserve open spaces and trails. They recently published an article entitled Considering Trail Closures on Public Agency Lands: U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service, which contains useful information for multiuse trail discussions. This is ammunition for you as trails are discussed in your communities, particularly when closure of horse trails looms possible. I’ve shared some it here and encourage you to explore further by visiting the group’s website: ELCR.org. The following are some of the issues we at GMHA find as landowner concerns. CHELLE GRALD is the trails and rides manager at the Green Mountain Horse Association in South Woodstock, Vermont.

along the trail may be unsightly to some or inconvenient to navigate around, but they are not biohazards. There is little evidence to show that manure or urine from horses on trails contributes in any substantial way to pollution of surface or ground water. Recent scientific studies confirm that adult horse guts do not significantly contain E. coli, Salmonella, Cryptosporidium, or Giardia, which are the organisms of most concern in water-borne spread of disease. Manure deposits on trails lose their nitrogen rapidly. Compared with that of other large livestock, horse manure is relatively dry and hot due to unique digestive enzymes and flora. Once deposited, it breaks down and becomes environmentally neutral in three weeks. There is very little data about the effects of horse manure and urine on ground water or surface water when it is deposited on the trail. Bacteria and nutrient effects are seldom detectable except next to stables where horses are concentrated. Mother Nature has a buffering ability when even as little as 10 feet of vegetation is available at the side of a trail. It is important, however, not to allow your horse to urinate or defecate directly in water. Perception: Horses spread the seeds of invasive species. Reality: It is very unlikely that invasive

species seeds will germinate when carried in horse manure. A study funded by an Continued on page 102

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S EQ

E S S E N T I A L S | T R AV E L

1000 Brandywine Creek Rd, West Brandywine, PA 19320

Here is the opportunity you have been waiting for- country living while still being close to Philadelphia and Wilmington! This 141 Acre farm offers the space, utility and most importantly, the view to make your equestrian dreams come true! Nestled within the picturesque countryside of Cheshire Hunt and bordered by the Brandywine River, this amazing property is protected under conservancy and provides three approved building sites to build your dream home-all with views overlooking the tranquil Brandywine. This equestrian facility is one of the only in the area to offer a nine acre polo field with irrigation hookup and attached outdoor riding ring with lights and sprinkler system- this spectacular amenity has possible commercial and private club use. For the horse enthusiast, there are ten turn out fields all with running water, five turn out sheds, and three well appointed barns. With miles upon miles of riding trails, a tennis court with sprinkler system and a breath taking outside dining pavilion- this is your chance to own your little piece of heaven! Opportunities like this do not come often; call today for more information! 1000BRANDYWINECREEKRD.go2frr.com Meghan Chorin Associate Broker, REALTOR (610) 299-9504 (Direct) (610) 651-2700 (Office Main) Email: Meghan.Chorin@foxroach.com www.meghanchorin.com 431 West Lancaster Avenue Devon, PA 19333

$3,475,000 1000 Brandywine Creek Rd, West Brandywine, PA 19320 OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 20 1 6 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 9 9


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR SPORTS & ENTERTAINMENT

GREENVIEW SHORES II. Enjoy the best of waterfront living at this beautiful Lake Wellington home that’s ready for your arrival. The interior boasts a stunning kitchen with wooden cabinets and granite countertops, while the backyard offers plenty of space and a quaint dock that overlooks the lake. This home is primely located, just a short drive from top schools, shopping and the horse shows. $629,000

AERO CLUB HOME. This stately 4 bedroom, 3 bath home is located directly on the runway. The residence features a spacious marble pool area, direct runway views, an expansive hanger and a full acre of land. With over 5,500 immaculate feet under air, the property is perfect for those wishing to fly their private jet or helicopter to Wellington for the winter season. $1,695,000

PALM BEACH POINT EAST FARM. A short hack away from PBIEC, this incredible 10-acre farm is fit for any professional rider. The 12-stall centeraisle stable recently underwent a full renovation and is complete with the finest amenities. The property features a spacious owner’s lounge with full kitchen and 2.5 bathrooms, a large grand prix field and a new ring with top-grade fiber footing. BUY $6,700,000 | RENT $50,000 mth.

AERO CLUB ESTATE. Sleek, stunning, and completely renovated, this Aero Club home features 4 bedrooms and 4 full baths. Light and bright, with vaulted ceilings, wood beams, and an abundance of impact glass windows. Other features include, gorgeous wood floors, a brand new kitchen with gas cooking, and a large island. Exterior renovations include, a new roof, new pool, and marble patio area, and a completely fenced spacious backyard. This luxurious and well appointed home is located just a short golf cart ride from the Wellington Horse Show Grounds. $1,695,000

MARTHA W. JOLICOEUR, PA BROKER ASSOCIATE 797 8040 10 0 | E Q UE S T R I A N561 L I V IN G | OC TOB ER/ N OVEMB ER | 2016

www.marthasproperties.com


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

MARTHASPROPERTIES.COM FARMS & ESTATES, WELLINGTON, FL

CHATEAU-INSPIRED EQUESTRIAN ESTATE. This stunning chateau-inspired estate sits on 5.44 acres and boasts a large covered patio with a summer kitchen and an infinity pool. For equestrians, the property delivers in all regards with 5 turnout paddocks, a 120x230 foot all-weather Riso arena, a walker, and a fully-equipped 12-stall stable with a new storage building. $7,950,000

PALM BEACH POINT ESTATE. This beautiful and completely redone estate sits on 5.4 meticulously landscaped acres. The split bedroom floor plan boasts 5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, new floors, high impact glass windows, and glass doors. Outside, enjoy a covered patio with summer kitchen and pool, a 120x230 foot riding arena, 7 paddocks, and an 8 stall center aisle barn. $5,900,000

PALM BEACH POLO CLUB BUNGALOW. With both IPC and the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center close by, this newly-renovated home falls nothing short of phenomenal. The property is complete with a 1 bedroom/1 bath guest cottage and a 3 bedroom/2.5 bath main home, in which everything is new, including impact windows and doors, custombuilt kitchen and cathedral wood ceilings. $749,000

AERO CLUB ESTATE. If hopping on a jet in your own backyard sounds like a dream come true, it’s time that you make your move to this fabulous, beautifully renovated 3 bedroom, 3 bathroom home, with a brand new roof at Wellington Aero Club. The property offers the unique opportunity to build your own hangar for your jet, and features its own personal taxiway lot. $1,450,000

PROVIDING THE HIGHEST LEVEL OF PROFESSIONAL REAL ESTATE SERVICE

FOR THE GLOBAL EQUESTRIAN COMMUNITY

OC TOB E R/NOVE MB E R | 2016 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 0 1

1111 LINCOLN RD, MIAMI BEACH, FL 33139. 305.695.6300 © 2017 DOUGLAS ELLIMAN REAL ESTATE. ALL MATERIAL PRESENTED HEREIN IS INTENDED FOR INFORMATION PURPOSES ONLY. WHILE, THIS INFORMATION IS BELIEVED TO BE CORRECT, IT IS REPRESENTED SUBJECT TO ERRORS, OMISSIONS, CHANGES OR WITHDRAWAL WITHOUT NOTICE. ALL PROPERTY INFORMATION, INCLUDING, BUT NOT LIMITED TO SQUARE FOOTAGE, ROOM COUNT, NUMBER OF BEDROOMS AND THE SCHOOL DISTRICT IN PROPERTY LISTINGS ARE DEEMED RELIABLE, BUT SHOULD BE VERIFIED BY YOUR OWN ATTORNEY, ARCHITECT OR ZONING EXPERT. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY.


E EQ Q U EUSETSRTI R A INA N P RPORPO E RT P E IRETS I E S

HORSES ON TRAILS Continued from page 98

American Endurance Ride Conference research grant conducted on trails in the Eastern U.S. found that germination and survivorship of non-native plants on the trail was extremely low. Furthermore, there was no difference between horse trails and hiking trails in this rate of germination. The equine gut is very efficient in processing seeds, and the environment in the manure pile finishes off any survivors. It is recommended that equestrians avoid distributing any unused hay, which is a more likely carrier of viable nonnative seeds. Perception: Horses trample native plant species. Reality: All users trample native

plant species. Horses, because of their size, have the potential to do the most nonmotorized, per capita damage. As equestrian trail users, we should take responsibility to minimize our impact by staying on the trail and not tying to trees. Trail design has a large role to play here. Usually, trails are widened to the detriment of plant life because users go around muddy or wet areas, thinking that they are doing a good thing. Mitigation of mud and wet areas corrects the problem. If you see a wet area that is becoming a problem, consider donating money, time, or both to get it corrected. All users will thank you. Perception: Horses cause erosion and soil loss. Reality: In 1996, a five-year study

concluded that horse traffic was not the single dominant process. Trail degradation was a function of landform, climatic and catastrophic events, and geomorphic processes. So, natural processes are responsible for most erosion. But trail users certainly contribute to the process, and horses are part of the equation. Compare the impact of a single horse versus a single hiker on the same trail and the erosion, soil disturbance, and sediment creation will be three times more for the horse. That makes intuitive sense when you compare horses versus humans

and consider the size, weight, number of feet, and how they are shod. The important thing to consider when weighing this is that there are many more hikers and bikers on most trails than there are horses. An Outdoor Industry Association study in 2003 estimated that nationally there are 73 million hikers, 43 million single-track mountain bikers, and 4.3 million equestrians, with other smaller groups such as trail running. Most studies indicate that trail damage by mountain bikers is somewhere in between that of hikers and horses. So, if the trail traffic on a given day equals 57 hikers, 25 bikers and 7 horses, which user group is doing the most damage? This is why, in virtually every mixed-use trail reference in the nation, the horse has been defined as a passive, low-impact, or light-weight user, even in the most sensitive environments. In fact, horses actually help to aerate and break up areas of compaction in certain soil types and help to keep lessused single-track trails open and viable. As riders, we can do our part by staying off the trails when they are wet and being willing to help build culverts, bridges, and other water-management structures. Perception: Horses disturb wildlife. Reality: Studies show that horses, and

the riders on them, are less a disturbance to wildlife than any other type of user, including hikers. Horses are prey animals. They are herbivores and leave the trace scent of an herbivore on the trail. Humans, dogs, and cats are predators. As they walk, they leave the trace scent of an omnivore on the trail, and that can impact wildlife. Horses are recognized by wildlife as prey animals, even when a person is sitting on their back. Also, an approaching horse passing along a trail provides sound rhythms in the cadence of a four-footed, hoofed prey animal, which informs wildlife of a non-threatening presence. For reptiles, rodents, and other terrestrial life forms, the percussion pulse of the approaching horse provides warning. Being warned diminishes flushing/ flight response that consumes wildlife

energy. It is not uncommon to find deer, bobcat, and coyotes that allow horses to get within feet of them on trails before calmly moving off. Horses rarely step on lizards, mice, and other fast-moving wildlife. Riders can easily avoid slowmoving wildlife. Bennett and Zuelke (1999) undertook an extensive review of recreation effects on birds and concluded that disturbance from recreation has temporary effects on the behavior and movement of birds. Direct approaches caused greater disturbance than tangential approaches, rapid movement by joggers was more disturbing than slower hikers, children and photographers were especially disturbing, and passing or stopping vehicles were less disturbing than human foot traffic. Horses and riders did not disturb birds. How to Get Along

Sharing trails may not provide the ideal trail experience for every user—hikers will have to step around an occasional manure pile; bikers will have to slow down in low-visibility areas and learn to announce their presence to other users; and equestrians will have to prepare their horses to tolerate fast-moving vehicles, joggers with baby carriages, and other strange sights and sounds. In most cases, it is worth the price to have more trails to enjoy than any one user-group would have under separate but equal status. The Vermont Horse Council offers a publicservice announcement called Hikers, Bikers, and Hooves that helps educate other trail users on the unique needs of equestrians. It is freely available at www. vthorsecouncil.org/safety. Consider sharing it with your local non-horse trail-use groups as a great way to open the lines of communication. As equestrians, we need to both advocate for trails and be willing to give up a few days of riding to do some trail work. When we work and play alongside other trail users, we often find that we share far more in common than otherwise, and it’s a win-win for us—and the trails. PAGE 113

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E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S EQ

E S S E N T I A L S | T R AV E L

Four Seasons, Peapack-Gladstone, NJ  

Gerry-Jo Cranmer

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EQ P E O P L E

A WOMAN WITH A MALLET Continued from page 32

NOW, ALL I NEED ARE SPECTATORS IN FANCY HATS.

JAY GIARDINA

I

t wasn’t quite the polo I’d lusted after in my youth. But the speed! The contact! The absolute thrill of galloping somewhere for a purpose! I was actually playing polo. I wasn’t a sedentary writer with rapidly diminishing eyesight. I was an athlete. Periodically during that first match, Alison stopped the action to point out “teaching moments,” a euphemism for “one of you just fouled.” She usually found a way to transform even our most laughable efforts into something celebratory. At one point, witnessing our inability to free the ball from underneath our knot of ponies, she scooped it away and scored an astonishing goal herself, giving us a glimpse of the grace and power we could aspire to

decided to recover off to the right. My second spill occurred when my horse decided to test my seat by abruptly stopping from a canter. I did a full flip in the air over his neck and came down hard on my backside. I spent the rest of the game trotting dejectedly behind the gutsy 12-yearold, who instructed me, in no uncertain terms, to “get my head back in the game.” I felt rusty and fearful, and not a little jealous. These kids had their entire young adulthoods to perfect the sport. I was just one more fall away from having a permanently bad back. Despite the falls, the risk of more falls, and the vast chunk of time the sport trequires out of my workweek, I keep playing. There’s not another area of my life that currently demands the kind of confidence and risk taking that polo does. On Wednesday nights, I’m not a mom, I’m ageless; I’m not having a hard time working on a novel, I am a woman with a mallet, mounted on a horse, enjoying the small victories of one of the world’s oldest games. And, for the first time in a long time, I’m not alone. My polo matches give me something missing from my long years of self-employment: teammates. The other night, when I was joking with the 12-year-old that I’d quit if I fell off again, she got serious. “You can’t quit,” she said. “You’re part of the team now.” After all these years, I’ve finally moved in from the edge of the field. Now, all I need are spectators in fancy hats. WIKICOMMONS

lessons, I could join her beginner’s league for a practice match. My first match with these folks was on a dark night in November. Our bush league consisted mostly of young kids: an 18-year-old show jumper, a 16-year-old collector of sunken World War II tank photos, a 15-year-old computer whiz and “deep web” fanatic, and an absurdly gifted 12-year-old who—literally—ran circles around us all night. Our coach, Alison, an impassioned polo player and veterinary surgeon, generously encouraged my skittish ride-offs and forgave the time (O.K., times), I hit my own pony with the mallet.

Felix and Courtney.

if we stuck with the game. Sticking with polo has meant playing with this motley crew every Wednesday night for months now, seldom with grace. The first time I fell off my horse was thanks to a teammate who struck my pony in the head with his mallet, sending me flying to the left where I’d been going for a nearside, while the poor pony

10 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017


E Q U E S T R I A N P R O P E RT I E S

TROPHY EQUESTRIAN ESTATE

in the heart of Santa Ynez Valley

3720-3800 BASELINE AVENUE, SANTA YNEZ

T

rophy Equestrian Estate is nestled in the heart of the serene Santa Ynez Valley and is within close proximity to world-renowned vet clinics. Behind grand iron gates is a 110+/- acre ranch that is an absolute horseman’s paradise. Built around 2006 as a state of the art breeding and training facility, the ranch consists of a Tudor-style main residence, newly built and beautifully finished manager’s quarters, 3 Barns with groom’s quarters, presentation and working arenas, round pen, hot walker, breeding area and lab, grain silo, endless acres of fenced and crossed fenced

pastures and paddocks with top of the line vinyl fencing, and an abundant water source from 3 wells. Priced well below replacement cost. This offering is available 3 different ways. The 45+/- acre parcel with homes, equestrian improvements and 2 wells if offered at $4,950,000. The 65+/- acre parcel with hay barn and 1 well is offered at $3,700,000. Both parcels can be purchased together for $8,550,000.

CAREY KENDALL 805.689.6262 | carey@clkre.com careykendall.com | CalBRE 00753349

All information provided is deemed reliable, but has not been verified and we do not guarantee it. We recommend that buyers make their own inquiries.

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EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

MONTANA COWBOY COCKTAIL F L AVO

LOC

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The HUCKLEBERRY HOUND is a favorite of ranch guests at PAWS UP resort.

RY

COURTESY PAWS UP

T UN CO ITES E RS OR H O FAV

HUCKLEBERRY HOUND Ingredients 1 bottle of 440North Idaho Huckleberry Vodka or other premium Vodka 16 ounces huckleberry syrup 1 can limeade 4 empty limeade cans of water

10 6 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017

BEALL & THOMAS PHOTOGRAPHY

T

he Huckleberry Hound is a true cowboy cocktail and is a signature drink of the Paws Up resort. Montana is known for the uniquely Pacific-Northwestern huckleberry, and its great local flavor makes the cocktail go down like lemonade. The drink is best made in a Montana-sized pitcher instead of an individual glass and served around a campfire.

About Paws Up: Glamping, a portmanteau of glamour and camping, has become a popular draw for travelers in search of a luxurious outdoor experience. Paws Up Resort claims to have coined the term. The sprawling 37,000-acre property sits on the banks of the Blackfoot River, 30 miles northeast of Missoula, Montana. Read Equestrian Living’s senior editor Jill Novotny’s travel diary in the October/November 2016 issue of Equestrian Living.

PAGE 113


EQ E S S E N T I A L S | F O O D + D R I N K

A TASTE OF THE HAMPTONS LOC LINDSAY MORRIS

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F L AVO R

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Almond’s JASON WEINER offers “honest, unpretentious French bistro fare at its best.*”

Y TR UN S CO ITE SE OR R V HO FA

Jason Weiner began his culinary career in Manhattan at two noted restaurants—Regine and China Grill. After working in these two hot spots, he headed to the West Coast and joined some of America’s top chefs in various restaurants. In 2001, Weiner headed back east to fulfill his dream and opened Almond, a French bistro in Bridgehampton, N.Y., with partner Eric Lemonides. Almond has a working relationship with a local Bridgehampton school sourcing produce from their organic student-run greenhouse. In fact, 90 percent of the restaurant’s produce from June through October comes from within a seven-mile radius of the restaurant. Celebrity diners have included Bill Clinton, Kelsey Grammer, Nathan Lane, New York Mets player Keith Hernandez, and Rihanna. In 2008, the team added Almond NYC in Manhattan’s Flat Iron district.

APPLE CRISP Ingredients (Serves 6) 8 semi-sweet large crisp apples such as Ginger Gold or Gala (peeled, cored, and quartered) Juice and zest of 1 lemon ¼ pound butter 1 cup sugar 1 scraped vanilla bean (hull reserved) Struesel topping ¾ cup brown sugar ¾ cup whole-wheat flour (we prefer Amber Waves Farm) 1 ½ teaspoons cinnamon ¼ cup butter softened

PREPARATION

LINDSAY MORRIS

1. Preheat oven to 435 degrees. 2. Toss the apples with the juice, zest, vanilla bean, and vanilla hull and let stand for 20 minutes. 3. Add the sugar and butter to a large heavy-bottom saute pan. 4. Whisking constantly, cook the sugar and butter on medium heat until they are a deep amber color. 5. Turn the heat all the way up and add your apples. 6. Toss the apples and cook until they have also taken on that amber color. 7. Add the apples to a preheated medium-sized casserole. 8. Give the crisps a nice liberal dusting of the struesel topping. 9. Cook for 15 minutes or until your crisp is bubbly and the streusel topping is—you guessed it—a deep amber color. 10. Mix until crumbly.

* Richard Jay Scholem of The New York Times. 10 8 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017

SERVING SUGGESTION

Serve with any or all of the following: honey, maple syrup, crème fraîche, whipped ricotta, vanilla ice cream, ginger sorbet. PAGE 113


MEDIA CORRIGAN ALDEN PHOTOS:

2017

SACRAMENTO INTERNATIONAL HORSE SHOW

MURIETA EQUESTRIAN CENTER

S E P T E M B E R 2 77 O C T O B E R 8

W W W . J U M P S A C T O . C O M


2017

Capital Challenge Presented by World Equestrian Center

September 29 - October 8

GEORGE KAMPER

capitalchallenge.org The next best thing to being there.

A LO NG S T RI D E B E YOND T H E E XP EC TE D Planning and Strategy Public Relations Marketing Branding Event Promotions Event Press Centers Email Marketing Social Media Websites Graphic Design Video Production Podcasts Sponsorship Support Product Launches Book Tours

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WHERE TO FIND IT Look for the symbol throughout the magazine to find out about featured products and services.

STYLE Page 12 Launer of London Launer.com DESIGN Page 18 Harrison Design Associates harrisondesigninc.com Board & Vellum Architecture and Design boardandvellum.com Scripps Networks Interactive Flynnside Out Productions flynnsideout.com Terracotta Design Build terracottadesignbuild.com FOOD + DRINK Page 22 The Withers Winery Thewitherswinery.com Page 106 The Resort at Paws Up pawsup.com Page 108 Almond almondrestaurant.com/s/ bridgehampton FASHION Page 24 Lisa Nelle California Show Couture lisanelle.com GIVING BACK Page 26 Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation southamptonanimalshelter.com TRAVEL Page 34 Vienna and the Lipizzaners www.srs.at Page 66 The Allure of Sotogrande Sotogrande.com FAVORITES Page 36 Spirit of the Horse By William Shatner Thomas Dunne Books us.macmillan.com/thomasdunne/ HORSE SHOWS Page 42 The Hampton Classic hamptonclassic.com Page 46 Washington International Horse Show wihs.org GOLD LIST Page 50 Adequan Global Dressage Festival Wellington, FL gdf.coth.com US Dressage Finals Lexington, KY usdf.org/usdressagefinals Dressage at Devon Devon, PA dressageatdevon.org Rolex Kentucky Three-Day kentuckythreedayevent.com Eventing Showcase Wellington, FL useventing.com/ wellington-eventing-showcase

Land Rover Burghley Horse Trials Stamford, UK burghley-horse.co.uk Winter Equestrian Festival Wellington, FL pbiec.coth.com CP National Horse Show Lexington, KY nhs.org Devon Horse Show Devon, PA devonhorseshow.net All American Quarter Horse Congress Richwood, OH quarterhorsecongress.com NRHA Futurity Oklahoma City, OK nrhafuturity.com National Reining Breeder's Cup Katy, TX nrbc.com International Polo Club Palm Beach, FL ipc.coth.com Aiken Polo Club Aiken, SC aikenpolo.org Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club Santa Barbara, CA sbpolo.com Dudley’s on Short Lexington, KY Dudleysrestaurant.com Red Fox Inn Middleburg, VA redfox.com Backstreets Bar and Grill Wellington, FL backstreetsbarandgrill.com Mille Fleurs millefleurs.com Rancho Santa Fe, CA Jake’s Del Mar, CA Jakesdelmar.com Dover Saddlery dover.com Tackeria tackeria.com Beval Saddlery beval.com Robert Ross RobertRealtyGroup.com Zach Davis kirkfarms.com/the-team/ zach-davis Visse Wedell vissewedell.com Martha Jolicoeur Wellington, FL marthasproperties.com Ariat ariat.com Ralph Lauren ralphlauren.com Barbour Barbour.com Hermès Usa.hermes.com David Yurman DavidYurman.com Coach coach.com CDW cwdsellier.com Devoucoux Devoucoux.com Charles Owen charlesowen.com Samshield Samshield.com/en GPA Helmets gpa-sport.com/en Tailored Sportsman thetailoredsportsman.com

Pikeur pikeur.de Vogel Vogelboots.com Parlanti parlanti.com Lucchese lucchese.com Tony Lama Tonylama.com Hunter Boots us.hunterboots.com LL Bean llbean.com Connemara Equestrian Escapes Galway, Ireland Connemaraequestrianescapes.com Castle Leslie Estate Glaslough, Ireland castleleslie.com Giraffe Manor Nairobi, Kenya thesafaricollection.com/properties/ giraffe-manor Snow Polo St. Moritz St. Moritz, Switzerland snowpolo-stmoritz.com The Home Ranch Clark, CO homeranch.com Twin Farms Barnard, VT twinfarms.com The Breakers Palm Beach, FL thebreakers.com The Inn on Biltmore Estate Asheville, NC biltmore.com World Equestrian Games inside.fei.org/fei/events/fei-weg Dublin Horse Show dublinhorseshow.com Olympic Games olympic.org Danny And Ron's Rescue dannyronsrescue.org Makers Mark Secretariat Center Secretariatcenter.org Equestrian Aid Foundation eaf.org Return to Freedom returntofreedom.org The Buffalo Therapeutic Riding Center hebtrc.org Vinceremos Therapeutic Riding Center vinceremos.org Pegasus Therapeutic Riding pegasustr.org Featherlite Fthr.com Sundowner sundownertrailer.com 4 Star Trailers 4startrailers.com

Visit us at

Saugerties, NY DURING

THE $1 MILLION GRAND PRIX SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 10th Enjoy our Wine at THE TAVERN AT DIAMOND MILLS

A BARN IN THE BACKYARD Page 84 Heritage Restorations Heritagebarns.com GALLERY Page 88 Stan Fellows stanfellows.com EQUESTRIAN PROPERTIES Page 108 Trails Green Mountain Horse Association gmhainc.org

H U D S O N

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Staatsburg, New York mileaestatevineyard.com AUGUST /SE PT E MB E R | 2 0 1 7 | EQ L I V I NG .CO M | 1 1 3


EQ B A R N D O G S

MEET ROOFO AND HOMER Pony trainer BILL SCHAUB shares the story of his two rescued dogs.

L

ast year I got Roofo, a big German shepherd, from Danny and Ron’s Rescue. There’s something about when you get a rescue dog; I don’t know what it is. When you’re the person who picks them up, it’s like they know. That dog is my big baby. He wants to be my lap dog. He’s really good around the barn, and he loves kids. But let me tell you, he’s fine as long as I’m here, but don’t you dare come through at night. My neighbor didn’t like the big dog barking at night, so I locked him up and that night, would you believe my truck got stripped—the whole inside stripped out of it. “Well, you’re going to have to live with the barking,” I told my neighbor, “because he’s barking for a reason.” I got Homer, the black and tan Rottweiler-Lab mix from Danny and Ron this year. Danny was at the pound in Wellington, and he said, “This dog is for Bill.” He has turned out to be the best dog. He’s so sweet with the kids, and he likes to play. He’s gotten really shiny and stocky. He’s a beautiful dog.

know. What dogs understand is incredible—they sense so much. I’ve kind of become a crazy dog person. The dogs are just part of the family. So now I have an assortment of dogs. We have... one, two, three... six dogs. Oh my god, yes, I have six dogs. Maybe I am a crazy dog person! I have the two Norwich terriers that come inside with me and also go out to the barn. Then I like to have “outside dogs” that live in the barn. And I’ve always had a golden retriever in my barn for my entire career, they’re so good with kids. I have a white golden now, named Charlie. And then there’s Bullet. He was my first shepherd. Before him, I never knew they were so cool and good natured. Shepherds are the most loyal dogs. If anyone ever went after me, I would be afraid of what would happen, because Roofo would really take care of them. Bullet is older and he stays to himself a bit more. He’s the king of the mountain. No one messes with him. He just goes around the barn and watches over things. When he was a youngster he used to lie in the driveway and protect the house, but now he goes inside. We never taught him to protect the house. He just knew that was his job. I tell Danny and Ron to keep me in mind when they find a special dog. I have a 30-acre farm so they don’t have to be fenced in. They don’t go anywhere. They don’t have a reason to go anywhere, and I mean what a life for a dog, just to be able to be free. They have everything they want. PAGE 113 KIM TUDOR

Trainer Bill Schaub is associated with many of the top pony riders, hunters, and junior and amateur riders in recent history. He has been a professional for almost 30 years, and his Over the Hill Farm is a premier hunter jumper and pony training facility in Sanford, Florida.

And Homer has been really good for Roofo. My dad worked on a ranch and used to say that when the old ranchers got a new puppy, they would take a three-foot rope and tie the puppy to the old dog for a month. The old dog would teach the new dog the ways of the world. Roofo was getting a little bit lazy and fat, and he started to get a little creaky behind, from not moving. He wanted to play with the little dogs we have, but they’re a little bit small for him. That’s why I told Danny and Ron I needed another dog that Roofo could train and make him more active. When Homer came, Roofo lost his extra weight and got so much healthier. Roofo somehow knows which tack trunk is mine, and we play games with him. We move my tack trunk around but he always lays in front of it when I’m not there. You wonder how he knows which one is mine; I guess he smells me, I don’t

11 4 | E Q UE S T R I A N L I V IN G | AU GU S T/ S EPTEMB ER | 2017


Hermès Allegro jumping saddle flat seat

SUPER SOX, LILLIE KEENAN AND THEIR HERMÈS ALLEGRO SADDLE, THREE MAKE A PAIR

Profile for Equestrian Living

August/Sept 17  

The August/September issue of Equestrian Living features the fourth annual Gold List, a collection of our readers' favorites in a wide varie...

August/Sept 17  

The August/September issue of Equestrian Living features the fourth annual Gold List, a collection of our readers' favorites in a wide varie...

Profile for wynnwood

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