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FMA Lifeline is the

COVER: Karen,

official news magazine of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians (Salesian Sisters of Don Bosco) in the Philippines and Papua New Guinea. FMA stands for Figlie di Maria Ausiliatrice, the official Italian name of the Congregation founded by St. John Bosco and St. Mary Mazzarello in 1872 in Mornese, Italy. Today, there are more than 13,600 FMAs in 94 countries who are dedicated in varied ministries for the youth.

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God’s Beloved Children

__________________

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Gaining Values, Growing in Faith

Daughters of Mary Help of Christians Provincial House 3500 V. Mapa Extension, Sta. Mesa 1016 Manila Tel. No. 714-5937; Faxphone 716-5097 www.fmafil.org.ph

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All Things are Possible in LVTC

John Michael, Lawrence, Cassandra and Samantha, children of the Laura Vicuña Foundation, Inc. Community-Based Center - Sta. Mesa, Manila

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Enriched by Love to Enrich Others in Love

Sr. Sarah Garcia, FMA

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From Mother General

Mother Yvonne Reungoat, FMA Sr. Aleth C. Evangelista, FMA Sr. Carolyn M. Cabahug, FMA

Sr. Maria Lourdes Virginia L. Fernando, FMA

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Education is Child-labor Protection

Sr. Maria Irene B. Beboso, FMA

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Child Protection Clinic on Wheels of the LVF, Inc.

Sr. Aleth C. Evangelista, FMA

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Mang-young Entrepinoys: IP Education/Evangelization with e-FTSP Sr. Ravena V. Dominguez, FMA

12 EDITORIAL BOARD Sr. Maria Socorro Bacani, FMA

Editorial Board Coordinator

Sr. Theda dela Rosa, FMA

Technical Coordinator

Sr. Florita Dimayuga, FMA Sr. Nora Hernandez, FMA Sr. Ann Lyn Rose Magno, FMA

The Fulfillment of a Dream - Aetas Mission

Sr. Lynn Grace M. Palanca, FMA

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Grades aren’t Everything; Learning in Life is... Sr. Candy Carmen M. Balverde, FMA

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Partnership for Sustainability Sr. Ann Lyn Rose D. Magno, FMA

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Da Mihi Animas, Coetera Tolle in Action Sr. Sheila Marie A. Ducot, FMA

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Don Bosco School Manila’s Alternative Learning System

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Sr. Ailyn P. Cayanan, FMA

Volunteering for Human Rights, Vides Pinoy Style Sr. Maria Josefina S. Carrasco, FMA

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Chronicles of Vatican II

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Homebound Salesian Forever

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December 2012

Vocation / Home for the Elderly FMA


From the Provincial Superior

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orking with the “poor” can sometimes be exasperating and discouraging. All of us, I think, have had this experience: seeing our “selfless and generous” efforts to helpreceived with defiance, disobedience, indifference, deception, ingratitude…The pain and shock of being reciprocated with the unexpected overwhelm us, and we forget that our ministry of compassion and service also has its stories of hope and lessons of faith and courage. Robin is 19, and his only dream is to be able to study. To be able to enroll in our agri-tech center in Calapan, Robin, wishing to preserve the amount he had scraped from odd jobs, went to Calapan on foot, making the trek from dawn to afternoon. Besides this amount of money, all he had was the willingness to learn and to believe in a better future for himself. Yet while holding on to his dream, he did not close his heart to those who were in need. When he came to know that his older brother had decided to go back to school, but could not because he had no money to enroll with, Robin simply handed his passbook to him. Robin is now happily immersed in his studies and hopes to learn all the farming skills he can so that he can take care of their ancestral land and repay the love he has received from his mother. Rowena comes from another religious denomination, and though already in her 40’s, enlisted as an ALS student in Don Bosco – Manila. In the recent equivalency examinations for high school, she found that one of the questions they were asked to answer lengthily was partial to the RH Bill. Aware that answering this question “correctly”meant much-needed points to pass the exam, and that failing to pass this exam would mean passing up the only opportunity she had to get a high school diploma, Rowena remonstrated with the proctors that she could not answer this question the way she was expected to, because it was against her conscience, it went against what she had learned from the Sisters. Although, as an ALS student, she had stayed with us for only a few months, the value of the dignity of life and other valuesthat Rowena strengthened in herwould remain with her all her life. In Minglanilla, ice candy is being sold for a cause. Part of the school’s ice candy sales goes to the oratory fund. A Grade 6 boy, Raymond, made it his commitment to donate five pesos from his own allowance to the fund every day, “even if you don’t give me the ice candy.”

MOH-TIW (Pampanga) has around 112 on-the-job trainees in the L & K Industries Philippines, Inc. in the Clark Free Zone. Our girls, though they have stayed only a year with us, have created such an impact in the workplace that the manager is asking the Sisters to send them their trainees again next year. The manager attests that they have added life and youthfulness to the place. With their joy and the values they uphold and exemplify, they inspire their co-workers and teach them what it means to work with a light heart. One can clearly see the difference between them and other trainees. And in one of our training centers, one of the graduates is a former member of the NPA (New People’s Army) who, spurred by the desire to turn a new leaf, left her cadres and her past, and enrolled in the Center. She had been driven to anger and despair when she saw her father shot by the military. In her new environment, she discovered that she still had a future before her, and that the past was not an obstacle to believing in herself and in the goodness of other people. These are just a few of the names and faces I have

encountered in my visits to the communities. These are just a few of the stories that our work among the poor and underprivileged churns out every day as we get to know these people that Our Lady was referring to when she told Maria Mazzarello, and us, through her, “I entrust them to you.” I am sure that if I have had more time and chances to talk with more of the persons we work for and with, I would have had more stories to share with you. And I am sure that you know of more such stories as you meet the “poor” in our technical training centers, oratories, Mothers’ Clubs, the ALS program, the COME Project, the home study program in Palawan, the LVF Program of Hope and the Child Protection Policy, the VIDES venues for volunteer service, the beneficiaries of the Mother Morano Educational Foundation scholarship grants. Yet these stories also abound among the young people we work for in our schools, boarding houses, in the campus ministry. We discover similar stories in the people we work with, in our teachers and non-teaching personnel, the parents of our students. These stories can even be our own.

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Poverty today wears many faces: not only in little economic well-being, but also and perhaps less conspicuously, in the lack of affection and love, the capacity for social relations, education and knowledge, moral strength and spiritual grace in many young people. Fr. Jack Finnegan, SDB mentions four “intriguing” words Don Bosco used to describe the young people of his time and to whom he ministered: poor, abandoned, in danger, and dangerous. Intriguing, indeed. Yet these were the “poor” of Don Bosco, the boys who stole his heart! He intended his educational system for the “poor” of his time. The preventive system today is for the “poor” of our time. Calling the objects of our mission “poor” is perhaps not politically correct. It implies that we are richer than they, and therefore are in a position to uplift their condition. Just as it takes a heart that is poor to be enriched by others, it also takes a poor heart to enrich others. We have to be “poor” ourselves, emptied of this way of looking at the less privileged, in order to really carry out a ministry of care and compassion among them, remembering that the objects of our mission still possess the wealth of human dignity and spiritual sonship/daughterhood that is theirs alone and that perhaps only need to be reawakened. They bear the seeds of change and transformation, both for themselves and the people they touch. They still have dreams that only need to find the right persons and the right environment to help bring them to fulfillment. Don Bosco has shown us that what makes persons and environments the “right” ones for enriching the poor is educative love. Amorevolezza is the heart of Don Bosco’s approach to poverty: “a joyful, creative love that responds to … the [poor young people’s] demand for caring pastoraleducative accompaniment” (Fr. Finnegan) with acceptance, support, patience, unconditional giving, and lived in a family-like network of relationships. When asked about what the greatest gift they have received from our schools and centers is, many say it is the dignity they have regained

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through our educational system. Through it they have discovered that they are not “dead men/women walking,” but God’s children whom the Father has graced with what is good, true, beautiful and delightful. The spirituality they have imbibed is a way of living and loving that can make them whole and holy. Life assumes deeper, broader proportions as they realize that it is not just about surviving, but about journeying to becoming and meaningfulness. The miracle of loving kindness has transformed them into persons they did not even realize or imagine they could be. Mother General’s latest circular letter (no. 932)challenges us FMA and educating communities to remain in the state of conversion so that we may bear coherent and credible witness to our faith, our identity, our vocation. Joyful and persevering fidelity to our being educators, whether we are FMA, parents or teachers, requires a constant paradigm shift – in our hope in the transforming power of education, in the potential of the “poor” to teach and enrich us in turn.I think, almost reverently, of our teachers and non-teaching personnel who have remained with us through the years, committed to the call and mission of educating, even if greener pastures beckon strongly elsewhere, even if they, too, feel the pinch of want, even if they see their now successful former students earning more than they do. This can only mean that they have been made “rich” in another, deeper way, and that they are so impelled by a higher call, a stronger value, a vision so noble and intense that theyhave actually made this life of service and compassion for the poor a life option. Poor yet rich, we thus create a cycle of hope as the young people we educate become transmitters of hope in their turn. In the school of the truly poor, no one is so poor that he has nothing to give at all. This, too, is the message of Christmas, in the wealth of grace and love that Jesus, the Poor One, enriched us with by His birth.

FROM

MotherGeneral

Mother Yvonne Reungoat, FMA

(Excerpt from Circular #932)

Dear Sisters, I have tried to communicate to you only a small glimmer of what I lived at the level of the universal Church [during the recently held Synod of Bishops], seeking to read it in the light of our realities so that they may become more and more places of joy, of hope, of New Evangelization. May this simple communication help us to live fully and in moderation the gift of Christmas. It is an event essential for Christian faith because it reveals a God so impassioned for the happiness of the human person that He sent His only Son on the earth. He is the true newness that we need for a new humanity, where the criteria for happiness are different than those of the world. Mary, Star of evangelization, brings us to Jesus. With great affection, I wish you a beautiful feast of the Immaculate Conception and a radiant Christmas. I extend my greetings to all of you, to your families, to the Rector Major, to our Salesian Priests and Brothers, to the groups of the Salesian Family, to the educating communities, and to all who share our educative service in the area and to all the young we receive with kindness and trust. Let us feel united as Institute in thanking the Lord for the holiness of Sr. Maria Troncatti, richness for the Church, for the Institute, for the Salesian Family. May God Bless You. Rome, 24 November 2012 Beatification of Sr. Maria Troncatti Affectionately, La Madre

Sr. Sarah B. Garcia, FMA Blessed Maria Troncatti


God’s Beloved Children Sr. Aleth C. Evangelista, FMA (LVC Cubao)

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escuing a child who escaped the center is not a big joke! Risking one’s life to retrieve the lost child is probably one of the most challenging roles a Salesian Sister could ever take. But the fatigue, anxiety and fear are nothing when the child is returned home. Patiently persuading a child to give back a knife is a scenario creating a massive tension one could ever experience. But a sense of victory is felt when the child willingly surrenders the sharp object and starts to calm down and be sorry for her action. Listening to the unconceivable stories of the girls’ traumatic past is a great mystery unfolding before our eyes. One could not but ask, is this true? Am I hearing a movie script? When tears start to flow out from the girl’s eyes, the Sister could not but embrace a wounded soul. Girls who come to our center are the lost, the least and the last. They are those described in our Constitutions article 65: “the poorer ones that is, those who for various reasons have the least chances of advancement and more exposed to dangers...” When they first arrive in the center, they are hostile, mistrustful, boisterous, filthy, harsh, confused, and angry. They feel betrayed and shattered and useless. They want to end their lives because they see no reason to live and reach their dreams. CHILD ARISE! These powerful words of command from Jesus to the dead girl are resounding and vibrating in our hearts every time we accept a girl in our center. It is also translated in our slogan, WE GIVE HOPE A HOME! We name every girl “HOPE” for like our great founder Don Bosco, we believe there is a seed of goodness in every young person. What we are and do in this home is a replica of Don Bosco’s love for his boys at Valdocco and Mother Mazzarello’s house of the love of God with her girls in the workroom at Mornese. The girls are at the heart of our educative mission. Our center becomes their home, where they feel safe, loved, and cared for. THE LVF’s PEACE PROCESS Sr. Ma. Victoria P. Sta. Ana, FMA, LVFI’s Executive Director, strongly

believes that as an educator, one has to accompany the young to discover that seed of goodness and bring out the best in that youth. Inspired by the beauty and richness of the Preventive System, she has translated a very comprehensive and effective journey for the healing and recovery of the girls, the PEACE process: P – PROTECTIVE AND NURTURING ENVIRONMENT The Sisters and lay professional collaborators pervade the atmosphere of our Center with love and the family spirit. The caring relationship built with the girls is the best therapy itself. We reinforce in them that they are loved, they are safe and protected here. They are important ,we believe in them and they are not to be blamed. E – EXPRESSION OF THEIR FEELINGS WITHOUT JUDGEMENT We allow the child to freely ventilate their “stucked-up feelings”, pain and fears by being open, non-threatening and nonjudgemental. Informal small talks, visual arts, play, recreation and theatre therapy help the girls come out of themselves. A – ACCEPTANCE OF THE SITUATION The girls are allowed to grieve at their loses and to ask why these happened to them. They are encouraged to write in their journals on how they feel daily or write a letter to our Blessed Mother which they put at her feet at the chapel. It is in prayer, their communion with self, others and the Creator where they find solace and the strength to accept and reckon with their broken situation and not blame themselves for the abuse. C- CLAIM CONTROL OVER ONE’S LIFE AND ASSERT THEIR RIGHTS This is characterized by regaining of internal strength, resilience (I AM, I HAVE and I CAN), network and support to overcome further trauma and restoring their self confidence, positive self- functioning and standing to assert their personal boundaries and rights. E – EMPOWER TO PLAN AND REBUILD THEIR LIVES AS IN CAPACITY BUILDING ACTIVITIES The Sisters and professional lay collaborators help the child chart her life path, gain productive skills or a profession where she can best contribute to her family

and nation’s development efforts. The PEACE process blended with the Spirituality of the Preventive System lived and shared among us Salesian Sisters, our lay collaborators and the young girls entrusted to us bear good fruits: Shane, 21 year old, who was a former resident of our Center trained at our Technology Center is now working in a business company and earning her own bread. Rescued by fishermen in a basket in the shores of Samar, trafficked by relatives in Manila to a domestic worker where she was also abused. She has now find her place in the Sun. Carmy, who underwent the PEACE process during her two years stay at the Center has risen up from her tragic past and is now a call center agent in a very wellknow call center. Charice who is now a mother to her baby son continues to visit the center from time to time as she is working in an accounting office nearby. She used to be one of the leaders in the center who also had the opportunities to represent the Foundation in countries in Asia and in New York. Ronalyn and Jaymee are both former residents and are now taking up a course in the University. They cannot go back to their families because of the great danger of revictimization. They are very grateful to be given the chance to rebuild their lives and make a difference. Justine, 15 year old girl, who is still residing at the Center, is chosen to be among the Children Representative in the National government. She is one of our most active Child Advocate and joins the Sisters and staff in conducting our awareness learning sessions in our Child Protection Clinic on Wheels. She has also been invited to various forums, and assemblies for children. She even joins other child-leaders in the nation in facilitating children’s congress among their fellow children in the entire archipelago. As FMA, the source of our preferential love for young people is the love of Jesus Christ, who moved Don Bosco and Maria Domenica Mazzarello to give practical response to the deepest aspirations of the poorest young people. (GEM28) Impassioned by the Da Mihi animas Cetera Tolle, we continue to commit ourselves for the salvation of the young no matter how difficult it may seem. God Emmanuel, is always with us and is dwelling among us each day, 24/7 as we face the young girls, as we encounter them in their fragilities, as we witness to their thirst for spiritual things and as we journey with them in their aspiration to stand up from their past, believing that they are God’s BELOVED CHILDREN.

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ducation to faith is what counts most at the Laura Vicuna FoundationCommunity Based Center in Sta. Mesa. Young boys and girls ranging from nine to eighteen years of age from poor families frequent oratory thrice a week. They go through a process of a solid Christian and Human Formation. They receive Catechesis on Tuesdays and Fridays. Sr. Linda Villanueva teaches the Elementary pupils while Sr. Carolyn Cabahug teaches the High School students.

Don Bosco and Mo. Mazzarello better and deepen the five elements of the Salesian Spirituality. They also experience group life which are venues for using, developing, and sharing their talents with others through arts, music, sports, and theater. To top it all, they are motivated to have great love and devotion to JESUS in the Eucharist and to MARY, Help of Christians that would spur them on to lead a life of holiness. They learn how to value prayer and the Sacraments as sources of strength for their life’s journey.

The Sisters of the Provincial House Community take turns in giving the “Buona Notte” to the Vicunians. They go back home with a good thought lingering in their minds and hearts which they also share with their families and friends.

One Vicunian testified, “I, Azalia Padilla, have been part of the LVF since I was in Grade 3 until now that I am a College student. I have realized that Catechism classes and other varied meaningful activities contribute to my unique self-identity but above all to my spiritual growth. But, for me, the most important thing I learned from the LVF Center is PRAYING. The Salesian Sisters taught me how to speak to and

Every Friday is Salesian Youth Spirituality formation day for the Vicunians through which they are able to get to know

gaining values, growing in faith Sr. Carolyn M. Cabahug, FMA LVF Community-Based Center - Sta. Mesa

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communicate with GOD. And I try my best to be faithful to these helps in deepening my faith and my relationship with HIM. Now, as I continue my Salesian Youth Journey, I know that life will not be easy. But I could surpass any obstacle with God at my side. With the learnings I got from the Sisters, I will continue to nourish my faith and walk with Christ, Crucified and Risen, for my wellbeing and happiness…Salesian holiness.” The Vicunians are exposed to different temptations and forms of poverty. However, even if they are deprived of many things in life, they believe that by coming regularly to the LVF Center there is greater value gained, besides the material help they have been receiving. They experience true peace and joy shared with their loved ones, and above all, they feel the unconditional love of God which gives them great hope to continue working towards achieving their dreams through education.


all things are possible Sr. Maria Lourdes Virginia L Fernando, FMA in LVTC (LVTC Sta. Mesa) The Laura Vicuña Technology Center, Sta. Mesa, Manila is a technical – vocational center directly under the Laura Vicuña Foundation that caters to urban poor and rehabilitated LVF cases. The LVTC offers technical / vocational courses to allow street children and working minors to learn employable skills enabling them to earn a living. It offers courses in Business and Office Technology (Two Years)and Electronics Technology (Two Years). The first year the student pays a minimum of Php300.00 a month instead of Php3,000.00 and when she goes for the OJT with the DTS Program the Company gives a sufficient amount to pay for the tuition fee dues and living allowance to sustain the student on OJT. Some students are already employed by the company right after OJT and the rest find work easily right after graduation

I’m Jane Aviles, a first year student of Electronics Technology at the Laura Vicuña Technology Center. I’m 17 years old residing at Tatalon, Quezon City. My mother is sick and does the homekeeping while my father works as a construction worker receiving a minimum wage of Php400/ day. We are three siblings – all girls and the eldest is a 3rd year full-scholar taking up BS Ed at the PNU while the youngest is at grade7 at a public high school. I knew about LVTC through a friend and so I applied and luckily passed the examinations. I never thought of pursuing my studies due to financial constraint but because of the study now - pay later program of LVTC, which can be afforded by my parents, my dream came true. My parents’ trust and

because during their first year prior to their OJT they take the NCII and NC III from TESDA making them more qualified to be hired immediately. Both courses are “dualized” which means fifty percent (50%) of training is spent in-center while the fifty percent (50%) is spent in–plant or in the partner company. The Center’s goal of “job- fitness” for its trainees is best achieved under the Dual Training System Program. The School or Training Center and the Company or Work place share the responsibility of providing trainees with well-coordinated learning experience and opportunities. The general and occupation-related theoretical instruction provided by the school is implemented by the on-the-job training in the Workplace, where trainees also learn good work habits and interpersonal communication skills besides the job skills.

confidence in me increased because I was able to study well with good grades and also because of the Sisters assurance of good education, moral and spiritual formation. My father has stopped drinking and spent more time working because he saw in us the great effort that we have in our studies and our great desire to have brighter future. I also became closer in my relationship with the Lord with the spiritual & moral teachings I received from my Rel Ed and Val Ed.subjects. With LVTC I am strengthened and encouraged to pursue my dream and ambition of a good work and be of help to my family. I want to provide a house for them and a small store for my mother. My hearfelt gratitude to the Sisters for helping me realize my dream through the education they offer to poor young like me, and to God whom I learned to know and love more and who makes me stronger in moments of problems.

Being a graduate of the Laura Vicuna Technology Center, I can really say that I am blessed to be a part of this Institute. I enrolled as a Business and Office Technology Trainee, a Two-year training course This school taught us everything including love, hope, faith, and most especially being a responsible Christian, molding each and everyone to goodness and greatness of God. Through our extra-curricular activities I was able to discover and enhance my talents in music, sports, drama and literature. The Sisters in the school, the teachers and all the FMA Sisters were always there to guide us and help us through counseling and their prayers. With the study now-pay later, which was really of big help for me and the less fortunate families, I was able to pursue my studies and have my dream realized. With the DTS Program of the LVTC, my OJT at the Ryonan Electric Philippines Corporation in Techno Park at Biñan Laguna helped me pay the remaining balance of my school fees and at the same time have allowances to sustain me during these months of my OJT. After graduation, I applied for a work at Alter to Fit (a tailoring and alteration shop), which is also a partner company of the LVTC. I started working here since October 2010 up to the present. My work includes the following: assisting the customers fit their items, check the measurement, do the job orders and receipt, cashiering, cleaning the shop, do the work schedule, check two sewers, do the quality control, reports, and see to it that the sales is consistently good. This job helped me be confident, brave and smart. I always tell myself that God is always there to guide and give me wisdom every day. I have been to 3 Branches of this company - - Mall of Asia, San Fernando Pampanga, and at SM Megamall . With LVTC I was able to have all these wonderful experiences and I really feel blessed and honored to be who I am now. I am able to help my family financially, save money for my future goal and keeping in mind that I always have to be good Christian and honest citizen. I’m proud to part of LVTC! Rhodesza C. Montemayor (picture on top wearing red)

Alter to Fit Dress Shop Incorporated SM Megamall Batch 2008-2010 Business and office T echnology

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Education is child-labor protection

Sr. Maria Irene B. Beboso, FMA (LVWDTC Malihao)

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Hacienda Malihao is one of the thirteen barangays located three kilometers Hacienda Malihao is one of the thirteen barangays located three kilometers away from Victorias Milling Company and is considered to be an agricultural land totally planted with sugarcane. The condition and majority therefore of families living within the hacienda and the nearby vicinity are dependent on sugarcane plantation. Since the work in the sugarcane plantation is seasonal, the tenant’s workers incur debts especially during off season in order to provide food for their families and the educational needs of their children. There were times that parents would asked their children even those younger in age to stop attending school so that they can work in the sugarcane field, thus, bring additional income to the family. This hard situation results to unemployment both for parents and young adults, high percent of young people working as domestic helpers, parttime construction and quarry workers, increasing number of drop-outs or out of school youth and the rest turns to truancy due to vices and the lack of formation especially on education and values. It is inevitable then that this painful reality also creates abuses in all its forms and most of its victims are children and young people. In the midst of this disheartening situation God listened to the cry of His people and with the presence of the Salesian Sisters in Malihao together with their lay mission partners commit themselves to give hope and enthusiasm among its people to dream again and to work for a better future. The compassion towards the less privileged, the efforts to counteract poverty and ignorance and other abuses strengthened the mission of the Salesian Sisters in this place and some nearby haciendas. The special predilection towards the poor brought about several fruitful and promising apostolate which became a haven for the people in their struggle. The Technical-Vocational Center that offers courses on Bookkeeping, Hotel and Restaurant Services and Garment Technology integrated with Job-Placement opportunities helps young people forming them with quality and value-laden education, training skills, thus, empowering them to work in creative level of partnership, building quality life for their families and society as well. The COME Project (Community Mobilization towards Education) paved the way for a more intensified intervention for the reduction and elimination of child-labor and the protection of children-at-risk through education. From this project two aspects are given attention, the Educational Program for out of school youth providing them a modular education through the Alternative Learning System of DepEd, Value-Integral Formation, Entrepreneurship, vocational and life skills training and the Community Organizing

and Advocacy which empowers parents, Public School Principals from different haciendas and Local Government Units(LGU) leading them to a greater awareness on Child’s Rights and duty, enhance their social responsibility concerning the hazards of child labor and the commitment to give importance to educational alternatives that counteracts child labor and other abuses including human trafficking. The Sunday Oratory that welcomes children and young people for catechesis, celebration, fellowship and faith sharing deepens their Christian and human formation. The parents in the PES (Parents Effective Seminar) who undergoes regular formation and training on effective rearing and nurturing of children including parenting issues creates a support systems that enables the community to respond to the needs and concerns of young people in different situation. True enough, that one of the greatest benefits we can bestow on the poor is to preserve their children from harmful influence. A good education will one day enable these children and young people support their old parents and bring them consolation. The young people themselves affirm: “I am very thankful to the Sisters for the formation and education they have given me since the time I was an ALS learner and now as a trainee at the Center. My life has a sense of direction now.” – Rodel Flora, 21 (BOT

trainee & former ALS learner)

“My stay at the Training Center helps me grow in my relationship with the Lord. I also came to appreciate the value of discipline and strive to make better my life so that one day I can help my family.” – Therese dela Torre, 19 (HRS trainee) “I started to have positive outlook in life when I came to the Center. I thought I will never be able to study again. Thanks to the goodness and dedication of the Sisters and our teachers.” – Reymond Balon, 19 (ALS) “Seeing my parents work hard in the sugarcane field encourages me to finish my studies. I dreamt to have a dignified work where I can be proud of myself and someday help my family.” – Yvonne Lauron, 19 (ALS) The words of Fr. Pietro Braido, SDB in his book Don Bosco’s Pedagogical Experience, speak of the truth that we can truly be effective in our work among the poor when he says, “Of all the kinds of charity, the most fruitful and wholesome is the one that forestalls poverty at its sources. Preventive charity cannot be practiced in a more useful way than by the education of the poor where one receives help for the present and the creation of a better future.” The mission in this far flung area may be vast and challenging but witnessing these people filled again with passion for life as they dream for a better future, we are enriched by their poverty and are impelled to respond to the call to become Emmanuel so “that all may have life and have it to the full” (Jn. 10:10).


tio n, Inc . of the La ura Vic uñ a Fo un da Sr. Aleth C. Evangelista, FMA (LVC Cubao)

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veryday the tri-media account for a number of children being abused, neglected and exploited within the family home and elsewhere. Our society’s awareness and understanding of the pervasivenenss of child abuse is a growing concern not only by child advocates but a greater majority of the Filipinos. Laura Vicuna Foundation as a strong advocate for child protection and development, continuously pilots innovative strategies. In its 20th Anniversary Celebration, the LVF launched its Child Protection Clinic dubbed as the CPC on Wheels with a tagline of “Building a Culture of Protection for Children.” Our work with abused children has taught us that sexual abuse and exploitation extremely damage the child’s core, his/her ability to trust and to develop

relationships. It can even be irreparable.It is crucial then to do preventive education against abuse and exploitation of children . The CPC on Wheels is a mission and an evangelization which seeks, heals and restores wholeness of the children experiencing damage of the soul (trauma). CPC on Wheels is inspired by the words of Jesus, “It is no part of your Heavenly Father’s plan that a single one of these little ones shall ever come to grief ” (Mt.19:14). It is a pioneering preventive grassroots advocacy approach to child protection particularly for the prevention of child abuse, commercial exploitation of children and human trafficking. Miriam Webster 2008 defines a clinic as a “meeting during which a group learns about a particular thing or work on a particular problem”. Manned

by a core of SalesianSisters, social workers, volunteers and child rights advocates the CPC on Wheels provide psycho-social spiritual intervention for child victims of abuse; child rights education;life skills sessions; formation of frontline advocates on child advocacy for child protection in communities & schools. Learning sessions are also conducted to organize preventive alert systems in these localities. The CPC on Wheels also brings social services, socio-cultural and recreational activities, educational assistance, food distribution, and occasional free medical clinic in highrisk communities. Since May 6 , 2010 with 200 children in Masambong, Quezon City and Barangay Napindan in Taguig, the CPC on Wheels has been serving an average of 1,000 children and youth in disaster communities in the cities of Taguig, Marikina, San Juan, Manila and Quezon City.

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Mang-young Entrepinoys: Calapan City - Ten years ago, we dubbed it the “Paradigm Shift for the Underprivileged Youth” for both the Indigenous Peoples (Mangyans of Mindoro) and lowlanders together with Malampaya Shell Foundation as our major mission partner. Just two years ago, the community had coined the “Mangyoung Entrepinoys Organic Farming sa Mindoro”, which had moved the Department of Agriculture’s Secretary Proceso J. Alcala to draw DA’s and also his pool of resources, human and material to MHCS (Mindoro), Inc. in Parang, Calapan City, Oriental Mindoro, Philippines.

The present MHCS community, following its Needs Assessment conducted sometime in June of this year, with the assistance of Dr. Salvador Catelo, PhD of the College of Economics and Development of UPLB, is now experimenting on the e-FSTP (eNTREPRENEUR-Farmers-Scientists Training Program) based on the existing FSTP of the Agriculture Science Cluster (ASC) of the University of the Philippines at Los Baños (UPLB) spearheaded by Dr. Romulo G. Davide, a most recent Ramon Magsaysay awardee, and his team. The present Corn-based Integrated with Livestock Training flow is specifically based on the assumptions following the planting/ sowing calendar of the year, what with the climate change now on the onset, and not anymore with the semestral or academic periods as we were used to do in the past. During Phase I, the lay trainers and the Sisters accompany the present trainees of the TESDA Course Programs on Horticulture and Animal Production, during the fivemonth (i.e. June-November) Christian Value and Salesian Youth Formation through orientation for and home visits to them and their parents, socialization, team-building, Youth Encounter, catechesis to neo-catechumens, Life Direction Encounter, Year of Faith and Hapag ng Pamilyang Mindoreño (HPM) celebrations, SYM Volunteerism and Buhay Ko ‘To Formation Sessions. This Phase is also characterized as the Research Exposure and Technical Empowerment period where trainees and trainers with Sisters set up experimental plots in the school to compare the effects of organic fertilizers vs. no fertilizer; Integrated Pest Management (IPM); varietal trials; intercropping system; and others.

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IP E

DUCATION vangelization with e-FSTP Sr. Ravena V. Dominguez, FMA (MHCS Mindoro)

Phase II, known as the On-Farm/On-Field Experimentation and Technology Adoption phase is done for a period of more than three months, 105 days to be exact, where trainees replicate their research experiences from Phase I in their own farms/field at home. They set up experiments with the assistance of trainers and sisters (backed up by scientists/experts and ATs or agricultural technicians) to determine which production technologies are adoptable in their farms/field.

After this period, the trainees come back to the center for LakbayAral and an intensive preparation for the Assessment to obtain the National Competency (NC II) Certificate. As a TVET institution, we are advised not to give any numerical grade or TOR (Transcript of Records) but instead a training certificate of completion with Special Orders (SO) released after the fulfillment of the said assessment. For Phase III which is called Farmer-to-Farmer Technology Transfer and Adoption, the trainees, with the mentoring/assistance of their trainers and sisters, share their KASH ~ knowledge, skills, attitudes and habits by teaching untrained

fellow youth or adult farmers how to generate and develop farming technologies based on their Phase I and II experiences. They use either the Adopt-A-Farmer model or Adopt-A-Barangay model with the support of the local government unit (LGU). They are backed up by the Municipal Agriculture Officer (MAO), ATs (Agriculture Technicians) and scientists/experts from other agencies when needed. We are looking forward for the next slash in our IP Education and Evangelization, the ALS (Alternative Learning System) A&E implementation. With this, we hope to give IP Education through Agriculture which is location specific while we commit to both the challenges and the demands of the new evangelization.

After which, they are allowed to experience “farming as a business” by being faithful to the “food supply chain” as crop and livestock producers, breeders, processors, marketers, if not, real managers – entrepreneurfarmer-scientists. December 2012

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The Fulfillment of a Dream –Aetas Mission

Dreams do come true, but it takes more than imagination and wishful thinking. Dreams are really realized through hard work, perseverance, sacrifices through the test of time. But these key ingredients comprise the sweet taste of reaching our dreams. This is the story of the Aetas at Sitio Monicayo, Brgy. Calumpang, Mabalacat, Pampanga; after ten years of visitation and oratory every Sunday from the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians, they finally have their own Chapel at their Sitio. The same place will also provide shelter and multi–purpose hall for the Aetas especially during their Sunday Oratory. The said multi–purpose hall was built with the help of the ACTS – Singapore that gave the financial assistance for the construction of the said building. Through the years it was a dream of the Aetas and the Sisters to have a shelter for their Sunday Oratory. It was providential that the project was pushed through because the Singaporeans help build this multi-purpose hall for the community. There is an inspiring quote that says: We are blessed in infinite ways, so that we may be the means and ways of spreading such blessings

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to others. This saying is a living testimony for the Aetas in Sitio Monicayo. With the help of the Sisters, Sr. Lynn Grace, Sr. Meldred and Sr. Virgie, together with the 12 Volunteer Catechists from the 3rd and 4th year students of Mary Help of Christians School and Ate Flor, every Sunday the Aetas community continue to celebrate Catechesis, feeding programs, formation of mothers, sacraments such as Baptism, Confirmations, Confessions, First Communions and even mass Weddings. Apart from this blessing, through the years the scholarship programs that were given to the Aetas expanded. To date, we have 11 scholars funded by Singapore, 5 are beneficiaries by the Morioka Scholarship Program of Japan, 11 from the MHCS - EC Scholarship program and 20 from the VIDES Philippines. These scholarships are great help not only for the living conditions of the Aetas, but provide them to a wider horizon of learning. Education does not

Sr. Lynn Grace M. Palanca, FMA (MHCS Mabalacat)

only give them a sense of meaning but gives them better opportunities for themselves, their families and even for their community. Dreams do come true first and foremost because of God’s grace. The Good Lord blesses those that have the heart to give and in turn give they do for our Aetas Brothers and Sisters. All these are possible because of kind hearted people who believe in sharing God’s love to others. But we must not stop dreaming; we still need to work hard to improve what we already have started. What we have here is only the start of something bigger. Through God’s kindness and guidance, we must not stop God’s calling of spreading His infinite love and grace. It is difficult to say what is impossible, for the dream of yesterday is the hope of today and the reality of tomorrow. Robert Goddard

(PICTURE - CHAPEL)


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he center provides a second home and quality high school education to these children of farmers, fisherfolks, live stock owners and indigenous tribes who have slim chances of availing themselves of quality education . The learners are all enrolled in Angelicum College with Palawan as its outreach program, REAP (Re-entry Education Agenda for the Poor), a home study program. An alternative to formal schooling for poor youth and adults and also for those with physical disability who want to finish basic formal education through the Angelicum non-graded System: no grade, no

The home study program also teaches the learners how to cope to the lessons by PEERTEACHING and SELF-STUDY style of learning, without depending totally to the Volunteerteachers. The Palawan learners are more busy during the times that all the students in the Philippines are already having their vacation. They have to take the Achievement Test every end of September, Dec. ember 26-30 and by the end of April. The results of the assessment taken in the presence of the Volunteer learning facilitators from Angelicum College determine the movement of learners to the next higher level per subject area. The learners also receive a holistic (spiritual and psycho-social) formation from the Sisters.This experience makes them grateful and hopeful to face life with greater confidence. Mary Jane Yayen a YS 11 learner : I come from a broken family, my auntie and my Grandmother took me and transferred me to Brgy. Bahile when I was in Grade 1. After finishing Grade 6, my auntie enrolled me in the center because of poverty, they can’t afford to support my High School education. The Sisters helped me a lot to study well, to value education and to love our work. I believe that in Studying well I

life. When they enrolled me in the center, I learned to discipline myself, to focus on my studies and to have a prayer life. Even if I was asked to transfer to another school, I chose to stay at the center because I believe I can reach my goals in life here but with perseverance and my capacity to endure hardships. Rodel Villarosa a YS 9 learner : I belong to a poor family , experiencing difficult problems but I am resolved to become a good learner. When I enrolled in the center, I learned a lot of things especially how to be closer to God. Our family situation also becomes better the more I strive to become a good Christian, and my mother is happy about this great blessing in our family, something that money can’t buy . Rubelyn Abello a YS 3 learner : I am a person with a physical disability, I can’t walk and have to stay in one corner of our house because I have a fresh big wound in my buttocks for 5 years now

GRADES AREN’T EVERYTHING.

Learning in LIFE is...

failure, self-paced and child-centered program, considering the diversity of the learners’ learning patterns. The placement test determines the initial learning module of each enrollee and later on the learners may belong to the same year level but are taking up different lessons of other level because the learners can progress quickly in certain subject areas while they struggle in others. The Sisters and the volunteers are giving tutorial classes to the learners to their wide range of subjects from YS 5-11 to prepare them for their Achievement Test .

Sr. Candy Carmen M. Balverde, FMA Eusebia Palomino Learning Center - Palawan

can reach my goal in life, to have a better future but I learned most of all to have a deeper relationship with God and a good relationship with my co-learners, respecting them as myself. These are the learnings I will surely not forget as long as I lived. Nordilyn Delos Santos a YS 8 learner : I am from Brgy. Marufinas, a place from which is accessible only through a boat ride from Brgy. Sabang. My mother is deaf and mute. I have many siblings, my uncle and auntie are the ones who support us all and teach us values in

because I was burned accidentally when I was in grade one. I prayed that one day I may have the chance to study again and my prayer was answered. The Sisters enrolled me in Angelicum REAP-Home Study Program that gives me hope that someday I will finish my schooling. I am very happy that the center is so close to me even I am at home because they continually help me in my studies and they also help in gradually treating my wound, which has a great improvement. They also help my family in difficult moments.

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PARTNERSHIP FOR SUSTAINABILITY Sr. Ann Lyn Rose D. Magno, FMA (MOHTIW Cebu)

After the Christmas vigil mass, Dessa and her family excitedly hurried home. This is the first time ever that they will experience “Noche Buena”. “Had I not studied in Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women (Cebu) Inc.,” she said “I would not have the joy of experiencing this beautiful Filipino tradition. I grew up attending the Christmas vigil mass with my family and after the mass, we go straight to bed. We could not afford to have Noche Buena for we cannot even eat three full meals a day.” At seventeen (17) years old, she is assigned by MOHTIW to TIMEX Philippines, Cebu for the ten (10) months Dual Training System. Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women (Cebu) Inc. advocates and promotes DTS or the DUAL TRAINING SYSTEM. Dual training means that the students are trained in the school and then in the company. The school’s goal of “job fitness” for its students is best carried out under the DTS Program. The school and the company share the responsibility of providing trainees with well-coordinated learning experience and opportunities. The School provides the students with: skills & values Training, Christian and values formation, human, psychological and cultural formation, learning environment in classrooms, workshops, laboratories & virtual offices, competent and qualifiedtrainors who are experts in their field (engineers, accountants and etc.), TESDA National Certification Passers and are also TESDA qualified assessors and trainors. The general and occupation-related theoretical instruction provided by the school is implemented by the on-thejob training in the workplace where trainees also learn good work habits and interpersonal communication skills hand-in-hand with the job skills,

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Strategic Partnerships for the integral sustainable development of the students and MOH-TIW (Cebu) Inc. is forged by the management in order to provide relevant and responsive quality technical vocational education, ensuring the young women’s gainful employment in the industry. The students of a two-year course have their intense academic and skills training in the school for eleven months and then they are sent to the companies for a ten months of hands-on training. The students of a one-year course, on the other hand, they stay nine months in the school and are then sent to the company for five months training. Our partnership with different multi-national and small medium enterprises which include among others: MITSUMI, TIMEX Philippines, LEAR Corporation, LEXMARK Research and Development, TERADYNE International, WELLMADE Motors and Development, TRANS-ASIA Shipping Lines, VECO (Visayan Electric Company), TIETO, DAIMLER, INTEC, NKC, Mactan Apparel and etc., is beneficial for the company because they are provided with value laden and highly skilled trainees. The school also benefits because partnership with companies is an opportunity for networking, thus, we are able to send students to good companies. The most important beneficiaries are the students because the partner companies give the students 75% of the minimum wage and they have a high possibility of being absorbed by the company after they have completed their OJT. Only the students of Hotel and Restaurant Services, who are sent to five star and three star hotels, do not receive the 75% of the minimum wage since no hotel industry in Cebu advocate the

DTS. For their three hundred hours training, they receive cash tips from their customers. The management is looking for possible partnerships with companies or other tourism industries that would share our advocacy for our young women in the tourism sector. However, other partner companies (for our Electronics, Office and Travel Services and Garments Technology) are even more generous. Instead of giving our studentsjust 75% of the minimum wage, they give the minimum wage or more. For five months training, our students receive Php. 40,000 – 60,000 not counting their overtime, night shift differential pay or even at times double pay for holiday. For ten (10) months training, the office students receive Php. 60,000 – 70,000 while the electronics students receive Php. 90,000 – 130,000 with their overtime, night shift differential pay or even at times double pay for holiday. For the meager amount our students pay for school fees, they are really able to save up for their family and for their stable future. It is also good to note that our partner companies encourage other companies to partner with us. When Energizer Philippines closed in July of 2011, the executives who transferred in other companies contacted MOHTIW (Cebu) Inc. for partnership with their new companies. Thus, our company partners keep on growing and multiplying. Through our work in MOH-TIW (Cebu) Inc. and our active partnership and networking with companies, we continuously commit ourselves to create ripples of hope in the lives of the young women of today who believe in education as the most effective antidote to the maladies of poverty.


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ur work at Mary our Help Technical Institute for Women (Pampanga) moves us to live the specific articles of our Constitutions that say: “’Da mihi Animas Coetera Tolle’ urges us to go out to the children and young girls of the working classes especially the poorest and help them to grow to the full stature of Christ” ( Art. 16)… “In filial abandonment to the Father, we place ourselves unreservedly at the service of the young, especially the most needy, becoming for them a sign of God’s gratuitous love.” (Art. 18) At present, we have 417 young girls, aged 16-18 who come from the towns of Mabalacat, Pampanga, some from Bataan, others from as

– that’s 75% of the basic salary. With the DTS – Dual Training System, the students have the chance to earn while they are still studying. This also opens the opportunity for the students to be employed after their in-plant training in the companies. Since these girls come from public schools they did not have the opportunity to learn their Catholic faith. In our curriculum we provide them values and spiritual formation through Theology and Value lessons. Regularly, they have the Salesian Youth Spirituality formation and some join inter-center encounters where they get more Salesian formation. Their parents also have a monthly formation especially on the Preventive System. The once-a-year Spiritual Retreat is something new to

“Da Mihi Animas, Coetera Tolle”

IN ACTION

Sr. Sheila Marie A. Ducot, FMA (MOHTIW Pampanga) far as Bicol and Mulanay, Quezon. Those who came from these farflung provinces stay-in a dormitory meant for them. The boarders are now 35 in all. Our students are less fortunate in all senses – financially, spiritually, emotionally. It is difficult to address these problems especially due to very limited time that we are with them. Our personal contact with them is only for 10 months on their 1st year while they take their academic subjects and on their 2nd year, they are deployed in companies for their OJT under the Dual Training System (DTS). Anyhow, we try to do what we can. For the financially handicapped students we provide education with the program: “Study Now, Pay Later” and many benefit from it. On their 2nd year, when they work in companies for their 10-month OJT, they settle their obligations little by little from the allowances they get

them. How they appreciate it because through it they come to know themselves more and come to meet God personally which they have never done before. In spite of their hectic academic program they also engage in co-curricular activities which enhance human development, self-esteem and strengthen the Family Spirit. They have sports, music, theater, arts, etc. It is true what Don Bosco said- that these activities have an enormous pedagogical impact on the young and provide them clean fun and happiness. And for the young, joy and goodness is an attractive way to holiness. In every Salesian ambient, “holiness consists in being very cheerful”. Their families are very appreciative of the apostolate of Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women and we are grateful to God, through Mary, for the chance to work with these young and give them good future.

“I have changed…!”

“She’s a complete introvert, she has limited friends, she’s quiet, shy, serious and weird.” That’s how they describe me a few years ago. I’m not good at socializing; I don’t have voice to speak out, and I don’t have enough guts to stand for my convictions. I had been always a follower until I entered Mary our Help Technical Institute for Women. The school has the mission not only to impart academic knowledge but also mental, emotional and spiritual knowledge. This Institution means a lot to us. They help us search for ourselves. As a Christian School, Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women never fail to see us through in whatever problems we undergo. They always remind us to choose what’s right which is for our good – body and soul. It’s been two years ago when we started our journey in this Institution as simple trainees, we’ve spent our time in learning many new important things, building selfesteem, developing our character, enhancing our skills and abilities and how to live with a Christian conscience. Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women, taught us to live in accordance with God’s will, to choose what’s better, to keep ourselves on the right track, to learn how to forgive, to fight for our dignity, to understand life and to grow in our faith in God. This Institution has always encouraged us to believe in ourselves. Our School is an instrument sent by God to help us see the meaning and purpose of our life. Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women has given a lot of changes in my life, from being an introvert into a more sociable person, having enough confidence to speak out my mind, to reason out, to deal with different kinds of people and to surpass the thought of giving up. Now that I’ve already finished my studies, I can say that this Institution proves to the young that financial problems are not obstacles in pursuing one’s dreams. Its main goal to fight poverty by helping unfortunate students is a remarkable asset and can be seen in its graduates. Mary Our Help Technical Institute for Women builds hope for everyone as well as giving to us, the young, a better assurance of success in the future anchored in our faith in God and confidence in what we can do. Marianne M. Miranda

Admin Officer, Shadows Travel and Tours Travel Services Graduate SY 2010-2012 December 2012

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D

on Bosco School Manila’s A lternative L earning S ystem Sr. Ailyn P. Cayanan, FMA (DBS Manila)

Poverty is one of the country’s perennial problem and those most vulnerable to it are women, young people and children. Many are deprived of education for various reasons, the top answer being lack of financial means to sustain their continuous education. Don Bosco School Manila takes up the challenge to improve the life of poor. Faithful to the Salesian mission of educating the young, especially the lost and the least, the school offers free education, skills training or livelihood workshops, and Christian formation to poor out-of-school youth, through a program called the Rekindling a Child’s Hope through Education -Alternative LearningSystem(REACH-Ed ALS). REACH-Ed ALS was accredited by the Department of Education on October 20, 2011. Those who are accepted after taking an initial qualifying exam, receive free education, aregiven opportunities for job placement, can avail of micro credit and skills training such bead and accessories making, silk-screen printing, soap, fabric conditioner and detergent making, culinary, electronic and sewingskills. Deserving graduates from the secondary level are given scholarship grants to pursuetertiary education. The Christian formation that the students receive have brought awareness to the learnersof the ugliness of sin. A good number of them willingly gave-up vices or immoral activities like drinking, living together without the Sacrament of Marriage, dishonesty, gambling, solvent-sniffing and prostitution. Many returned to the Church

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to receive the Sacraments, particularly confession and attending the Sunday Eucharist. They participated in spiritual encounters, retreats and pro-life encounters. Trustworthiness and having a deep sense of gratitude for goodness received are stressed in their formation. So far, many who were considered “problematic” before have responsible and appreciated members of their community as attested by their parents, relatives and barangay officials. Accomplishments:

A). REACH-Ed ALS has the highest passing rate nationwide in the Accreditation and Equivalency Exam of the Department of Education, with 100% passing rate for the elementary level and 88% for the secondary level in school year 2011– 2012. B) Networking with Blacktie Company in Makati provided work opportunities for the learners and graduates.Some were chosen as coordinators for advertising projects. C) Livelihood programs for bead work and silk screen printing are ongoing and continuously support the students. REACH-ED ALS products are promoted and sold in bazaars at the NBC the Fort, Eton Centris Element Tent, SMX Mall of Asia and Manila Peninsula Hotel, as means of gathering funds to sustain the program, and to encourage sponsors to help support the program for the poor.

December 2012

For those who wish to be volunteer teachers, speakers, skills trainers and benefactors,come and visit Don Bosco School Manila at 3500 V. Mapa Extension, Sta Mesa, Manila or call 7147791. If you wish to sponsor a young person’s education, you may send your donations to Metrobank - V. Mapa Branch, account number: 306 730651109-9, account name: Don Bosco School Inc. ALS.

TREADING THE BOUNDARIES OF TIME Elena Marcial is a native Bicol and is presently the kagawad of Barangay in Barangay 601. She is commonly called Nanay Elena. Last June 2011,Nanay Elena enrolled in DBS Manila’s REACH-ED ALS program. At sixty four years of age, she was one of the few elderly learnersthen.She was enthusiastic and determined to pursue her studies. Nanay Elena shares her reason for enrollingin REACH-ED ALS. Her parents adhered to the traditional way of thinking that women are meant to be at home to do household chores.Therefore, it is not necessary for women to go to school. When Elena finishedgrade 3, her parents pulled her out of school and confinedher to do tasks suchas cooking, cleaning, washing and helping her mother do other household chores. Although happy and contented about being married, having her own family, being elected and serving as a barangay official, she admitted that her long lost dream is to finish her schooling and be considered an educated person. After learning that Don Bosco School is offering the REACH-ED ALS program, she made the decision to finally pursue this dream of hers. Nanay Elena never got discouraged. For her, hindrances are challenges firing-up her enthusiasm. Hope gives her enough reason to press on toward the goal. She is a role model student. She listens attentively in class and helps fellow learners in their studies. She is also humble. She would ask pardon for being a slow learner in certain subjects. Nanay Elena wrote an essay entitled: Angnagawang REACH-ED ALS saakingbuhay: “Malakiangpasasalamatkosapagtanggapsa akin ng Don Bosco School sakanilangprogramang REACH– ED ALS. Napalalim nito ang pananampalataya ko sa Panginoon gawa ng Katekesis, nagkaroon ako ng higit na tiwala sa sarili pagdating sa pagtulong ko sa aking kapwa at higit sa lahat na buhay muli ang matagal na mithiin ng aking puso na magkaroon ako ng pagkakataon bumalik sa paaralan upang matuto. Ito ay hudyat ng pag-asa para sa akin. Ang edukasyon ay nasa aking mga palad na. Sa edukasyon walang nauuna or nahuhuli. Ang karunungan ay magiging makabuluhan kung may sapat na pinag-aralan.Tunay nga na kayamanan ng tao ang edukasyon. Robert Frost in his famous book “The Road Less Traveled” wrote: Two roads diverged in a wood and I-, I took the one less traveled And that made all the difference. Yes, our “Nanay Elena”took the road less traveled and she made a difference! Indeed she is an inspiration to many, including her fellow REACH-ED ALS learners.


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n 41 countries all over the world, VIDES lives up to its name with joy and commitment: Volunteers International for Development, Education, and Solidarity. Founded in Italy in 1987 by the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians, VIDES International celebrates its 25th anniversary this year. In the Philippines, VIDES volunteers continue to find meaning and fulfillment in rendering their time, talents, resources, and their very selves for the good of others, especially the poorest young. They do it VIDES Pinoy Style, with their motto “One for Others”, as they volunteer for the promotion of human rights. EDUCATION PLUS At VIDES Pinoy, we believe that education is the human right that can break the cycle of poverty in the long term. It liberates a person from the shackles of ignorance and opens up countless possibilities to greater learning and development. 1) “Busina Mo, DunongKo” Mobile Education Project - Initially launched by VIDES Philippines with Jo Tankers in May 2006 in Pasay, this mobile education project can now be found in seven (7) communities, with three (3) additional mobile libraries donated by VIDES Korea, VIDES Canada, and VIDES Pinoy Volunteers, serving 2,500 children. In May 2011, the “Busina Mo, DunongKo” has been chosen by the International Catholic Child Bureau (BICE) to the PRESENTATION OF BEST PRACTICES FOR CHILDREN WORKING / LIVING ON THE STREETS at the BICE International Congress at UNESCO &L’Enclos Rey in Paris, France. The “Busina Mo, DunongKo” has met the ten (10) criteria set by BICE for the selection process: availability, accessibility, affordability, safety, acceptability, non-discrimination, participation, accountability, impact and sustainability. 2) Alternative Learning System (ALS) for VIDES youth - In the conduct of the daily “Busina Mo, DunongKo”, VIDES Pinoy volunteers encounter out-of-school youth whom they invite to join the VIDES ALS Program in partnership with Don Bosco School (Salesian Sisters), Manila. They

are prepared by the volunteer teachers and Salesian Sisters together with other children from Metro Manila. In 2012, 100% of the VIDES ALS children passed the national examinations conducted by the Department of Education, Bureau of Alternative Learning System (BALS) in October 2011. 3) Educational Assistance and Scholarships: VIDES Pinoy Volunteers often meet children who are unable to go to school due to lack of transportation allowance and food. Although public school education is free, projects and other school activities such as field trips are not. With the financial assistance of these groups, VIDES Pinoy has the following number of scholars: a) From Solidarity At A Distance VIDES Internazionale = 49 scholars b) From Solidarity At A Distance VIDES Italy = 56 scholars c) From VIDES Korea = 10 scholars 4) Advocacy on Children’s Rights and Human Rights A number of interviews over Radio Veritas and ABS CBN have been conducted concerning topics on volunteerism, prevention of bullying, promotion of positive discipline, and advocacy on children’s rights. This year, another audio CD has been released by VIDES Pinoy for the promotion of the rights of girl-children. It contains the song “BabaeAko!”, “Disiplina, Hindi Parusa”, and the theme song of this year’s National Children’s Month Celebration entitled “NaritoMuntingPuso” and “Here I Am One Small Voice” – all sung by the Voice of VIDES Choir and aired over the LRT. The Voice of VIDES Choir brings the advocacy of VIDES to the legislators and government officials thru their choreographed songs, sang specifically on these dates this year: a) 5th National Convention of the Ligangmga Barangay – SMX Convention Center, Pasay City, September 27, 2012 b) Launching of the National Children’s Month by the Council for the Welfare of Children – San Andres Complex, Manila, October 1, 2012

c) Opening Session of the Senate – November 19, 2012 5) Inputs on health and hygiene For this year, 600 participants listened to inputs on health and hygiene conducted by VIDES Pinoy volunteers. LIVELIHOOD VIDES Pinoy is engaged in various development projects. It has intensified its development projects after receiving a copy of the book entitled “Cooperation for Development” published by the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians on December 5, 2007. This is a very special day for VIDES Volunteers because it is the World Day for Youth Volunteers annually promoted by the United Nations (UN). It contains guidelines concerning the promotion of human rights thru volunteering, education and development. As VIDES Pinoy, we draw courage from the call of Jesus Christ to serve and volunteer, and are inspired by the spirit of volunteerism of Mary, Don Bosco, and Mother Mazzarello, especially in helping the young and their families discover the fullness of life here on earth and in the life to come. Every person has the right to work and be gainfully employed with dignity. We respect and promote this right by providing means of livelihood for the families of the children under the care of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians. Rather than simply giving dole outs, VIDES Pinoy believes in and taps the person’s capacity to be creative and productive. As of November 2012, total rural livelihood projects launched are as follows: 1) “Baboy Mo, Buhay Ko” = Negros (40), Mindoro (10), Laguna (10), Pampanga (10) 2) “Kambing Mo, Kabuhayan Ko” = Laguna (10), Cebu (10), Pampanga (25), Palawan (30), Mindoro (20) In Metro Manila, urban livelihood projects have been availed of by mothers as follows: 1) “Makina Mo, KabuhayanKo” Sewing Machine Livelihood Project = Delpan (5), Sta. Mesa (30) 2) “Pera Mo, Kabuhayan Ko” Microcredit Livelihood Project = Delpan (40), Sta. Mesa (120) >>> turn to page 19

Sr. Maria Josefina S. Carrasco, FMA

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Brief Chronicle of

VATICAN II

January 25, 1959: Pope John XXIII at St. Paul Outside the Walls announces his intention to summon a Council June 5, 1960: Pope John establishes the preparatory commissions December 25, 1961: Pope John in the apostolic constitution Humane Salutis convokes the Council July 20, 1962: Invitations are sent to separated Christian Churches and Communities to send delegate-observers to the Council. September 11, 1962: Pope John addresses the world asking for prayers for the Council. October 11, 1962: The Second Vatican Ecumenical Council solemnly opens. John XXIII gives his opening address: Gaudet Mater Ecclesia. October 12, 1962: The Council adjourns at its first meeting to prepare to elect its own commission members rather than accept those appearing on the prepared lists. October 20, 1962: The Council issues its “Message to Humanity”. November 27, 1962: The first of the lay observers (men and women) is invited to the Council. December 4, 1962: Cardinal Seunens proposes redrafting the schema on the Church, with two emphases, ad intra (the nature of the Church) and ad extra (the Church’s mission in the world); proposal is enthusiastically accepted. December 8, 1962: The First Session of the Council concludes without any completed results or approved documents.

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April 11, 1963: John XXIII issues his encyclical Pacem in Terris. June 3, 1963: Pope John XXIII dies. June 21, 1963: Pope Paul VI is elected and announces his intention to continue the Council. September 29, 1963: The Second Session of the Council opens. December 4, 1963: The Second Session of the Council closes with the promulgation of the Constitution on the Sacred Liturgy and the Decree on Social Communication. January 4-6, 1964: Pope Paul makes an ecumenical journey to the Holy Land and meets with Patriarch Athenagoras. May 19, 1964: Pope Paul creates the Secretariat for Non-Christian Religions [renamed Pontifical Council for Interreligious Dialogue in 1988]. September 14, 1964: The third session of the Council opens. November 14-21, 1964: The socalled “Black Week” unfolds, revealing tensions on issues such as religious liberty, relations with non-Christians, and the role of the Church in the modern world. November 21, 1964: The Third Session closes with the promulgation of the Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, the Decree on Ecumenism, and the Decree on Eastern Catholic Churches. Pope Paul proclaims the title of Mary as the Mother of the Church. December2-5, 1964: Paul VI travels to India for Eucharistic Congress. March 7, 1965: The reformed Eucharistic liturgy is inaugurated; Pope Paul celebrates Mass in the vernacular.

October 2012

September 14, 1965: The fourth and final session of the Council opens. September 15, 1965: Pope Paul in the apostolic constitution Apostolica Sollicitudo issues the norms governing the new Episcopal Synod (Synod of Bishops) established to assist him in governing the Church. October 4-5 1965: Pope Paul travels to New York to address the United Nations General Assembly; he reports to the Council about his visit. October 28, 1965: The following documents are promulgated: Decree on the Bishops’ Pastoral Office in the Church; Decree on the Renewal of Religious Life; Decree on Priestly Formation; Decree on Christian Education; Declaration on the Relationship of the Church to Non-Christian Religions. November 18, 1965: The Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation and the Decree on the Apostolate of the Laity are promulgated. Pope Paul announces the beginning of the reform of the Roman Curia, the introduction of the beatification process of Popes Pius XII and John XXIII, a Jubilee period, and the convocation of the Synod of Bishops not later than 1967. December 4, 1965: At St. Paul Outside the Walls, where John XXIII announced the Council, an ecumenical prayer service is held with the purpose of promoting Christians unity. December 6, 1965: The following documents are promulgated: Declaration on Religious Freedom, Decree on the Ministry and Life of Priests; Decree on the Church’s Missionary Activity; and, Pastoral Constitution on the Church in the Modern World. At Istanbul and Vatican City, a joint declaration lifts the mutual excommunications between Greels and Latins (1054). December 8, 1965: The Second Vatican Ecumenical Council solemnly closes in St. Peter’s Square. The messages addressed to various sectors of society are read. November 28-December 8, 1985: An extraordinary synod of bishops is held on the twentieth anniversary of the close of Vatican II to study and promote the fruits of the Council. September 3, 2000: Pope John XXIII, “Pope of Vatican II” is beatified. May 1, 2011: Pope John Paul II, a participant in Vatican II, is beatified. Source: Exploring the Treasures of Vatican II, James H. Kroeger


Volunteering... from page 17 SOLIDARITY VIDES Pinoy volunteers reach out in order to be one for and with others. We believe in the right of persons to live and survive; to have a decent life. Solidarity comes in various forms and initiatives. We adapt and respond the best way we can, always for the Lord. Since 2009, VIDES Pinoy responded to the request of other communities of Salesian Sisters to host the VIDES annual mission camp. Henceforth, VIDES Pinoy volunteers have moved from Negros to Cebu, Palawan, and this year, in Mindoro, were 500 children were served. Medical missions have been conducted in Delpan and Hagonoy, serving at least 600 patients. After the Habagat in August 2012, VIDES Pinoy volunteers joined the Don Bosco School Educating Community and the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians in the relief operations in Hagonoy and Sta. Mesa. Aside from these areas, VIDES Pinoy volunteers also reached out to Delpan and Pasay with the donations from the family of Mr. Joey and Mrs. Marissa Concepcion. In networking for Human Rights, VIDES Philippines actively collaborates with the Philippine NGOCoalition on the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child;coordinates with the Child Rights Network (CRN); and shares updates with the FMA Human Rights Office in Geneva (the Istituto Internazionale Maria Ausiliatrice) specifically on the Universal Periodic Review (UPR) of the Philippines.

HOMEBOUND

Salesian For e v e r 2nd Past Pupils’ Grand Homecoming December 1, 2012 Don Bosco School - Manila

EDUCATION IS EMPOWERMENT, NOT DOLE OUT “The key word of VIDES is GENEROSITY. This is not only in terms of money, but of my SELF-GIFT: even words whispered to children which they will cherish for the whole of their life. I also saw the generosity of the VIDES volunteers. I thank God for each volunteer, for making us one community, one family. Many are called, but few are chosen. And that’s us. We learn from the children; it’s not just the children learning from us.” Jun, VIDES Volunteer since 19____ “I’ve been with VIDES Philippines since 2005. The reason why I’m still with VIDES now is that I have found a family here. What I like with this organization is that it’s not just “dole out”; we establish rapport and relationship with the barangay, the church, the community and empower the children and women we meet. What’s most beautiful is we educate them about their rights and we empower them. And that’s very important.” Ciel, VIDES Volunteer since 1995.

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Be

totally tocommitted GOD for the YOUNG

Be a Salesian Sister! Contact us:

Daughters of Mary Help of Christians (Salesian Sisters of St. John Bosco) Provincial House 3500 V. Mapa Extension, Sta. Mesa, 1016 Manila ( (02) 714 59 37 : www.fmafil.org / www.cgfma.org FMA Vocation Directress ( (02) 714 7791 0949-4979822

Help us build the

“BAHAY na PANGARAP” (DREAM HOME for the Elderly FMA).

Send your donation to any community of the Salesian Sisters nearest you. Or deposit your donation to: BANK of the PHILIPPINES ISLANDS - Araneta Branch Account Name: Mother Provincial of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians Account No. 3271-0293-56

Any amount coming from the heart will surely count. For you and for your family may abundant blessings truly abound. THANKS for helping us realize our DREAM...

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FMA Lifeline

October 2012

FMA Lifeline - december 2012  

The FMA Lifeline is the official magazine of the Daughters of Mary Help of Christians (also known as the Salesian Sisters of St. John Bosco)...

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