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ACADEMIC MAJORS

ma.psu.edu


Contents

6

Bachelor Degree Majors

19

Nursing

Business

20

Occupational Therapy

8

English

21

Physical Therapist Assistant

22

Minors

Business English Security and Risk Analysis Women’s Studies

22

Additional Information

9

Human Development and Family Studies 10

Information Sciences and Technology

12

Letters, Arts, and Sciences

13

Nursing (RN to BS program)

14

Associate Degree Majors

Business Administration

15

Forest Technology

16

Human Development and Family Studies

17

Information Sciences and Technology

18

Letters, Arts, and Sciences

23 Admission Requirements for Baccalaureate (Four-Year) Degrees 24 Admission Requirements for Associate (Two-Year) Degrees


Fast Facts 97 beautifully landscaped, wooded acres

Technology on campus

Average class size: 17–20

123 computers for student use

Geographic distribution of students

2 digital multimedia studios

Pennsylvania residents: 1,023

Wireless capabilities in most campus facilities

Out of state: 223 Student–to–faculty ratio

6 computer labs

Housing and Food Service

16:1

36 percent of students live on campus

Makeup of student body

In a four–hour dinner period, Mill Café sells about 180 pounds of hot wings

43 percent male 57 percent female

48 percent of students participate in a varsity, intramural, or club sport

21 percent underrepresented groups First–year students

26 percent choose to start in the Division of Undergraduate Studies (exploratory) 70 percent plan to finish their degree at another Penn State campus Average number of footsteps from one class to another: 203 Number of parking spaces on campus: 751 Cost of a Penn State Mont Alto parking pass: Free

The most popular food items at Mill Café are hot wings and nachos grande.

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Penn State graduates earn an average of $10,000 more per year than graduates from other Pennsylvania colleges and universities.

Penn State Mont Alto is part of a Penn State tradition of excellence that spans the globe, including the more than 159,000 members of the Penn State Alumni Association, the largest dues–paying alumni association in the country.

Getting started at Mont Alto has many benefits: small class sizes, a close–knit learning environment, activities, athletics, residence halls, and faculty who are experts in their fields.

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Penn State Mont Alto was founded as one of the nation’s first public forest academies and has a rich tradition of conservation and environmental awareness.

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Almost 60 Percent of penn state students start at a campus other than university park.

Take the first two years of course work at Mont Alto, then move to another campus to complete the last two years of your degree.


in an intimate college setting, with tons of opportunities both in and outside of the classroom—Penn State Mont Alto may be the place for you. I f y o u a r e l o o k i n g f o r a w o r l d – c l ass e d u cati o n

As a student at Penn State Mont Alto, you’ll have access to all the advantages Penn State has to offer, from the University–wide computer network to the University Libraries system, one of the richest repositories of literature and information in the country. You might take a course through the Internet, work with a professor on important research, help design devices useful to people with disabilities, or complete an internship at a local organization. Penn State Mont Alto offers choices you may not find elsewhere. Penn State’s reputation for academic excellence reaches around the world. Many of our academic programs rank among the best in the nation. A Penn State degree is renowned throughout the world.

One out of every 115 U.S. college graduates has a Penn State degree.

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Business

Bachelor of Science Degree

Is Business right for me? Think about a bachelor’s degree in business if: You want to become a flexible business professional, equipped to adapt to the ever–changing workplace of the future. The Bachelor of Science in Business (BSBCC) is an upper–division, professionally oriented business degree for individuals who are seeking general preparation in business. The degree combines the core business disciplines, notably management, marketing, finance, and logistics, with applied study in a practical setting, especially the small–business climates across most of the Commonwealth. Through the choice of an 18–credit option, students develop a specialty related to a key business sector. Students also develop written and oral communication skills throughout the program, acquire contemporary computer skills, and engage in active and collaborative learning.


P E N N S T A T E M O N T A L T O M a j o r s an d C a r ee r s

The BSBCC program is suitable for a wide range of students, including recent high school graduates, returning adult students, and transfer students from other colleges and universities.

Careers The BSBCC program graduates work in a variety of industries including, but not limited to, accounting, banking, economics, finance, investing, marketing, and management. Positions held by graduates of the Business major include: —Business owner —Financial consultant —Supply chain manager —Logistics manager —Information systems manager —Healthcare management —Production/operations supervisor —Project manager

The BSBCC Affords Students Options and Choices Students choose one of two 18–credit options within the BSBCC major in order to develop a specialty related to a key business sector. Students in this program also become familiar with the unique business environments of their local communities, a design that sets the degree apart from other business degrees offered throughout the Commonwealth. Marketing and Management Option: Places an emphasis on the

skills and knowledge necessary for the business professional to function in community and regional centers of commerce. Individualized Business Option:

Allows the tailoring of a program of study to suit specific student needs. Also, requires the selection of 18 credits of study based on an individualized plan of study submitted by the student and approved by an adviser. A senior project, internship, or independent study with area businesses will allow you to take what you learn in the classroom and apply it in a dynamic, real–world business situation.

For the B.S. degree in Business, a minimum of 120 credits is required, 15 of which must be at the 400 level.

Common Requirements for the Major (All Options): 53–61 credits

Sample Courses (Marketing and Management option)

Prescribed Courses (32–37 credits)

— International Business Operations

General Education: 45 credits (12 of these 45 credits are included in the REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR)

Additional Courses (21–24 credits)

— Leadership

First–Year Seminar: (Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection) United States Cultures and International Cultures: (Included in ELECTIVES or GENERAL EDUCATION course selection) Writing across the Curriculum: (Included in REQUIREMENTS FOR THE MAJOR) Electives: 8–16 credits Requirements for the Major: 71–79 credits (This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses.)

Requirements for the Option: 18 credits Individualized Business Option: 18 credits Prepare an individualized plan of study consisting of 18 credits to be submitted for approval by an adviser. (Sem: 5–8) Management and Marketing Option: 18 credits —Select 15 credits from the following to include at least 3 credits in MGMT and 3 credits in MKTG and at least 3 credits at the 400 level (Sem: 5–8) —Select 3 credits from CAS 250(3), CAS 252(3), CAS 352(3), CAS 404(3) or ENGL 419(3) (Sem: 5–8) [1] A student enrolled in this major must receive a grade of C or better, as specified in Senate Policy 82–44.

— Marketing Research — Small Business Management — Strategic Business Planning Sample Courses (Individualized Business option) — Business Logistics Management — Global Marketing — Healthcare Management — Financial and Managerial Accounting for Decision Making — Supply Chain Management Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/bsb

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English Bachelor of arts Degree Is English right for me?

Th in k a bo u t a b ache l o r ’s de gr e e in En gl ish if: You are interested in traditional academic emphases on reading, writing, literature, and language, while developing analytical and critical thinking skills, decision making skills, and communication skills that make English graduates so valuable in the job market.

English majors often go on to post– graduate study not only in English but in such areas as law, business, education, and other liberal disciplines. The strong liberal arts tradition at Mont Alto makes this an ideal program for students who want to complete their Penn State degree in a small campus environment.

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The English program graduates work in a variety of industries including, but not limited to, writers, editors, educator and journalists. Careers obtained by graduates of the English major include: — Advertising — Banking — Business — Government — Law — Public Relations — Publishing — Teaching

General Education: 45 credits Degree Requirements: 24 credits (3 of these 24 credits are included in the Major Requirements, General Education, or Electives and 0–12 credits are included in Electives if foreign language proficiency is demonstrated by examination.)

Major Requirements: 36 credits

Prescribed Courses: 6 credits

English Community and Opportunity

Whether English majors eventually become writers, editors, governors, astronauts, educators, lawyers, journalists, or any of the hundreds of other occupations to which English majors are drawn, our students tend to be self–motivating, independent thinkers with a deep interest in life and a strong desire to understand themselves and their role in the world.

The English program offers students a close–knit community, rich with opportunities to interact with other English students and with the larger campus community. Some of the opportunities available to English majors are the International English Honor Society, The Fourth Wall — Penn State Mont Alto’s student–run newspaper, and the English Club.

Additional Courses: 9 credits Supporting Courses: 21 credits Electives: 18 credits

Joe Paterno was an undergraduate English major at Brown University and planned to study law before becoming Penn State’s legendary football coach.

Sample Courses — African American Literature — American Literature — Creative Writing — Critical Reading — Literature and Society — Shakespeare Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/english


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Human Development and Family Studies Bachelor of SCIENCE Degree Is HDFS right for me? T h ink a bo u t a b ache l o r ’s de gr e e in HDFS if: You are interested in working with children, teens, families, and adults. Human Development and Family Studies is a multi–disciplinary program designed to help students explore the development of individual and families across the life span in order to prepare for professional, managerial, or scientific roles in health and human services professions, public and nonprofit agencies, and business and industry, as well as advanced professional or graduate study. The program combines the study of psychology, biology, sociology, medicine, anthropology, history, social work, and philosophy.

The LSHS option is designed to prepare students to enter the human services professions. The program also provides excellent preparation for students interested in pursuing graduate study in human development and human services areas. Students typically enter the program with a strong desire to help people. The program provides them with the knowledge and ability to do so effectively.

General Education: 45 credits (3–4 of these 45 credits are included in the Major Requirements) First–Year Seminar: Included in Electives or General Education course selection

In addition to helping you develop skills relevant to your career objectives, the program will help you prepare for graduate study in family studies, human development, psychology, or sociology, or advanced professional training in behavioral health, counseling, law, psychology, or social work. The Life Span Human Services (LSHS) Option

For the B.S. degree in Human Development and Family Studies, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

United States Cultures and International Cultures: Included in Electives, General Education course selections, or Requirements for the Major Writing across the Curriculum: Included in Requirements for the Major Electives: 3–5 credits Requirements for the Major: 73–76 credits (This includes 3–4 credits of General Education GQ courses.)

The HDFS program graduates work in a variety of settings, including: — Mental health — Drug and alcohol recovery — Day care programs — Employee assistance programs — Hospital programs for children, youth, and families — Head Start programs — Family education — Preschools — Juvenile detention — Adult day care programs — Nursing Homes

Common Requirements for the Major (All Options): 30–31 credits Prescribed Courses (18 credits) HD FS 129 GS(3), HD FS 301(3), HD FS 311(3), HD FS 312W(3), HD FS 315 US(3), HD FS 418(3) (Sem: 3–6)

Additional Courses (12–13 credits) Select 6 credits from HD FS 229 GS(3), HD FS 239 GS(3), HD FS 249 GS(3) (Sem: 1–4) STAT 200 GQ(4) or EDPSY 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1–4) Select 3 credits of United States Cultures (US) (Sem: 4–8) Requirements for the Option: 43–45 credits Life Span Human Services Option: 43–45 credits Prescribed Courses: 9 credits Additional Courses: 22–24 credits Supporting Courses and Related Areas: 12 credits Electives: 3–5 credits Sample Courses — Adolescent Development — Development and Administration of Human Services Programs — Infant and Child Development — Family Relationships — Family Disorganization: Stress Points in the Contemporary Family Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/hdfs

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Information Sciences and Technology Bachelor of SCIENCE Degree Is IST right for me? Th in k a bo u t a b ache l o r ’s de gr e e in ist if: You want the theoretical frameworks and skill sets necessary to compete and be productive in the information technology–intensive global context that defines the new “Information Age.” Specifically, this degree program focuses on building an understanding of core information technologies and related areas of study; helps students prepare for the practical application of various information sciences and related technologies; and engages students in sharpening their abilities to think critically and work in teams. All this is done with considerable interdisciplinary integration in order to expose students to the cognitive, social, institutional, and global environments of IST. Team projects in most courses, a required internship, and a senior capstone experience provide additional, focused venues for involving students in the cutting–edge issues and technologies of the field.

General Education: 45 credits

IST 302(3), IST 420(3), IST 421(3) (Sem: 5–8)

Electives: 7 credits

Supporting Courses and Related Areas: 12 credits Select 12 credits from college–approved list (Sem: 5–8)

Requirements for the Major: 85 credits (This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GQ courses; 3 credits of GS courses; and 3 credits of GWS courses.) Common Requirements for the Major (All Options): 64 credits Prescribed Courses: 33 Credits Additional Courses: 10 credits Supporting Courses and Related Areas: 21 credits Requirements for the Option: 21 credits

Sample Courses — C+ Programming and Databases ��� Networking and Telecommunications — System Integration — SAP Enterprise Resource Planning — Threat of Terrorism and Crime — IT Project Management — Organization and Design of Information Systems — Usability Engineering

Information Technology: Integration and Application Option: 21 credits

Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements.

Prescribed Courses: 9 credits

ma.psu.edu/4ist

The Integration and Application Option The IST degree prepares graduates for careers in almost any field—manufacturing, health care, business and finance, education, aerospace, biotechnology, government—to name a few. Where do you want go? Here are a few examples of careers obtained by IST graduates: — Business analysis consultant — Business systems delivery specialist — Information systems engineer — Information technology manager — IT project manager — IT specialist — Network administrator — Security architecture analyst — Security intelligence analyst — Software technology analyst — Systems integration associate — Strategic architect — Technology analyst — Technology integration associate 10

This option is designed to prepare students to use information technology to realize a variety of system–based goals (e.g., reliability, accessibility, efficiency, etc.). It is focused on developing a theoretical foundation and the skill set needed for integrating information technology into different systems for the purpose of enhancing system performance. The emphasis is on providing the student with both the theoretical frameworks needed to use information technology as a system attribute as well as a set of application– oriented experiences and skills.


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Letters, Arts, and Sciences Bachelor of arts Degree

Is LASCC right for me? T h ink a bo u t a b ache l o r ’s de gr e e in LASCC if: You want to complete a baccalaureate degree at Penn State Mont Alto and your interests span more than one discipline. LASCC is a good fit if you have a unique mix of interests and want to build a specific combination of skills.

The Letters, Arts, and Sciences (LASCC) baccalaureate program is a multidisciplinary, theme– oriented, student–designed major. Motivated, creative students interested in an individualized course of study find the LASCC degree attractive. The flexibility of the LASCC program helps a student prepare for a wide range of careers.

Students must have a GPA of at least 2.0 with 27.5 credits completed to be eligible for entrance into this major. Students may enter this degree from pre–major status at Penn State, after completing an associate degree, or as a transfer student from another college. Students who have completed 91 credits may not enter this major. For the B.A. degree in Letters, Arts, and Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Each LASCC degree is unique and designed by the individual.

Students from Mont Alto have used the LASCC degree as a stepping stone to graduate programs in:

In consultation with the LASCC adviser, the student formulates a proposal to meet his/her educational and career goals. The degree requirements include 36 credits in the major. The major requires courses in four skills areas: research proficiency, communication, critical thinking, and application of theory. In addition, students address a theme by selecting five senior– level courses drawn from at least three subject areas and nine additional credits from courses at any level. Students may not duplicate existing majors from any academic area. An important standard for entrance to the Letters, Arts, and Sciences major is the student’s ability to design a program with academic integrity worthy of a bachelor of arts degree.

— Health care, including naturopathy, physical therapy, occupational therapy, psychology — Athletic administration — College student counseling LASCC graduates have also enhanced their careers in human resource management and other fields. Some students have combined the LASCC degree with a minor in psychology or business. Because LASCC is an individual degree, the possibilities are endless.

LASCC degree requirements

Core skills courses: 12 credits

For the B.A. degree in Letters, Arts, and Sciences, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

— Research methods / projects — Communication — Theory / application — Critical analysis

General Education: 45 credits — Writing and Speaking: English 15, English 202, Communication Arts and Sciences 100 — Quantification: 6 credits — Science: 9 credits, including a lab — Arts: 6 credits — Social and behavioral sciences: 6 credits — Health and physical activity: 3 credits Bachelor of Arts: 12–24 credits

Content–based courses: 24 credits — 400–level courses: 15 credits — Other courses, supporting the theme: 9 credits Electives: 15–27 credits Electives are any courses that take your fancy. If you are a transfer student, or if you have changed your major, you may use previous college credits as electives.

— World language: up to 12 credits (through level 003) — Other knowledge areas: 9 credits — Other cultures: 3 credits

Sample Courses

Major Requirements: 36 credits, C or better grades required

Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements.

LASCC is a highly individualized program. Please contact the LASCC Adviser to explore the possibilities.

ma.psu.edu/las


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Nursing Bachelor of science Degree Is the RN to BS Nursing program right for me? T h ink a bo u t a b ache l o r ’s de gr e e in n ursin g if: You have previously earned either an associate degree or a diploma in nursing and you want to upgrade your skills. This program is also for you  if you want to prepare for nontraditional areas of nursing. The RN to BS major prepares registered nurse students as professional practitioners in areas of health promotion and maintenance, illness care, and rehabilitation. The major in Nursing is accredited by The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission.

The RN to BS program helps you prepare to meet the rapid changes in the health care field by expanding and enhancing your nursing education. In addition to upgrading your skills, the program prepares you for nontraditional areas of nursing such as administration, community health, pharmaceutical sales, managed care, etc.

For the B.S. degree in Nursing, a minimum of 120 credits is required.

Supporting Courses and Related Areas: 6 credits

General Education: 45 credits

— Informatics in Healthcare — Community Health — Advance Concepts of Medical and Surgical Nursing — Trauma and Critical Care — Forensic Nursing — Nursing Management

United States Cultures and International Cultures: Included in Electives, General Education course selection, or Requirements for the Major. Writing across the Curriculum: Included in Requirements for the Major Electives: 3–5 credits Requirements for the Major: 91–93 credits

Whatever career path you choose, our RN to BS program is designed to build on what you’ve already accomplished. The curriculum is divided into phases that allow you to build upon previous knowledge as you progress in the program.

Sample Courses

Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/nursing

33 credits by portfolio Prescribed Courses: 76 credits Additional Courses: 9–11 credits

Mont Alto Nursing students have access to the campus’s mobile simulation lab, a state-of-the-art learning lab on wheels. 13


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Business Administration associate in science degree Is an associate degree in business administration right for me? T h ink a bo u t a de gr e e in b us in e s s AD MINISTRATION if : You want to advance in your career, earn a higher salary, prepare for a bachelor’s degree, or start or manage your own business. This program is highly intensive with courses that focus on the skills necessary to be successful in the business world.  The goal of the program is to produce well–rounded and technically knowledgeable graduates.

The associate degree in Business Administration (2BACC) will help graduates develop highly marketable professional competencies, including: — finding and evaluating information — writing effectively — thinking critically — understanding and applying knowledge to real situations — speaking clearly and giving effective presentations — building and working in teams — creating small business plans Students can chose either the General Business option as a focus within the associate degree in Business at Mont Alto.

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For the Associate in Science degree in Business Administration, a minimum of 60 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits Requirements for the Major: 48–50 credits Common Requirements for the Major (All Options): 30–31 credits Prescribed Courses: 13 credits CAS 100 GWS(3) (Sem: 2–4) ACCTG 211(4), ENGL 202D GWS(3) , MIS 204(3) (Sem: 2–4) Additional Courses: 17–18 credits ENGL 015 GWS(3) or ENGL 030 GWS(3) (Sem: 1–2) MATH 021 GQ(3), MATH 022 GQ(3), or MATH 110 GQ(4) (Sem: 1–2)

B A 243(4)or B A 241(2) and B A 242(2) (Sem: 1–4) ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 104 GS(3) (Sem: 1–4) SCM 200 GQ(4) or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 2–4) Requirements for the Option: 18–19 credits General Business Option: 18–19 credits Additional Courses: 8–19 credits a) Select 3 credits from MGMT 301(3) or MGMT 301W(3) (Sem: 3–4) b) Select 3 credits from MKTG 301(3) or MKTG 301W(3) (Sem: 3–4) c) Select 12–13 credits from B A 250(3); CAS 250(3) or CAS 252(3); LER 100 GS(3) or LER 136 US(3); ECON 102 GS(3) or ECON 104 GS(3); MATH 022 GQ(3), MATH 110 GQ(4), MKTG 220(3) (Sem: 1–4)

The Penn State Mont Alto library received a face-lift and some major improvements in the past year. The front desk and lobby were renovated, and a state-of-the-art recording studio and digital commons equipped for audio and video editing were installed.

Sample Courses — Effective Speech — Financial and Managerial Accounting for Decision Making — Introduction to Business Information Systems — Supervisory Management — Contemporary American Marketing — Labor and Employment Relations Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/2bacc


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Forest Technology associate in science degree Is a Forestry degree right for me? T h in k a bo u t a de gr e e in FORES T T ECHNOLOGY if: You want to make a difference in your outdoor environment; you are interested in field–oriented study; you are interested in ecology, forests, and wildlife; you want to work for the Pennsylvania Bureau of Forestry or for a tree care company.

Penn State Mont Alto was founded as the nation’s first public forest academy and has a rich tradition of conservation and environ– mental awareness. At Mont Alto, the Forest Technology major isn’t just about trees. It’s about nature and science, environment and research, conservation and technology. Forest technicians are trained to perform fieldwork in forest management, tree care, and wildlife management. They conduct forest inventories, gather research data, mark timber, and supervise timber sales. The Forest Technology associate degree program can help you prepare for a career in forestry and natural resources management. You will gain classroom knowledge and field skills to build your career. Half of the Forest Technology class time is spent outdoors giving our students invaluable hands–on training!

Forest technicians are trained to perform fieldwork in forest management, tree care, and wildlife management. They conduct forest inventories, gather research data, mark timber, and supervise timber sales. They are employed as: —Arborists —Forest technicians —Foresters —Land surveyors —Plant health care specialists —Soil conservation technicians —Urban foresters —Utility foresters —Wildland firefighters Forest technology students are involved with the Woodsmen Team, a coed University club sport, and the Forestry Club, a student chapter of the Society of American Foresters. Many of our graduates continue their education toward a baccalaureate degree. Forest Technology students can transition to bachelor of science programs at the Penn State School of Forest Resources.

For the Associate in Science degree in Forest Technology, a minimum of 67 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits Requirements for the Major: 46 credits Prescribed Courses: 40 credits FORT 100S(1), FORT 105(3), FORT 120(2), FORT 150(3) (Sem: 1) FORT 110(3), FORT 130(2), FORT 140(3), FORT 160(3) (Sem: 2) FORT 170(3), FORT 175(1) (Sem: Summer) FORT 200(1), FORT 220(4), FORT 230(2), MGMT 100W(3) (Sem: 3) FORT 240(3), FORT 250(3) (Sem: 4)

Additional Courses: 6 credits Select 6 credits from FORT 210(3), FORT 260(3), WILDL 101(3), or WILDL 207(3) (Sem: 3–4) Sample Courses — Introduction to Forestry — Dendrology — Introduction to Wildlife Management — Aboriculture — Forest Ecosystem Protection — GIS for Natural Resources Management — Forest Management Practices — Forest Soils and Hydrology Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/forestry

Grow and learn among the best.

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Human Development and Family Studies associate in science degree Is a two–year HDFS degree right for me? Th in k a b o u t a n as s o ciat e de gr e e in HDFS if: You like work with children, teens, families, and adults. Human Development and Family Studies offers an interdisciplinary approach to individual and family development across the life span. Students have hands–on experiences through a variety of internships, fieldwork, classwork, and volunteer work. Coursework includes the study of human development from conception to death, theories and research on development, ethics and social policy, family development and relationships, social problems and issues, and physical and mental health.

This major integrates practical and academic experiences to provide you with entry–level professional competence in the human service field. The objective of the major is to offer a general education background, a knowledge base in life span and family development, and a core of professional skills that may be applied in program planning and service delivery activities. The major is offered part–time, in the evening, and through independent learning. Children, Youth, and Family Services Option Penn State Mont Alto offers this option with the HDFS major to prepare students for service roles in preschools; day care centers; hospitals; institutional and community programs for emotionally disturbed, abused, or neglected children and adolescents; as well as a variety of public welfare and family service agencies.

Adulthood and Aging Services Option This option is designed to prepare students for a wide variety of service roles in mental health facilities, nursing homes, area agencies on aging, public welfare and family service agencies, women’s resource centers, human relations programs, employee assistance programs, and customer services and consumer relations programs in business and industry. An approved field experience is required for this option.

The HDFS program prepares you for a

number of career opportunities. With an education that addresses individual and family development across the lifespan, the opportunities are endless. Positions held by HDFS graduates include:

Children

— Case worker, assistant teacher, preschool director, mental health aide, daycare provider Adolescence/Young Adult

— Assistant director of programs, behavior specialist, counselor, residential counselor, therapeutic support staff Family

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— Child advocate, mental health worker, family services coordinator, house supervisor

For the Associate in Science degree in Human Development and Family Studies, a minimum of 60 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits (15 of these 21 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major) Electives: 0–3 credits Requirements for the Major: 51–55 credits (This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 6 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GN courses; and 3 credits of GQ courses.) Common Requirements for the Major (All Options): 30–31 credits Prescribed Courses: 21 credits CAS 100 GWS(3), ENGL 015 GWS(3), HD FS 129 29 GS(3), HD FS 301(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1–2) HD FS 395(6) (Sem: 3–4) Additional Courses: (9–10 credits) EDPSY 101 GQ(3), STAT

100 GQ(3), or STAT 200 GQ(4) (Sem: 1–2) HD FS 315 US(3) or SOC 030 GS(3) (Sem: 3–4) BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 155 GN(3), or BI SC 004 GN(3) (Sem: 3–4) Requirements for the Option: 21–24 credits Adult Development and Aging Services Option: 21 credits Children, Youth, and Family Services Option: 24 credits Sample Courses — Introductory Psychology — Sociology of the Family — Infant and Child Development — Adult Development and Aging — Adolescent Development — Value and Ethics in HDFS Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/hdfs


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Information Sciences and Technology associate in science degree Is a two–year IST degree right for me? T h in k a bo u t a N ASSOCIAT E de gr e e in IS T if: You want immediate and continuing employment opportunities in the broad disciplines of information science and technology. The major is designed to ensure a thorough knowledge of information systems and includes extensive practice using contemporary technologies in the creation, organization, storage, analysis, evaluation, communication, and transmission of information. Technical material covers the structure of database systems, web and multimedia systems, and considerations in the design of information systems. Graduates of this program head into the workforce with knowledge of the cutting–edge issues and technologies in the field.

Generalized Business Option Where do you want to go? Pick almost any field—manufacturing, health care, business and finance, education, aerospace, biotechnology, government, to name a few—and you’ll find that IST can help you get there. IST graduates have been hired for professional positions such as these: — Application programmers — Associate systems designers — Network managers — Web designers and administrators — Information systems support specialists The Two–Year IST Degree Affords Students Options and Choice Baccalaureate Option This option provides maximum articulation with the baccalaureate degree. Students who complete this option will meet all lower division requirements for the baccalaureate degree. This is not the case with the remaining options, although the degree of articulation is quite high for all associate degree options.

This option enables students to specialize in the general business areas of accounting, marketing, and management. Individualized Option This option enables students to work closely with an adviser to develop a plan of study that meets the dual objectives of allowing a flexible academic program and providing breadth of technical specialization. An example would be a program where a student would take some of the courses listed in the Web Administration option and the remainder in the Software option. Networking Option This option prepares graduates for positions as entry–level computer network administrators. Students take courses in personal computer hardware, networking essentials, and network administration.

For the Associate in Science degree in IST, a minimum of 60 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits (9–12 of these 21 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major) Electives: 2–6 credits Requirements for the Major: 45–47 credits (This includes 9–12 credits of General Education courses, i.e., ALL options: 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GWS courses. The Baccalaureate Option also includes 3 credits of GS courses to equal a total of 12 credits that double count; the General Business Option also includes 0–3 credits of GS courses to equal 9–12 credits that double count.) Common Requirements for the Major (All Options): 30 credits Prescribed Courses: 26 credits CMPSC 101 GQ(3) (Sem: 1–2) CAS 100B GWS(3), IST 110 GS(3), IST 111S(1), IST 210(4), IST 220(3), IST 250(3), ENGL

015 GWS(3) (Sem: 1–2) IST 260W(3) (Sem: 3–4) Additional Courses: 4 credits ENGL 202C GWS(3) or ENGL 202D GWS(3) (Sem: 3–4) IST 295A(1) or IST 295B(1) (Sem: 3–4) Requirements for the Option: 15–18 credits Baccalaureate Option: 17–18 credits Generalized Business Option: 15–16 credits Individualized Option: 15 credits Networking Option: 15 credits Sample Courses — Networking and Telecommunications — New Media and the Web — Systems Analysis and Design — Programming Languages Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/2ist

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P E N N S T A T E M O N T A L T O M a j o r s an d C a r ee r s

Letters, Arts, and Sciences associate in arts Degree

Is LASCC right for me? Think about an associate degree in letters, arts, and sciences (2LASCC) if: You want the flexibility to create an individualized major. With such options, students are able to anticipate tomorrow’s needs and stay one or two steps ahead of the curve. The Letters, Arts, and Sciences major will broaden your understanding, interests, and skills to help you to become a more responsible, productive member of the family and community; and it offers a degree program with sufficient electives to permit some specialization according to your interests or career plans. Letters, Arts, and Sciences is a complete two–year degree major. However, graduates who later seek admission to baccalaureate degree majors may apply baccalaureate credits toward the new degree.

Letters, Arts, and Sciences is a complete two–year degree major. However, graduates who later seek admission to baccalaureate degree majors may apply baccalaureate credits toward the new degree. Detailed information for each of the bachelor’s degree programs offered at Penn State Mont Alto is included in this brochure. In addition, graduates of the Letters, Arts, and Sciences major may qualify for admission to a wide variety of baccalaureate majors offered at University Park campus. Or they may qualify for any of a large number of baccalaureate degree majors such as Business, Behavioral Sciences, Elementary Education, Humanities, or Public Policy offered at other Penn State campuses.

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For the Associate in Arts degree in Letters, Arts, and Sciences, a minimum of 60 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits (6 of these 21 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major) Electives: 15 credits Requirements for the Major: 30 credits Prescribed Courses: 6 credits ENGL 015 GWS(3) CAS 100 GWS(3) Additional Course: 3 credits ENGL 202A GWS(3), ENGL 202B GWS(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3), or ENGL 202D GWS(3) Supporting Courses and Related Areas: 21 credits Select 3 credits in any course designated as arts* (Sem: 1–4) Select 3 credits in any course designated as humanities* (Sem: 1–4) Select 3 credits in any course designated as social and behavioral sciences*

(Sem: 1–4) Select 3 credits in any course designated as physical, biological, or earth sciences* (Sem: 1–4) Select 9 credits in any one of the following areas*: arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences and quantification, and foreign language skills. (If foreign language courses are chosen, it is recommended that these courses be in one foreign language sequence.) (Sem: 1–4) #The required credits of General Education and Requirements for the Major must be baccalaureate–level courses. For students intending to seek admission to a baccalaureate program upon graduation, it is recommended that most, if not all, of the courses be at the baccalaureate level. For those students who will seek a bachelor of arts degree upon graduation from Letters, Arts, and Sciences, it is strongly recommended that a foreign language be taken since admission to a bachelor of arts program in the College of the

Liberal Arts requires one college–level course, or the equivalent, in a foreign language. *Courses that will satisfy the arts, humanities, social and behavioral sciences, natural sciences, and quantification requirements are defined on the Letters, Arts, and Sciences checksheet, which may be obtained from the College of the Liberal Arts associate dean for undergraduate studies at the University Park campus or from any Letters, Arts, and Sciences representative at other locations. Sample Courses — Effective Writing: Writing in the Social Sciences — Rhetoric and Composition — Effective Writing: Business Writing — Effective Speech Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/2las


P E N N S T A T E M O N T A L T O M a j o r s an d C a r ee r s

Nursing ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE Is the RN program right for me? T h ink a bo u t a n as s o ciat e de gr e e in n ursin g if: You would like to become a Registered Nurse and have the opportunity to work in a variety of healthcare settings. The RN program is an associate degree program designed to be completed in two years by full–time students. Graduates of this major may qualify for admission to the RN to BS program in Nursing.

Graduates of this major are prepared to provide care in a variety of health care settings to individuals with commonly occurring acute or chronic health problems. After earning the associate degree, students are eligible to take the registered nurse examination for licensure by the State Board of Nursing. The Nursing program is accredited by The National League for Nursing Accrediting Commission (NLNAC), 3343 Peachtree Road NE, Suite 500, Atlanta, GA 30326 (404– 975–5000), and approved by the Pennsylvania State Board of Nursing.

For the Associate in Science degree in Nursing, a minimum of 68 credits is required. Scheduling Recommendation by Semester Standing given like (Sem: 1–2) General Education: 21 credits (15 of these 21 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major) Requirements for the Major: 62 credits (This includes 15 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GN courses; 3 credits of GQ courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GWS courses) Prescribed Courses: 53 credits BIOL 129 GN(4), BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 142(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), NURS 111S(4), NURS 112(4), NURS 113(3), NURS 114(3), NURS 116(2), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1–2)

Our students come from nineteen states and territories, giving our campus one of the most diverse student populations. But did you know that about 20 percent of our faculty hail from nations around the globe, including China, Central America, Germany, Ghana, India, Kazakhstan, Malaysia, Palestine, Thailand, and Wales?

MICRB 106 GN(3), MICRB 107 GN(1), NURS 211(5), NURS 212(4), NURS 213(5), NURS 214W(3), NURS 216(2) (Sem: 3–4) Additional Courses: 9 credits HD FS 129 GS(3) or PSYCH 212 GS(3); SOC 001 GS(3) or SOC 005 GS(3) (Sem: 1–2) Select 3 credits of GQ courses (Sem: 3–4) Sample Courses — Introduction to Childrearing Years (OB) — Introduction to Childbearing Years (Pediatrics) — Behavioral Health — Fundamentals of Nursing — Medical-Surgical Nursing — Leadership Immersion For the LPN Portfolio/ Credit By Exam Option, visit: ma.psu.edu/lpn Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/nursing

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P E N N S T A T E M O N T A L T O M a j o r s an d C a r ee r s

Occupational Therapy ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE Is Occupational Therapy right for me? Th in k a bo u t a n as s o ciat e de gr e e in OT if: You want to prepare to be an occupational therapy assistant who is qualified to be employed by agencies that provide occupational therapy services. Occupational Therapy is a growing healthcare field in the United States with increasing employment opportunities expected to steadily increase through 2020. The United States Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) includes occupational therapist assistant among its list of fastest growing occupations and predicts much faster than average growth (36 percent) for assistants. Penn State Mont Alto offers an associate degree program that helps students prepare for careers as certified occupational therapy assistants.

Certified Occupational Therapy Assistants (COTA’s) work in a variety of settings, under the supervision of occupational therapists. Young or old, we all have a job to do—the job of living. Learning, growing, playing, working, managing our homes, and caring for our families and ourselves are among the “occupations” of life. Sometimes physical, emotional, or other challenges prevent people from participating fully in the job of living. Stroke, injury, depression, and developmental disabilities, for example, can make it difficult for people to do everyday tasks or be as active and as independent as they’d like. Occupational therapy makes it possible for people to regain independence and to enjoy life to its fullest. By choosing a career in occupational therapy, you will make a difference. You will improve the lives of children, young people, and adults alike. Following graduation, students are eligible to take the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) exam.

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Career opportunities for a graduate with an associate degree in occupational therapy may include working in public and private schools, early intervention programs, general, behavioral health, and pediatric hospitals, day treatment centers, hospices and home health agencies, rehabilitation hospitals and centers, skilled and intermediate care facilities, community living programs, community wellness centers, work hardening and adjustment programs, and/or hand therapy clinics. The program is fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) through the 2014–2015 academic year.

For the Associate in Science degree in Occupational Therapy, a minimum of 64 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits (12 of these 21 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major) Requirements for the Major: 55 credits (This includes 12 credits of General Education courses: 3 credits of GWS courses; 6 credits of GS courses; 3 credits of GN courses.) Prescribed Courses: 55 credits BIOL 129 GN(4), BIOL 141 GN(3), BIOL 142 (1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), HD FS 129 GS(3), O T 100S(1), O T 101(3), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1–2) O T 103 US(3), O T 105W(3), OT 107(3) (Sem: 2–3)

KINES 013 GHA(1), O T 202(3), OT 204(3), O T 206(3), PSYCH 243 GS(3) (Sem: 3–4) O T 295A(6), O T 295B(6) (Sem: 4–5) Sample Courses — Mammalian Anatomy — Introductory Physiology — Occupational Performance Across the Life Span — Activity Analysis: Group Interaction Skills — Occupational Therapy for Physical Disabilities Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/ota


P E N N S T A T E M O N T A L T O M a j o r s an d C a r ee r s

Physical Therapist Assistant ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE DEGREE Is PTA right for me? T h in k a bo u t m aj o r in g in P TA if : You want to become a skilled technical health care worker who assists physical therapists with testing and treatment of patients. Physical Therapist Assistants (PTAs) help people who have short– or long–term disabilities recover their physical capabilities.

The PTA Program at Penn State Mont Alto includes five semesters of studies—four semesters of course work followed by a semester–long practicum in a healthcare setting. This balanced curriculum helps students prepare to support professional physical therapists in patient treatment. Through a combination of science and nonscience course work, students gain skill and knowledge in the use of equipment and exercise in physical therapy treatment. Specialized instruction includes anatomy and physiology, kinesiology (the study of human muscular movements), and therapeutic, postsurgical, and rehabilitative procedures. The Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredits this program.

Physical therapist assistants (PTAs) graduate with an associate degree after two years of study. PTAs work under the direction of a physical therapist (PT). PTAs’ duties can include assisting in instructing patients in exercises and activities of daily living (including physical modalities), using special equipment, collecting data on the patient’s progress, and documenting and reporting on the patient’s response. (Source: www.apta.org)

For the Associate in Science degree in Physical Therapist Assistant, a minimum of 68 credits is required. General Education: 21 credits (9–12 of these 21 credits are included in the Requirements for the Major) Requirements for the Major: 59 credits (This includes 9–12 credits of General Education courses: 3–6 credits of GWS courses; 3 credits of GN courses; 3–6 credits of GS courses.) Prescribed Courses: 41 credits BIOL 129 GN(4), BIOL 1 41 GN(3), BIOL 142(1), ENGL 015 GWS(3), P T 100(3), P T 384(4), PSYCH 100 GS(3) (Sem: 1–2) P T 150(2), P T 160(3), P T 250(4), P T 260(3) (Sem: 3–4) P T 395F(4)*, P T 395G(4)* (Sem: 5) Additional Courses: 18 credits Select 1 credit from KINES 013(1) or KINES 303 GHA(3) (Sem: 1–4) Select 3 credits from CAS 203(3), ENGL 202C GWS(3), or PSYCH 212 GS(3) (Sem: 1–5)

Select 4 credits from P T 395E(4) * or P T 395W(4)* (Sem: 3) Select 3 credits from P T 270(3) or P T 270W(3) (Sem: 3–4) Select 4 credits from P T 280(4) or P T 280W(4) (Sem: 3–4) Select 1–3 credits from any P T course not listed above in prescribed or additional courses. (Sem: 1–5) *Courses that include clinical education experiences may require the student to travel long distances or obtain housing near the assigned clinic. Housing and transportation arrangements are the responsibility of the student. Sample Courses — Physical Therapist Assistant Introduction — Applied Kinesiology — Physical Therapist Assistant Procedures — Therapeutic Exercise — Rehabilitation — Pathophysiology Please refer to page 23 of this publication for Admission Requirements. ma.psu.edu/pta

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Minors Penn State Mont Alto offers four minors for students to supplement their major. Business Minor

Women’s Studies Minor

This interdisciplinary minor provides students with a business–oriented supplement to their academic major. It is designed to introduce students to a variety of fundamental business skills and knowledge. The minor consists of 22–23 credits, at least 6 credits of which must be at the 400 level. Only courses in which students earn a grade of C or better may be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the minor.

This interdisciplinary minor is designed to develop a broad understanding of the study of women and women’s perspectives in all areas of academic scholarship. The primary focus is on feminist analyses of women’s lives, women’s social, cultural, and scientific contributions, and the structure of sex/gender systems. The interdisciplinary and inclusive nature of the field is reflected in a curriculum that includes courses cross–listed with a wide variety of departments, courses that deal with aspects of women’s lives throughout history, and courses that recognize the diversities of culture, race, religion, ethnicity, age, disability, and sexual orientation. The Women’s Studies minor emphasizes the development of critical and analytical skills, creative approaches to problem solving, and the ability to articulate productive alternatives. Women’s Studies minors have a definite career advantage, and can be successful in a wide variety of career paths. Some of these include legal advocacy, counseling, journalism, public relations, management, nonprofit administration, teaching, medicine, politics, or art. In addition, many alumnae/i are currently studying in professional, law, or graduate schools. The minor consists of 18 credits. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

English Minor This minor provides students with an English–oriented supplement to their academic major. The minor consists of 18 credits, with 6 credits from English classes at the 200 level, the 400 level, and 6 additional credits in English. Only courses in which students earn a grade of C or better may be counted toward fulfillment of the requirements for the minor.

Security and Risk Analysis Minor The minor in Security and Risk Analysis (SRA) is intended to familiarize students with the general frameworks and multidisciplinary theories that define security and related risk analysis. Course work will engage students in the challenges and problems of assuring information confidentiality and integrity (e.g., social, economic, technology, and policy issues) as well as the strengths and weaknesses of various methods for assessing and mitigating associated risk in the students’ major field. The minor consists of 21 credits, with at least 6 credits which must be at the 400 level. A grade of C or better is required for all courses in the minor.

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Additional Information Veterans

At Penn State Mont Alto, we value men and women who bravely volunteer to serve in today’s military and defend the freedoms

we enjoy. We also proudly participate in Veteran Administration’s Yellow Ribbon program, a program that allows our campus to partner with the V.A. to extend a higher benefit to you. We welcome you to explore the many high–quality educational opportunities we provide. Please visit the veterans’ page on our website: ma.psu.edu/veterans or call our Veterans Affairs Office at 717–749–6094. Adult Learners

Penn State Mont Alto welcomes the adult learner—anyone 24 years of age or older —to explore educational opportunities. Adult learners typically return to school after four or more years of employment, homemaking, or other activity, and they often assume multiple adult roles such as parent, spouse/partner, employee, and student. Adult Students often enter the college environment anxious and uncertain about their ability to succeed. However, current research shows that adult students are typically more successful than younger students because of their maturity and the experience that they bring to the classroom. Penn State provides a variety of services and activities to help adult students be successful in their college experience. Adult learners also may start taking courses one at a time, credit or noncredit, and may not go through the admissions process until later in their educational experience. For more information, contact our Admissions Office at 800–392–6173.


Admission Requirements for Baccalaureate (Four–Year) Degrees First–Year Student Baccalaureate (Four–Year) Degree Admission Criteria Compare your high school record with the following Penn State entrance require­ ments. If you will not have the required courses by the time you graduate from high school, contact an admissions officer to discuss alternatives. Penn State’s admis­ sion offer is contingent on the satisfact­ory completion of all entrance requirements, including graduation from high school. An applicant may present a high school equiva­ lency diploma based on the General Educa­ tional Development (GED) test score in place of a high school diploma.

High School Requirements The minimum high school units required for admission to baccalaureate degree programs are as follows: English—Four units; these must include a composite of one unit each in composition and literature. Foreign Language/Social Studies/Arts/ Humanities—Five units in any combination of foreign language, social studies, arts, and humanities are required. Two units of the same foreign language are recommended for all programs. NOTE: Students who have gradu`ated from high school in the year 2001 or later who have not completed the recommended two high school units of the same foreign language, or who have not completed one 3–4 semester credit foreign language course with a grade of C (2.0) or higher at the collegiate level, will need to schedule the appropriate foreign language course work at Penn State within their first two years of study. Science—Three units of science are required; preparation in chemistry and physics is recommended for the Colleges of Engineer­ ing, Earth and Mineral Sciences, and Science, and Penn State Erie or Penn State Harrisburg Engi­neer­ing/Engineering Technology pro­ grams. Math—Three units of mathematics are required (four are recommended)—including one–and–a–half units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry, and one–half unit of trigo­ nometry—by the Colleges of Business, Earth and Mineral Sciences, Engineering, Informa­ tion Sciences and ­Tech­nology, and Science; and by all other Business, Engi­neering/Engi­ neering Technology, and Science programs. All other colleges, as well as the ­­Division of Under­grad­uate Studies, require three units of ­mathematics (four are recommended) selected from any ­combination of algebra, geometry, and trigonometry.

Special Academic Program Opportunities Schreyer Honors College Schreyer Honors College (SHC) is Penn State’s undergraduate honors program for students of exceptional academic achievement and research or creative potential. Established in 1977, SHC has a three-part mission: academic excellence with integrity, an international perspective, and opportunities for service and leadership. With one of the largest portfolios of honors courses of any university in the country, and a wealth of special opportuni­ ties ranging from on-campus to abroad, SHC complements study in the major to provide a uniquely enriched experience. Honors faculty advisors in all Penn State majors work with Schreyer Scholars to maximize the scope and depth of their studies. All Schreyer Scholars complete a thesis, which is a large-scale work of original reserach or creative activity appro­ priate to their field of study. Schreyer Scholars may start their studies at any of Penn State’s twenty undergraduate campus­ es and Scholars housing is available in Atherton and Simmons Halls at University Park. All first–year Schreyer Scholars receive the Academic Excellence Scholarship of $3,500 per year, renewable for a total of four years of study. This scholarship may be combined with other merit–based and need–based awards. For more information, visit: shc.psu.edu

Educational Opportunity Program As part of its land–grant university mission, Penn State is ­committed to providing access and retention to low–income Pennsylvania students through the Educational Opportu­ nity Program (EOP). The EOP can provide an alternative admis­ sion opportunity for entering first–year students who meet the following criteria: —Pennsylvania resident; —family’s adjusted gross income must fall within the guidelines established by the Pennsylvania Department of Education; —applicant may not meet regular admission criteria for his or her selected campus, and/or may need basic skills courses and/ or supplemental academic support. In addition to providing an offer of enroll­ ment to Penn State, the program provides thorough diagnostic and placement services; basic skills courses in English, math, and reading (if needed by the student), and a study skills course; academic support includ­ ing tutoring, counseling, and academic advis­ ing. Available courses and services may vary by campus. If you wish to apply for admission to Penn State and be considered for EOP, you must take the following steps:

1. Complete the enclosed application for admission to Penn State. If you cannot afford to pay the application fee, ask your principal or school counselor to attach a fee waiver request to the application. 2. Complete the EOP Financial Information Form (FIF) and attach it to the application for admission. If you do not have a FIF, you may obtain one from an admissions office at a Penn State campus or Penn State Com­munity Recruitment Center. 3. Complete this year’s Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). You may obtain this form from your high school counselor, a Penn State campus or Commu­ nity Recruitment Center, or online at fafsa. gov. This form should be submitted as soon as pos­sible after January 1. To be consid­ ered for maxi­mum financial aid, you should submit this form before February 15. For more detailed information about EOP, please contact an admissions counselor at a Penn State campus or Community Recruitment Center.

Services for Students with Disabilities Penn State encourages academically qualified students with disabilities to take ad­ vantage of its educational programs. It is the policy of the University not to discriminate against per­sons with disabilities in its admission policies or procedures or its educational programs, services, and activities. The University is responsible for ensuring that courses, programs, services, jobs, activities, and facilities are available and usable in the most integrated and appropriate settings. Students with disabilities seeking accommo­ dations must identify themselves as individu­ als with a disability and demonstrate and/or document (from an appropriate professional) how the disability limits their participation in courses, pro­grams, services, jobs, activities, and facilities. Upon receiv­ing docu­mentation of a disability, the Office for Disability Ser­ vices will explore and facilitate reasonable accommo­dations, aca­demic adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids and services for individu­ als with disabilities in courses, pro­grams, services, jobs, activities, and facilities. Students anticipating the need for accom­ modations, both before and after enrollment, are encouraged to con­tact the Office for Disability Services at University Park campus (116 Boucke Building, 814–863–1807 V/TTY) or the di­rector of student affairs at other Penn State campuses. Ad­ditional information can be found at equity.psu.edu/ods on the web.

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Transfer Student Baccalaureate Degree (Four–Year) Admission Criteria Penn State expects transfer students to apply for admission using the Web application avail­ able at admissions.psu.edu. Typically, decisions for admission to Penn State’s various programs and locations are made on the basis of the appli­cant’s request­ ed academic program, space availability, and the quality of the applicant’s credentials in relation to those of other applicants. Consideration for transfer admission to Penn State as a baccalaureate degree candidate is based on the fol­lowing criteria: 1. A cumulative collegiate grade–point aver­ age of 2.0 on a 4.0 scale, computed in the manner used for Penn State students, is the minimum University requirement for admission consideration. Admission to many programs, at many campuses, re­ quires substantially higher mini­mum cumu­ lative collegiate grade–point averages. In general, admission consideration for Uni­ versity Park campus requires a minimum 2.5 cumulative grade–point average. The number of qualified transfer appli­cants usually exceeds the number of available campus and pro­gram spaces; therefore, satisfaction of the min­imum requirements does not guarantee admission. 2. Good standing at institutions previously attended. 3. Attendance at a regionally accredited col­ lege or university. 4. A high school diploma or equivalent and completion of the high school units required by your requested Penn State academic college (see page 3). To expedite the review of your transfer ap­ plication, submit with your application official transcripts from high school of graduation (or GED) and all postsecondary institu­ tions. These official transcripts should be forward­ed, by you, to Penn State in the original, sealed envelopes provided by those schools.

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Admission Requirements for Associate (Two–Year) Degrees First–Year/Transfer Student Associate (Two–Year) Degree Admission Criteria

Be sure that the campuses you choose on your application for admission offer the program that you select. Unless otherwise noted, associate degree programs are not avail­able at University Park campus. All programs may not be avail­able to students who are beginning their studies in the spring semester or summer session.

Typically, decisions for admission to Penn State’s various programs and campuses are based on the applicant’s re­quested academic program, space availability, and the quality of the applicant’s credentials in relation to those of other applicants.

Note: Consideration for the Schreyer Honors College requires (in addition to the regular Penn State admission application) a separate application, which is reviewed by the Faculty Selection Committee. Students applying to the program by November 30 will be given first consideration. Applications submit­ ted after March 14 will not be considered. Because SHC is limited to only 300 enter­ ing first–year students, admission is highly selective. Competitive applicants generally have excellent high school records in terms of grades, schedule strength, and extra­ curricular activities. The Faculty Selection Committee makes all decisions on first–year entry to SHC. For more information about the program, please visit shc.psu.edu, or call 814–865–2060.

High School Requirements The minimum high school units required for admission to associate degree programs include the following: English—four units. These should include a composite of one unit each in composi­ tion and literature. Foreign Language/Social Studies/Arts/ Humanities—five units. These units may include Advanced Placement courses in the arts. Science—two units. Applicants for admis­ sion to the Medical Laboratory Technology and Nursing programs should have one unit each in biology and chemistry. Applicants to the Physical Therapist Assistant program should have one unit in biology and one other science unit. Math—two units: One unit of algebra and one unit in any combination of advanced al­ gebra, plane geometry, solid ­geometry, or trigonometry are required for the associate degree programs in Information Sciences and Technology, Medical Laboratory Tech­ nology, Mining Technology, Science, Radio­ logical Sciences, Surveying Technology, and all Engineering Technology programs.

Academic College Transfer Requirements

Two units of mathematics (any combina­ tion of algebra, geom­etry, trigonometry, or general mathematics) are required for the associate degree programs in Agricultural Business; Criminal Justice; Hotel, Restau­ rant, and Institutional Management; Human Development and Family Studies; Letters, Arts, and ­Sciences; and Occupational Therapy.

Along with the general transfer requirements listed here, additional transfer requirements may be specified by each academic college. Please review the academic college require­ ments at admissions.psu.edu/academics/ majors/requirements/transfer before apply­ ing. These academic college requirements can change over the course of the admission year; we recommend that you apply as early as possible.

Two units of mathematics (one unit of al­ gebra and one addi­tional unit of mathemat­ ics) are required for the associate ­ degree programs in Business Administra­ tion, Forest Technology, General Business, Nursing, Physical Therapist Assistant, and Wildlife Technology. For the second unit, plane ­geometry is recommended for Business Admin­istration, Forest Technology, and Wildlife Technology.

Advanced Placement International Baccalaureate Credit Penn State cooperates with the College Board in the Advanced Placement (AP) program. Credit may be awarded for Advanced Placement examinations, de­ pending upon the grade earned on the examinations. If you have taken Higher Level Examina­ tions in the Inter­national Baccalaureate program or have studied sub­jects at the advanced level in some foreign educational systems, you also may be eligible to receive Advanced Place­ment credit. Details are available from admissions officers at each Penn State campus or on the Web at admissions.psu.edu. Official Advanced Placement Examination scores (and Interna­ tional Bacca­laureate exam­ination scores as well as official documents from foreign secondary school leaving exam­inations) should be forwarded to the Under­graduate Admissions Office/The Pennsylvania State Univer­sity/201 Shields Building/University Park, PA 16802–1294.


Penn State Mont Alto One Campus Drive Mont Alto, PA 17237–9703

Admissions Office Penn State Mont Alto One Campus Drive Mont Alto, PA 17237–9799 800–392–6173

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This publication is available in alternative media on request. The Pennsylvania State University is committed to the policy that all persons shall have equal access to programs, facili­ ties, admission, and employment without regard to personal characteristics not related to ability, performance, or qualifications as determined by University policy or by state or federal authorities. It is the policy of the University to maintain an academic and work environment free of discrimination, including harassment. The Pennsylvania State University prohibits discrimination and harassment against any person because of age, ancestry, color, disability or handicap, national origin, race, religious creed, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, or veteran status. Discrimination or harassment against faculty, staff, or students will not be tolerated at The Pennsylvania State University. Direct all inquiries regarding the nondis­ crimination policy to the Affirmative Action Director, The Pennsylvania State University, 328 Boucke Building, University Park, PA 16802–5901; Tel 814–865–4700/V, 814–863–1150/ TTY. Produced by the Penn State Department of University Marketing. U.Ed. MAO 12–17

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19078 psu montalto (printers proof)