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SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


the importance of integrity to leadership by CeCe Cole, President

O

n Sunday, July 18th and Thursday, August 5th, I wore a badge of pride. I was elated to see so many candidates who participated in The Elephant Charge to Secure our Future and the Seminole Regional Chamber of Commerce, Suburban Republican Women’s Club was represented at every level with the exception of Judicial. Suburban, I am a proud president, thank you for your leadership. Sometimes when you speak, you don’t know if people are listening…well for the past two years I’ve been asking and pleading for women of Suburban to take the journey and run for office, and you ladies (and gents) are so awesome that many of you decided to run, and at the same time and even against one another…they say be careful what you ask for, because you just might get it….Thank You. I’m Proud of You.

I consult with world leaders quite frequently as I’m on a personal journey into ministry. My sermons have mostly been on women, barrenness, and integrious leadership. As we approach the Primary and soon the General Election, and as you cast your vote, think about the integrity of your candidate, can she or he lead with integrity and will they successfully manage their district. Out of the mouth of my mentor, in order to be successful in business, whether you work for a non-profit or for profit organization, in the private or public sector, as a leader, integrity is one of your most important assets. In fact, I will go out on a limb and say it is the most important leadership trait, you can possess. An organization must have a system of shared values if it is to prosper. In order to develop these shared values, the leadership must transmit a sense of honesty and integrity to each member of the organization/club/district. Character and integrity in a leader is not really something you can describe; it is something that is demonstrated. It shows in everything the leader says and does (publicly and privately). People want to be part of something meaningful. As a leader, it is up to you/us to help them find that sense of meaning. A strong sense of shared values motivates people to achieve beyond their expectations. When every member of an organization feels a genuine commitment to the goals and values of the organization, great things are possible. When people take ownership of the value system of the organization, in fact, few things are impossible. How do you go about building shared values in your organization, in your club, or in your district? It's actually very simple. You do it by example. Let’s be demonstrative.

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


* * * BREAKING NEWS * * * North Carolina passes Katie's Law (p.19)

“A Call to Action” I’m a huge fan of advocating for what I believe is right and/or necessary. Here are a few projects that I would like Suburban to get involved with and speak to our legislators about; topics that are important to us as women and as Americans. Please join us on this national initiative to show that Republican women are in the communities, understand what’s important, and collectively we have the power to effect legislation.

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Mother. Businesswoman. Community Leader. Karen Diebel, 42, currently serves the citizens of Winter Park, Florida as Vice Mayor and City Commissioner. Since taking office in March 2007, she’s fought hard to bring solutions-oriented government to the city in which she lives. Whether it’s expanding regional mobility, curtailing government waste, improving emergency response or preserving environmentally-sensitive wetlands, Karen has made a positive difference. As our Congresswoman, Karen will take that same common-sense approach to Washington. Karen Diebel knows about what it takes to get our economy moving again. As an Executive Director at Verizon Business, Karen helps companies grow by finding solutions to complex technological challenges. Because of her work, she earned a spot on the Orlando Business Journal’s 2009 list of "Women Who Mean Business.” Karen knows first - hand that Florida’s 24th District has more technology jobs at stake than anywhere in the country. By leveraging her business experience in Congress, Karen will fight to restore our local economy and keep our Space Coast, biotech and research jobs where they belong - right here in Florida. Her compassionate leadership continues to make Central Florida a better place. In memory of her late husband, Karen co-founded the N. Donald Diebel, Jr. M.D. Good Samaritan Fund in 2004. The Foundation provides medical care to uninsured women and children, serving nearly 1000 patients annually. For Karen, her service to others is rooted in her deeply-held faith. She is a member of St. Margaret Mary Catholic Church in Winter Park and a graduate of the University of Notre Dame (B.B.A., Finance). Karen received her M.B.A. from the University of South Florida. Less Spending & Lower Taxes No more bailouts! Republican Karen Diebel is a fiscal conservative who knows government spending is out of control. That’s why she’s signed the American’s for Tax Reform’s Taxpayer Protection Pledge and has committed to banning wasteful earmarks. As our congresswoman, Karen Diebel will stand up to Washington’s careless spending and will fight for Florida’s Taxpayers. Karen Diebel understands that we need to simplify and transform our out-of-control federal tax code. Creating Jobs for District 24 The Democrats in Congress continue to punish innovators and entrepreneurs. As a businesswoman, Karen Diebel has created hundreds of jobs for Floridians. She knows first hand what it takes to create growth and improve small businesses. Karen Diebel will protect those who create jobs by fighting burdensome government regulations & overbearing taxes. As your Congresswoman, Karen Diebel will support those who create jobs – not punish them.

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


A Conservative Leader We Know and Trust Sandy Adams has built a reputation as a tough, no non-sense leader and she is exactly what Central Florida needs in the United States Congress. While Washington politicians ignore the problems facing our country, Sandy Adams has demonstrated her commitment to responsible fiscal policy, defense of traditional values, and protecting our border. During her eight years in the Florida House of Representatives, Sandy Adams has been a champion on the most pressing issues facing us. She has led the fight to expand of the use of E-Verify to end state agencies using illegal workers and against driver’s licenses and in-state tuition for those not in the country legally. She has taken a hard line against government spending and new taxes, protected Second Amendment rights, stood up for the sanctity of life and increased penalties for violent criminals. Sandy grew up in a military family and came to Florida when she was just seven years old. She dropped out of high school to join the U.S. Air Force where she met the man that would become her husband. After a few short years, Sandy made the tough decision to walk away from a marriage strained by alcoholism and violence in order to protect her young daughter. A single parent with no high school diploma, Sandy worked two jobs seven days a week and was barely making ends meet. That is when she decided to pursue a career in law enforcement and after earning her high school equivalency degree she entered the academy for night classes. In 1985, she joined the Orange County Deputy Sheriff’s Department where she served for seventeen years until being elected to the state legislature in 2002. Sandy met and later married fellow deputy Frank Seton. Tragically, Frank died in the line of duty. Frank’s death motivated Sandy to become more active in citizens’ and victims’ rights issues. However, she became increasingly disillusioned with what she saw happening at the state level to protect our families and felt the need to do more. She helped found the Central Florida Chapter of the Concerns of Police Survivors and became a leading advocate for victims’ rights. She traveled to Tallahassee to push for commonsense legislation but as she became more exposed to the process, she became more frustrated as the laws being passed seemed designed to protect the predators rather than the victims. In 2002, Sandy decided that rather than complain about Tallahassee, she was going to do something about it and announced her candidacy for the Florida House of Representatives. In a hard-fought 5-way primary, Sandy took 42% of the vote and has been re-elected ever since. Once again, Sandy watches as Washington politicians refuse to make the tough decisions to get our nation back on track. Liberal special interests, hostile to American traditions, are systematically stripping our country of the ideals that make us exceptional. Record spending which today leaves us with a $1.5 trillion deficit and a $12 trillion debt are enslaving our children and grandchildren. Today, America looks more like Greece than the Shining City on the Hill. SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Alice Sterling: Endorsed by the Orlando Sentinel In the race to succeed Rep. Sandy Adams in a district that spans parts of Orange, Seminole and Volusia counties, optometrist Alice Sterling takes a far more reasoned approach to issues than the dogmatic, even dangerous positions embraced by her opponents, James DeCocq and Jason Brodeur. While Ms. Sterling sounds much like other Republican candidates who oppose new taxes and support less regulation, she doesn’t fear marching to other beats. She opposes drilling in state waters, for example. The Space Coast and clean tech industries also would find her a strong advocate. Constituents of the district should find plenty to be wary of in her opponents. Mr. DeCocq wants to dismantle the state agency that oversees growth. As a former city manager in the Florida Keys, Mr. DeCocq should know first-hand the cost of leaving growth decisions solely to local governments, which let developers decimate parts of the island chain. A health-care consultant, Mr. Brodeur seems happy to let developers run amok. He sees no merit in gun restrictions of any kind. And he continued to defend former state GOP chairman Jim Greer even after his disgraceful exit. We endorse Alice Sterling.

Dr. Alice Sterling is a native of Central Florida and attended Orange County Public Schools. She received a B.S. in Biology from the University of Central Florida (UCF). After graduating from UCF, Alice attended the University of Alabama in Birmingham where she received a Doctorate of Optometry degree. Alice was appointed to the Florida Board of Optometry by Governor Jeb Bush in 2002 and served as chairman for two years. She is currently the Clinical Director of the Winter Springs branch of Florida Eye Clinic on Red Bug Road. As a lifelong resident of Central Florida, Alice is passionate about giving back to the community that gave so much to her. Alice’s zeal for service is deeply rooted and goes beyond her own community activities. She believes government best serves our communities and people by being smaller and more efficient, not by creating burden through taxes and bureaucracy. It should also promote a culture of volunteerism, which makes our neighborhoods and state strong. In these difficult economic times, government needs to get out of the way and make it easier for small businesses to thrive since 75% of all jobs are created by small businesses. Although she is now part of a larger, multi-specialist eye care group, Alice has been a small business owner in the past and understands the challenges of running a business and making payroll. Alice will work hard to reduce the burden of excessive taxes and regulation and help our economy grow. She will work with space industry professionals to encourage the spirit of entrepreneurship so that our region is not dependent on government spending. SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Excellence In Leadership. Leadership. The Ingenuity of Education.

"We've accomplished accomplished so much at Seminole County Public Schools; however, there is always room for more." As an experienced school board member, I have been chosen to serve as Chair and Vice Chair of the board multiple times. I have served in State leadership positions by being named to the Florida Task Force on Public Education Funding, the Exceptional Student Education Advisory Council, and Instructional Materials Councils. I was chosen to represent the school board on the Seminole County Workforce Housing Task Force, the Midway Community Committee, and the Seminole County Coalition for School Readiness as well as the Student Museum Committee. My concern for the housing issues facing many of our staff's families resulted in a SCPS Housing Expo that I organized with our community partners that connected 128 families with housing vendors, Habitat for Humanity and the SHIP Program (assistance with mortgage down payments). I have been honored to receive awards recognizing my community involvement and advocacy for all children. We've accomplished so much at Seminole County Public Schools however; there is always room for more. I have received a Jefferson Award for Outstanding Community Service, the Florida School Boards Association Pat Spengler Award "for your untiring efforts to assure equal educational opportunities for all Florida children", an award from Congregation Beth Am for the promotion of tolerance, understanding and goodwill, a Woman of the Year in Education from St. Paul Missionary Baptist Church, and an award from SEA for leadership and service to the students and employees of Seminole County Public Schools. In other leadership roles in the community, I have served on the board of directors of the American Cancer Society, and as a Girl Scout leader for 16 years, a Girl Scout Service Unit Chair, a Girl Scout Trainer, a Boy Scout Troop Committee Chair, PTA President at every school level, PTA County Council President, Florida PTA Vice President, Florida PTA Legislation Chair and Florida PTA Platform Chair. I served on the School Advisory Committee at each of my children's schools. I have been actively involved in the Education Committee of the Sanford Chamber for years. I am a Leadership Seminole graduate. In my parish, I am a facilitator for New Beginnings, a class for separated and divorced people, as well as singing in the Choir. SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Involved. Informed. Invested. For the past 21 years I have logged more than 6,000 hours as a SCPS Dividend Volunteer. I have a good working relationship with our County and State legislators. I understand the processes involved in getting things done, and know the people that can facilitate that process, and recognize that the role of an elected official is to serve the needs of the people. In addition to meeting folks and getting the word out about my campaign, I am busy attending School Board and communityrelated meetings, as well as reading up on timely topics such as The Race to the Top Funding and the proposed 10 Year Sales Tax Capital Plan. On a personal note, Randy and I have been married for 30 years. We have three children, Jenny, Alex and Nick. Aside from spending time with my family and my friends, I enjoy cooking, reading, walking, biking and gardening. Quite simply, I enjoy life! On a personal note, Randy and I have been married for 30 years. We have three children, Jenny, Alex and Nick. Aside from spending time with my family and my friends, I enjoy cooking, reading, walking, biking and gardening. Quite simply, I enjoy life! As your School Board Member I will work hard to ensure that our communication is relative, timely and easy for students, families, parents, teachers and support staff to access and understand. I will emphasize the need to get "back to the basics" in providing the best in customer service for our students, families, teachers, support staff and our community at large. Fostering stronger relationships amongst all concerned will ensure better results. I will encourage the Seminole County professional community, including businesses, organizations and associations, to take a vested role in the future of both our schools and our students. We have untapped resources, in the way of funds, volunteers and mentors, that will benefit our schools at every level. Let's make this a Win/Win for both students and community!

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


WIN THE YARD SIGN WAR By Steve Grubbs, former Iowa state representative and Chairman of the Republican Party of Iowa

At VictoryStore.com, we have printed more than 12 million yard signs since we began helping candidates. I founded the company after defeating an incumbent to win my seat in the legislature. I was 24 at the time. I then went on to serve as the head of the campaign committee and helped enough other candidates to win to propel my party into the majority. I know campaigns and I know that yard signs can play a key role in any victory. Yard Signs can be an important part of local and legislative elections because they can 1) very quickly raise name identification, 2) create a sense of momentum, 3) protect a candidate against being labeled a "radical," and 4) help create an organizational structure. Because of these important benefits, candidates should be sure they do yard signs well. When I was preparing for my first State House election, I visited with many people who had previously run – some successfully and others not. One particular candidate told me that when it came to yard signs, I needed to put up about 50 signs across my district. She went on to say that most candidates put up about that many. There were two things that jumped out at me immediately: first, this candidate had lost, therefore, I was skeptical when she said that was all I needed; and second, if most candidates put up 50 signs, then I knew I would definitely be putting up more than that because I intended for my campaign to be much more than what "most people" did. A good rule of thumb is to try and raise about one sign for every 30 registered voters. In some districts that may be too high or too low, but it’s a good place to start as you determine your yard sign strategy. But just determining your target goal for yard signs isn’t enough, you also have to determine your ratio of large signs to small signs. Large signs are typically 2’x4’, 4’x4’ or 4’x8’. Small signs should generally be no smaller than 14" x 28" if you want them to be noticed. Rural districts will need a much larger proportion of large signs to small signs – perhaps a 50/50 ratio; while urban districts will need fewer large signs, but should probably try to have at least 25% of the larger for the busier thoroughfares. Small signs should be reserved for neighborhoods. A standard rule of thumb would be to place large signs on streets where the speed is 30 MPH or faster and small signs in neighborhoods with speeds of 30 MPH or slower. To make a big impact on voters and donors in a small amount of time, a campaign should overwhelm the district with yard signs all at once. Some campaigns dribble their signs up slowly over a period of weeks. This may be sufficient, but it lacks the real punch that yard signs can bring to a campaign. To make a real impression, a candidate should be first and biggest with yard signs. That means choosing a weekend and raising the yard signs all at once. This will have a more dramatic impact and create a sense of momentum for your campaign (not to mention scaring the daylights out of your opponent). Candidates should use yard signs as an opportunity to show voters that their campaign has viability. While incumbents frequently have advantages in money and name identification, there is no reason that a challenger can’t have the most yard signs - it’s simply a matter of determination and aggressive yard sign recruiting. Yard signs can also be an effective defense against negative attacks. Frequently through broadcast media or even whisper campaigns, an opponent will try to paint a candidate as "radical," "risky," or even "dangerous.” But if a district is blanketed with hundreds or thousands of yard signs, each displaying their own personal endorsement, voters will be a lot less likely to believe that the candidate in question could be much out of the mainstream. Yard signs bring viability and votes to a campaign, all the while forcing it to rise up and accomplish its organizational goals as well. For those candidates wanting to even the playing field with an opponent who has an advantage, making yard signs a central focus in your next local or legislative campaign can play a part toward that goal. You can buy your own yard signs at http://www.victorystore.com/signs/ysigns.htm

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Endorsed by Orlando Sentinel When it comes to public schools, Seminole County residents have been fortunate. Their system has been ranked among the state's best for years. But the financial obstacles facing Seminole's schools, including the high cost of meeting the state's class-size limits and the looming cut-off in the flow of millions of federal stimulus dollars to the system, will challenge even the most capable candidates for the county's School Board. The five board members in Seminole represent separate districts, but all stand for election countywide to four-year terms. There are two contested races on the ballot this year. In District 5, we give the nod to Tina Calderone. The most important election this fall is one that can affect your life almost immediately and will impact the quality of life here in Seminole County for generations to come. There are three seats up for election on our Seminole County School Board. I’m running for District 5 because I believe our schools are our most important local resource. Our great schools have brought valuable economic development, raised our property values and most importantly, trained the employees and leaders of our future businesses and governments. Now our school board faces challenges it hasn’t seen in decades. The economy has changed the environment in which our schools operate and I believe its leadership has to change to meet these new challenges. Now more than ever we need to increase the business experience and business knowledge base on the board. I have been in leadership positions in both small businesses and national corporations. You won’t find that in every school board candidate. As a parent and a local business owner, I am passionate about our schools. I have led the School Advisory Councils of 5 different schools in Seminole County, and, along with a team of committed volunteers, raised over $4 million as the leader of the school district’s fund-raising organization. The quality of our schools affects everyone and there is an opportunity for everyone to help our schools. I am asking that you help by supporting my campaign for Seminole County School Board District 5. I think school board members should Manage Schools Like a Business and Care About Our Students Like a Parent. Please give me the opportunity to enhance our schools' effectiveness, our children's futures and our community's vitality with your vote on August 24.

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


A vote and a voice for common sense, conservative principles I am pleased and excited to announce that I am a candidate for Seminole County School Board, District 5. The Primary Election is August 24, 2010. The General Election is November 2, 2010. As a parent, business owner and active school volunteer I have a vested interest in the success of Seminole County's schools. I am running to bring a business perspective and fresh leadership to our school board and make Seminole County Schools even better. My classroom experience combined with my business ownership will provide a unique perspective to our School Board. I am the only outsider in this race and a true conservative. I do not have ties to the current school board or administration. I believe we need to do more with less. I would like to see zero based budgeting implemented, where we push our administrators to examine and justify every expenditure, every year. I will bring a critical eye to every aspect of the budget process and end DROP Program abuses. I humbly ask for your support and your vote on August 24, 2010. Becky Erwin will be a vote and a voice for common sense, conservative principles, and fiscal accountability. In addition to the budget and taxes, Civics and Social Studies is a big concern with voters I am talking to. I believe that social studies should be truthful. Judeo-Christian values were at the center of the establishment of the United States of America. Textbooks should not shy away from the American economic concept of free enterprise, of limited government, of less state regulations and show the direct relationship between those traditional concepts and individual freedoms.

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


* * * BREAKING NEWS * * * North Carolina passes Katie's Law New law expands collection of DNA By Michael Abramowitz, The Daily Reflector Law enforcement officers in North Carolina will soon have another crime-solving tool and might close some cold cases when a new state law is enacted to require DNA collection when certain types of arrests are made. Others are expressing concerns about potential privacy violations. The State Legislature passed House Bill 1403, “The DNA Database Act of 2010,” on Friday. When signed into law by Gov. Beverly Perdue, as expected, the law will require that a DNA sample be taken from any person arrested for certain offenses. Offenses listed in the legislation are first and second-degree murder; manslaughter; rape and other sex offenses listed in Article 7-A of state statutes; offenses requiring a person to register as a sex offender or under the public protection programs; kidnapping, abduction, human trafficking and other offenses listed in Article 10; first and second-degree burglary, including houses of worship; stalking and cyberstalking. State law now requires samples be taken from any person convicted of a crime. The bill’s sponsors cited DNA’s value as a tool in criminal investigations, prosecutions and detection of repeat offenders. They also believe a thorough DNA database would help in the identification and location of missing persons. The collection procedures and the database system would be the responsibility of the State Bureau of Investigation, which would process, record and store the samples at its laboratory, according to the bill. The legislation and existing federal laws protect the database from unauthorized access or use, and the DNA profile used does not contain medical information, its backers said. The Greenville Police Department welcomed the law, saying it puts another tool in their crime-fighting toolbox. “A hundred years ago we realized the unique nature of fingerprints, and we now have a database of those to work with,” homicide detective Cpl. Scott Stanton said. DNA might even solve some cold cases for detectives, Stanton said. “A drop of blood left at a murder scene 20 years ago was no concern then because no one even knew what DNA could do,” he said. “But now we can take that evidence, get a DNA profile and match it against the new database. “If that suspect is in the database and we can match it, we can put them at the scene of the crime.” Bill opponents, including the American Civil Liberties Union, said Fourth Amendment rights to privacy would be violated by the law. Prominent local criminal defense attorney Ernest “Buddy” Conner agreed. He also raised concerns about placing responsibility for management of the records system with the SBI. “They are a police agency and not objective or unbiased,” Conner said. “They have an important duty as a law enforcement agency, but it conflicts with the management of an innocent person’s DNA. I also worry about what they will do with the information. The SBI lab is not accessible to see how they store it and take care of it. We can’t monitor them, and they are presumed to be above suspicion, so how can we be sure they are managing it properly?” There are built-in safeguards in the legislation that lawmakers believe will prevent mismanagement of the database information, including a provision that when any person is acquitted of a qualifying charge or has a charge dismissed, the DNA sample and associated records are to be expunged from the database and destroyed. “How do we know that will be done?” Conner asked.

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


State Rep. Marian McLawhorn, who voted for the bill’s passage, recognizes Conner’s concerns, but said she believes the advantages of the bill far outweigh the disadvantages. “This database will be used with great caution,” McLawhorn said, “and if it needs to be amended down the road due to unintended consequences, we will hear about it from those concerned with the constitution and from law enforcement if it proves unmanageable.” Attorney General Roy Cooper issued a statement Saturday applauding the legislature for backing the measure to solve crimes and protect communities. “We’ll be able to catch criminals sooner rather than later thanks to this new law,” Cooper said. “More use of DNA will also help law enforcement zero in on the right suspect and clear the wrongly accused.” Conner expressed concerns about the potential for abuse of the law by police. “If an officer has a suspect in mind for a crime being investigated, but doesn’t want to follow the constitution and get a warrant to collect evidence based on reasonable suspicion and just cause, all they have to do is charge a person with one of the crimes on the list, and they will be able to get a DNA sample they hope will connect the suspect to the crime they are investigating,” Conner said. “But once you accuse someone of a crime, even if that person is exonerated, you can never unring that bell. You can’t unspoil spoiled milk.” Adding DNA from arrestees to the N.C. database is projected to crack as many as 100 unsolved murders, rapes and other violent crimes in the first year, Cooper’s spokeswoman, Noelle Talley, said, adding that courts have upheld the practice as constitutional. It will cost the Department of Justice between $1.3 million and $2.6 million annually to manage the database system during the next five years, legislative fiscal summaries indicated. Approximately 10 positions will be added each year for the next five years. The bill awaits Perdue’s signature. Contact Michael Abramowitz at mabramowitz@reflector.com or (252) 329-9571. DATABASE The State Legislature passed House Bill 1403, “The DNA Database Act of 2010,” on Friday. The law would require that DNA samples be taken from people arrested for certain offenses, including first and second-degree murder; manslaughter; rape and other sex offenses, kidnapping, abduction, human trafficking, first and second-degree burglary, stalking and cyberstalking. As state law now stands, DNA samples are taken from people convicted of a crime. The collection procedures and the database system would be the responsibility of the State Bureau of Investigation.

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Thank you to Mariann Lansing, Ways and Means Chair

The Elephant Charge to Secure Our Future

was a great success!!! Thank you to all members of the Executive Board for your leadership, you are appreciated!

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


Suburban Republican Women’s Club, Federated 201 2010 Application for Membership Membership Founded 1971

Last Name ________________ First Name____________________Spouse ________________ Mailing Address ________________________________________________________________ City ___________________ ZIP + 4 _________________ Birthday _______________________ Home Phone: _________________________ Second Phone: ___________________________ E-Mail ______________________________________________ (only if you check it on a regular basis) How did you learn about our club? ___________________________________________________ Tell us a little bit about yourselfTpolitical experiences/campaigns work, hobbies, interests, etc.

_____________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________ Signature ________________________________ Date: _________________Precinct No. ___________ (By signing this application, I certify that I am a registered Republican) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ _____ Active Membership ($25 per year, with voting rights) ______New Member

______Renewal

_____ Associate Membership WOMEN OR MEN ($12.50 per year – no voting rights) NOTE: Women joining as an associate member MUST hold an active membership in another Federated Club. Please list your club of active membership __________________________________.

_____ Subscription Membership ($10 per year to receive newsletter – no voting rights)

PATRONAGE LEVELS (Annual Membership is Included w/Patronage) BUSINESS9. $250 _____

Recognition in the SRWCF monthly newsletter

(Year round marketing on website and newsletter, access to VIP events Your annual membership dues are included w/your patronage)

LINCOLN9. $100 _____

Recognition in the SRWCF monthly newsletter

REAGAN99$75______

Recognition in the SRWCF monthly newsletter

BUSH999. $65______

Recognition in the SRWCF monthly newsletter

Payment Info:

Check #/amount _______________ Cash/amount _________ Date Received Mail your payment to: SRWCF P. O. Box 162958 Altamonte Springs, FL 32716

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


H ONORED P ATRONS NEW! Enterprise Level: Patrick Aliu

Lincoln Level: Ann Carr Marcia Fenning Ann Pinnock Susie Plakon Bonnie Rogers Mary Tibbitts Connie Austin Eleanor Bees Karen Hays Nancy King

Reagan Level: John Mica Pat Mica Melanie Chase Sandi Lacey Mariann Lansing Fran Murray Alice Myers Sonia Sliger Anita Carlsson-Trout Norma DeWolf Alice Weinberg

Bush Level: Cheryl Adamkiewicz Diane Bonheim Marilyn Huddleston Terri Stevens Frank Tibbitts SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


2009-2010 OFFICERS PRESIDENT – CeCe Cole 1 VP (PROGRAMS) – Sonia Sliger, Terri Stevens 2ND VP (MEMBERSHIP) – Mary Blake, Mary Tibbitts RECORDING SECRETARY – Kim Carroll CORRESPONDING SECRETARY – Marie Pendergrast TREASURER – Linda Edvardsen ASSISTANT TREASURER – Alpha Livingston PARLIAMENTARIAN – Alice Myers IMMEDIATE PAST PRESIDENT – Karen Almond WAYS AND MEANS – Mariann Lansing ST

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The Suburban Republican Women Is a publication of the Suburban Republican Women’s Club, Federated (In Seminole County, Florida) Return Address: P.O. Box 162958 Altamonte Springs, FL 32716-2958 President ~ CeCe Cole

SUBURBAN REPUBLICAN WOMEN’S CLUB, FEDERATED

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(FOR INFORMATIONAL PURPOSES ONLY)

AUGUST 2010 NEWSLETTER


SRWCF August 2010 Newsletter