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Solutions Issue 130

July 2007

including all the latest orders in your definitive Newbuildings guide

Yachts get a lift Unique ship for a growing trade

Feature

DESIGNS EVOLVE

Tanker designers respond to CSR

FUELLING DEBATE

Residual, distillate or biofuels?

PORTABLE POWER

Oakland tests new shore power option

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

COVER UP

New coatings keep corrosion under wraps p14 Class Issues

HEAD BOY

DNV’s Tor Svensen takes over at IACS p12 News

X-BOW BOXES

First box ship gets novel bow shape p4


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comment T

he crack-down on illegal oily water discharges by the US authorities has attracted a lot of public attention and the level of fines and penalties must surely have given potential offenders second thoughts over committing a crime that does nothing to enrich them personally and that only saves cash for the shipowner. In an effort to catch more offenders the United States has taken to rewarding handsomely those who report the misgivings of their colleagues to officials. Now it seems, the lure of rich rewards is encouraging some less scrupulous seamen to make false accusations with little regard for the consequences. Last month Artemios Maniatis, chief engineer of Athenian Sea Carriers crude carrier Captain X Kyriakou, stood accused, along with the ship’s owner, of an illegal oily water discharge alleged to have MALCOLM taken place last November. Maniatis and Athenian were found not LATARCHE guilty of the crime, marking the first such defeat for the Department EDITOR of Justice’s juggernaut of prosecutions over maritime oil dumping. The “not guilty” verdicts followed a trial in the US District Court for the Eastern District of California. During the trial, six Filipino crewmen testified against the chief engineer, claiming that he installed the magic pipe, then destroyed Encouraging whistleblowers by protecting their the evidence and finally ordered the identity is perfectly justified, rewarding them for crew to lie to the helping to uncover illegal activity is also valid in USCG. However, inconsistencies in some circumstances, but when the level of reward the whistleblowing encourages false accusations the system needs a crew’s testimony and belief that they very hard second look. fabricated their testimony just to receive the reward apparently rang true with jurors. The case dated to November 2006 when the Marshall Islands-flagged Suezmax called at Benicia, near San Francisco, and crewmen aboard the vessel reported the alleged wrongdoing to the Coast Guard. Filipino seamen may not be the best paid and, given the lure of some easy money, it is understandable – but unforgivable – that they

Wicked lies

It seems the lure of rich rewards is encouraging some seamen to make false accusations with little regard for the consequences

from 18 000 to

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ABB TPL . . -B 2-stroke turbochargers run 36,000 hours without a bearing inspection.

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Long-distance runners. www.abb.com/turbocharging July 2007 Solutions 1


Solutions Head office: Lombard House, 3 Princess Way Redhill, Surrey, RH1 1UP UK Tel: +44 1737 379000 Fax: +44 1737 379001 Web: www.fairplay.co.uk

Editorial: Tel: +44 1737 379140 Fax: +44 1737 379007 Email: solutions@fairplay.co.uk Managing Editor: G Paul Gunton Editor: Malcolm Latarche Sub Editor: Stephen Spark Contributing Editors: David Foxwell, David Tinsley Design: Tel: +44 1737 379165 Fax: +44 1737 379006 Art Editor: Phil McAllister Designers: Matt Ramsdale, Neal Thompson, Hannah Kidd Picture Editor: Martin Erhard Production Tel: +44 1737 379160 Fax: +44 1737 379006 Email: production@fairplay.co.uk Head of Production: Liz Wall Advertising Production: Sarah Treacy, Ellie Healey Graphic Designers: Carol Kidd, Lynda Hargreaves, Alison Andrews, Ria Chantler, Mark Newton Sales Advertising sales Tel: +44 1737 379707 Fax: +44 1737 379001 Email: sales@fairplay.co.uk Americas sales Tel: +1 305 718 9929 Fax: +1 305 718 9663 Email: sales-us@fairplay.co.uk Subscriptions Tel: +44 1737 379180 Fax: +44 1737 379001 Americas Office Fairplay Publications Inc, 8410 N.W. 53rd Terrace, Suite 207, Miami, Florida 33166 Tel: +1 305 718 9929 Fax: +1 305 718 9663 Email: magazineus@fairplay.co.uk Americas Editor: Greg Miller Americas Sales Manager: Richard Veale Tel: +1 305 718 9929 Fax: +1 305 718 9663 Email: sales-us@fairplay.co.uk Asia 7500A Beach Road, #06-301 The Plaza, Singapore 199591, Republic of Singapore Tel: +65 6 292 7430, Fax: +65 6 292 7431 Email: fairsing@singnet.com.sg Asia Editor: Ramadas Rao Asia & Pacific Sales Manager: Mark Windle Tel: +65 6 295 1625 Fax: +65 6 293 0739 Email: sales-sg@fairplay.co.uk Printers: The Mansons Group, Hertfordshire, UK

BUSINESS PRESS

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Solutions July 2007

comment chose to take the course of action they did. Had the verdict gone the other way, the Filipinos would have been several thousands of dollars richer and Athenian hundreds of thousands of dollars poorer. More importantly, chief engineer Maniatis would have been dragged off in irons to begin a lengthy prison sentence. It is to be hoped that the US authorities will now consider carefully the effect their whistleblowers’ bounty might have on an innocent man. s

Refinery cuts threaten fuel switch THE debate over distillates refuses to die down, and plenty of visitors and exhibitors at last month’s Nor-Shipping gave their views to Solutions. There was even a mini seminar devoted to the topic, with speakers representing most of the interested parties. The general consensus of opinion was that the idea of a wholesale switch to diesel having been given a public airing – and by a respected industry body at that – it will take a great deal of effort to prevent regulators from forcing the issue through to the detriment of shipping as a whole. At the mini seminar, Dragos Rauta, the Intertanko representative, was very much alone in supporting the switch. At one point he appeared to be back-pedalling on the idea, explaining that the main purpose of the proposal was to simplify compliance with expected future legislation. Even so, he appeared to suggest that opponents of the idea were using incorrect figures on cost and shortages of available fuel whereas Intertanko’s sums were the right ones. Other speakers did not agree with him on that and several other issues.

The challenge of biofuels

Over the past few months, we at Solutions have made our views quite clear – that the cost penalty is too great and, should a switch be forced on shipping, major fuel shortages will result. It appears those views are justified. At the beginning of the week following Nor-Shipping it was reported that refinery capacity around the world has already started to fall because of another environmentally friendly initiative – biofuels. Oil companies it seems are nervous about opening new refineries because of proposals from around the world to reduce dependence on oil by increasing production of biofuels. Even President Bush is now calling for a 20% reduction in oil use and similar moves are being made by governments around the world (see Analysis, pp38–39). As a result, the oil companies that only a year or so ago were planning 10% extra refining capacity have pulled in their horns and cancelled around half of the new refineries. And with every new biofuel initiative the future for more planned refineries is being reconsidered. No one has yet suggested that if biofuel production increases to the extent that some are predicting then existing refineries will close, but global demand for refined products is soaring mainly as a result of growing car ownership in China, India and other emerging economies. If, as Intertanko believes, refiners are able to extract more distillate from crude oil than they presently achieve then shipping will be competing for it with these new consumers. Residuals, on the other hand, have no obvious alternative market apart from power production. s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


this month… News 4 News – ECDIS cuts grounding risks Plans for X-Bow box ship 8 News: intouch – Ice navigation aid launched Broadband package for ship-to-shore use 10 News: equipment – Emissions monitoring Type approval for Kelvin Hughes S-VDR/ECDIS 12 News: class – Class has a new head boy

Features

14 Coatings and corrosion control Keeping corrosion under wraps Aggressive bulk cargoes demand tough coatings 30 Tanker design Appearances can be deceptive Chemical tankers react to demand

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38 Analysis: Where do biofuels fit into the debate over residual or distillate fuels? 40 Innovations: Stabilisation system for yachts could have wider applications 42 Update: A mobile power system could be an alternative to mains grid cold-ironing 44 Troubleshooter: Crankshaft failures occur despite advances in engine technology. Why?

Newbuildings 45 Newbuildings news: Heavy-lifters claim records Evergreen’s series nears its end 48 Notablenewbuildings: The world’s first purpose-built yacht transporter, Yacht Express 51 Newbuildings data: Latest order details

Regulars

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1 Comment Are rewards encouraging false allegations? 76 Echosounder Watching paint dry at Nor-Shipping

July 2007   Solutions 


NEWS

ECDIS cuts the risk of grounding A study carried out by class society Det Norske Veritas (DNV) has concluded that if electronic chart display and information systems (ECDIS) are made mandatory onboard ships, the number of groundings is likely to be reduced by a third. DNV conducted the study to assess the adequacy of electronic chart coverage on behalf of Denmark, Finland Norway and Sweden in preparation for a submission to the IMO’s Committee on Safety of Navigation. The joint submission will seek to make carriage of ECDIS mandatory. In a previous study DNV documented that ECDIS is a preventive measure, reducing the probability of grounding by well above one-third when electronic nautical charts are available. The motivation for the current study has been to address the common industry perception that the lack of global electronic nautical chart coverage is diluting ECDIS’s risk-reducing potential. This perception is considered one of the major obstacles faced by advocates of a mandatory ECDIS carriage requirement. The main finding in the latest DNV study is that the coverage of electronic charts in coastal waters is already very good and improving, with around 96% coverage. Coverage of suitable electronic navigational charts along selected routes considered representative of worldwide shipping varies between a minimum of 28% and a maximum of 100%. “These results support moves that ECDIS should be implemented as a mandatory requirement for most ships,” said DNV’s CEO Henrik O Madsen. “Besides, the more ships that install such equipment, the more electronic charts are likely to be produced.” 

Solutions   July 2007

The first container vessel featuring the Ulstein X-Bow is a concept ship developed by Ulstein Es-Cad and Ulstein Design

Plans for X-Bow box ship Norway’s Ulstein Group has unveiled plans for a container ship featuring the group’s revolutionary X-Bow. Since being developed in 2005, the X-Bow has been applied only to offshore vessels. Ulstein Design’s MD Rolf Inge Roth stressed, however, that the design’s benefits are not restricted to offshore vessels. “The principal features of the X-Bow are as relevant for a number of merchant vessel applications as they have proven to be for offshore applications,” he said. Technical manager of the recently established Ulstein EsCad Cem Aktüre is heading the development of new concepts

using the X-Bow for merchant applications. “Particularly small- and medium-sized vessels engaged in regional trades are set to capitalise on the benefits offered by the X-Bow and we are currently evaluating this feature for use on container feeder vessels, ro-ro vessels and certain general cargo vessels,” explained Aktüre. Among the benefits for commercial ships, Ulstein lists reduced fuel consumption; negligible slamming, reducing the risk of damage to the vessel; lower pitch and heave accelerations; and enhanced protection of cargo areas, reducing the risk of loss or damage of cargo. It also says that certain applica-

tions and configurations could give an increased cargo capacity over traditional designs. While looking forward to cargo ship designs, Ulstein also picked up another ground-breaking contract for the X-Bow when Dubai-based Eastern Echo placed an order for a quartet of seismic ships. The vessels will be built at the Barreras shipyard in Vigo, Spain. The first ship will be ready for operation at the end of 2008 and the three remaining ships will be delivered a few months apart during 2009. All four ships will operate worldwide. They are equipped for 3D seismology and have up to 10 streamer winches each.

Beluga beefs up More powerful gear and extra capacity are to be added to two ships owned by German project carrier Beluga Shipping, which is expanding its operations into the super-heavy-lift sector. Beluga awarded Motorenwerke Bremerhaven (MWB) a €30M contract to upgrade the Beluga Intonation and Beluga Indication by the end of the third quarter of this year. The two ships will each receive

a new 28m, 1,200-tonne midship section, taking the total length to 162m and carrying capacity from 11,934 to 13,670, while the crane lifting capacities will be increased to 700 tonnes. Work is expected to be completed by the end of October. The company has also ordered heavy-lift newbuildings with crane capacities of up to 1,400 tonnes, the first of which will be delivered in 2009 www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


NEWS

Norwegians take stake in Schottel Former Schottel Group chairman Dietrich Bork has sold a 15% stake in the company to Norway’s Frydenbø Industri. Frydenbø Power, a subsidiary of Frydenbø Industri, is a long-standing sales partner of Schottel in Norway. The Schottel Group, based in Spay am Rhein, Germany, builds propulsion and manoeuvring systems with power ratings of up to 30MW. It ended the last financial year with consolidated group sales of about €150M.

Frydenbø Industri, headquartered in Bergen, is one of the largest suppliers of diesel engines, generating sets and propeller equipment in Norway, with a strong position within sales, service, after-sales and parts deliveries. “Being directly involved in production is a natural step for the future development of our company. We are happy to have strengthened the ties with the Schottel Group,” Knut Herman Gjøvaag, chief executive and owner of the Frydenbø Group, explained.

CleanHull’s new ROV cleaning system was on show at NorShipping last month

Quick hull clean service available soon A rapid underwater hull cleaning service is being set up by CleanHull, a subsidiary of Norway’s Umoe Group. The service makes use of a newly designed purpose-built remotely operated vehicle (ROV) with a high-pressure spray clean-

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

ing system. The ROV has five cleaning heads and is electrically powered using a generator and control system. Both of the latter are housed in a single 20ft container located either on the deck of the ship being cleaned or on a workboat. The device is capa-

ble of cleaning up to 2,000m2/h, depending on hull shape and the extent of fouling. With the aid of a camera mounted on the ROV, the operator can control the cleaning process from the control room, which shares the container that houses the generator. The camera also permits the whole process to be recorded, which not only provides the owner with proof that a satisfactory job has been done but also may help identify any damage to the underwater hull. The machine was on display at Nor-Shipping, where Lars Erik Baustad, CleanHull’s MD, told Solutions that although the high pressures employed rule out the system’s use on silicone coatings, a machine is being tested that would enable it to be used with softer silicone coatings. The service will be offered at various locations around the world, including Norway, Singapore and Fujirah.

Fire-proof guarantee Manufacturer 3M is offering a moneyback guarantee in case its Novec 1230 halon replacement is banned or restricted in use. Under a recently announced Blue Sky Warranty scheme, 3M has declared that if Novec 1230 fluid is banned from use or restricted in use as a fire protection agent because of its ozone depletion or global warming potential, 3M will refund the purchase price of the fluid. “Regulating authorities around the world have committed to the reduction of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gas emissions by imposing strict regulations affecting many fire-suppression agents that are on the market today,” said Joe Koch, business manager for 3M Novec Fluids. “To our knowledge, no other chemical clean agent comes with a comparable warranty,” he added. Novec 1230 fluid is a nextgeneration halon replacement and is claimed to have a zero ozone-depletion potential, an atmospheric lifetime of just five days and a global warming potential of 1. The non-conductive, non-corrosive and fast-evaporating fluid can be applied in streaming, flooding, inerting and explosion-suppression applications. Leading equipment manufacturers that offer systems incorporating Novec 1230 fluid include Tyco Safety Products, Siemens Building Technologies, Kidde, Fenwal and Chemetron. The warranty is good for 20 years, but users must register their system with 3M within 30 days of system commissioning and every five years thereafter.

July 2007   Solutions 


NEWS

Able wins in ghost ship row A change of attitude on the part of Hartlepool Borough Council has taken Able UK a step closer to being able to recycle four former US government ships that have been sitting in its Teesside yard since 2003. While Able says it is pleased that the council is not going to challenge Able’s appeal against planning committee decisions, the company points out that it is still waiting for approval to start work on the ships. “We are exploring whether the council will now grant permission so as to remove the uncertainties as quickly as possible,” said Able UK chairman Peter Stephenson. The council attributes its change of heart to new UK government planning policy relating to ship recycling and its potential for the future. Coincidentally, two weeks ago A&P Group, the UK’s largest shiprepair company, was given permission to establish a ship recycling operation on Tyneside. Able has already decided to withdraw from the remaining nine so called ‘ghost ships’, which were part of its original contract.

West Navigator is the first vessel to be linked to Wärtsilä’s online CBM service

First ship signed to online CBM Round-the-clock monitoring of a ship’s engines at sea has become a reality now that the first vessel has been connected to Wärtsilä’s online CBM (condition-based maintenance) service based in Vaasa, Finland. Operated by Seadrill Offshore, West Navigator a dynamically positioned drill ship with seven Wärtsilä diesel generating sets, has been linked up since April. It

is operating on the Ormen Lange gas field about 100 km northwest of Molde, Norway. The CBM service uses a combination of online monitoring of mechanical and thermal condition (with in-built sensors, for example), system efficiency data and many other indicators to assess the condition of an engine. All the information in the shipboard system is transmitted

in real time around the clock to Wärtsilä service engineers at the CBM centre in Vaasa, Wärtsilä in Norway and the Seadrill office in Stavanger, Norway. The service team then assesses the overall status and condition of the plant – and ultimately the maintenance it needs – and makes regular reports to the engine users based on established guidelines and specific operating conditions.

Møller in talks on yard sale The Volkswerft Stralsund shipyard in eastern Germany could be sold by its owner, AP Møller Maersk, to the German yard group Detlef Hegeman, the German state government of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern has said. Reports of a possible sale surfaced in April, but were denied by Møller. Now the Mecklenburg-Vorpommern state Economy Ministry confirmed it has received an application for financial guarantees from Hegemann to support a purchase 

Solutions   July 2007

of Volkswerft. A ministry spokesman confirmed an application had been received, but said options were open and no decision had been taken. Depending on the yard’s orderbook, the purchase price could be anywhere from €40M to €100M. Volkswerft was extensively modernised with state aid after German reunification in 1990. It has 1,300 employees, but in recent times the only orders it has won have been from its par-

ent Møller group, largely for offshore support vessels. Hegemann also owns another yard in MecklenburgVorpommern, Peene Werft, with 800 employees, together with Rolandwerft, near Bremen. The Economy Ministry said it would back a solution that would support a strong shipbuilding industry in the state, although any help it might offer would be subject to complex EU regulations on state intervention in the shipyard sector. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


Ask DNV about … Shipping and the Global Environment

DNV’s objective is “To safeguard Life, Property and the Environment”. As a leading international ship classification society, we care about the shipping industry. Do you wish to communicate your environmental performance and efforts to the market? Increasingly, leading companies understand the need to do this. As evidence of your company’s focus on environmental issues, documentation proving that environmental issues are incorporated into your ships is necessary. Assigning an environmental class notation such as CLEAN or CLEAN DESIGN will give such documentation from an independent source.

Det Norske Veritas NO-1322 Høvik tel +47 67 57 99 00 www.dnv.com


NEWS: in touch

New service cuts the ice

New pair from Rutter

A new service to aid ice navigation was shown at Nor-Shipping by Kongsberg Satellite Services (KSAT), part of the Kongsberg Group. KSAT collects the latest satellite images from the European Space Agency satellite Envisat and Canadian Radarsat-1 satellites and can deliver them to service subscribers within half an hour of acquisition, enabling users to receive the very latest information on sea ice conditions. Users connect to KSAT in Tromsø, Norway, using an Iridium phone to access the latest radar satellite image of the sea ice conditions immediately ahead of them. Studies in the Baltic Sea have estimated that by using satellite data to navigate through sea ice can potentially reduce journey time by 20%. Other benefits from being able to navigate the optimum route through the ice field include lower fuel costs and reduced hull damage.

A new radar and a new VDR were unveiled by Canada-based Rutter at Nor-Shipping last month. Its VDR-100G3/G3S is said to be compact, flexible and reliable and is designed particularly for retrofits. The G3/G3S is a bulkheadmountable unit that reduces cabling costs and installation time while its solid-state architecture is aimed at minimising maintenance and support costs. The RADAR-100S6 provides superior radar imagery and enhanced target detection using Sigma S6 radar processing technology. Specialist radar applications based on a mix of processing capabilities include ice detection, search and rescue, coastal surveillance, port security, and vessel traffic systems. It is claimed to offer a comprehensive range of on-screen features and radar tools.

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Rutter’s new RADAR-100S6 is said to give superior imagery and enhanced detection

A 500W radio has been developed by Thrane & Thrane to complete a range that already includes 150W and 250W units, launched at the SMM exhibition last year. The new product completes both the company’s Sailor System 5000 and its updated GMDSS portfolio of equipment, which includes a GMDSS terminal and hand-held VHF radio. The company emphasises the new radio’s user-friendliness, saying that it has improved “the renowned Sailor man-machine interface even further”. It claims that the device is intuitive to use, with simple menus, larger buttons and redesigned knobs. It features a mute button that turns off the audio alarm to allow text alarms to be studied under more tranquil conditions during stressful operating.

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Solutions   July 2007

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Broadband package A new VSAT package covering hardware, airtime and leasing was launched at Nor-Shipping by Radio Holland (RH). The package is called Connector and it provides internet access, voice lines and three bandwidth levels. Level 1 gives 128kbps ship-to-shore/128kbps shore-to-ship and two voice lines, Level 2 allows 128kbps ship-to-shore/256 kbps shore-to-ship and four voice lines, while the top-rated Level 3 operates at 256kbps ship-to-shore/512kbps shore-to-ship and features eight voice lines. The C-band services are based on three Intelsat satellites covering the globe (excluding the poles). For the Ku-band services, RH has made a combination of footprints covering a major part of the globe, including the North Pacific and North Atlantic. On all three service levels RH guarantees a maximum contention ratio of 7:1, giving users a minimum bandwidth availability to make at least two voice calls at the same time. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


NEWS: in touch

Oslo debut for Marlink’s VSAT

New ECDIS has long pedigree Twelve years of product evolution has gone into Consilium Navigation’s new Selesmar ECDIS – it was back in 1995 that the maker pioneered the combination of electronic navigation charts (ENCs) and radar overlay in the Selesmar ENC 945. The new Consilium Selesmar ECDIS is described as a powerful navigation decision support and information tool, which helps optimise sailing time, fuel consumption and safety. The device features radar video overlay and complete ARPA functionality, combined with a clear display of AIS data. The ECDIS supports official ENC and raster chart formats and provides seamless presentation of ARCS ENCs. Among its features is a simple, low-cost update and maintenance of electronic charts via email. A built-in user manual and online help facility come as standard. Consilium offers several combinations of the Selesmar ECDIS with its VDR and S-VDR hardware allowing less committed shipowners to prepare for upgrading to fully type-approved single or double ECDIS. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

VoIP telephone lines per vessel combined with a guaranteed rate of 128kbps with

MULTIPLE PSA GENERATORS: THE X4 SERIES 7 6 5

press

A PSA (Pressure Swing Adsorption) generator consists of 2 tanks containing CMS. When the tank is pressurized with dry air, the CMS adsorps the oxygen. When the pressure is released, the oxygen is released too.

The plant still requires a buffer tank to control the flow and purity, but the tank size is equal to the tanks used for the generators. A 1000 m3/hour plant requires a 300 litres tank only.

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This cycle requires a buffer tank of significant size to ensure a steady flow of nitrogen. A 1000 m3/hour plant requires a 12 m3 tank. The Oxymat X4 series divides the plant into 4 generators and runs the generators in sequence, thus producing nitrogen in a constant flow.

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A preview of VSAT@SEA – Marlink’s new broadband service for ships – was given at last month’s Nor-Shipping exhibition in Oslo. VSAT@SEA will feature three standard service configurations that include a minimum guaranteed committed information rate for IP-based communications and enabling free internet access and calling for crew members and passengers. Option 1 gives vessels two voice over internet protocol (VoIP) phone lines and a guaranteed 32kbps committed information rate for IP-based communications at sea. This option is designed to provide a maximum bandwidth rate of 128kbps ship-to-shore and 256kbps shore-to-ship capacity. Option 2 adds a third VoIP telephone line along with a two-way guaranteed data rate at 64kbps and featuring a maximum bandwidth rate of 256kbps shipto-shore and 512kbps return speed. The premium Option 3 service gives four

maximum data rate ceilings of 384kbps and 1,024kbps, respectively. Marlink, a Telenor Satellite Services subsidiary, is planning commercial availability of VSAT@SEA during the fourth quarter of this year.

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This makes the solution suitable for retrofitting in most locations, as the plant design is extremely compact.

Fasanvej 18-20 • DK-3200 Helsinge • Tel. +45 48 79 78 11 • Fax +45 48 79 78 13 • www.oxymat.dk

July 2007   Solutions 


NEWS: equipment

Uprated autopilot As successor to the highly regarded AP9 and the natural evolution of the benchmark AP50, the new Simrad AP50+, launched at Nor-Shipping last month, is said to provide big improvements in auto-steering performance, functionality and flexibility. A key element of the AP50+ is the improved integration of sensors and greater flexibility in installation since adjustments may now be done in software in the control unit instead of in various boxes around the vessel. The system can integrate with almost any magnetic and gyrocompass, steering gear and navigation systems. The AP50+ is claimed to give highly accurate operation and precise coursekeeping with steering accuracy, further enhanced by its ability to set and finetune parameters individually. The AP50+ actually learns how the rudder responds and proactively adapts to ensure it is positioned exactly as required, eliminating rudder overshoot. The system also compensates for wear in the steering gear, which is especially important for retrofit vessels. It also has a unique built-in adaptive adjustment to the steering gear dead band that adjusts itself through the vessel’s lifetime.

The image-intensified Night Navigator 5000

Navigators’ night eye On show at Nor-Shipping last month were new products in Current Corporation’s Night Navigator range of image-intensified and infrared detection systems. Night Navigator 5000 is an image-intensified camera that can be connected to the ship’s

Salwico watches emissions

Sweden-based Consilium Marine used last month’s Nor-Shipping exhibition to announce the launch of its new Salwico Emissions Monitoring System. The system measures NOx/SO2 and CO2 output of marine engines and is said to be in full accordance with IMO Resolutions and the NOx Technical Code. It has been fully type-approved by Lloyd’s Register. The Salwico system uses proven monitoring

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technology, including chemiluminescence, as prescribed in the NOx Technical Code. According to its maker, this is the first system to meet the IMO requirements of both MEPC.130 (49) Guidelines for on-board NOx verification procedure – direct measurement and monitoring method, and MEPC.130 (53) Guidelines for on-board exhaust gas cleaning systems.

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Solutions July 2007

when selecting targets for tracking. Images can also be fed to other remote screens or recorded. The camera can be used to identify and track suspected security risks. In night navigation it can give a visual picture to help the watch officers interpret signals from the ship’s radar and AIS systems, and it can also be of assistance during mooring operations.

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www.bahamasmaritime.com www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


NEWS: equipment

Triple-echo ultrasonic testing Tritex NDT has developed a new range of triple-echo ultrasonic thickness gauges. They have been designed to be robust, simple to use and, most importantly, accurate. The range includes the Multigauge 5500, supplied with a belt clip for hands-free use when users are climbing on staging, ladders, scaffolding or when accessing by rope during ship’s surveys. It features an easy-to-use keypad interface and a bright LED display that can be used in all light conditions. The moulded soft rubber surround designed for comfort also provides extra protection against knocks and scrapes. All probes have Intelligent Probe Recognition (IPR), which automatically adjusts settings in the gauge at the same time

as transmitting recognition data. The maker claims that the device’s Automatic Measurement Verification System (AMVS) ensures only true measurements are displayed, even on the most heavily corroded metals. Triple-echo testing can reduce preparation time by ensuring that coatings are entirely ignored and no zeroing is required. Coating Plus+ allows measurements to be taken through coatings up to 20mm thick, depending on the coating type. The gauges can be calibrated for all types of metal.

Tritex’s new Multigauge 5500 thickness gauge

S-VDR/ECDIS achieves type approval Kelvin Hughes has obtained European type approval for a combined S-VDR/ECDIS system (left). In a statement, the company’s S-VDR product manager, Barry Jones, indicated that “this product enhancement will provide typeapproved ECDIS functionality at around half the cost of an independent stand-alone ECDIS”. Jones explained that the ECDIS enhancement can either be factory-fitted to new systems or supplied as an upgrade for existing

IMPROVING SAFETY AT SEA –

MantaDigital S-VDR equipment. The combined system has achieved European Wheelmark certification, which confirms that it complies with both IMO and IEC standards. The system is being sold worldwide, and the company claims that the benefits of its integrated system include lower fitting and running costs and the opportunity to make crew familiar with ECDIS operation in advance of proposed US carriage legislation.

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July 2007 Solutions 11


NEWS: class

Class has a new governor Tor Svensen was appointed IACS chairman last month. Accident prevention, green shipping and CSR are just some of the issues he discussed with Solutions recently.

DNV’s headquarters in Sandvika, near Oslo, was the location for our meeting with the society’s deputy chief executive, Tor Svensen. Last month he was appointed chairman of the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS), but he will still maintain his roles at DNV, where he is also COO of DNV

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Maritime. Safety, class rules and green shipping are some of the issues he will be addressing at IACS. He began by discussing accident prevention – a hot topic across all sectors following a number of highprofile incidents and publication of an Intertanko report that claims accidents are rising. “There have been

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Solutions July 2007

accidents and now we have to go behind that and ask is it qualifications, lack of training or lack of competence causing this? There can be a complicated set of reasons behind it and it is definitely concerning all of us,” he commented. To avoid accidents, IACS can monitor industry problems such as crew competence and fatigue. The key, he said, is to identify the problem and address it to maintain quality. “We have to realise that IACS classes about 90% of the world’s tonnage, maybe 40% … in terms of numbers of ships, because there are lots of different types of ships,” he pointed out. Referring to the capsize of the Bourbon Dolphin off the Shetland Islands, in which eight lives were lost, he said that such an incident is never acceptable. He agreed with reports that suggested the root of the problem could have been that the chain moved sideways, pulling the ship around, which perhaps indicated that the design should be revised. “You can fit in additional safeguards maybe, but you don’t need to change the ships,” he added. Svensen is in a strong position to give advice, because he trained as a naval architect before joining DNV in 1993. He has an impressive CV. After an initial three-year stint

• Ships, Rigs & Offshore

• Ship and Construction Yards

as a section manager in the technical departments he was appointed regional manager in southeast Asia and then technical director for DNV Singapore. He was made COO of DNV Maritime in January 2003. Then in May 2006 he became deputy CEO of DNV and, more recently, chairman of IACS. He said he wants to use his chairmanship to explore issues of competence to prevent accidents. Competence testing is the route he favours, saying that shipping should follow the aviation industry’s example, in which pilots are tested twice a year. Just as certain countries specialise in particular ship types, perhaps class will follow a similar course, Solutions suggested. It doesn’t matter, Svensen said: basic competence is not so much shipspecific as technical. “I honestly think that the best class societies are those that have a fairly broad knowledge, covering many ship types. Because the knowledge you have is on structure, machinery systems – most areas cover all ship types, and of course can you build up specialist experience in addition to that. Maybe it’s only the biggest societies that can have the specialist experience for a broad range of ship types.” He believes there are quality gaps between societies, but also contends that smaller societies may have a special role to play. “The smaller you are the less threat you can have in the context. Additionally, you have the opportunity to bring knowledge

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NEWS: class from one ship segment to another ship segment,” he said. Svensen does not believe the maritime industry has suffered by Norway being outside the EU. “Where we actually lose out, is on the political influence,” he said, referring to the maritime safety policy of the current green paper. “The fact that we don’t have politicians there, sitting in parliament, who represent our views is perhaps the negative side,” he added. Over-complex class rules are in his sights and he intends to use his chairman’s role to call for some of them, such as CSR, to be simplified. “When you prescribe exactly how the structural detail is going to be done, the exact thickness, everything like that, it can leave less room for actually allowing innovation, development and design,” he warned. He said it is important to maintain paragraphs in the rules that allow for some principle of equivalency. He was cagey on the subject of expanding CSR to container ships, saying we should wait for feedback from bulkers and tankers. In Svensen’s view, over-restrictive rules can take away a surveyor’s own competence to make a decision. “If everything is prescribed, if everything is written down, we start following paragraphs rather than following our own competence, and that is extremely dangerous.” Green shipping is another issue close to his heart. “Maritime transport is one of the most efficient ways of transporting goods, much more efficient than roads etc

when it comes to utilisation of energy. In a way, that’s not enough. In my view, the most efficient way of reducing emissions – whether of NOx, Ox, or CO2 – is to improve your fuel economy, burn less fuel.” Referring to the likes of Wallenius Wilhelmsen, which recently won an environmental award at NorShipping, Svensen said that most companies that really work hard at energy efficiency find they can cut fuel consumption by 5–8%. “Some companies are also now taking a responsible attitude on scrapping and recycling of ships. They are actually saying ‘we are good corporate citizens, we are not accepting the dangers to health in certain countries’. They are attempting to do it properly,” he added. Once he starts, Svensen maintained, he will delegate some of his DNV responsibilities to his colleagues. He also promised he will be objective in his dealings. “One of my missions, at least as chairman, will be to focus on quality and quality performance, because collectively we are class, so if one society does a bad job, it reflects also on us, even if we are doing a wonderful job.” So what makes a good class society? Svensen was clear: “I’d start with quality, which I think is number one. And coming from that, to be a good class society you have to have completeness. Secondly, the competence within your organisation. Then you need to be trusted by those you serve – not only the shipowner, but the flag and the government.”

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July 2007 Solutions 13


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

New coatings keep corrosion under wraps EVEN BEFORE THE DEMISE OF TRIBUTYL TIN (TBT) BECAME A FAIT ACCOMPLI, COATINGS MANUFACTURERS WERE WORKING TO DEVELOP REPLACEMENTS. PERFORMANCE STANDARDS FOR THE FIRST GENERATION OF REPLACEMENTS MAY NOT HAVE LIVED UP TO EXPECTATIONS, BUT MAKERS ARE STRIVING TO SATISFY CUSTOMER DEMANDS. SOLUTIONS LOOKS AT THE LATEST COATINGS AND CORROSION CONTROL SYSTEMS.


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

A

photo: Fotolia, ABS, Dietmar Hasenpusch

mong a raft of new coatings and antifouling products recently introduced by manufacturers is the latest version of International paint’s Intersleek fouling control technology. In 1996 International introduced Intersleek 425, the first commercially available biocide-free foul release coating for fast craft, and in 1999 it introduced Intersleek 700, for deepsea scheduled ships. The latest generation of foul release technology from the company is Intersleek 900. According to its manufacturer, this unique, patented fluoro-polymer foul release coating significantly improves upon the performance of the silicone-based Intersleek 700. International describes Intersleek 900 as “exceptionally smooth with unprecedented low levels of average hull roughness…[with] excellent foul release capabilities and good resistance to mechanical damage”, making it suitable for vessels with speeds of in excess of 10kt, including scheduled ships, tankers, bulkers, general cargo ships and feeder containers. In a statement, International said that, compared with Intersleek 700, Intersleek 900 is 25% smoother and provides 38% better coefficient of friction, has up to 80% better static fouling resistance, 40% better foul release properties, a 50% reduction in slime, 100% better holdup, a 35% higher gloss, a 60% reduction in overspray and 60% better abrasion resistance. In terms of fuel efficiency and reduced emissions, Intersleek 900 offers predicted savings of 2% in comparison with Intersleek 700 and 6% in comparison to SPC antifouling. “The potential exists for even greater savings in comparison to controlled depletion antifouling,” said the company. “For a single VLCC currently coated with an SPC antifouling this could mean savings of over 4,500 tonnes of fuel, a reduction in carbon dioxide emissions of over 14,000 tonnes and $1.2M over a five-year period.” A 166m LPG tanker, Courcheville, is the latest vessel to have been coated with an Ecospeed coating. The vessel is owned by Exmar, with which Subsea Industries, based in Antwerp, Belgium, the manufacturer of Ecospeed, has embarked on a research project to demonstrate the advantages that Ecospeed offers compared with conventional paint systems. At the same time that

Courcheville was coated with Ecospeed, sister vessel Chaconia was coated with a traditional antifouling paint. Both ships will now be strictly monitored and detailed information will be gathered concerning fuel consumption, speed and durability of Ecospeed and the antifouling paint, putting this into a framework that will compare the two products. Subsea Industries describes Ecospeed as a homogenous coating providing both hull protection and antifouling. The product consists of large glass platelets suspended in a reinforced but resilient vinyl ester resin. Glass is a natural barrier to water and is often used for this purpose. In glass flake lining technology, this important property has been utilised by incorporating glass flakes into a matrix of tough carrier resins. These, when applied in the form of a liquid coating, cure to create tough, glass-like products that form a powerful bond with a host of diverse substrates. According to information provided by the company, Ecospeed uses glass platelets specially designed to resist water ingress in the marine environment. After the curing process is complete and the vessel refloated, it is conditioned to an exceptionally smooth finish. Hull roughness is brought down to a figure of less than 20μm, providing substantial fuel savings. Ecospeed is suitable for use on hulls, decks, ballast tanks, rudders and propellers. Hempel’s new Hempadur Fibre 4760 epoxy coating meets the B1 standard required by the new IMO performance standards for protective coatings for ballast tanks. With its incorporation of synthetic mineral fibres, Hempadur Fibre 4760 has also been proven to reduce significantly the incidence of cracks in water ballast tank coatings. Hempadur Fibre 4760 was extensively qualitytested by independent institutes and has been awarded a B1 certification from Det Norske Veritas (DNV). B1 is the highest rating and is now the required rating in the new IMO standards. Independent tests conducted by FORCE Technology have demonstrated that Hempel’s Hempasil has significantly lower skin friction compared with conventional tin-free antifouling. For a large container vessel, the required power for propulsion was reduced by up to July 2007 Solutions 15 


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

Applying Ecospeed glass flake coating to the underwater area of a container ship

16

Solutions   July 2007

10.6%, claimed Hempel in a statement, noting that these results can be directly translated into fuel savings. With the IMO Coating Performance Standard scheduled to take effect from 1 July 2008, Jotun has developed a number of inspection tools for ballast tank coatings, including DFT control and a luminous solution used for pin-hole and holiday inspections. To comply with the new IMO standard, ballast tank coatings must have at least 2 × 160μm DFT (according to the 90:10 rules), which means it is vital to get the thickness right on each coat. The DFT control utilises the opacity effect to help the sprayer during coating jobs. The coating will not cover the underlying substrate until at least 100μm DFT is applied, meaning that the next pass of the spray gun fulfils the need of 160μm DFT. DFT control and luminous inspection techniques for pinholes/holidays are available in both Jotacote Universal and Balloxy HB Light. While the first-time application of these coatings as required by the standard may add time and costs, there are long-term benefits in doing it right first time, notes the company. “Vessels can achieve up to 50% savings in inspection time, coating applications can be checked without arms-length access, and the system enables an easy way to record defects for compliance to the coating performance standard,” Jotun said. Europort Eurasia, the 9th Maritime Exhibition for the Eurasian Region, held last month in Istanbul, Turkey, provided an excellent platform for Advanced Polymer

Coatings to showcase its MarineLine cargo tank lining system. According to APC’s chairman, Donald Keehan, the company has recently signed contracts that will see 64 new ships coated with MarineLine over the next few years. Said Keehan: “Turkey is a fast-growing market in the shipbuilding industry, and many of the shipyards are very familiar with the MarineLine system. As our fleet of success stories continue to escalate, shipowners are very comfortable in specifying MarineLine as the cargo tank lining of choice for all types of aggressive chemical cargoes, CPPs and edible oils.” Keehan added that shipowners have told him they are particularly pleased that MarineLine has received the Certificate of Design Assessment by the American Bureau of Shipping. The process that led to this involved ABS reviewing and certifying documentation on MarineLine’s specifications, performance data, standards of compliance and engineering analyses. MC-Technology, owner of Wasser Europe, a leading manufacturer of moisture-curing urethanes, was one of the first companies to come to market with a stable surface-tolerant zinc primer by combining moisture-cure resin with micaceous iron oxide (MIO) and zinc. “The primer is not only unique because it is a surface-tolerant zinc primer, it also has all the properties to make it easy to use and to offer maximum quality assurance while avoiding costly premature failures,” claimed the company in a statement. The major advantages of this moisture-cure universal primer is that it is compatible with almost any type of old paint including alkyd-, vinyl-, lead- and oil-based paints and phenols, it has no maximum recoat time, is tolerant of damp surfaces, can be immersed or subjected to rain or condensation within minutes of application, and cures quickly at temperatures as low as -12°C. The primer will also tolerate flash rust and can be applied on all areas of a vessel including areas such as the underwater hull, water ballast tanks, cargo holds, topsides, decks, superstructures, internal areas, areas with cathodic protection and drinking water tank. “Independent laboratory and field testing has shown MC-Miozinc to be superior to all other epoxy mastics and even other zinc coatings,” claimed the company. SigmaKalon Marine Coatings has developed a range of coatings with a high level of resistance to the wear and tear experienced by ships, as well as specialist coatings for more rigorous service conditions. These coatings, designed for the different areas of the ship and/or operations, have recently been brought together into one product family – SigmaShield – of which SigmaShield 1200 is the most recent development. It offers maximum abrasion resistance even to hard angular cargoes when applied to cargo tanks, but is equally capable of withstanding harsh conditions in Arctic environments when going through heavy ice.   s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


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FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

Protecting cargo holds on bulkers

A

ggregates are well known for their aggressive nature when transported in bulk shipments. Loading aggregates 150mm in size via a ship loader 15m above the main deck at up to 6,000 tonnes/hour can destroy the protective coatings on bulkheads, leading to corrosion that creates pitting and wastage. The first warning signs will be detected during classification surveys as the “substantial corrosion” margins are exceeded. In structures incorporating high-tensile steel the corrosion margins are less because of the lower steel weight used. This means the coating protection of bulkheads, coamings and upper and lower stool arrangements is particularly important if an owner wishes to see 30 years or more service life without expensive steel renewals. Certain types of coatings are able to withstand this kind of treatment. As a spokesperson for Corrosion and Abrasion Polymeric Protection Systems (CAPPS)

Marine pipework antifouling systems LEliminates bio-fouling in seawater engine cooling lines. LProven on over 14,000 ships of all types around the world. LEasy to install and automatic in operation. LProvides major savings in maintenance costs.

Hull protection systems LOption of compact modular control panels or thyristor panels. LUtilises the latest ICCP technology and computerised controls. LRange of hull mounted anodes to suit any hull configuration. LCombined hull protection and pipework anti-fouling packages available.

Cathelco Ltd, Marine House, Hipper Street South, Chesterfield S40 1SS, United Kingdom Tel +44 1246 246700 Fax +44 1246 246701 Email: sales@cathelco.com Web: www.cathelco.com 18

Solutions   July 2007

explained, Foster Yeoman faced exactly this problem recently. Its Capesize bulk carrier Yeoman Bridge had delivered more than 7M tonnes of aggregates in the previous two years, supplying track ballast for the highspeed rail link between Paris and London. Foster Yeoman had already applied high-volume solid two-pack epoxy coatings during an earlier drydocking. Despite the manufacturer’s claims, the epoxy proved to be too brittle, chipping and cracking easily on cargo and incapable of coping with the compressive loads placed on the bulkheads from the cargo pile. Downward movement simply stripped off the corrugated bulkhead coating leaving bare steel areas. When Yeoman Bridge entered its third special survey the need to find a solution became paramount. Roger Parsons, fleet technical manager with Foster Yeoman, set up trials using a polymeric coating system proposed by CAPPS. Vessgard is a two-component 100% volume solids polymeric, solvent-free coating, which is hot-spray-applied in a single coat up to 2,000μm DFT through a specially designed machine known as a Multi Mix Task Master. Application of Vessgard is a highly specialised, needing strict surface preparation and environmental control. Treated areas must be grit (copper slag) blast-cleaned to SA 2.5 standard leaving a surface profile of minimum 75μm; during application, scaffolded areas must be sheeted in and dehumidifiers installed. Parsons decided to apply Vessgard to the eight transverse corrugated bulkheads that form Yeoman Bridge’s five cargo holds. Up to a height of 7m, 2mm were applied, while 1mm was applied over a further 4m, giving protection over 11m from the lower stool position to the maximum height of the cargo pile. During the service period since application the owner’s superintendent has closely measured the DFT of the Vessgard at 1m height intervals. During this 28-month service period, in which the vessel carried 7,278,000 tonnes of aggregates, the coating remained 99.9% intact. The last set of readings, taken in November 2006, showed minimal loss of coating even in the most aggressive positions by the cargo hold conveyor gate. At an average monthly cargo throughput of 300,000 tonnes, Parsons estimates the life of the coating will exceed 10 years before some areas will need over-coating with another 1mm of the product. The ship’s fourth intermediate survey recently started, including closeup inspection and steel thickness measurements of the bulkheads, and the surveys revealed no change to the overall condition of the bulkheads since the Vessgard was applied.   s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


Turn flexibility into strength

HEMPADUR FIBRE 4760 The fibre-based advantage for ballast tanks Adding fibres to materials to boost their strength and flexibility is now common in industry. Fibre-based materials are widely used in everything from bulletproof vests and sports equipment to Formula 1 racing cars and spacecraft. Hempel is the first to fine-tune this technology in protective epoxy coatings for marine use. HEMPADUR FIBRE 4760 is specially designed for the extensive surfaces inside ballast tanks, where access is difficult and durability at a premium. Ballast tanks are exposed to constant stress due to structural flexing, so flexibility is also at a premium. HEMPADUR FIBRE 4760 therefore contains synthetic fibres that boost tensile strength and flexibility way beyond conventional epoxy coatings. HEMPADUR FIBRE 4760 – fibre-based ballast tank coating technology from Hempel.

HEMPADUR FIBRE 4760 combines strength and flexibility to prevent cracking in ballast tank coatings

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FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

Waterjet tunnel with anode installed

Advanced solutions for fast ferries

A

ll vessels are vulnerable to hull corrosion, but in the case of fast ferries the problems are exacerbated by the wide variety of materials employed in their construction. To improve performance, advanced metal alloys are used in the construction of vessels designed for high speed, but this can make them more susceptible to corrosion. A typical fast ferry could, for instance, have a propulsion system containing stainless-steel components and a hull built from aluminium with fins and various other appendages using metal alloys such as titanium – a combination that could have major implications for the design of effective hull corrosion protection systems. Although modern hull coatings go part of the way to providing protection against hull corrosion, they are not the complete answer, and there will always be the risk of damage or blistering as a result of poor application. Porosity or small imperfections over the surface of coatings can lead to areas of corrosion over time, and this can have a significant effect on maintenance costs where weld seams have to be repaired or plates renewed due to localised corrosion. Bi-metallic (galvanic) corrosion occurs when dissimilar materials are connected electrically and exposed to an electrolyte. In a ship, the dissimilar metals may typically be steel hull plates, bronze alloy propellers and stainlesssteel shafts. In these circumstances the vessel becomes, in effect, a giant battery when immersed in seawater. In a bi-metallic cell (battery), the more noble metal in the galvanic series will become the cathode, while the less noble metal corrodes as the anode. The greater the difference between the metals, the greater the voltage 20

Solutions   July 2007

driving the current in the cell, accelerating corrosion. The actual rate of hull corrosion can be affected by many other factors including the nature of the electrolyte – in this case, seawater. The ease with which a current passes through the seawater (conductivity) primarily depends on the level of salinity, while the oxygenation of the water increases the susceptibility to corrosion in many metals such as steel. In areas such as the northern Baltic, where there is a higher concentration of freshwater and hence reduced conductivity, belowaverage hull corrosion is experienced. In contrast, in the oceans surrounding the equator – particularly the Indian Ocean – where salinity is high, there is higher conductivity and a tendency to higher levels of corrosion. To counteract corrosion, cathodic protection is used to suppress electro-chemical activity, applying a more powerful external current in the opposite direction to the corrosion current. A typical impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) system consists of one or more power units to provide a direct current, anodes to suit each specific requirement, reference electrodes to monitor performance and bonding kits to ensure electrical continuity to the appendages. An essential feature of ICCP systems is that they constantly monitor the electrical potential at the seawater/hull interface and carefully adjust the output to the anodes in relation to this. This makes the system much more effective and reliable than sacrificial anode systems where, over time, the level of protection is varied and relatively uncontrollable.

Cathodic reaction and protection As David Moran, a senior technical manager at Cathelco in the UK, explained, many corrosion problems on fast ferries are the result of having dissimilar metals joined to one another. These problems exist on conventionally propelled vessels, but in the case of fast ferries they can be magnified through a wider range of appendages such as T-foils, rudder fins and stabilising arrangements. Fast ferries can be constructed from high-tensile steels, which combine strength and lightness but also have implications for the design of cathodic protection systems. Hydrogen is produced as part of the cathodic reaction and normally dissolves into the seawater without any detrimental effects. However, if excessive hydrogen is produced over a long period of time it can be absorbed into the crystalline structure of the steel, which can lead to a localised breakdown of the metal structure. As high-tensile steel is inherently stressed, the excess hydrogen can result in embrittlement, leading in turn to the formation of stress fatigue and stress cracking. It is therefore very important to avoid ‘overprotection’ by using monitoring reference electrodes and di-electric shields. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


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FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control As fast ferries can operate at anything up to 40kt, considerably more turbulence is created around the hull than with a conventional vessel. It directly affects the level of corrosive activity on the surface of the hull in a phenomenon known as the concentration/aeration effect and ‘impingement’. “In theory,” Moran explained, “a steel plate travelling through water would have a relatively uniform potential across its surface. This, of course, is never the case in reality, as other factors are introduced by welding it to other plates and many other influences. When the rate of depolarisation is changed by the speed of the vessel, it leads to greatly differing potentials across the plate. In this way, the level of corrosive activity is raised, making it even more important to have a means of suppressing the activity.”

Water jet worries Marine-grade aluminium alloy is widely regarded as a stable material that does not corrode easily in seawater, and with the advantages of strength and lightness it has been extensively used in the construction of fast ferries. Under certain conditions, however, it can corrode rapidly, resulting in the serious corrosion of hull plates, particularly around waterjet ducts, Moran explained. Because of its high affinity for oxygen, aluminium naturally creates an oxide film on its surface making it resistant to corrosion in seawater in most circumstances. Corrosion can occur, however, in areas deprived of oxygen such as narrow cavities, places affected by fouling and surfaces beneath rubber gaskets. If the aluminium alloy is in contact with a more noble material, then rapid bimetallic corrosion can take place, usually taking the form of large pits. This phenomenon is mostly noticeable in those areas of the hull in which stainless steel or copper alloys are present such as parts of the hull

Saving time in the tanks While some shipowners are happy to rely on coatings to protect ballast tanks from corrosion, sacrificial anodes can provide a second line of defence. Installing traditional anodes is a difficult task in confined spaces, however, as it involves potentially dangerous hotwork. Norwegian specialist Beme Corrosion International has developed a patented system that it claims overcomes these problems and can cut installation time for the anodes by 80%. The Beme system makes use of a special clamp fitment that bolts to a suitable position in the tank. The anodes are then simply hung on the clamp and secured to it with a lock pin, which is fitted with just the use of a hammer. The design of the clamp unit is such that it can be fitted in a variety of orientations, meaning that few difficulties should arise in installation. When the anode has reached the end of its useful life, the lock pin is simply knocked away with a hammer, the spent anode core removed and a new one hung on the clamp and secured with the same lock pin. Because both the front and rear surface of the anode are exposed, its efficiency is enhanced compared with versions that are welded to the tank surface.    s 22

Solutions   July 2007

surrounding waterjets, bow-thruster tunnels, foils and sea chests. The potential difference between an aluminium hull and stainless-steel waterjet can be as high as 700mV to 900mV, making it the most important factor affecting the rate of corrosion. Coatings have been used to mitigate the problem with varying degrees of success, but where failures have occurred they have served to concentrate pitting in particular areas. Electrical isolation systems are another remedy, but many have a history of repeated failure because of the inherent problems of selecting a gasket material that is sufficiently durable to withstand the harsh operating conditions. “The most effective solution is ICCP,” said Moran, “but this must be carefully monitored to avoid the risk of over-protection, which can cause alkaline hydroxyl ions to be produced on the surface of the aluminium.” In response, Cathelco has developed a hull corrosion protection system for aluminium-hulled ferries, and gone a step further in designing a system that is uniquely effective in providing protection for waterjet ducts. The AluTek hull protection system has several extra features over systems designed to protect steel hulls. These additional features include monitoring electrodes that measure the electrical potential near the di-electric shield as well as shield sensors that detect any defects in the di-electric shield. In this way, the key parameters of the system are carefully monitored, avoiding the risk of localised over-protection. Fast ferries propelled by waterjets are usually constructed with aluminium or high-tensile steel including the inlet ducts. This combination brings dissimilar metals into direct contact and will cause localised severe corrosion of the hull unless it is prevented by protective measures. The waterjets themselves are mainly manufactured from stainless-steel alloys such as Duplex stainless steel and are directly bolted on to the hull. “There have been examples where pitting has reduced ducts to half of their original thickness,” Moran told Solutions. In one case, he noted, corrosion meant the operator was faced with the prospect of taking out of service an aluminium ferry that had been in service less than six months after its annual drydock. The ferry had been fitted with an electrical isolation system, but this had broken down and could not be restored without returning to drydock where the waterjets could be refitted and the isolation restored. Fortunately, the craft could be ballasted to expose the jet ducts for thorough inspection and remedial action. The initial solution was use of increasingly sophisticated coating regimes, but this failed on each occasion. At this point a corrosion engineer was called in and a survey undertaken. This led to the installation of a temporary ICCP system, which was successful in halting the corrosion, leading the operator to make it permanent.   s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


Changing the way the world ďŹ ghts Corrosion and Rust in Water Ballast Tanks EASY ON:

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FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

Antifouling products on trial

N

ew-generation antifouling products perform well, the Norwegian Shipowners Association found in recent trials. It was in October 2001 that a diplomatic conference adopted the International Convention on the Control of Harmful Anti-Fouling Systems on Ships. It prohibited application of tributyl tin (TBT)-based antifouling from January 2003, and bans the presence of TBT-based antifouling on ship hulls after 1 January 2008. In order to evaluate alternatives to tin-based antifouling, the Norwegian Shipowners Association initiated a research project – the TBT-free Anti-Fouling Paint Test Programme – which included all of the major suppliers of antifouling and several shipping companies. The companies provided 16 ships of various types that were representative of different operating conditions, trades, activity levels and docking intervals. Large test panels on each of these vessels were used to test a wide range of antifouling products under operational conditions, in order to provide comparable results. MARINTEK was engaged as project manager for the project, which has provided invaluable data on the performance of various alternatives to TBT-based products. The final drydocking of the final test vessel later this year will complete the project. In anticipation of the event the Norwegian Shipowners Association organised a seminar at Nor-Shipping 2007 in Lillestrøm, in June, at which it provided an update on the trials. As Helge Vold, project manager for the antifouling project at Det Norske Veritas, explained, shipowners have been testing TBT-free antifouling for several years, with varying success. Some have experienced severe fouling and speed loss, highlighting the need for further, independent testing and documentation of antifouling paint systems and their performance. Vold explained that all the parties involved in the project adopted a common procedure, routines and reporting scheme, and the performance of the various products was assessed during a final drydock inspection, which included visual inspection of fouling, determination of polishing rate for self-polishing antifouling and visual evaluation of the leaching layer. A detailed drydock report for each ship was compiled, which the coating manufacturer and shipowner reviewed and the coating manufacturer commented on. The final report will be published in the latter part of the year. Arne Willy Henriksen, of Jotun Coatings, provided a manufacturer’s perspective on the tests. As he explained, the trials were preceded by pre-docking meetings between the shipowners, paint suppliers and MARINTEK’s project manager, to discuss information 24

Solutions   July 2007

such as the vessel’s operating profile, drydocking period, operating area, speed and activity level. The paint supplier decided on the best product for each vessel, while the project manager was provided with all the product specifications, including the manufacturer’s recommendation on issues such as film thickness for the given operational profile, number of coats etc. Test patches were located amidships on each vessel (for vessels with single side loading arrangements preferably on the seaward side to reduce mechanical damage), and the test patches extended vertically from the bilge keel to the deep load line, and horizontally by 3–5m. The shipowner selected the antifouling system to be used on the rest of the hull, and a few test ships were fully blasted to steel (Sa 2/Sa 2.5). The most common solution was to touch up areas of damage and apply a new TBT-based antifouling on top of the existing paint system. Surface preparation of the test patch was decided by the ship’s superintendent and the manufacturer’s representatives, according to the surface condition of existing coating. Some ships had the upper half of the test area blasted to steel in order to evaluate the adhesion of the new coating systems on top of the old compared with complete removal of the old coat. Application of the coatings was attended by the owners’ superintendent and representatives of the paint supplier. By mid-June, 15 of the vessels participating in the project had provided reports, one of which was coated with a silicone-based foul release system and 14 of which had self-polishing antifouling applied. “From these reports some preliminary conclusions can be drawn,” noted Vold. “The new types of self-polishing antifouling systems have been proven to solve fouling problems to about the same degree as the old TBT-based systems. Compared with the old TBT-based systems, the new self-polishing antifouling systems have even been shown to be more efficient against fouling.” “The new self-polishing antifouling systems have been shown to polish at a slightly slower rate,” said Vold. “Particularly in cold water, this has resulted in more weed fouling. Weed fouling has shown to represent problems for all the products tested. The problem was most significant in cold water, but also evident in warm water,” Vold explained in his Nor-Shipping presentation. “Except for a few small ‘acorn’ barnacles on two test patches on one ship, other types of fouling problems have not been reported,” said Vold. “Between the six product types used, fouling performance showed some slight differences, but each has performed the best on at least one ship. The test patches with silicone foul release systems have shown promising results so far.”   s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

Coatings survive tank treatments

A

s highlighted in last month’s Solutions, concerns have been expressed that rulings intended to prevent corrosion in ballast water tanks could be rendered useless if no account is taken of the ballast water treatment system used in the tanks. In December the IMO approved a Performance Standard for Protective Coatings (PSPC) for water ballast tanks. Earlier, the IMO had introduced the International Convention for the Control and Management of Ships Ballast Water & Sediments (SBWS). The two pieces of legislation could have implications for the ship repair and newbuilding sectors because of

While the new regulations will have an impact on the entire industry, shipyards will face the greatest challenge adapting to the new standards

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Solutions   July 2007

PSPC’s focus on surface preparation, coating application and their subsequent inspection and planned maintenance throughout a vessel’s life, and the impact of the ballast water treatment system installed on the coating system applied. Several of the ballast water treatments that are being proposed – mainly those that use chemicals to treat ballast water – could, it has been suggested, adversely affect the environment in a ballast tank and degrade tank coatings. Recent tests would seem to suggest, however, that at least two potential ballast water treatment technologies could be used without adversely affecting coatings. Speaking to Solutions at the Nor-Shipping exhibition and conference in Oslo in mid-June, Stein Foss, managing director of OceanSaver, said tests of the OceanSaver technology had been carried out to determine whether it affected coatings: the tests had proved that it does not. As Foss explained, OceanSaver is a three-step treatment process involving separation by mechanical filtration, nitrogen (N2) super-saturation and oxygen (O2) deprivation, and hydrodynamic cavitation. Nitrogen (N2)

is produced by a nitrogen generator from ambient air and mixed into the flow. Because N2 dissolves more easily in seawater than does O2, the N2 replaces most of the dissolved oxygen in this process. Foss said the tests carried out recently were intended to confirm that the OceanSaver technology is beneficial to the condition of ballast tanks and that any coatings in tanks in which it was used would not be degraded by the use of N2. The tests were carried out in association with classification society DNV and coatings consultant Safinah, whose managing director Raouf Kattan first raised the issue of the possible conflict between the two regulations. Foss told Solutions that the tests were carried out on a car carrier, and a bulker operated by Fednav in Montreal, Canada. They conclusively demonstrated that the OceanSaver technology complied with the PSPC and did not damage the coatings in the ships’ ballast tanks. “The OceanSaver technology does not harm coatings,” Foss concluded. Another company that has pioneered development of ballast water treatment technology, NEI Treatment Systems in the US, has also conducted independent tests which would seem to verify that its process does not adversely affect ballast tank coatings either. BMT Fleet Technology Limited was asked by NEI Treatment Systems to conduct corrosion testing and provide support to the development of NEI’s de-oxygenation technique for treating ballast water, a process similar to aspects of OceanSaver’s treatment technology. NEI developed a process it calls Venturi Oxygen Stripping that, like OceanSaver, reduces oxygen levels in the water in ballast tanks to kill micro-organisms. BMT Fleet Technology explained: “Experimental protocols were developed to carry out corrosion testing of bare and coated steel plates under de-oxygenated conditions as well as under aerated/control conditions, simultaneously. Two types of coatings, coal tar epoxy and modified epoxy, were used in the current programme. Four ballast tank conditions, submerged, humid, buried and splash zones, were simulated in the present corrosion testing programme. Tests were carried out for 30, 60, 90, 120, 150, 180 and 270 days using simulated seawater of 35ppt salinity. Dissolved oxygen, pH and the tank-head space oxygen were monitored during the test programme.” The experimental data revealed that overall corrosion rates were low under de-oxygenation conditions compared with control conditions. Comparison of experimental data after 30 days’ exposure indicated that under de-oxygenated conditions the corrosion rates were reduced by 40% in the splash zone environment, 48% www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control in the submerged condition, 78% in the humid environment and 14% in the buried condition. After 270 days the corrosion rates were lower by 38% in the splash zone environment, 84% in the humid environment and 20% in the buried condition. Corrosion rates, however, were similar under submerged conditions after 270 days. Corrosion tests on coated steel revealed that there was no effect on the coatings exposed to the de-oxygenation environment. Evaluation of the coatings was carried out in accordance with ASTM D 1654-92, Test Method for Evaluation of Painted or Coated Specimens Subjected to Corrosive Environment. Statistically, said BMT Fleet Technology, no difference in coating performance was found under control and de-oxygenated conditions. Speaking to Solutions, Kattan said he had submitted his concerns to Lloyd’s Register, and that they had subsequently been tabled by the UK delegation at IMO. “I know that the latest version of the PSPC, MSC.215 (82), does not take account of these concerns,” said Kattan. He expected his concerns about the possible effects of ballast water control techniques to be taken into account in any further work on the ballast water convention.   s

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

Trial by ice Operation in ice is a severe test for any coating and it is not unusual to see freshly painted vessels lose most of their hull coating after a single voyage in hard ice conditions. With the increasing importance of arctic waters for oil and gas trades, the problems once experienced by just a few ships will become more common. Subsea’s Ecospeed glass flake coating has recently undergone a severe test in ice and the company claims it has passed the trial with flying colours. The general cargo ship Patriot carries mainly forestry product cargoes to and from Finland. This ship sails through the Baltic region in extreme weather conditions and frequently comes into contact with ice during the winter. A highly durable hull protection system is essential to protect ships against these conditions, while the rudder and propellers need protection against cavitation and pitting. Previously, the ship’s conventional paint system suffered significant damage from heavy ice impacts, especially around the bow area. The scraping effect caused by ice removed the paint layers back to bare steel. Interscan, the German owner, decided to coat the underwater hull, bow area and rudder of the Patriot with Ecospeed. A routine inspection of the hull nine months after application showed the coating to be in “perfect condition” overall. The ship had been subjected to the worst of the winter weather, including frequent contact with ice, yet the coating remained in place. In addition, the ship’s master noticed a significant increase in speed after the Ecospeed application, leading the coatings manufacturer to claim decreased frictional resistance and thus lower fuel consumption.   s

July 2007   Solutions 27


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control

photo: ABS

Getting to grips with the PSPC

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oatings comprise a major proportion of the cost of a new ship, the American Bureau of Shipping (ABS) noted recently. The quality of the coatings directly affects the structural integrity of the ship, its environmental performance and, ultimately, the value of the asset. The Performance Standard for Protective Coatings (PSPC) is intended to help delay the onset of corrosion within dedicated seawater ballast tanks and the doubleside skin spaces of bulk carriers. The importance of coatings drove the members of the International Association of Classification Societies (IACS) to decide jointly to advance the 1 July 2008 IMO implementation date for tankers and bulk carriers subject to the new IACS Common Structural Rules (CSR). For these vessels the new coatings standards took effect in December 2006, and shipyards, owners and class are working together to facilitate their application. IACS’s interpretation of the IMO resolution (SC 122) demands a minimum level of documentation about the coating system applied. “In practice, however, the standard for surface preparation and coating application has varied widely,” noted ABS, which highlights PSPC’s introduction of a common minimum standard to be applied by all yards to all ships. As the classification society also emphasised, this 28

Solutions   July 2007

common minimum standard applies to all owners and shipyards. The requirements extend through the whole process from specification to application, detailing the role of each party involved. A useful innovation of PSPC is the adoption of a coating technical file that records all the technical details relating to coatings. The shipyard compiles the file, which the class society then reviews for content by the class society; previously, none of this information was recorded. As ABS noted, the introduction of the new regulations has refocused attention not just on assessors of coatings and the standard applied but also on a wider community that has a need for more technical awareness of coatings. In recognition of the need to help those involved with marine coatings, ABS has invested in a substantial revision and extension to the guidance it provides to industry on the application and maintenance of marine coatings, explaining the technology and identifying the practical implications using illustrative photographs and diagrams. Other classification societies have also been quick to act to fill the gap in understanding in some sectors of the industry about coatings. Last month, Lloyd’s Register (LR) announced that it had teamed with International Paint to offer shipyards in China step-by-step advice on how to prepare to meet the requirements of the PSPC. As LR explained, the new partnership has been offering interested Chinese shipyards a free consultancy, or ‘gap analysis’ survey, comparing their current processes for coating a ship’s water ballast tanks to those that will be required under the PSPC. “To date, Lloyd’s Register and International Paint have completed gap analyses for four of China’s biggest private and state-owned shipyards and have agreements in place to extend this service to many other leading yards in the country,” said LR. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


FEATURE: coatings and corrosion control “The gap analysis we are jointly offering not only gives yards a clear strategy for meeting the challenges of this key regulatory development, it also gives them an idea of which areas need the greatest attention and, from there, the yards can start to calculate the extra costs involved before negotiating contracts with prospective buyers,” said Nick Brown, LR’s general manager, business development China. He also noted that, in general, Chinese yards have been reluctant to sign PSPC contracts before fully understanding the extra costs involved. Many yards in Korea, said LR, have already begun accepting PSPC-compliant contracts for new vessels. While ships have yet to be built to the new PSPC regulations, some yard executives believe the process may add 10% to construction costs. Tripartite teams formed by Lloyd’s Register, International and the shipyard spend two days in each yard assessing the gap between current coating practices and PSPC requirements, and looking at extending the coating lifecycle of vessels to 15 years. Lloyd’s Register and International Paint then jointly deliver a presentation to yard senior management and departmental

managers. This is a key aspect of the analysis. The main objective is to help the yard understand that, to maximise shipbuilding efficiency, all departments – design, procurement, quality, steelwork, outfitting and production – not just the paint department, need to consider the requirements of the PSPC. Following the presentation, a gap analysis report is issued to the yard. Brown reported: “It became clear from the feedback Lloyd’s Register received during the PSPC seminars we conducted earlier this year that many yards needed detailed and practical guidance to understand which of their coating application processes and procedures would need to be modified and what investment in resources and infrastructure would be needed. We found it necessary to not only give advice on procedural development, training and quality controls, but also on the practical aspects of coating application. This is why Lloyd’s Register wanted to work together with a leading marine coating manufacturer. With IP’s leading position in terms of marine coatings in China and their valuable attendance at our Chinese start-up discussions on PSPC, they were the natural choice.”   s

Bulk Carrier Cargo Hold Protection The Ultimate Total Solution Unique polymeric spray applied compound Copon Hycote Vessgard Specially designed hi-tech application system CAPPS Multi-Mix Task Master Badly damaged bulkhead with serious steel loss due to abrasion and corrosion caused by cargoes of coal and granite aggregate.

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

After blasting to SA2½, 75 micron profile, and application of 1 –2 mm of Copon Hycote Vessgard through the specially designed CAPPS Multi –Mix Taskmaster machine, the steel pitted profile is completely encapsulated with Copon Hycote Vessgard.

Coated bulkhead after 28 months in service. The vessel was used to transport 7.3 million tonnes of granite chippings during this period with rocks up to 120cm in size. The coating is still 99.5 % intact with minimal thickness lost. Projections from statistics show that the coating will last for at least 12 years.

• Unique product properties with specialised application • Offers protection levels never seen before with conventional coatings • At least 12 years coating life • Bulkhead steel loss from abrasion & corrosion is now a problem solved For further information contact: CAPPS UK Ltd, The Playfoot Workshops, Udiam Oast, Bodiam, East Sussex TN32 5XD, United Kingdom t : +44 1580 831299 f : +44 5600 757798

w: www.cappsinternational.com e: info@cappsinternational.com July 2007   Solutions 29


FEATURE: tanker design and construction

Appearances can be

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Solutions  July 2007

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


FEATURE: tanker design and construction

deceptive

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EXCEPT FOR A VERY FEW VESSELS, THE OUTWARD  APPEARANCE OF TANKERS HAS CHANGED VERY  LITTLE OVER THE YEARS. BUT APPEARANCES CAN  BE DECEPTIVE AND TANKERS ARE PERHAPS ONE  OF THE FASTEST-EVOLVING SHIP TYPES.

photo: Dietmar Hasenpusch

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

osmetic changes and perhaps the covering-up of above-deck pipework are the only obvious differences between a brand-new tanker and one launched two decades ago. Under the skin, though, it’s a different matter and the process of change is continuing, especially for ships ordered since IACS common structural rules (CSR) took effect. The accelerated phase-out of single-hull ships means that, save for a few small bunker vessels, all tanker newbuildings are now of double-hulled construction. The CSR requirements necessitate design changes for tankers above 150m in length, while amendments to MARPOL Annex II from the beginning of this year introduced the need for enhanced pumping and tank cleaning equipment on chemical and product tankers. Globally, the single-hull phase-out is due to complete in 2010. The EU has recently passed laws banning the use of single-hulled tankers under flags of the 27 member states, but, as some Asian countries are saying they cannot meet the deadline, it is almost certain that their continued use will be allowed beyond the original deadline in some corners of the world. Nevertheless, the tanker building boom that has taken place since the phase-out was first agreed will ensure that there will be no shortage of tonnage to meet demand. Although the switch from single to double hulls was initially strongly argued against, it was eventually accepted without too much genuine opposition. The same cannot be said of the introduction of IACS’s CSR project. Promoted heavily by their instigators, LR, ABS and DNV, the rules caused deep divisions between owners and class and even among IACS members themselves. In their publicity material the smaller societies make much of the fact that the rules apply only to vessels of more than 150m and that under that size they still apply their own rules. The implied message is that they have no intention of extending CSR to other sizes or indeed to ship types other than those already agreed. It is generally accepted that the CSR will add some 4–7% to the weight of steel used in construction. The exact figure will vary according to ship type and size and the previous rules of the classification society involved. Vessels nearest to the 150m length starting-point for CSR are likely to suffer most. There was a noticeable rush to order new tankers before CSR came into force in April last year. Less obvious were the modifications made to some ship designs to bring them under the 150m length. LR-Fairplay records indicate that 21 ships are on order or under construction with a length between 150.01m and 155m, with deadweights ranging from 13,000 tonnes to 25,000 tonnes. By contrast, ships on order with a length of 145–150m are nearly three times as numerous – deadweights of these 58 vessels range from 12,365 to 20,000 tonnes. While shrewd owners have always taken advantage of July 2007 Solutions 31 


FEATURE: tanker design and construction

Coming clean

Changes to Annex II of MARPOL have introduced new cleaning standards for chemical tankers and makers of cleaning equipment and service contractors have responded to meet the challenge. Tank cleaning guns used for washing tanks have undergone continual evolution despite the market being dominated by a very few manufacturers, notably Scanjet, Polarmarine and Alfa Laval. The number of guns installed can vary from as many as 100 on a large chemical tanker down to around a dozen on small vessels. Last year, Alfa Laval introduced a new gun with a hysterisis clutch designed to resolve the problem of slippage in magnetic drives. Scanjet, which claims a 60% share of the worldwide market in cleaning guns, has also developed the SC180. This is a multi-stage gun with vertical and horizontal sector cleaning capabilities. Regardless of the cleaning equipment installed onboard, there are some tasks, such as a switch-over from HFO to light MGO or chemicals, that have special requirements. According to a spokesman from Danish tank cleaning specialist Navadan, special cargo changeovers do not take place frequently and, despite qualification requirements, there may be a lack of experience among the crew. In chemical tank cleaning it is necessary to get the cargo tanks and cargo pipeline systems cleaned properly and in time. Navadan says that using a contractor ensures that the cleaning is carried out in the right way and costs, in most cases, less than half a day’s delay to the vessel.

cut-off points for regulation and there are other international regulations that use the 150m criteria, it is a fair bet that many in this case are also avoiding CSR. Owners of larger tankers that cannot get under the bar

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Solutions   July 2007

are also looking at ways to lessen the effect of the rules. Crude carriers, for example, might actually save weight overall by moving from a three-tank athwartship configuration to having just two cargo tanks. For most large vessels the class societies have admitted the best way to meet the new rules will not be to modify existing designs but start again from scratch. In its Tanker Focus, Lloyd’s Register noted “Upgrading an existing design will involve changes to slot sizes for secondary members, stiffener sizes, panel line configuration, block arrangement, plate seam arrangement within blocks and numerical cutting data, among other items. Typical design-related items that may also lead to increased costs include changes to main scantling plans and all detail plans. To realise real production efficiencies from the new Rules, a major redesign including stiffener sizes and plate seam locations may be required.” LR added that such changes will raise short-term costs, but the resulting design could have a much longer life and would represent a longer-term investment. Some owners, though, might have been happier if in the final statement the word “could” was replaced by “would”.   s

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


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FEATURE: tanker design and construction

Chemical reaction

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hile the long-term future of oil transport may be in doubt as stocks dwindle, there will continue to be a need for specialist chemical tankers to meet demand for such products. Chemical tankers presently make up around half of all the 2,200 or so tankers on order, and that is likely to increase given that orders for them are being announced daily. Being in the smaller size ranges and relatively simple to construct, it is not surprising that emerging shipbuilding nations are keen to snap up orders for chemical and product tankers. Turkey in particular has carved itself a a generous slice of the pie with 156 of the 1,105 vessels on order worldwide.

photo: Angelo Scorza

Turkey is benefiting from the boom in new chemical and product tankers

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Solutions   July 2007

As owners of large tankers that mostly carry crude oil cargoes struggle to overcome the CSR headache, those with smaller vessels used for chemicals and products have had an equally problematic time since the beginning of the year coping with the changes to MARPOL Annex II and the IBC Code. The changes may have been well trailed, but there were reports of some owners being caught out by not having appropriate new certificates or manuals, while confusion over the new pollution categories meant that they were suddenly disqualified from carrying cargoes that had become part of their routine business. Uncertainty among owners over the switch from five categories of hazardous and polluting substances to four was not helped by the fact that many substances were not evaluated and categorised until December 2006. In the process of recategorising, many chemicals were given higher hazard ratings and moved from chapter 18 to chapter 17 of the Bulk Code. As a result there are now

many products that IMO class 3 vessels (the lowest rating for chemical tankers) are barred from carrying, notably vegetable oils, which many would consider relatively harmless. Caustic soda is another example of a commodity that, although still allowed for class 3 vessels, has had its pollution category changed from the old D rating to the new category Y. To continue carriage of this cargo would necessitate the ship undergoing stripping tests and being equipped with an underwater discharge outlet. Shifting vegetable oil and other cargoes into a higher category has left the owners of many small, single-skin tankers that otherwise were unaffected by the doublehull rules with a real dilemma. Their options are to give up the trade, convert their vessels to double-hull ships or invest in new tonnage. With some of these ships still relatively young and with a good 15 years’ trading life ahead, conversion seems to be the most profitable option. The changes have also affected some product tankers that, although not meeting the requirements to be categorised as chemical tankers, had been allowed to carry cargoes listed in chapter 18 of the Bulk Code. Several of these vessels have been regularly engaged to carry vegetable oils. Should their owners wish to continue to do so, they too will have to consider the merits of a conversion. Converting a product tanker into even a class 3 chemical tanker is not a quick fix. There are major differences between the two types, including damage stability requirements, tank venting arrangements, electrical equipment, level gauging, high-level alarms and many other features beside. Furthermore, under the ISM code chemical tankers are considered a different ship type from product carriers, which could require changes to the operators’ documentation and procedures. The certification and category changes were just two of the factors that changed for chemical tanker operators. On the more practical side of operations, they have had to consider equipment issues. There was for instance a revision of the permitted stripping residual levels for existing vessels and more stringent requirements for newbuildings. Initially, this was presented as being a relatively minor matter for owners, but at Nor-Shipping last month at least one leading cargo pump maker told Solutions that it had received a rush of retrofit requests for upgraded equipment. New ships will now be permitted a residue of only 75 litres after cleaning – a considerable reduction on the maximum of 300 litres previously allowed for the least harmful cargoes. The new rules also mean a stricter pre-washing regime for ships, which has given makers of tank cleaning equipment and specialist cleaning firms a boost and led to improvements in existing tank cleaning systems.   s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


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FEATURE: tanker design and construction

Fire blanket

F

ollowing incidents of fires and explosions on chemical tankers and small product tankers, the IMO is debating whether such vessels under 20,000dwt should be fitted with inert gas systems, to bring them into line with larger vessels. Norway started the ball rolling when in December 2006 it submitted a paper to MSC 82 asking for a review of existing SOLAS rules and stating that industry guidelines on the matter are inadequate. Initially, the MSC rejected the proposals, although it did ask the sub-committees on Fire Protection (FP) and Design and Equipment (DE) to look into the matter and report back. In January this year the FP report recommended that “consideration” should be given to both the disadvantages and potential benefits of fitting inert gas to new ships carrying combustible liquids. With regard to the existing fleet it was decided that any discussion should wait until the position on newbuildings is clarified. In March the DE sub-committee agreed to follow the line taken by FP. The issue is on the agenda for further discussion at the next session of the Maritime Safety Committee in October. In the meantime, Solutions understands that many owners of vessels likely to be affected are either contemplating fitting an inert gas system or have already committed to doing so in anticipation of a future mandatory requirement. Some ships are able to produce sufficient inert gases from the exhaust of engines and boilers. Because of impurities, however, these systems are only suitable for tanks containing dirty oil products. For other cargoes the answer is a nitrogen generator that can produce a clean, oxygen-deficient atmosphere where the volume of oxygen present is between 5% and 8%. Most of the current crop of nitrogen generators are

of the membrane type, but newcomer Oxymat, based in Helsinge, Denmark, has developed a pressure swing adsorption system that it claims is far more flexible and will relieve pressure on already confined machinery spaces in small vessels. The main components of the system are four pairs of pressure tanks, compressors and associated pipelines. Usually the system will be supplied as a compact skid-mounted complete unit, but where space is limited, the tanks can be separated and installed in pairs in any convenient location and only extra piping is required. Oxymat claims that with only clean air being used to feed the system very high purity levels can be achieved, ensuring that sensitive cargoes are not contaminated. Furthermore, the system is simple to operate and very little maintenance is needed. Since there is no membrane, the possibility of system failure is reduced, the company states.   s

Oxymat’s spacesaving system is supplied as a complete skidmounted unit

Stability under discussion Earlier this year the UK Maritime and Coastguard Agency (MCA) believed it had identified a problem concerning damage stability compliance on a significant number of tankers. Although the loading computers fitted on most vessels to assess longitudinal strength can also be used to verify compliance with the intact stability requirements, the agency considers that they may not be capable of verifying compliance with damage stability requirements. The MCA believes confusion exists over the difference www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

between intact and damage stability requirements. It also suggests that quite often the ship’s loading manual does not contain sufficient detail to cover all likely loading conditions, and that apparently minor deviations from approved loading conditions could render the vessel non-compliant with damage stability requirements. The matter will be under discussion at the IMO in October when the Maritime Safety Committee will consider a proposal that vessels should be required to demonstrate compliance

with damage stability requirements before leaving port. The MCA’s paper to support this proposal stated that the only practicable way for vessels to achieve this would be to use an approved damage stability computer. If this is accepted, any enforcement campaign could cause problems for the many tankers that do not yet have such programs. Numerous companies produce loading computers and stability software, many of whom state that their products fully address the damage stability situation. s July 2007   Solutions 37


operations: analysis photo: Istock

From diesel to algae Is the marine industry’s increasingly heated debate over whether to use residual or distillate fuel irrelevant when governments and other industry sectors seem adamant on increasing the amount of biofuel in the mix?

The fuel/emissions debate that is engulfing the industry is whether to abandon the use of residual fuels in favour of cleaner distillates, marine diesel oil (MDO) in particular. The whole issue is a controversial one, with those either in firmly favour or equally adamantly opposed. There is little common ground shared on this one. For instance, the International Bunker Industry Association (IBIA) argues against the move and has derided Intertanko’s campaign to get the shipping industry to start burning marine diesel oil (MDO) as “flying in the face of common sense”. “We all want to improve air quality and reduce emissions from shipping,” says IBIA chairman Fritz Fredriksen, a major buyer of fuel on behalf of a Norway-based shipowner. “But there is more than one way to tackle the issue, and it does not make sense to stifle innovation and shut the door on different approaches by preaching that everyone should be forced into a straitjacket and use one type of fuel.” Indeed, it is possible that such a move could 38

Solutions   July 2007

hinder future engine and fuels development and it would certainly place limitations on the evolution of biofuels in the marine industry; because their use would probably have to comply with the specifications laid down for MDO. “Biofuels do have a place in the marine industry; definitely alongside and when the ship is in harbour,” says IBIA general secretary Ian Adams. Yet although it is likely to be some time before renewable fuel, either biodiesel or bioethanol, forms a high percentage of the marine energy mix, it is a tried and tested solution. In fact, it dates back to 1895, when Rudolf Diesel unveiled a prototype engine running on peanut oil during the World Exhibition in Paris in 1900. “The use of vegetable oils will help considerably in the development of the agriculture of the countries which use it… Vegetable oils for engine fuels may seem insignificant today. But such oils may become in course of time as important as petroleum and the coal tar products of the present time,” Diesel predicted. The man, clearly ahead of his time, met an untimely death under somewhat suspicious

circumstances in 1913 and his clean machine and the use of vegetable oil as source of fuel was forgotten; or perhaps concealed by oil majors threatened by the initiative.

Changing the mix Now of course it’s a different ball game and legislation is beginning to be introduced that will see biodiesel form a high percentage of the fuel mix in future, particularly in the automotive industry and at the pump. The Canadian government has said that it will regulate an annual average renewable content of 5% in gasoline by 2010, and during the European Council Spring Summit it was confirmed that the EC will develop a policy to have a binding share of at least 10% of biofuels in every EU member state by 2020. Consequently, all the oil majors are developing their product portfolios to offer biofuels. In Europe, rapeseed oil methyl ester (RME) is the common feedstock, but used cooking oils and animal fats are gaining ground, because of their significantly lower emissions properties. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


operations: analysis

Plant potential Vegetable and forestry feedstock is being used in Europe, which has led to companies hitherto not normally associated with biofuel production beginning to emerge as key players. For example, Finland’s paper producer and shipowner Stora Enso – whose Varkaus Mill has an annual wood consumption of about 2.3M m3 – is embarking on an ambitious project with Neste Oil to produce biofuels from wood waste. Farther east, an altogether different forestry product is being used as a viable feedstock: Jatropha Curcas. These trees, typically used as a fencing crop, grow in tropical and subtropical regions in non-arable land, are hardy and relatively drought-resistant and have a lifespan of up to 30 years. These attributes, together with a 40% yield, give the plant enormous potential to become a key energy crop. The seeds are crushed to produce oil for refining into bio-diesel, while the residual seedcake left after oil extraction can be used as an organic fertiliser and has potential as animal feed or fuel briquettes. Glycerol, which can also be burned as fuel, is another by-product that could make jatropha growing and processing an economically viable and energyefficient business. Perhaps the key to a commercially viable www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

Photo: Martin Erhard

Research has shown that when the chemical properties of various feedstocks are compared, the main difference between vegetable oils and animal fats is the diversity of fatty acids. While rapeseed and soybean oils have a high content of unsaturated fatty acids, animal fats such as tallow or lard contain mainly saturated fatty acids – which have been proven to increase the oxidation stability of biodiesel. Tallow-derived biodiesel was found to deliver not only reduced exhaust emissions but also higher diesel engine efficiency compared with conventional fossil-fuel diesel. Engine noise levels were also found to be lower. More than 140,000t of animal fat is generated each year in New Zealand, and Argent Energy is investigating, with Shell and   ChevronTexaco, a plant to process 75,000t of the stuff. The expected yield is 85M litres of bio-diesel a year. In February this year, Shell New Zealand announced it had signed a letter of intent with Argent Energy in preparation for meeting the country’s biofuels sales directive, which mandates for 3.4% of the total fuel sold in New Zealand to be biofuel by 2012.

Jatropha Curcas has big potential

Biofuel crops are a booming business

sustainable energy source for the marine industry is pond life, or more precisely – algae. According to US-based UNH Bio-diesel Group, micro-algaes present the best option for producing bio-diesel in quantities sufficient enough to completely replace petroleum. While traditional feedstock crops have yields of around 50–150 gallons of bio-diesel per acre each year, algaes can yield 5,000–20,000 gallons per acre annually. Algaes grow best off of waste streams – agricultural, animal or human. Some other studies have looked into designing raceway algae ponds to be fed by agricultural or animal waste. The company is pursuing funding to investigate redesigning wastewater treatment plants to use raceway algae ponds as the primary treatment phase, with the dual goal of treating the waste and growing algae for biodiesel extraction. Newcastle University’s Dr Adam Harvey agrees: “Algae, in principal, is the only way to change things; conventional [bio-feedstock] crops will not replace fossil fuels”.

Although the day is still some way off when the technology is cost-effective enough to transform algae blooms in to a cheap, literally green fuel, several companies are investing in its development. EBT’s research has concentrated on the production of bio-diesel from algae grown in 14m × 77m raceway ponds that use waste CO2 from coal-fired power plants as a fertiliser for the algae. The algae are introduced into the pond and allowed to grow until they occupy 1% of the volume of the pond. Very high growth rates are achieved because the pond is constantly mixed by a paddle wheel and it is infused with an ample amount of CO2 and fertiliser. This intense mixing is required to ensure that all of the algae receive the necessary amounts of solar radiation, CO2, and fertiliser required for optimal growth. The CO2 is injected into the algae pond in the form of flume gas from a nearby coal-fired electric plant. Similarly, GreenFuel Technologies, a pioneer in algae bioreactor technology, has started testing an emissions-to-biofuels technology at NRG Energy’s Big Cajun II – a 1,489MW coalfuelled power plant in Louisiana. A full-scale commercial deployment could recycle enough CO2 to yield as much as 8,000 gallons (36,400 litres) of bio-diesel per acre annually under optimum conditions. “With the help of forward thinking and environmentally responsible companies like NRG, we can use algae to recycle power plant CO2 emissions safely and economically into a continuous supply of clean, renewable fuels,” said GreenFuel Technologies CEO Cary Bullock. This technology has the potential to be transferred across to the marine industry, especially the cruise sector with its high sewage and wastewater content. It could be that, in time, sufficient fuel could be ‘grown’ onboard to negate completely the need for bunkering and related fuel costs.   s

Rich in oil There are several species of algae that produce vegetable oils as an energy-storage mechanism. One species even produces a C34 straight-chain hydrocarbon. The oil content of the algae can be as much as 65% of the organism. Even if only 40% of the algae are oil it would be possible to grow the entire world production of oil (800Bn bbl) in a square 1,600km × 1,600km (approximately 2.5% of the available surface area). The reason why algal production of oil has not been adopted as a method of producing bio-diesel is the cost of the very large bioreactors needed to grow the algae over four to five days. Despite limited funding, Newcastle University is investigating the feasibility of a cheaper alternative to proposed designs for algal growth reactors.

July 2007   Solutions 39


photo: oceAnco

operations: innovations

Keeping a level playing field Although intended mainly for luxury yachts, the stabilisation at rest system introduced by Rolls-Royce last summer could have applications in other areas, such as offshore and naval, where a stable working platform is essential for some tasks. THE stabilisation at rest (SAR) system is a refinement of the standard Rolls-Royce Aquarius retractable fin stabilisers which are fitted to several vessels – notably large cruise vessels and which are a well-proven technology. SAR was developed as a response to requests from the owners of luxury yachts, who, according to Rolls-Royce, were increasingly looking for a stabilisation system that would operate when the vessel was at rest as well as when underway. The first vessel to be fitted with the system completed sea trials at the end of last year and a further three sets are on order for similar vessels. The second vessel is due for imminent delivery with the remaining two following next year. All four vessels have a beam of 13.8m and a draught of 3.6m, but length varies between 80m and 82m. The smallest vessel has a 1,850 tonne displacement and the largest 2,275 tonnes. The system chosen for all four are of the Aquarius 50 type. Since then two further sets of Aquarius 50 40

Solutions   July 2007

have been sold, one for a retrofit carried out at the Benetti Shipyard in Italy in May this year and the other for a newbuilding in Holland. Rolls-Royce has developed two variations of the original Aquarius 50: the Aquarius 25 is the smallest retractable fin unit available in the world today and suited to vessels under 65m, while the Aquarius 100 is intended for vessels between 80m and 95m. Both types have already picked up first reference orders. Early versions of the SAR system used a fin of similar design to the original Aquarius but with the addition of a trailing edge, which increased surface area from the standard 3.5m2 up to 6.1m2. As well as the additional fin area, the   basic design was adapted by modifying the tile actuator so that a maximum fin sweep of 40˚, compared with the 22.5˚, could be achieved. More recently, a new teardrop fin profile has been developed, which Rolls-Royce claims will offer improved performance both when at rest and underway.

None of the modifications so far made has required any strengthening of the fin shafts, bearings, fin box or crux box. The SAR system has a control and electrohydraulic operation that senses the start of a roll. When at rest, the system tilts the fins at a high angle to generate reaction load to counteract the motion of the waves. When underway, the system uses the lift forces generated by the vessel’s forward speed to dampen roll motion. A further new development is the introduction of interlocks allowing safe operation of the fin unit at rest or when manoeuvring for anchor operations. Testing of the new fin design was carried out at MARIN in the Netherlands. Results show that it can reduce roll in sea heights of 0.5m by as much as 80% when the vessel is at rest and by 80–90% when underway. Even with the fins in passive mode, a roll reduction of 30% was measured. In service, performance on individual yachts will vary depending on vessel and equipment size. Rolls-Royce believes that the present method of measuring performance is somewhat outmoded and it plans to develop a comfort index for roll angle of yachts, which it says will make performance standards clearer in the future. Rolls-Royce claims that the improved performance of the new systems means that costs can be reduced because in many cases one pair of the www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


operations: innovations Left: This luxury yacht is the first vessel to feature Rolls-Royce’s new stabilisers Right: Diagram showing the fins in open and closed positions. The new trailing edge is an important feature of the design new fins can replace to pairs of low-aspect fins for vessels in the 90–95m range. In addition, the two new sizes mean that specific configurations can be tailored for individual yachts depending on the length, beam and GM of the yacht. For example, where two pairs of fins are preferred, the forward set could be the Aquarius 50 type with Aquarius 100s being used aft. As a guide Rolls-Royce suggests vessels up to 65m in length use Aquarius 25s, between 65m and 88m Aquarius 50s and from 80–95m the Aquarius 100s. For vessels of more than 95m, two sets of fins would be the ideal solution. The choice of fin size in the overlapping area of 80–88m will depend on the operational waters and the

www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

natural roll period of individual yachts. To minimise the intrusion into the inside of the vessel and to give some stabilising effect when not in use, the trailing edge of the fins remain outside of the fin box. So as to maintain the favoured sleek lines of

the hull, the extent to which the fin edges protrude will not go beyond the bilge keel outreach. Rolls-Royce will also install an ice knife to protect the protruding edges for those few vessels that operate in waters where ice is present.   s

July 2007   Solutions 41


operations: update APL China is being used for trials of a mobile cold ironing system at the Port of Oakland

Cheaper, greener power in port The relentless quest to drive down emissions while ships are in port has focused on expensive mains grid systems. But there may be an alternative. Solutions looks at a mobile unit being trialled this month. A MOBILE dock-based maritime power system (cold ironing) to be tested at the Port of Oakland on 18 July is being seen as a realistic alternative to the expensive and complicated mains grid method proposed by Los Angeles and Long Beach, the two biggest container ports in the United States. Formerly known as dual-frequency multivoltage cold ironing by the manufacturer, Wittmar Engineering and Construction of Signal Hill, California, it comprises a 1,300hp Caterpillar engine powered by LNG stored in a separate tank. The connection to the ship is through the bow thruster transformer. 42

Solutions   July 2007

Power output can range from 380V to 480V (and can be stepped up to 12,000V with dock transformers), depending on the customer’s needs. Two cycles are possible, 50Hz and 60Hz, making the unit adaptable to all types of vessels. “The essence of our system is variable voltage and dual cycles”, company founder Eric Witten explained. A patent was applied for in 2002 and granted in 2006. The Oakland test is being done in conjunction with APL Americas, which is using its Class 11 APL China. This is a 5,000+ teu vessel, with a 2,750kVA transformer, with a line voltage of 440V at 3,608A. Load voltage is 4,340V at

366A. APL says that the bow thruster transformer will take 4,160V from the dock (440V from the generator, stepped up to 4,160V by a transformer on the dock) and step it down to 440V to power the ship. Brian Constable, COO for APL Maritime, said: “If the proof-of-concept works, we will obtain an LNG-powered ondock generator that runs at 4,160V to match the bow-thruster transformer”. According to Witten, “APL’s load is variable based on their reefer load on any given day. Our current plan is to build two units that can be connected together. Each unit is 1,200A. When fully functional, APL can dispatch the power they need on that day. If they only need 1,200A that is what we will deliver and charge APL for. If they need more than 1,200A we will dispatch two units and APL will be charged for 2,400A.” Both APL and Wittmar are expecting no www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


operations: update practical difficulties in running the test. The crucial element is heat build-up at the transformer, which is rated for 30 minutes rather than for continuous running. Constable said: “An independent study shows that transformers are sized at 125% of the full calculated load for 30 minutes. The power requirements will load this transformer at only 65%, hence it is felt the transformer should function within design range.” LNG is being used as the fuel because of California’s relentless drive to curb pollution at its ports. For a 24-hour call at Oakland, use of the system should greatly reduce air pollution compared with a ship running its engines on 0.05% sulphur diesel: NOx will drop by 94% to 25.4kg, CO by 57% to 15.4kg, PM10 by 99% to less than 1kg, SOx will be eliminated and CO2 will be down by 42% to 11,100kg, it is claimed. The consumption of LNG will be higher than diesel – 12,700 litres compared with 8,650 – because of the difference in efficiency, but this is seen as being well worth the pollution savings. Three other benefits are being sought from the use of this system – versatility, ease of installation and low cost. Versatility is provided by the trailer-mounted fuel tank and generator, which are housed in 40-foot containers. Wittmar says it can make 43 units by 2012, which would be able to coldiron 4,472 ships a year. The only major component needed to modify a ship is a transfer switch with two positions, cold ironing and transformer. Constable said: “In a 35-day voyage, once we have all the equipment, we can retrofit each ship without taking it out of service”. John Bowe, president of APL Americas, said that if the test succeeds five ships will be adapted by the end of this year. A delivery time of 16 weeks has been quoted for each switch. Simplicity is increased by the use of only one cable, of 7.5cm, compared with at least 10 needed to hook up to the mains grid. APL and Wittmar estimate that it will take little more than an hour to set up the connection for the 18 July test. The cost advantage has almost certainly made Oakland sit up and take notice. The port will pay nothing, as against a figure of $122M for mains wiring that officials were contemplating. For shipping lines the transfer switch accounts for almost the entire cost of $225,000 per ship, compared with $1.2M for mains grid wiring. Port advisers also point out that the grid elecwww.solutionsmagazine.co.uk

tricity can produce only one frequency and a series of standard voltages that are non-standard for ships, which have to be adapted to the grid output instead of the other way around. Small bulkers and container ships do not have to carry out any adaptations, Wittmar says, as the link-up can be done directly to the existing shoreside connection box that is used when the vessel is in drydock. Wittmar’s patent focuses on two main aspects: the dual-frequency power module and the electrical wiring. The key to the dual frequency is the ability to run the generator at different speeds. “I found that at 1,800rpm the generator could operate at 60Hz and at 1,500rpm it would operate at 50Hz,” noted Witten. Easily available electronic governor controls are used to set the frequency before the engine starts. The wiring and associated components are laid out such that the voltage output can be controlled by a digital voltage regulator, which can be set to any output required. “This is more

or less independent of the frequency controls”, said Witten. LNG has an unsavoury reputation in California and its use as the system’s fuel is being critically examined by the port and the City of Oakland’s fire department because of safety worries. “The fuel is vaporised in the tank and taken off at 7psi”, says Witten. “There is no LNG anywhere in our system. The fuel can also be LPG or propane.” Engineers believe there will be no problem in adapting the bigger classes of APL vessels, which have transformer units of 3.3kVA and 6.6kVA, although differing results in heat-rise and power requirements are expected. On the APL China (and the majority of the fleet) the ship’s normal operating power from the auxiliary engine is 440V. Initially, the financial agreement with APL is an hourly charge from the time of connection, with Wittmar retaining ownership of the generator. A complete Wittmar unit costs about $3M.   s

Wittmar’s system, housed in a 40ft box, could be in five ships by year’s end, says APL’s Bowe July 2007   Solutions 43


operations: troubleshooter ing. When this occurs, machining becomes difficult because of the hardness of the metal. If the hardness depth exceeds the maximum undersize limit for a given pin, traditional reconditioning methods are not possible. In this case, the crankshaft has to be scrapped and replaced. The resulting replacement work and long lay-up time come at a significant cost. And that cost can escalate dramatically if a replacement crankshaft is not available when needed – often the case because of the high demand for components. Faced with extended delivery times from overbooked suppliers, customers have been demanding a solution to this problem.

Stress release Preventing crankshaft failures is better than the expensive alternative of replacement

Prevention better than cure The continued sophistication and technological development of the marine diesel engine surely ought to have put an end to, or at least reduced, crankshaft failures. Yet the opposite appears to be the case. ACCORDING to BMT Marine and Offshore Survey sources, as ratings and parameters increase, engines are nearing critical conditions. Surveyors have been noting a rising incidence of failures, particularly to auxiliary engines, caused by ovality of the ‘keeps’ that keep the crankshaft bearings in place. This problem can be machined out, or new keeps fitted – so long as operators have detected abnormal running in time or the engine’s oil mist detection system works properly. If not, then lubricating oil grooves will be susceptible to blockage and the bearing will overheat. Failures can be prevented if the engine’s lubricating oil is regularly checked. Analytical X-ray specialist PANalytical has developed spectrometers that can detect wear to metal surfaces by means of careful oil analysis. As metal surfaces within a machine undergo physical and chemical wear, trace concentrations of the component metals appear in the lubricant. Elemental analysis of the lubricating oil provides a fingerprint of the worn component and enables it to be rapidly identified. For example, Ni and Fe levels 44

Solutions   July 2007

indicate worn pistons, rings and crankshaft wear, whereas Cu and Sn are associated with bearing and bush wear. By enabling accurate, precise quantification of wear metals in lubricating oils, PANalytical systems, such as the MiniPal 4 energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) and Axios-Petro wavelength dispersive X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) spectrometers, can help to improve predictive maintenance programmes and scheduled down-time planning, minimise repair costs and increase safety margins by reducing the chance of catastrophic machine failure. Oil analysis is of course a pre-emptive measure, but what should the course of action be followed after failure?

Hot topics Most engine manufacturers now deploy teams to carry out in-place machining of crankpins for any engine brand, type or size. But in-place machining repair cannot remedy the problem when a crankpin has been exposed to severe overheating and subsequent surface harden-

One engine maker - Wärtsilä - has developed a solution in which it “brings the furnace to the site” so that stress-release heat treatment on the hardened pin can be carried out. The procedure involves placing heating devices, temperature sensors and insulation mats on the pin without dismounting the crankshaft, to perform controlled heating, steady-temperature cooling cycle to reduce the pin hardness and taking it back to the manufacturer’s original specifications. While this procedure produces satisfactory results, some challenges had to be overcome before Wärtsilä could increase the use of its technology, which hitherto had seen only limited application. A team from the manufacturer’s Italian and Finnish factories honed the procedure for more frequent use. The first step was to issue a common technical procedure for the process. This followed several engine tests using sophisticated measurement devices and strain-gauges to carry out detailed checks. The process also enabled the behaviour of the treated crankshafts to be monitored for hardness drops, process repeatability, stress release and deformations/elongations of the crankshaft. Specific procedures were then developed to make and maintain the crankshaft free from constraints and abnormal loads during the heat treatment by dismantling and removing some specific engine parts, thus permitting free elongation and contraction to take place. The outcome was that solid technical specifications and guidelines for safe commercial operations could be issued. Wärtsilä is developing the process to clone the activity for selected repair centres around the world.   s www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


Solutions

NEWBUILDINGS 

July 2007

Your definitive guide to the latest new orders

To download the latest copy of this magazine go to  www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

photo: Dietmar Hasenpusch


NEWbuildings: news

Austal USA ferry for Hawaii On 20 June, Alakai, a 107m highspeed ferry, was delivered by its builder Austal USA to Hawaii Superferry. A second US-flagged vehicle-and-passenger-carrying catamaran is under construction. Powered by four MTU 20V 8200 M70 main engines via four ZF 53800 gearboxes, with a top speed of 35kt, the high-speed craft is capable of carrying 866 passengers and 282 cars. It incorporates environment-friendly technology, such as hulls with a nontoxic coating and onboard storage of wastewater, refuse and other solid waste. The specially designed energyefficient catamaran meets or exceeds government standards for protecting Hawaii’s islands and the ocean. The ship is the largest aluminium catamaran ever built in the US and is a result of the influence of Australian ship designers and builders who have co-operated with US yards in recent years – mostly on military projects. An important requirement for Alakai’s entry into service is the completion of the United States Coast Guard’s detailed certification and inspection process, which has reached its final stages in Mobile, Alabama. The Alakai - the names translates from Hawaiian as ‘ocean path’ - took to the sea for the first time in April during sea trials in Mobile Bay, achieving or surpassing all performance parameters specified for the vessel. From late summer, Hawaii Superferry will offer a daily service between Maui and O’ahu and between Kaua’i and O’ahu several times a week. A second ferry is under construction at Austal USA shipyard. It is scheduled to be delivered in 2009 for use between the islands of Hawaii, O’ahu and Maui. Both of the vessels have been classed by Germanischer Lloyd. 46

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An artist’s impression of the new Seaway Heavy Lifting vessel being built by Merwede

Battle of the heavy-lift giants Two heavy-lift specialists are claiming records for ships equipped with 5,000-tonne cranes. Nordic Heavy Lift subsidiary Avonway has ordered what it calls a unique crane vessel with a record 5,000 tonne single-mast lifting capacity from Singapore’s Sembawang Shipyard, and IHC Holland Merwede has announced that its subsidiary Merwede Shipyard will build a new vessel for Seaway Heavy Lifting. IHC claims that its 5,000-tonne crane capacity makes the vessel the world’s largest monohull heavy-lift vessel and will be the biggest ship ever built by the IHC Holland Merwede Group. Both vessels are set to enter service in 2010. Sea of Solutions, part of the Offshore Ship Designers Group, was responsible for both the concept and basic design of the Avonway monohull vessel, with HuismanItrec designing and constructing the crane. The design is said to have many innovations, but what catches the eye is the enormous single-mast crane, reaching approximately 150m above the deck

when topped up. Until now the largest unit was the 3,000-tonnecapacity crane for the Sapura 3000 – also a combined Sea of Solutions/Huisman project. The 180.9m loa vessel’s transit speed of 14kt is achieved with a pair of propulsion thrusters of 5.5MW each. These, combined with four 3.2MW retractable thrusters and a 2.5MW bow thruster, give the vessel DP3 class. Provision for a future eight-point mooring system

is built into the design. The Merwede vessel is equipped with a fully revolving offshore pedestal crane and is also DP3 class. Its propulsion system consists of two 5MW azimuthing thrusters, two 3.5MW retractable azimuthing thrusters and two 1,012kW bow thrusters. It will be equipped with an eight-point mooring system with winches suitable for 2,200m wire and 15-tonne Delta Flipper type high holding power anchors.

Nordic Heavy Lift is also claiming the heavy-lift crown with its vessel to be built in Singapore

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NEWbuildings: news

Seven Seas launched

Ever Safety, Evergreen’s ninth 7,024teu S-class vessel, being launched at Mitsubishi’s Kobe shipyard

Evergreen notches up nine out of ten Last month saw Ever Safety, the ninth of ten 7,024teu S-series vessels being built for Evergreen in Japan, launched at Mitsubishi Heavy Industries’ Kobe shipyard. Timetabled for delivery in October this year, Ever Safety is scheduled to join Evergreen Line’s transpacific service. The eight earlier sister ships are being transferred to Evergreen Line’s new China-Europe Shuttle Service.

The ship’s owner highlights the green credentials of the S-series, although their protected bunker tanks and the oily water separator that works to 15ppm are mandatory requirements. One environmentfriendly feature is not mandatory, however: all the ships incorporate ‘cold-ironing’ – the ability to shut down all their shipboard generators and switch to shore-based electricity supplies while in port.

Big four for Bohai Norwegian owner Bergesen Worldwide has ordered four very large ore carriers (VLOCs) from Bohai Shipyard in China, it was announced at Nor-Shipping last month. Newly appointed IACS chairman Tor Svensen made the announcement during a DNV conference, adding that the $115M, 388,000dwt ships will be the biggest bulk carriers in the world. The previous largest VLOCs measured 360,000dwt, he said. “China is of course experiencing a lot of growth, with a large number of bulk carriers ordered this year,” said Svensen. “This order proves that size matters. These vessels will go on a steady contract. This year is a bulk carrier year, and more than half the tonnage ordered have been bulkers. We predict that the number of bulk carriers will double within the next four or five years”. www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

With an overall length of 300m and a beam of 42.8m, the S-series vessels are able to carry containers 17 rows across on deck and 15 rows across below deck. They have a deadweight of 78,700 tonnes on a service draught of 14.2m. Each vessel is powered by a single 10-cylinder Mitsubishi Sulzer 10RTA96C main engine developing 54,900kW to give a service speed of 25.3kt.

Merwede Shipyard of the Netherlands, which specialises in offshore and specialist vessels as well as naval craft, launched a new pipelayer for Subsea 7 at the beginning of last month. The Seven Seas, a deepwater Flexlay and J-lay vessel, will have the ability to perform a wide variety of offshore and subsea operations in addition to its main pipelaying role. The ship has accommodation for a crew of 120 persons. The highspecification pipelay spread for the vessel was designed and manufactured by Huisma-Itrec in Holland and will be installed in October once the rest of the vessel has been completed at the Merwede yard. The Seven Seas is the second vessel for Subsea 7 built by Merwede Shipyard. The first, Seven Oceans, was being finished at Huisman-Itrec and should have been delivered as Solutions went to press. Once finished, Seven Oceans will head to the Gulf of Mexico for its first project. Later this year Subsea 7 will be opening an office in Rotterdam to support its continuing growth in the North Sea and Africa.

Cochin’s double launch Cochin Shipyard, one of India’s largest shipyards, launched two vessels on 5 June – a double-hull bulk carrier and a platform supply vessel. Both ships were part of series: the bulker Clipper Texan is the penultimate vessel of the six 30,000dwt vessels ordered by Clipper Group of Denmark, while the PSV is the fourth in a series of eight ordered by Deep Sea Supply of Norway. The keel for another

bulk carrier for Clipper was laid on the same day. Apart from these commercial vessels, the yard is also building an aircraft carrier for the Indian Navy. Chairman and MD of the shipyard M Jitendran said that the yard’s commercial orderbook is now Rs20Bn in value with shipowners NFC of Norway, Vroon Offshore and Tidewater Marine of the US among its customers. July 2007   Solutions 47


48

Solutions   July 2007


NEWbuildings: notable newbuildings

One of a kind Semi-submersible ships are very much a niche sector at any time and the latest addition to their ranks can truly be termed unique. Solutions takes a look at this one-off specialist

Yacht Express is the world’s first and only purpose-built yacht carrier

Built at China’s Yantai Raffles yard and delivered to its Dutch owner Dockwise Yacht Transport last month, Yacht Express is the world’s first and only purpose-built yacht transporter as well as being the largest ship devoted to this task. There are other vessels that operate in this very specialist sector, but these are either dual-purpose or conversions from other vessel types. A spokesperson for the owner told Solutions that Yacht Express is unlikely to be used for anything other than its design purpose, as modifying the vessel would be too expensive. The number of yacht owners wishing to reposition vessels around the world is growing and whereas the craft would once have travelled as deck cargo on a general cargo ship the switch to containerisation has reduced the number of opportunities to do this. Owners like Dockwise have responded by converting ships to meet demand. A semi-submersible is the ideal design since floating the yachts into position reduces the risks inherent in craning them aboard a cargo ship. The deck space of Yacht Express occupies 165m of the ship’s total 209m length and extends to 31m of its 32.2m beam. The exact number of yachts that can be accommodated depends on

their individual dimensions, but a typical full load would be between 18 and 25 craft. Preparation for loading requires detailed information on the yachts’ dimensions and hull shapes, allowing the ship to prepare blocks at suitable positions. After ballasting the ship, the yachts are floated in to their designated positions assisted by a team of locally contracted specialist divers. Once all craft have been placed over their blocks, deballasting begins, the yachts settle down and, when the crew are satisfied as to final positioning, are made fast. Cargo handling is facilitated by a   2 × 10-tonne crane with an outreach of 15m. At sea the yachts are protected by the side walls, or spray covers as they are better known. At the top of each spray cover there is a catwalk used by crews when positioning and securing yachts. Another catwalk is constructed along the centre line of the deck. Ballasting and deballasting are carried out with four main ballast pumps, each with a capacity of 1,200m3/h. Ballast operations are usually completed within six hours. Because the ballasting is needed only to submerge the ship and deballasting takes place at the same site immediately after operations are completed, no ballast is used when at sea, so the ship does not require a ballast treatment system. With a service speed of 18kt, Yacht Express lives up to its name being almost twice as fast as other ships in the Dockwise Yacht Transport fleet, which normally operate at around 10kt. This increase in speed will cut the voyage time of a typical voyage from Florida to the Mediterranean from 15 days to eight. Propulsion plant consists of two 8,700kW Wärtsilä 12V38 B common rail diesel generator sets, each driving two Lips azimuth pulling thrusters featuring CP propellers via two electric motors of 5,100kW each. Manoeuvring is enhanced by a single Lips 1,640kW bow thruster with CP propeller. Auxiliary power is derived from two Wärtsilä 6L20 common rail diesel generator sets July 2007   Solutions 49


NEWbuildings: notable newbuildings Cargo area of Yacht Express showing the protective spray covers and the central catwalk which will be used when securing and to give access to the yachts

of 1,020kW and there is also an emergency Volvo Penta D34A MS generator of 610kW, 440V, 60Hz. The navigation set up features an integrated bridge system consisting of a UniMACS 3000 with two radar systems with ARPA and two ECDIS, one conning and platform management system, incorporating an advanced DPT 3500 autopilot/joystick system. In the world of yacht transporting it is quite normal for the yachts’ crews to accompany their craft on the voyage. Yacht Express has a safety equipment certificate that allows for 50 persons onboard. The crew accounts for 26 of this number, which means that up to 24 supernumeraries can be carried. This ship will feature amenities designed for worldwide yacht transport, including a conference room, media room, an atrium, a swimming pool, fitness room, complimentary cabins for ride-aboard crew and other facilities to make the voyage as productive and pleasant as possible. As well as its regular work, Yacht Express is also taking part in a project to monitor the world’s oceans. The International SeaKeepers Society has equipped the vessel with its innovative SeaKeeper 1000TM ocean and meteorological monitoring system. The fully automated device samples, measures, records 50

Solutions   July 2007

and transmits data to various scientific and public communities across the globe. The unit onboard Yacht Express will be one of 50 similar devices plotting a broad and continuous picture of the critical measures of ocean health, such as salinity, temperature, oxygen and pollution. “The ship’s regular routes will enable us to provide regular and ongoing readings of ocean conditions over time,” said DYT president and CEO Clemens van der Werf, “which

will offer better analysis opportunities compared to private yachts that are only in certain regions on different occasions.” Clemens added that those who typically use the DYT service have the same sentiments as the original group of luxury yacht owners who founded the SeaKeepers Society in 1998 – they are concerned about the deteriorating health of the waters they have come to know and love. “This is our chance to give back something to our clients and the marine environment.”    s

principal particulars Yacht Express Length, oa Beam Draught Draught submerged Deck length Deck width Main engines Power output Speed

109m 32.2m 5.8m 14m 165m 31m 2 × Wärtsilä 12V38B 17,400kW 18kt www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Summary of On-Order vessel numbers Country of domicile No. Greece Japan Germany China Unknown Denmark Hong Kong Korea (South) Turkey Taiwan Singapore Norway Bermuda Panama Italy United Arab Emirates France United States Iran Russia United Kingdom Cyprus Liberia Netherlands Switzerland Qatar India Belgium Canada Saudi Arabia Marshall Islands Israel Malaysia Brazil Bahamas Sweden Croatia Vietnam Kuwait Poland Monaco Algeria South Africa Madeira Latvia Portugal Indonesia Romania Ecuador Finland Honduras Venezuela

664 582 1,003 383 651 348 236 245 325 104 315 441 100 148 225 119 158 322 56 102 191 156 68 292 62 52 104 85 60 44 24 31 82 45 21 52 22 49 12 24 8 4 15 6 9 8 32 6 3 16 1 6

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Total dwt

Gen C

51,161,437 42,214,356 31,488,530 25,085,959 22,683,962 15,641,485 15,065,325 13,800,381 12,184,288 11,971,954 10,036,691 9,858,794 9,610,197 9,590,526 8,608,740 6,849,773 6,615,705 6,608,297 6,567,060 6,260,586 4,992,657 4,642,411 4,396,455 3,999,930 3,983,000 3,814,444 3,722,402 3,436,835 3,110,958 2,945,800 2,938,600 2,522,120 1,639,358 1,596,770 1,286,920 1,251,860 1,071,100 961,595 932,810 891,560 579,000 403,784 391,900 357,600 333,680 313,000 282,098 242,400 210,620 182,800 171,000 168,000

- 28 250 34 69 21 20 9 38 5 - 9 - 10 11 - - 20 2 7 25 14 1 138 8 - 5 15 10 - - - 1 1 2 - - 27 - - - - - 3 - 1 2 - - 1 - -

Cont 21 81 481 72 47 73 42 46 34 32 39 - 5 - 15 12 73 17 15 12 8 55 2 42 38 4 2 14 6 - 4 30 - - - - - 3 - - - - - - - - 1 - - - - -

Tank Bulk

Pass Misc Ro-Ro Reef

341 182 108 137 138 127 75 122 170 33 122 120 39 56 93 50 9 80 28 57 55 43 30 41 8 36 26 27 16 31 - - 30 11 13 41 7 9 11 - 2 4 11 3 7 2 8 6 2 - - 4

2 10 3 4 11 - - - 9 - 1 10 5 3 22 - 5 20 2 - 9 - - - - - 14 - 5 - - - - 5 1 4 6 - 1 2 - - 1 - - 4 1 - - 4 - -

257 228 107 100 198 71 81 39 47 23 28 36 44 62 45 9 2 12 2 11 23 13 24 14 3 - 20 7 18 - 19 - 1 - 2 - 7 6 - 21 5 - 1 - - - - - - 2 1 -

2 11 13 22 125 13 1 2 20 - 35 24 1 6 13 11 14 50 4 9 19 - 2 24 4 5 11 15 5 2 1 1 9 1 - 3 - 2 - 1 - - 1 - 2 - 17 - 1 - - 2

36 40 7 9 18 10 17 27 5 3 3 42 - 9 11 1 2 2 - - 11 - - 8 - - - 6 - - - - 7 - 1 2 - - - - 1 - 1 - - - 3 - - 9 - -

5 - - - 8 - - - - - 1 6 - 1 - 2 - - - - - - - 4 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

Comb Offs - - - - - - - - - 6 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

2 34 5 37 33 2 2 86 194 6 1 15 34 53 121 3 6 41 31 9 21 1 7 26 1 11 34 27 2 2 2 2 1 -

July 2007   Solutions 51


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings Country of domicile No. Nigeria Spain Thailand Bulgaria Malta Seychelles Ireland Ukraine Chile Virgin Islands (British) Syria Philippines Isle of Man Argentina Uruguay Azores Iceland Canary Islands Estonia Egypt French Polynesia Angola Anguilla Australia Bahrain Brunei Darussalam Cayman Islands Channel Islands Faeroe Islands Luxembourg Macau Maldives Mexico Netherlands Antilles New Caledonia New Zealand Oman Pakistan Papua New Guinea Peru Senegal Vanuatu Total

6 54 9 3 5 4 8 10 9 11 2 3 5 5 1 1 9 2 5 18 1 1 1 10 2 2 6 1 5 1 12 1 5 1 1 6 7 4 1 14 2 2 8,373

52 Solutions   July 2007

Total dwt 166,600 164,104 127,750 105,150 96,650 90,000 74,808 47,267 39,300 28,300 20,000 15,200 12,300 9,700 8,974 8,600 7,500 7,300 7,000 6,000 1,000 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 380,721,016

Gen C - 9 5 - 1 - 8 8 - - 2 1 - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 822

Cont - 2 - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,329

Tank Bulk 2 5 - - 2 2 - - - - - 1 - 3 1 - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 2,588

- 1 2 3 - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,596

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Pass Misc Ro-Ro Reef - 7 - - - 2 - - 1 2 - - - - - - - 1 3 1 - - - 1 - - - - - - 12 - - - 1 - 5 - - - 1 - 201

- 30 1 - 2 - - 2 7 7 - - 4 1 - - 6 - 1 11 - - 1 8 1 - 5 1 3 1 - 1 4 1 - 6 2 4 1 14 1 - 630

- - - - - - - - - - - 1 1 - - - - 1 - 1 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 296

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 3 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 30

Comb Offs - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6

4 1 1 1 5 1 1 1 2 1 2 1 2 875

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


nEWBUILDINGS BY COUNTRY OF BUILD Country of build Dry Cargo No dwt Korea (South) China Philippines Japan Turkey Romania Russia Total

- 13 - 4 - - - 17

- 274,200 - 72,000 - - - 346,200

No

Container dwt

55 19 7 - - - - 81

5,469,730 576,857 723,500 - - - - 6,770,087

No 38 10 - 4 7 1 1 61

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt 2,171,800 379,000 - 19,100 31,500 40,400 13,000 2,654,800

70 129 6 14 6 - - 225

7,454,800 12,272,400 813,000 967,412 714,000 - - 22,221,612

2 6 - 2 - - - 10

42,400 98,000 - 30,000 - - - 170,400

No

Totals

dwt

165 15,138,730 177 13,600,457 13 1,536,500 24 1,088,512 13 745,500 1 40,400 1 13,000 394 32,163,099

nEW orders reported BY COUNTRY OF owner Country of owner Dry Cargo No dwt Greece - Germany 2 Korea (South) - Turkey - China - Norway - France - Denmark 1 Italy - Bermuda - Taiwan - United Kingdom 2 Marshall Islands - India - Hong Kong 8 Netherlands 4 Liberia - Poland - United States - Russia - Honduras - Indonesia - United Arab Emirates - Unknown - Panama - Belgium - Cyprus - Sweden - Total 17

- 13,000 - - - - - 12,000 - - - 25,200 - - 224,000 72,000 - - - - - - - - - - - - 346,200

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

No

Container dwt

- 47 4 - 8 - 16 - - 5 - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 81

- 3,882,280 224,800 - 808,000 - 1,666,900 - - 137,857 - - - - 50,250 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 6,770,087

No 9 6 6 8 - - - 5 3 - 4 6 - - - - - - - - - 2 - 3 1 4 - 4 61

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt 322,400 78,000 78,000 282,000 - - - 192,500 312,900 - 771,400 282,000 - - - - - - - - - 170,000 - 114,300 25,000 19,100 - 7,200 2,654,800

54 22 24 17 15 7 - 15 18 9 - 7 4 4 2 4 4 4 6 4 1 - 2 - - - 2 - 225

6,150,800 1,268,500 2,353,800 1,936,000 1,224,000 2,021,112 - 1,360,000 954,000 873,000 - 413,000 720,000 696,000 360,000 460,000 368,400 320,000 210,000 228,000 171,000 - 116,000 - - - 18,000 - 22,221,612

- 2 - - 4 - - - - - - - - - - 2 - - 2 - - - - - - - - - 10

- 24,000 - - 74,000 - - - - - - - - - - 30,000 - - 42,400 - - - - - - - - - 170,400

No

Totals

dwt

63 6,473,200 79 5,265,780 34 2,656,600 25 2,218,000 27 2,106,000 7 2,021,112 16 1,666,900 21 1,564,500 21 1,266,900 14 1,010,857 4 771,400 15 720,200 4 720,000 4 696,000 11 634,250 10 562,000 4 368,400 4 320,000 8 252,400 4 228,000 1 171,000 2 170,000 2 116,000 3 114,300 1 25,000 4 19,100 2 18,000 4 7,200 394 32,163,099

July 2007   Solutions 53


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

vessel types on–order BY COUNTRY OF build Country of build Dry Cargo No dwt Korea (South) China Japan Philippines Germany Romania Vietnam Turkey Taiwan Croatia Poland Brazil India Denmark Russia United States Netherlands Ukraine Indonesia Iran Spain Bulgaria Singapore Argentina Italy Norway Slovakia Portugal Malaysia United Arab Emirates Tunisia Thailand Yugoslavia Egypt Bangladesh Estonia Israel Georgia Total

22 393,240 321 4,102,325 63 982,961 - - 25 237,472 7 46,667 63 332,075 31 151,225 - - - - 9 208,376 1 10,900 26 121,212 - - 21 136,255 7 112,000 111 547,399 33 228,873 6 81,200 4 97,200 21 96,900 21 134,240 - - - - 2 26,000 5 19,500 27 96,055 7 64,754 - - - - 7 18,200 5 16,350 3 12,150 - - 2 5,800 - - 1 4,500 1 2,625 852 8,286,454

54 Solutions   July 2007

No

Container dwt

444 32,202,739 453 13,942,423 92 4,961,730 24 1,592,300 112 2,818,150 31 1,533,970 13 153,000 30 555,400 48 2,421,370 - - 31 1,135,300 - - - - 10 1,292,800 - - - - 23 228,122 - - 1 4,180 5 143,110 5 69,330 - - 7 154,700 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,329 63,208,624

No

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt

1,049 80,340,206 639 41,357,850 467 35,194,936 2 228,000 12 316,080 24 580,150 11 575,900 155 1,570,261 - - 35 2,042,729 4 162,150 11 1,585,870 7 62,200 - - 38 833,410 18 852,840 20 88,050 14 417,000 11 153,200 5 259,000 15 267,104 1 3,544 2 9,900 8 192,700 22 130,425 9 128,299 - - - - 5 32,200 3 22,533 - - - - - - - - - - 1 4,550 - - - - 2,588 167,411,087

145 18,614,300 667 54,268,301 611 53,821,320 66 4,552,746 2 62,000 7 1,144,400 46 2,026,300 10 760,000 - - - - - - 4 195,600 29 1,174,200 - - - - - - - - 1 69,700 6 305,500 - - 1 10,600 4 146,400 2 48,200 1 27,000 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,602 137,226,567

60 41 97 5 16 - 12 - - 15 16 - 5 - - 1 - - 4 - 5 - 2 - 4 3 - - 7 2 - - - 1 - - - - 296

1,346,720 512,400 1,608,148 67,800 191,315 - 165,600 - - 250,600 298,550 - 24,700 - - 150 - - 7,318 - 28,550 - 7,000 - 49,400 6,200 - - 16,033 1,800 - - - 6,000 - - - - 4,588,284

No

Totals

dwt

1720 132,897,205 2121 114,183,299 1330 96,569,095 97 6,440,846 167 3,625,017 69 3,305,187 145 3,252,875 226 3,036,886 48 2,421,370 50 2,293,329 60 1,804,376 16 1,792,370 67 1,382,312 10 1,292,800 59 969,665 26 964,990 154 863,571 48 715,573 28 551,398 14 499,310 47 472,484 26 284,184 13 219,800 9 219,700 28 205,825 17 153,999 27 96,055 7 64,754 12 48,233 5 24,333 7 18,200 5 16,350 3 12,150 1 6,000 2 5,800 1 4,550 1 4,500 1 2,625 6,667 380,721,016

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


vessel types on–order BY COUNTRY OF flag Country of flag Dry Cargo No dwt Panama 86 Liberia 17 Greece 2 Hong Kong 22 China 10 Cyprus 92 Bahamas 3 Singapore 6 Marshall Islands 2 Germany 51 Korea (South) 6 Malta 40 Italy 3 Turkey 29 Danish Int Register 5 Norwegian Int Register 4 Isle of Man 4 Unknown 13 India 5 Norway 1 France - Antigua 129 Iran 2 Saudi Arabia - Belgium - Netherlands 158 United Kingdom 21 Brazil 1 Malaysia 1 Bermuda - Taiwan - United Arab Emirates - Japan 15 Israel - United States 7 Cayman Islands - Vietnam 27 Russia 6 Denmark 7 Croatia - Kuwait - Sweden - Algeria - Canada 1 Poland - Switzerland 7 Indonesia 2 Qatar - Gibraltar 10 Ecuador - Venezuela - Spain 8

1,068,602 96,825 21,000 473,800 76,370 910,529 135,000 182,600 4,800 737,925 42,450 493,846 40,650 147,618 52,580 196,000 17,800 139,240 21,362 - - 1,088,123 13,500 - - 1,154,749 177,400 10,900 4,725 - - - 104,050 - 112,000 - 128,895 30,899 44,626 - - - - 5,400 - 108,000 16,000 - 56,600 - - 39,400

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

No

Container dwt

184 246 20 76 28 135 35 75 45 162 19 11 8 36 26 - 12 6 3 - 24 90 5 - 7 25 13 - - 5 - - 4 11 - - 3 4 4 - - - - - - - 1 4 - - - 2

11,641,622 12,390,161 1,421,270 4,069,669 2,149,150 3,424,841 2,008,940 3,609,720 1,221,579 7,302,727 1,419,020 772,460 280,700 693,560 2,469,015 - 251,832 347,000 129,580 - 2,979,720 1,632,647 143,110 - 234,220 271,900 492,200 - - 137,857 - - 348,000 1,015,600 - - 69,000 73,944 120,000 - - - - - - - 4,180 50,400 - - - 33,000

No 427 212 172 114 113 99 114 172 169 36 82 63 89 140 51 54 51 19 25 30 3 4 15 13 10 22 24 11 30 20 - 18 34 - 18 15 9 5 17 5 7 12 3 - - 2 6 4 15 2 4 5

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt 30,635,357 17,469,781 14,902,166 7,836,539 8,689,445 8,772,910 10,107,124 9,009,079 9,814,106 1,359,900 4,186,700 4,655,720 4,247,340 3,905,923 4,183,700 2,564,890 2,198,850 1,222,280 2,116,660 2,233,400 43,600 49,800 1,990,990 1,969,900 1,210,760 248,400 483,170 1,585,870 1,545,100 1,298,184 - 893,833 189,377 - 852,840 690,700 569,200 167,030 417,300 497,900 600,010 278,197 353,784 - - 39,850 244,000 202,280 155,000 210,620 168,000 81,104

575 56 154 117 95 60 85 37 45 43 38 31 43 27 4 9 10 29 20 23 - 4 2 - 6 1 5 - - 2 5 5 11 - - 7 6 10 6 4 - - - 11 4 3 - - - - - 1

52,771,061 5,783,163 14,234,134 10,410,356 9,265,240 4,392,219 3,965,139 2,712,440 4,706,000 2,865,500 4,118,200 2,451,890 2,848,000 2,435,100 460,000 1,904,450 1,562,000 1,956,700 1,391,000 805,000 - 171,600 152,000 - 511,200 56,000 449,305 - - 95,600 1,349,200 336,400 491,938 - - 267,982 194,500 678,000 192,000 310,600 - - - 330,000 320,000 129,000 - - - - - 10,600

77 3 6 5 10 - 34 16 - 10 4 - 13 4 - 19 7 5 - 8 2 - - - - 11 6 - 7 - - 4 6 - 2 1 - - 10 - - 8 - 1 - - 2 - - - - -

1,462,678 49,100 90,000 58,000 107,500 - 463,918 265,150 - 110,900 86,000 - 284,600 42,234 - 289,640 79,850 281,700 - 37,200 7,000 - - - - 152,050 71,000 - 16,033 - - 50,800 77,600 - 42,400 19,000 - - 118,600 - - 172,300 - 150 - - 2,100 - - - - -

No 1349 534 354 334 256 386 271 306 261 302 149 145 156 236 86 86 84 72 53 62 29 227 24 13 23 217 69 12 38 27 5 27 70 11 27 23 45 25 44 9 7 20 3 13 4 12 11 8 25 2 4 16

Totals

dwt

97,579,320 35,789,030 30,668,570 22,848,364 20,287,705 17,500,499 16,680,121 15,778,989 15,746,485 12,376,952 9,852,370 8,373,916 7,701,290 7,224,435 7,165,295 4,954,980 4,110,332 3,946,920 3,658,602 3,075,600 3,030,320 2,942,170 2,299,600 1,969,900 1,956,180 1,883,099 1,673,075 1,596,770 1,565,858 1,531,641 1,349,200 1,281,033 1,210,965 1,015,600 1,007,240 977,682 961,595 949,873 892,526 808,500 600,010 450,497 353,784 335,550 320,000 276,850 266,280 252,680 211,600 210,620 168,000 164,104

July 2007   Solutions 55


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings Country of flag Dry Cargo No dwt Luxembourg 2 20,940 Finland 1 4,600 Seychelles - - Madeira (MAR) 10 66,700 Ireland 8 74,808 Thailand 5 21,050 France (FIS) - - New Zealand - - St Vincent 3 24,100 Virgin Islands (British) - - Argentina - - Netherlands Antilles 2 23,969 Belize 1 9,200 Syria 2 20,000 Georgia 4 17,467 Ukraine 4 16,056 Dominica - - Cambodia 1 11,000 Romania 2 9,900 Portugal 2 8,600 South Africa - - Egypt - - Philippines - - Jordan 2 3,800 Comoros - - French Polynesia - - Total 852 8,286,454

No

Container dwt

- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,329 63,208,624

No

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt

- - - - 2 90,000 3 17,588 - - - - 5 71,400 - - 2 6,000 2 24,730 4 24,700 - - - - - - - - - - 2 14,000 - - - - - - 2 8,500 - - 1 5,500 - - - - - - 2,588 167,411,087

- - 2 37,600 - - - - - - 1 53,350 - - 3 37,500 - - - - - - - - 2 14,600 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,602 137,226,567

7 4 - - - - - - 1 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 - - 1 1 296

89,731 49,350 - - - - - - 3,500 - - - - - - - - - - - - 6,000 - - 1,200 1,000 4,588,284

No

Totals

dwt

9 110,671 7 91,550 2 90,000 13 84,288 8 74,808 6 74,400 5 71,400 3 37,500 6 33,600 2 24,730 4 24,700 2 23,969 3 23,800 2 20,000 4 17,467 4 16,056 2 14,000 1 11,000 2 9,900 2 8,600 2 8,500 1 6,000 1 5,500 2 3,800 1 1,200 1 1,000 6,667 380,721,016

vessel types on–order BY COUNTRY OF owner Country of owner Dry Cargo No dwt Greece Japan Germany China Unknown Denmark Hong Kong Korea (South) Turkey Taiwan Singapore Norway Bermuda Panama Italy United Arab Emirates France United States Iran Russia United Kingdom

5 28 250 34 77 21 20 9 38 5 1 15 - 11 11 2 - 20 2 7 25

56 Solutions   July 2007

36,300 282,335 2,552,750 352,543 550,969 149,782 390,660 75,750 201,120 53,800 4,900 515,500 - 142,307 169,350 3,800 - 523,123 13,500 43,819 189,200

No

Container dwt

21 81 481 72 47 73 42 46 34 32 39 - 5 - 15 12 73 17 15 12 8

1,281,300 5,155,190 17,473,941 4,511,269 1,066,580 5,510,550 1,765,000 3,229,222 668,560 2,032,530 1,244,420 - 137,857 - 576,950 700,740 6,312,905 1,089,154 897,570 296,014 234,316

No 341 182 108 137 138 127 75 122 170 33 122 120 39 56 93 50 9 80 28 57 55

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt 24,268,854 12,191,845 3,582,836 10,165,647 5,733,888 6,652,644 6,288,559 5,788,309 6,817,493 5,693,380 6,986,357 5,541,630 5,533,480 4,506,549 4,630,240 5,507,533 188,800 4,060,620 5,503,990 5,219,108 2,128,304

257 228 107 100 198 71 81 39 47 29 28 36 44 62 45 9 2 12 2 11 23

25,059,983 23,913,066 7,805,003 9,951,000 15,103,367 3,209,909 6,378,256 3,947,800 4,445,400 4,126,244 1,738,614 3,154,674 3,938,860 4,763,220 2,972,300 636,800 107,000 893,000 152,000 701,645 2,341,287

36 40 7 9 18 10 17 27 5 3 3 42 - 9 11 1 2 2 - - 11

515,000 671,920 74,000 105,500 229,158 118,600 242,850 759,300 51,715 66,000 62,400 646,990 - 178,450 259,900 900 7,000 42,400 - - 99,550

No 660 559 953 352 478 302 235 243 294 102 193 213 88 138 175 74 86 131 47 87 122

Totals

dwt

51,161,437 42,214,356 31,488,530 25,085,959 22,683,962 15,641,485 15,065,325 13,800,381 12,184,288 11,971,954 10,036,691 9,858,794 9,610,197 9,590,526 8,608,740 6,849,773 6,615,705 6,608,297 6,567,060 6,260,586 4,992,657

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Country of owner Dry Cargo No dwt Cyprus 14 198,000 Liberia 1 13,794 Netherlands 142 1,059,140 Switzerland 8 102,400 Qatar - - India 5 17,862 Belgium 15 158,940 Canada 10 54,000 Saudi Arabia - - Marshall Islands - - Israel - - Malaysia 1 4,725 Brazil 1 10,900 Bahamas 2 9,415 Sweden - - Croatia - - Vietnam 27 128,895 Kuwait - - Poland - - Monaco - - Algeria - - South Africa - - Madeira 3 13,500 Latvia - - Portugal 1 13,000 Indonesia 2 16,000 Romania - - Ecuador - - Finland 1 4,600 Honduras - - Venezuela - - Nigeria - - Spain 9 39,400 Thailand 5 21,050 Bulgaria - - Malta 1 2,650 Seychelles - - Ireland 8 74,808 Ukraine 8 47,267 Chile - - Virgin Islands (British) - - Syria 2 20,000 Philippines 1 8,500 Isle of Man - - Argentina - - Uruguay - - Azores 1 8,600 Iceland 3 7,500 Canary Islands - - Estonia - - Egypt - - French Polynesia - - Total 852 8,286,454

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

No

Container dwt

55 1,195,281 2 101,400 42 505,060 38 3,448,900 4 50,400 2 115,580 14 462,735 6 275,600 - - 4 202,000 30 2,522,120 - - - - - - - - - - 3 69,000 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 4,180 - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 33,000 - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 39,300 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,329 63,208,624

No

Tanker Bulker Ro-Ro dwt No dwt No dwt

43 2,881,880 30 2,194,682 41 1,147,930 8 302,700 36 3,764,044 26 2,197,960 27 2,048,710 16 2,174,758 31 2,945,800 - - - - 30 1,441,600 11 1,585,870 13 1,240,355 41 1,227,160 7 601,500 9 569,200 11 932,810 - - 2 229,400 4 403,784 11 211,100 3 344,100 7 333,680 2 300,000 8 258,100 6 242,400 2 210,620 - - - - 4 168,000 2 166,600 5 81,104 - - - - 2 94,000 2 90,000 - - - - - - - - - - 1 5,500 - - 3 9,700 1 8,974 - - - - - - 1 7,000 - - - - 2,588 167,411,087

13 367,250 24 2,086,579 14 1,140,000 3 129,000 - - 20 1,391,000 7 686,200 18 606,600 - - 19 2,736,600 - - 1 177,000 - - 2 37,000 - - 7 469,600 6 194,500 - - 21 891,560 5 337,600 - - 1 177,300 - - - - - - - - - - - - 2 37,600 1 171,000 - - - - 1 10,600 2 106,700 3 105,150 - - - - - - - - - - 1 28,300 - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,602 137,226,567

- - 8 - - - 6 - - - - 7 - 1 2 - - - - 1 - 1 - - - 3 - - 9 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1 1 - - - - 1 - 1 1 296

- - 147,800 - - - 80,250 - - - - 16,033 - 150 24,700 - - - - 12,000 - 3,500 - - - 3,818 - - 140,600 - - - - - - - - - - - - - 1,200 12,300 - - - - 7,300 - 6,000 1,000 4,588,284

No

Totals

dwt

125 4,642,411 57 4,396,455 247 3,999,930 57 3,983,000 40 3,814,444 53 3,722,402 69 3,436,835 50 3,110,958 31 2,945,800 23 2,938,600 30 2,522,120 39 1,639,358 12 1,596,770 18 1,286,920 43 1,251,860 14 1,071,100 45 961,595 11 932,810 21 891,560 8 579,000 4 403,784 13 391,900 6 357,600 7 333,680 3 313,000 14 282,098 6 242,400 2 210,620 12 182,800 1 171,000 4 168,000 2 166,600 17 164,104 7 127,750 3 105,150 3 96,650 2 90,000 8 74,808 8 47,267 1 39,300 1 28,300 2 20,000 3 15,200 1 12,300 3 9,700 1 8,974 1 8,600 3 7,500 1 7,300 1 7,000 1 6,000 1 1,000 6,667 380,721,016

July 2007   Solutions 57


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

New ORDERs

All neworders reported since last issue by vessel type, shipyard and owner

BULKER Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Imabari Shipbuilding 696 Imabari Shipbuilding 697 Tsuji Heavy Industries Jiangsu Tsuji Heavy Industries Jiangsu Tsuji Heavy Industries Jiangsu Tsuji Heavy Industries Jiangsu Taizhou Maple Leaf Shbldg Taizhou Maple Leaf Shbldg Taizhou Maple Leaf Shbldg Tsuji Heavy Industries Jiangsu Dongze SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co Dongze Dongze Dongze Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Kouan SB Kouan SB Kouan SB Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding 58 Solutions   July 2007

Bulk Cement Carrier Bulk Cement Carrier Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker

Intership Navigation Co Ltd Intership Navigation Co Ltd Bolten A Bolten A Ya-Sa Shipping Industry Ya-Sa Shipping Industry Ya-Sa Shipping Industry Ya-Sa Shipping Industry STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd Ya-Sa Shipping Industry Trans Pacific Carriers Premuda Premuda Trans Pacific Carriers Trans Pacific Carriers Trans Pacific Carriers Sider Navi SpA Sider Navi SpA Sider Navi SpA Sider Navi SpA Premuda Sider Navi SpA Premuda Sider Navi SpA Apex Marine Ship Management Premuda Premuda Apex Marine Ship Management Apex Marine Ship Management Apex Marine Ship Management Metrostar Management Corp Metrostar Management Corp Metrostar Management Corp Metrostar Management Corp Metrostar Management Corp Apex Marine Ship Management Metrostar Management Corp Metrostar Management Corp Apex Marine Ship Management Metrostar Management Corp Conti Reederei Conti Reederei Ahrenkiel CF Ahrenkiel CF Ahrenkiel CF Conti Reederei

9000 9000 28250 28250 30000 30000 30000 30000 30000 30000 30000 30000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 35000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000

HP Contract Delivery date

MAN B&W MAN B&W 6S42MC MAN B&W 6S42MC MAN B&W 6S42MC MAN B&W 6S42MC MAN B&W 6S42MC MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 10K108ME-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S50MC-C MAN B&W 6S50MC-C MAN B&W 6S50MC-C MAN B&W 6S50MC-C MAN B&W 6S50MC-C MAN B&W 6S50MC-C

7106 7106 7106 7106 7106 9083 9083 80318 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955

0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0507

0809 0409 0109 0309 0411 1210 0611 0211 1209 0909 0609 0810 1209 0509 0909 0309 0609 0909 1209 0310 0609 0610 0110 0910 0510 0909 1209 0910 0109 0609 0610 0910 0309 0310 1209 0610 0909 0310 0910 0609 0909 1210 0610 0310 1109 0910 0510 0909

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Taizhou Sanfu Shipyard Kouan SB Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Taizhou Sanfu Shipyard Taizhou Sanfu Shipyard Kouan SB Hantong Ship Heavy Industry 016 Taizhou Sanfu Shipyard COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd Jinling Shipyard COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd Hantong Ship Heavy Industry Jinling Shipyard Hantong Ship Heavy Industry 019 Jinling Shipyard Jinling Shipyard COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2008 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2014 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2006 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2015 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd Cicek Shipyard 52 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2023 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2021 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd Cicek Shipyard 51 Cicek Shipyard 50 STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd D2017 Tsuneishi HI Cebu Inc Tsuneishi HI Cebu Inc SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker

Conti Reederei Ahrenkiel CF Conti Reederei Jinhui Shpg & Transportation Jinhui Shpg & Transportation Jinhui Shpg & Transportation Jinhui Shpg & Transportation Conti Reederei Conti Reederei Ahrenkiel CF Oltmann Verwaltung Conti Reederei COSCO FESCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO Schluter Karl FESCO Oltmann Verwaltung FESCO FESCO COSCO Trojan Maritime Inc Shipping Land Co Ltd Trojan Maritime Inc Trojan Maritime Inc Shipping Land Co Ltd Shipping Land Co Ltd Shipping Land Co Ltd Shipping Land Co Ltd Trojan Maritime Inc Shipping Land Co Ltd Bayraktar Gemi Union Marine Tradeline Tradeline Bayraktar Gemi Bayraktar Gemi Union Marine Jinhui Shpg & Transportation Jinhui Shpg & Transportation Lemos NS Lemos NS Lemos NS Lemos NS Lemos NS

57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57700 57700 57700 57700 57700 57700 57700 57700 57700 57700 58000 58000 58000 58000 58000 58000 58000 58500 58500 59000 59000 59000 59000 59000

MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W

6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C

HP Contract Delivery date 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 9915 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955 10955

0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0507 0607 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507

0911 0710 1209 0310 0610 0909 1209 0311 0711 0210 0609 0511 0709 0810 0109 0109 0209 0309 0409 0609 0809 0909 1009 1208 0310 0210 0909 0410 0610 0509 0310 1209 1209 1209 0610 0609 0410 0210 0310 0909 1209 0810 0610 1010 1009 0509 0110 0812 0312 0910 0911 1210 0611 0610

July 2007   Solutions 59


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co SPP Plant & Shipbuilding Co Oshima Shipbuilding 10669 Imabari Shipbuilding Imabari Shipbuilding Imabari Shipbuilding Imabari Shipbuilding Oshima Shipbuilding 10665 Oshima Shipbuilding 10666 Oshima Shipbuilding 10667 Oshima Shipbuilding 10668 Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Mindong Congmao Shipbuilding Penglai Zhongbai Jinlu Ind Penglai Zhongbai Jinlu Ind New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd Tsuneishi Corp Tsuneishi Corp Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1050 Qingdao Jimo Mastek Shbldg Qingdao Jimo Mastek Shbldg Qingdao Jimo Mastek Shbldg Qingdao Jimo Mastek Shbldg Jinling Shipyard Jinling Shipyard Jinling Shipyard Jinling Shipyard Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard 60 Solutions   July 2007

Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker

Lemos NS Lemos NS Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Eitzen Bulk Conti Reederei Conti Reederei Conti Reederei Conti Reederei Laskaridis Shipping Co Ltd Laskaridis Shipping Co Ltd Polish Steamship Co Polish Steamship Co Polish Steamship Co Polish Steamship Co Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd Teo Shipping Corp Teo Shipping Corp Teo Shipping Corp Teo Shipping Corp Teo Shipping Corp Teo Shipping Corp Rizzo Bottiglieri de Carlini Rizzo Bottiglieri de Carlini Rizzo Bottiglieri de Carlini Rizzo Bottiglieri de Carlini Songa AS Brave Maritime Corp Inc Brave Maritime Corp Inc Brave Maritime Corp Inc Brave Maritime Corp Inc Chios Navigation Hellas Ltd Laskaridis Shipping Co Ltd Laskaridis Shipping Co Ltd Chios Navigation Hellas Ltd Cafiservice SpA Cafiservice SpA Anemi Maritime Services SA Anemi Maritime Services SA Anangel Maritime Servs Inc Anangel Maritime Servs Inc Anangel Maritime Servs Inc Anangel Maritime Servs Inc Norden Norden Norden Norden

59000 59000 60000 60000 60000 60000 60000 60000 60000 60000 60000 75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 80000 80000 80000 80000 82300 82300 87000 87000 87000 87000 87000 87000 87000 87000 87000 87000 91800 92100 92100 92100 92100 92500 92500 92500 92500 93000 93000 93000 93000 114500 114500 114500 114500 115000 115000 115000 115000

MAN B&W MAN B&W Mitsubishi Mitsubishi Mitsubishi Mitsubishi Mitsubishi MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W

HP Contract Delivery date

6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 7UEC50LSII 7UEC50LSII 7UEC50LSII 7UEC50LSII 7UEC50LSII 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 7S50MC-C 7S50MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 6S50MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 5S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C

10955 10955 11688 11688 11688 11688 11688 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 12781 12781 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 13058 10955 13058 13058 13058 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670

0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507

0310 0311 0312 0112 0611 0911 1110 0611 0112 0312 0312 0809 0809 0909 1009 0310 0410 0510 0810 0210 1010 0612 0312 0311 1111 0911 0711 0511 0111 1210 0910 0310 0610 0210 1010 0910 0311 0111 0511 0810 1110 0211 0309 1208 0610 0310 1210 0611 1010 0311 0310 1209 0909 0609

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1056 Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1058 Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1051 Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1057 Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1059 Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng 1046 HHIC-Phil Inc 024 HHIC-Phil Inc 025 Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0001 Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0002 Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0003 Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0004 Sedef Gemi Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0005 Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0007 Hyundai Heavy Industries Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0008 Sedef Gemi Sedef Gemi Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Korea Shipyard Co Ltd - Mokpo 0006 Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd Hyundai Heavy Industries Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker

Seaarland Shipping Mgmt BV Seaarland Shipping Mgmt BV Seaarland Shipping Mgmt BV Seaarland Shipping Mgmt BV Kyla Shipping Co Kyla Shipping Co Kyla Shipping Co Tsakos Shipping & Trading SA Tsakos Shipping & Trading SA Songa AS Tsakos Shipping & Trading SA Korea Line Corp Tsakos Shipping & Trading SA Tropical Sea Adani Group Adani Group Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Adani Group Adani Group GEDEN LINES GEDEN LINES Golden Ocean Group Ltd Golden Ocean Group Ltd Centrofin Management Inc Centrofin Management Inc Centrofin Management Inc Centrofin Management Inc Golden Ocean Group Ltd Alpha Tankers & Freighters Lauritzen Bulkers GEDEN LINES GEDEN LINES GEDEN LINES GEDEN LINES Turkon Konteyner Tasimacilik Quintana Maritime Ltd Quintana Maritime Ltd Chang Myung Shipping Co Ltd Quintana Maritime Ltd Turkon Konteyner Tasimacilik Turkon Konteyner Tasimacilik Lauritzen Bulkers Quintana Maritime Ltd ZOSCO Zhejiang Sinotrans Shipping Ltd Dong-A Tanker Co Ltd ZOSCO Zhejiang Keoyang Shipping Co Ltd ZOSCO Zhejiang

115000 115000 115000 115000 170000 170000 170000 170500 170500 171000 171000 171000 171000 171000 173000 173000 174000 174000 174000 174000 174000 174000 175000 175000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 177000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000

MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W Sulzer Sulzer Sulzer Sulzer Sulzer Sulzer MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W

6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC 6S70MC 6RTA68T-B 6RTA68T-B 6RTA68T-B 6RTA68T-B 6RTA68T-B 6RTA68T-B 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C

HP Contract Delivery date 15670 15670 15670 15670 21564 19484 19484 21287 21287 21287 21287 21287 21287 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 19484 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564

0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507 0607 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607

1210 0910 0311 0611 0909 1009 1209 0310 0410 0610 0310 1210 0610 1109 1110 1210 0809 1210 0810 0410 0309 1209 1210 1210 0710 1010 1210 0910 0610 1211 1210 0611 0610 0310 1209 0909 1209 0210 0310 1209 0510 0710 1109 0810 0409 0809 0310 0610 0910 0311 0710 0610 1210 1110

July 2007   Solutions 61


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Imabari Shipbuilding 8058 Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind

Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Ore Carrier Ore Carrier Ore Carrier Ore Carrier

Chang Myung Shipping Co Ltd Dong-A Tanker Co Ltd Marmaras Navigation Ltd Marmaras Navigation Ltd Phoenix Energy Navigation Phoenix Energy Navigation Keoyang Shipping Co Ltd Sinotrans Shipping Ltd Korea Line Corp Korea Line Corp BW Gas ASA BW Gas ASA BW Gas ASA BW Gas ASA BW Gas ASA

180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 180000 181000 181000 206312 388000 388000 388000 388000

MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W

HP Contract Delivery date

6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C 6S70MC-C

21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564 21564

0607 0507 0607 0607 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507

0410 0809 0810 1210 0610 1209 0810 0611 0910 1210 0609 1212 0611 0612 1211

CONTAINER Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator TEU Engine Engine Make Design Hyundai Heavy Industries Dae Sun Shipbuilding & Eng Dae Sun Shipbuilding & Eng Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Nanjing Wujiazui Shipbuilding Guangzhou Wenchong Guangzhou Wenchong Guangzhou Wenchong Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Samsung Heavy Industries Co Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Hyundai Heavy Industries 62 Solutions   July 2007

1143 1144 1146 018 017 016 1145 2088

Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship

Oltmann D Nam Sung Shipping Co Ltd Nam Sung Shipping Co Ltd Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Ship Finance International Ltd Ship Finance International Ltd Ship Finance International Ltd Ship Finance International Ltd Ship Finance International Ltd Schulte T Schulte T Schulte T CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM Schulte T Thien & Heyenga Bereederungs Thien & Heyenga Bereederungs Thien & Heyenga Bereederungs Thien & Heyenga Bereederungs Orient Overseas Container Line Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt COSCO

962 962 1085 1085 1085 1085 1085 1085 1085 1085 1740 1740 1740 2504 2504 3600 3600 3600 3600 3600 3600 3600 4400 4400 4400 4400 4500 4600 4600 4600 4600 8208

HP Contract Delivery date

MAN B&W 10K98MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C MAN B&W 6S46MC-C Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 Sulzer 6RT-flex50 MAN B&W 7S60MC-C MAN B&W 7S60MC-C MAN B&W 7S60MC-C MAN B&W 6K80ME-C MAN B&W 6K80ME-C Wartsila 7RT-FLEX82C Wartsila 7RT-FLEX82C Wartsila 7RT-FLEX82C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 8K90MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 7K98MC-C MAN B&W 12K98MC

66102 9083 9083 11233 11233 11233 11233 11233 11233 11233 11233 18282 18282 18282 25031 25031 43018 43018 43018 46191 46191 46191 46191 42250 46191 46191 46191 46191 79324

0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507

0510 0310 0610 0610 0910 0310 1209 0909 0609 0309 1210 0310 0510 0710 0310 0510 0110 0310 0910 1209 1009 1009 0610 0310 0610 1009 1209 1209 0310 1209 0610 0909 1110

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator TEU Engine Engine Make Design Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Hudong Shipyard Hudong Shipyard Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc

2081 2082 2083 2084 2085 2086 2087 1787 1789 1790 1791 1792 1788

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

029 026 027 028

Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship

COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM Hansa Treuhand Hansa Treuhand Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Norddeutsche Reederei Schuldt Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG Hapag-Lloyd AG CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM CMA CGM Dohle P Dohle P Dohle P Dohle P Dohle P Dohle P Dohle P Dohle P NSC Schiffahrts mbH & Cie KG NSC Schiffahrts mbH & Cie KG NSC Schiffahrts mbH & Cie KG NSC Schiffahrts mbH & Cie KG

8208 8208 8208 8208 8208 8208 8208 8500 8500 8500 8500 8500 8500 8528 8528 8580 8580 8600 8600 8600 8600 8749 8749 8749 8749 8749 8749 8749 8749 12500 12500 12500 12500 12500 12500 12500 12562 12562 12562 12562 12562 12562 12562 12562 12800 12800 12800 12800

MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W

12K98MC 12K98MC 12K98MC 12K98MC 12K98MC 12K98MC 12K98MC 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98ME 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C 12K98MC-C

HP Contract Delivery date 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79324 79324 79185 79185 79185 79185 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79324 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185 79185

0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507

1109 1209 0210 0410 0810 0910 0910 0909 0110 0610 0710 0710 1109 1010 0411 0211 0411 0310 0610 0909 1209 0909 1209 1109 0210 0110 0110 1209 0310 0710 1210 0910 1210 0310 0510 1110 0910 1110 1210 1010 0710 0610 0111 0311 1210 0310 0610 0910

July 2007   Solutions 63


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

dry cargo Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Dalian Fishing Vessel Co 2006-1205 Dalian Fishing Vessel Co 2006-1204 Taizhou Sanfu Shipyard SF070102 Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co 2007-774 Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co 2007-773 Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding

General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship

Briese Schiffahrts GmbH & Co Briese Schiffahrts GmbH & Co Dannebrog Rederi Carisbrooke Shipping Ltd Carisbrooke Shipping Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd COSCO HK Shipping Co Ltd

6500 6500 12000 12600 12600 28000 28000 28000 28000 28000 28000 28000 28000

MaK MaK MaK MaK MaK

8M32C 8M32C 6M43 6M43C 6M43C

HP Contract Delivery date 4437 4437 6240 6933 6933

0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507

0909 0309 0709 0110 1209 1211 1210 1209 0811 0810 0809 0411 0410

miscellaneous Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Song Thu Co ASENAV 156 Penglai Bohai Shipbuilding Co 513005 Penglai Bohai Shipbuilding Co 513006 Penglai Bohai Shipbuilding Co 513007 Penglai Bohai Shipbuilding Co 513008 Song Thu Co Song Thu Co ASENAV 155 Song Thu Co Song Thu Co Montajes Cies SKL UNV UNV Schelde Shipbuilding 403 Ben Kien Sembawang Shipyard Pte Ltd Merwede Shipyard IHC Holland Merwede BV CO1252

64 Solutions   July 2007

Tug Tug Tug Tug Tug Tug Tug Tug Tug Tug Anti-Pollution Vessel Fisheries Protection Tug Tug Naval Vessel Hopper Suction Dr Crane/Derrick Barge Crane/Derrick Barge Hopper Suction Dr

Smit Harbour Towage Co Ultragas Remolcadores Ltda Bourbon Bourbon Bourbon Bourbon Smit Harbour Towage Co Smit Harbour Towage Co Ultragas Remolcadores Ltda Smit Harbour Towage Co Vietnam Govt Denmark Ministry Fishing Shetland Islands Council Shetland Islands Council Sweden Govt Kustbevakningen Boer Baggerbedrijf DYVI Seaway Heavy Lifting Van Oord

425 500 550 550 700 3000 5000 6000 53800

Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar Caterpillar MAN B&W 9L27/38 MAN B&W 9L27/38 Caterpillar 3516B MAN B&W 16V48/60B

HP Contract Delivery date 3500 3500 7072 7072 3695 36708 44376

0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607

1209 0708 0709 0709 1209 1209 1209 0709 0708 0709 1208 0908 0110 0310 0609 0808 1010 0510 0609

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


offshore Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Davie Shbldg Ltd Davie Shbldg Ltd Jurong Shipyard Pte Ltd Keppel FELS Ltd Labroy Shipbuilding & Eng MIS MIS COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd Damen Shipyards Galatz Damen Shipyards Galatz Yuexin Shipbuilding Yuexin Shipbuilding Aker Vung Tau Aker Vung Tau Aker Vung Tau Aker Vung Tau Aker Vung Tau Barreras, J Barreras, J Barreras, J Barreras, J Sekwang Heavy Industries Sekwang Heavy Industries Sekwang Heavy Industries Sekwang Heavy Industries Aker Yards Braila SA (66) Aker Yards Braila SA (68) Fjellstrand AS Solstrand AS Pan-United Marine Ltd Pan-United Marine Ltd Halsnoy Verft AS 123 Volkswerft Stralsund GmbH Bharati Shipyard Ltd Bharati Shipyard Ltd Aker Yards AS Aukra Aker Yards Tulcea Samsung Heavy Industries Co Havyard Leirvik AS Strategic Marine V Co Ltd Keppel FELS Ltd

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Offshore Maintenance Offshore Maintenance Platform jack-up Platform jack-up Pipe Laybarge Platform jack-up Platform jack-up Platform semi-sub Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Seismic Survey Vessel Seismic Survey Vessel Seismic Survey Vessel Seismic Survey Vessel Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Drillship Anchor Handling Offshore Support Vessel Offshore Support Vessel Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Platform semi-sub Diving Support Vessel Diving Support Vessel Platform semi-sub

Cecon AS Cecon AS Petroprod Limited PV Drilling Lewek Shipping Pte Ltd Orion International Orion International Red Flag AS Brodospas Brodospas Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Aker Capital Aker Capital Aker Capital Aker Capital Aker Capital Eastern Echo Eastern Echo Eastern Echo Eastern Echo Nordcapital Holding GmbH Nordcapital Holding GmbH Nordcapital Holding GmbH Nordcapital Holding GmbH ER Schiffahrt GmbH & Cie KG ER Schiffahrt GmbH & Cie KG Havborg Supply Service Havila Shipping ASA Lewek Shipping Pte Ltd Lewek Shipping Pte Ltd Fugro NV Maersk Supply Service Ferrostaal Ferrostaal Rem Maritime AS Rem Maritime AS Statoil Norge Havila Shipping ASA Coastline Maritime ENSCO International

1525 1525 3000 3000 3000 3000 3000 3000 3000 3179 3179 3179 3179 3600 3600 3600 3600 4000 4000 4000 4000 4229 4229 4400 4577 5000 5000 5500 5500 6000 6200 6600 8500

Wartsila Wartsila MaK MaK Wartsila Wartsila Wartsila Wartsila Bergen Bergen Bergen Bergen Bergen Bergen MaK Caterpillar

12M32C 12M32C 6L32 6L32 6L32 6L32 B32:40V12P B32:40V12P B32:40V12P B32:40V12P 9M32C 3516TA

HP Contract Delivery date 13866 13866 13864 13864 13864 13864 13866 13866 13866 13866 20800 8604

0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607

0809 1209 0610 1209 0609 0310 0909 1109 0909 0609 1208 0908 1011 1010 0610 0211 0212 1208 0309 0609 0909 0209 0409 0609 0809 0909 0310 1208 0609 1009 1209 1108 0910 0909 1209 0610 0310 0110 0210 1208 0910

July 2007   Solutions 65


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

passenger Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator GT Engine Engine Make Design FBMA Babcock Marine Colombo Dockyard Ltd Colombo Dockyard Ltd Fincantieri Fincantieri Meyer Werft GmbH

679

Multi-Hull Pgr/Vehicle Passenger/Vehicle Passenger/Vehicle Passenger/Vehicle Cruise Ship Cruise Ship

SAS Sudiles India Govt Lakshadweep India Govt Lakshadweep Grimaldi Group Holland America Line Celebrity Cruises

1000 3000 3000 40000 86000 122000

HP Contract Delivery date

Caterpillar MaK 12M43C MAN B&W 14V48/60B

73958 77660

0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507

0808 1209 0610 0609 1010 0911

reefer Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Kitanihon Shipbuilding Co Ltd Kitanihon Shipbuilding Co Ltd Kitanihon Shipbuilding Co Ltd Kitanihon Shipbuilding Co Ltd

Reefer Reefer Reefer Reefer

Seatrade Groningen BV Seatrade Groningen BV Seatrade Groningen BV Seatrade Groningen BV

18000 18000 18000 18000

HP Contract Delivery date

0607 0607 0607 0607

1211 0910 0612 0611

RO–RO Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Xiamen Shipbuilding Industry Xiamen Shipbuilding Industry Mitsubishi Heavy Ind Ltd Mitsubishi Heavy Ind Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine

Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier

Rickmers Reederei GmbH & Cie Rickmers Reederei GmbH & Cie Vroon BV Vroon BV COSCO COSCO COSCO COSCO Liberty Maritime Liberty Maritime

12000 12000 15000 15000 18500 18500 18500 18500 21200 21200

HP Contract Delivery date

MAN B&W 9S50MC-C MAN B&W 9S50MC-C Mitsubishi 7UEC52LSE Mitsubishi 7UEC52LSE MAN B&W 7S60MC MAN B&W 7S60MC

16433 16433 13752 13752 16502 16502

0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507

0710 0310 1209 0310 1208 0909 0609 0309 0910 0310

tanker Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Soli Shyd Soli Shyd Soli Shyd Soli Shyd Yamanishi Zosen Shitanoe Zosen Shitanoe Zosen Shitanoe Zosen Zhenjiang Sopo Shipyard Zhenjiang Sopo Shipyard Zhenjiang Sopo Shipyard Marmara Yard Marmara Yard DEARSAN 66 Solutions   July 2007

125 126 127 124 1067 7036 7037 SP0508 SP0509 SP0507 2061

Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker

Vaderotank Vaderotank Vaderotank Vaderotank Exmar NV Exmar NV Exmar NV Exmar NV Livanos Maritime Co Ltd Livanos Maritime Co Ltd Livanos Maritime Co Ltd Yilmar Denizcilik Yilmar Denizcilik Unknown Owner

1800 1800 1800 1800 3800 5100 5100 5100 5500 5500 5500 7000 7000 10300

HP Contract Delivery date

Makita LS35L Mitsubishi 6UEC37LA Mitsubishi 6UEC37LA Mitsubishi 6UEC37LA MAN B&W 6L32/44CR MAN B&W 6L32/44CR MAN B&W 9L32/40

1955 3605 3605 3605 4568 3883 4992

0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507

1008 0109 0409 0708 0509 0909 0309 0609 0609 1209 1208 0309 0609 0110

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder Hull No. Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Engine Engine Make Design Krasnoye Sormovo STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Hyundai Heavy Industries 2093 Hyundai Heavy Industries 2094 Dae Sun Shipbuilding & Eng Hyundai Heavy Industries 2099 Hyundai Heavy Industries 2107 Hyundai Heavy Industries 2092 Guangzhou Shipyard Intl Guangzhou Shipyard Intl Guangzhou Shipyard Intl Guangzhou Shipyard Intl Guangzhou Shipyard Intl Santierul Naval Constantza SA 585 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2188 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2164 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2185 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2186 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2187 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2163 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2180 Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd 2181 STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard Samsung Heavy Industries Co Samsung Heavy Industries Co Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine 5331

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Products Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Chemical Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker

Palmali Shipping Serv MPC Steamship GmbH STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd MPC Steamship GmbH MPC Steamship GmbH MPC Steamship GmbH MPC Steamship GmbH MPC Steamship GmbH Dong-A Tanker Co Ltd Dong-A Tanker Co Ltd Dong-A Tanker Co Ltd Dong-A Tanker Co Ltd Naftomar Shipping & Trading Co Naftomar Shipping & Trading Co Moundreas Shipping Prime Marine Management Inc Prime Marine Management Inc Prime Marine Management Inc Norden Norden Norden Norden Norden Motia St Shipping & Transport St Shipping & Transport St Shipping & Transport St Shipping & Transport St Shipping & Transport St Shipping & Transport Dunya Denizcilik ve Ticaret AS Dunya Denizcilik ve Ticaret AS Dunya Denizcilik ve Ticaret AS Dunya Denizcilik ve Ticaret AS Dunya Denizcilik ve Ticaret AS Ray Shipping Ray Shipping Formosa Plastics Marine Corp Formosa Plastics Marine Corp PERTAMINA PERTAMINA Finaval d’Amico Societa di Navigazione Liquimar Tankers Management TMT Co Ltd TMT Co Ltd

13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 13000 16700 16700 25000 35000 35000 35000 38500 38500 38500 38500 38500 40400 47000 47000 47000 47000 47000 47000 51000 51000 51000 51000 51000 52000 52000 74200 74200 85000 85000 114800 157700 167500 306000 317000

Wartsila MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W MAN B&W

9L20 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S35MC 6S46MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S50MC-C 6S46MC-C 6S46MC-C 6S46MC-C 6S46MC-C 6S46MC-C 6S50MC 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60MC-C 6S60ME-C 6S60ME-C 6S60MC-C 6S60ME-C 6S60MC-C 6S70ME-C 6S70MC-C 6S90MC-C

HP Contract Delivery date 3744 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 4853 9083 10955 10955 10955 9083 9083 9083 9083 9083 9915 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 15670 21564 21564 33907

0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607 0507 0507 0607 0607 0507 0507 0507 0507 0607

1108 0610 1209 0210 1209 0910 0909 0609 0310 1209 0909 0309 0609 0210 0510 0510 0210 0310 0909 1009 0209 0409 0609 0809 0410 0311 0211 0810 1110 0111 1210 0910 0610 0310 0110 0111 0610 0411 0909 1209 0710 0710 0910 1210 0310 0111 0411

July 2007   Solutions 67


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Pending contracts

All known pending contracts by shiptype arranged by ascending deadweight, gross tonnage or teu

Bulker Shipbuilder Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Bharati Shipyard Ltd Nantong Nikka Shipbuilding Tsuji Heavy Industries Jiangsu Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard Nantong Mingde Heavy Industry Shanhaiguan Shipyard Taizhou Maple Leaf Shbldg Weihai Shipyard Wuhu Shipyard Jinse Shipbuilding Co Ltd Pharung Shipyard Pharung Shipyard Fujian Guanhai Shipbuilding Wonyoung Shipbuilding Co Saiki Heavy Industries Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard Zhejiang Dongfang Shipbuilding Hantong Ship Heavy Industry Hantong Ship Heavy Industry SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial Hindustan Shipyard Ltd SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial Qingdao Beihai Shipyard ABG Shipyard Ltd Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corp IHI Marine United Inc Qingshan Shipyard Jinling Shipyard Kouan SB Kouan SB Zhejiang Jin Mao Yangzhou Guoyu Shipbuilding Co Zhejiang Zhenyu Shipbuilding Qingshan Shipyard Oshima Shipbuilding Oshima Shipbuilding Hudong Shipyard 68 Solutions   July 2007

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Bulk Cement Carrier Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Open Hatch Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Open Hatch Bulker Open Hatch Bulker

Intership Navigation Co Ltd Clipper Denmark ApS STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd Unknown Owner Canfornav Polish Steamship Co Canfornav STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd Canfornav Canfornav Songa Shipping Pte Ltd Messina I Premuda MST Sider Navi SpA Chowgule Steamships Ltd Tankerska Plovidba Unknown Owner Pancoast Trading SA Good Faith Shipping Co SA Oldendorff KE Ltd Iran Shipping Lines COSCO Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Goodearth Maritime Ltd Iran Shipping Lines Changjiang National Pacific First Shipping Pte Ltd K Line Singapore Pte Ltd Nissho Shipping Co Ltd-Tokyo Meadway Shipping & Trading Inc Enterprises Shipping & Trading Ahrenkiel CF VEGA-Reederei Friedrich Dauber Unknown Owner Sider Navi SpA STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd Hellenic Star Shipping Gearbulk Pool Ltd Gearbulk Pool Ltd Perseveranza

9000 20000 29000 29000 30000 30000 30000 30000 30000 30000 32000 34000 34000 34000 35000 37000 37500 37500 37500 51000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53000 53700 54000 55000 56000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 57000 71220 71220 74500

1209 0410 1208 0609 1209 0710 1209 0609 1208 0909 0310 1108 1209 0109 0111 1211 0608 1109 0409 0409 0408 1207 0610 1208 1208 1208 1208 1207 1207 1207 1207 0411 1207 0610 1209 1008 0608 0609 1009 1109 1009 1208 0609 0609 1209 0710 1210 0608

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder ISOICO Qingdao Jimo Mastek Shbldg Pipavav Shipyard Ltd Nantong Rongsheng Shipbuilding ISOICO ISOICO ISOICO ISOICO ISOICO Universal Shipbuilding Corp C& Heavy Industries Co Ltd Hudong Shipyard Jinling Shipyard Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Jinling Shipyard Penglai Zhongbai Jinlu Ind Qingdao Jimo Mastek Shbldg Daehan Shipbuilding Co Ltd Daehan Shipbuilding Co Ltd Daehan Shipbuilding Co Ltd Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind Qingdao Beihai Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard Shanghai & Chengxi Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard Shanghai Waigaoqiao Shipyard Daewoo Mangalia (DMHI) Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Koyo Dockyard Co Ltd STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd Universal Shipbuilding Corp

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Bulker Ore Carrier

Iran Shipping Lines Bocimar International NV Golden Ocean Group Ltd Golden Union Shipping Co SA Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Iran Shipping Lines Yangming Marine Transport Corp Target Marine SA Iolcos Hellenic Mtme Suisse-Atlantique Perseveranza Brave Maritime Corp Inc Transmed Shipping Ltd-Athens Capital Ship Management Corp Daehan Shipping Co Ltd Emirates Trading Agency LLC Golden Ocean Group Ltd Changjiang National Changjiang National Foremost Maritime Portline Transportes Maritimos Interorient Navigation Hamburg GEDEN LINES Seacrest Shipping HOSCO GEDEN LINES Dynacom Tankers Management Minerva Marine Inc Anangel Maritime Servs Inc Chios Navigation Hellas Ltd Japanese Interests STX Pan Ocean Co Ltd Neu Seeschiffahrt GmbH

75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 75000 80000 82000 87000 92500 92500 92500 93000 93000 170500 170500 170500 174000 175000 175000 175000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 176000 177000 180000 180000 180000 181000 300000

0409 0609 1209 0210 0708 0408 0109 0108 1008 0909 1209 0610 1209 0411 1209 0911 0111 0609 0808 0610 0610 0610 1210 0610 0610 1210 1109 1209 1209 1010 0910 1210 0910 0109 0610 0611

July 2007   Solutions 69


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Container Shipbuilder Madenci Gemi Sanayii Ltd Ananda Shipyard & Slipways Ltd Aker MTW Werft GmbH Namtrieu Shipyard Detlef Hegemann Rolandwerft Detlef Hegemann Rolandwerft Ada Shipyard Jinling Shipyard Jiangdong Changjiang Shipyard Bach Dang Shipyard Pipavav Shipyard Ltd Weihai Shipyard Sietas Schiffswerft, J J Peene-Werft GmbH Peene-Werft GmbH Peene-Werft GmbH Guangzhou Wenchong China Shipbuilding Corp Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Szczecinska Nowa Stocznia Guangzhou Wenchong Pipavav Shipyard Ltd HHIC-Phil Inc Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co China Shipbuilding Corp Samsung Heavy Industries Co Jiangsu Yangzijiang Shbldg Co Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Hyundai Heavy Industries China Shipbuilding Corp Samsung Heavy Industries Co Hyundai Heavy Industries HHIC-Phil Inc

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship Container Ship

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship Heavy Lift Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship General Cargo Ship

Unknown Owner Komrowski Befrachtungskontor Norilsk Nickel-Murmansk Unknown Owner K&K Schiffahrts GmbH & Co KG K&K Schiffahrts GmbH & Co KG Rohden Bereederung Bockstiegel Reederei GmbH & Co Unknown Owner Patjens Reederei Unknown Owner Marten O Reederei Dohle P Jungerhans Maritime Services EMES Denizcilik ve Nakliyat EMES Denizcilik ve Nakliyat Leonhardt & Blumberg Seatankers Management Co Ltd Wan Hai Lines Ltd Seaspan Ship Mgmt Ltd FESCO Ownership Emissionshaus GmbH Unknown Owner CMA CGM Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Schepers Rudolf-Haren Wan Hai Lines Ltd Danaos Shipping Co Ltd Seaspan International Tsakos Shipping & Trading SA Unknown Owner Yangming Marine Transport Corp Hanjin Shipping Co Ltd Zim Integrated Shpg Serv Ltd NSC Schiffahrts mbH & Cie KG

TEU Delivery 325 650 707 850 850 900 1118 1118 1250 1300 1304 1400 1440 1604 1604 1740 1790 2504 2504 2785 2800 3400 3600 4250 4250 4250 4250 4253 4500 4860 6500 6600 8063 12500 12800

0307 0610 0409 1208 0209 0409 1207 0608 1208 0909 0308 1009 1209 1009 0210 0610 0610 0610 0610 0510 0809 0710 0408 1010 0110 0610 0609 0311 1209 0309 0610 0610 0610 0510 0610 0311

Dry cargo Shipbuilder Giurgiu Mednaval SA Hong Ha Shbldg Co Bodewes Scheepswerven BV Chowgule Ben Kien Gdanska Stocznia Remontowa Zhoushan Dinghai Panshi Chongqing Dongfeng Ship Ind Co Saigon Shipyard 70 Solutions   July 2007

Nifra Holding BV Fehn Bereederungs GmbH & Co KG Amasus Shipping BV Held Union Transport Clipper Denmark ApS Meriaura Eight Ships Unknown Owner VINALINES

2100 2600 3500 4400 4450 4600 4600 4800 5000 6500

1207 1208 0409 0109 0109 1209 0807 1207 0608 1207

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder Jiangsu Eastern Shipyard Koninklijke Niestern Sander BV Yantai Raffles Shipyard Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Chongqing Dongfeng Ship Ind Co Larsen & Toubro Ltd Ha Long Shipyard Volharding Shipyards BV Ben Kien Viana do Castelo Taizhou Sanfu Shipyard Jiangdong Changjiang Shipyard Mokpo Shipbuilding & Eng Bach Dang Shipyard Shandong Huanghai Shipbuilding Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

General Cargo Ship Pacific Basin Shipping HK Ltd General Cargo Ship Wagenborg Shipping BV General Cargo Ship Hartmann Schiffahrts GmbH & Co General Cargo Ship Hartmann Schiffahrts GmbH & Co General Cargo Ship Unknown Owner Semi-Sub Heavy Lift Vessel RollDock BV General Cargo Ship Kanematsu General Cargo Ship JR Ship Management BV General Cargo Ship Flinter Groningen BV Heavy Lift Ship Jungerhans Maritime Services General Cargo Ship Dannebrog Rederi General Cargo Ship Unknown Owner General Cargo Ship Arklow Shipping Ltd General Cargo Ship Nippon Yusen Kaisha General Cargo Ship Braren R General Cargo Ship Star Shipping AS

6600 7350 7600 7660 8000 8250 8700 8700 9120 10000 12000 12850 14200 22500 28000 49000

1207 1208 0308 0709 1008 0109 0108 1207 0309 0309 1209 1208 0310 1208 1111 0410

miscellaneous Shipbuilder Unknown Medyilmaz Gemi Insa Jinhae Heavy Industrial Co Ltd ASL Shipyard - Singapore Zamakona, Astilleros Industria Naval del Pacifico Fosen Mek Verksteder AS Sembawang Shipyard Pte Ltd IHC Holland Merwede BV IHC Holland Merwede BV IZAR

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Tug Tug Fishing Vessel Tug Tug Fishing Vessel Research Vessel Crane/Derrick Barge Hopper Suction Dredger Hopper Suction Dredger Hopper Suction Dredger

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Platform semi-sub Platform semi-sub Platform semi-sub Offshore Maintenance Anchor Handling/Tug Platform semi-sub Platform semi-sub Platform semi-sub Crewboat Crewboat Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Supply Vessel Supply Vessel

Unknown Owner Lamnalco Ltd Omnium Marocaine URAG Unterweser Reederei GmbH SAR Remolcadores Unknown Owner Taubatkompaniet DYVI Boskalis Westminster NV Boskalis Westminster NV Jan de Nul NV

0 0 0 0 96 478 3000 5000 18440 65000 78000

0607 0708 1207 1209 0208 1207 1208 1210 0609 0310 0609

offshore Shipbuilder COSCO Zhoushan Shipyard Co Ltd Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Davie Shbldg Ltd Eastern Shipbuilding Group Keppel FELS Ltd Yantai Raffles Shipyard Aker Yards ASA Penguin Shipyard Intl Pte Ltd Breaux Brothers Jiangsu Zhenjiang Shipyard Labroy Shipbuilding & Eng Bharati Shipyard Ltd Thoma-Sea Boatbuilders Inc Zamakona, Astilleros www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Marine Accurate Well ASA Petroserv AS Seatankers Management Co Ltd Cecon AS Harvey Gulf GlobalSantaFe Corp OffRig Aker ASA Abu Dhabi National Oil Edison Chouest Offshore LLC Marine Logistics Solutions Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Aries Marine Transatlantic Rederi AB

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 350 500 1800 2000 2400 2651 2750

1209 0609 0311 0410 0608 0109 0310 1209 0608 1208 0908 0609 0109 1207 0610

July 2007   Solutions 71


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings Shipbuilder SMEB Cantieri Navali SpA Vulcano SA, Factorias Unknown Yuexin Shipbuilding Est Nav Alianca Ltda Batamec Damen Shipyards Galatz Solstrand AS Hanjin Heavy Inds & Const Sekwang Heavy Industries Unknown Fjellstrand AS Aker Yards AS Brevik Kleven Verft AS Kleven Verft AS Kleven Verft AS Kleven Verft AS Aker Yards Tulcea Halter Marine Inc Aker Yards Tulcea Metalships & Docks Aker Yards AS Soviknes SEVMASH - SMP Shipyard

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Supply Vessel Seismic Survey Vessel Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Diving Support Vessel Anchor Handling Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Anchor Handling Supply Vessel Supply Vessel Anchor Handling Offshore Maintenance Offshore Maintenance Platform semi-sub

Sartor Shipping AS Rieber Shipping AS Aker Capital Unknown Owner Brasileira Offshore Otto Marine Pte Ltd Vroon Offshore Services BV Trico Supply UK Ltd Gulmar Offshore Nordcapital Holding GmbH Unknown Owner Havborg Supply Service ER Schiffahrt GmbH & Cie KG Siem Offshore AS Siem Offshore AS Siem Offshore AS Siem Offshore AS GDV Shipping AS Unknown Owner DOF Management AS North Sea Shipping Aker Oilfield Services Ltd Moss Mosvold Platforms

2800 2800 3000 3000 3000 3200 3200 3250 3500 3600 3600 4000 4000 4250 4250 4250 4250 4400 4900 5500 10500 11000 14508

0908 0909 0612 0309 1208 1209 1208 0408 0610 1209 0909 1208 0910 1210 1110 0910 1010 0310 0908 1210 0311 0412 1207

passenger/ferry Shipbuilder Todd Pacific Barreras, J Nuovi Cantieri Apuania SpA Singapore Technologies Marine Mariotti SpA Mariotti SpA Fincantieri IZAR Aker MTW Werft GmbH Fincantieri Aker Yards SA Saint

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Passenger/Vehicle Ferry Passenger/Vehicle Ferry Passenger/Vehicle Ferry Passenger/Vehicle Ferry Cruise Ship Cruise Ship Cruise Ship Passenger/Vehicle Ferry Passenger/Vehicle Ferry Cruise Ship Cruise Ship

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected

Reefer

Washington State Ferries SNAV SpA Grandi Navi Veloci SuperFast Ferries Seabourn Cruise Line Ltd Seabourn Cruise Line Ltd Silversea Cruises Ltd Acciona Trasmediterranea Stena Line Scandinavia Holland America Line Norwegian Cruise Line

GT Delivery 8000 25000 26000 32000 32200 32200 36000 37000 62000 86000 150000

0108 0909 0108 0509 1210 0609 0410 1210 1211 1011 0311

reefer Shipbuilder Kitanihon Shipbuilding Co Ltd

72 Solutions   July 2007

Seatrade Groningen BV

18000

0313

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


RO–Ro Shipbuilder Bharati Shipyard Ltd Jinling Shipyard Yangfan Group Co Ltd Xiamen Shipbuilding Industry Flensburger Schiffbau GmbH STX China Shipbuilding Co Ltd DSME Weihai Shipyard Co Ltd

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Pallet Vessel Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier Ro-Ro Vehicle Carrier Vehicle Carrier

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Products Tanker Chemical Tanker Bunker Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Chemical Tanker LPG Carrier Chemical/Oil Tanker Asphalt Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical Tanker Products Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Products Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker

Nor Lines AS CSC Shenzhen Enterprise TB Marine-Hamburg GmbH Unknown Owner Rettig Group Ltd Bore Unknown Owner Fleischer

5000 7000 10000 12000 13375 21500 22500

0108 1009 0609 1009 1211 0610 1209

Tanker Shipbuilder Muetzelfeldtwerft Weihai Shipyard Fujian Southeast Shipyard Weihai Shipyard Zamakona, Astilleros Chuan Dong Shipyard Gdanska Stocznia Remontowa Qingdao Hyundai Shipbuilding Guangzhou Huangpu Shipbuilding Penglai Zhongbai Jinlu Ind Pharung Shipyard Pharung Shipyard Fujian Fu’an Shuangfu Shipping Chuan Dong Shipyard Linhai Hongsheng Shipyard Co Nokbong Shipbuilding Co Ltd Nokbong Shipbuilding Co Ltd Nokbong Shipbuilding Co Ltd Zelenodolskiy Shipbuilding Taizhou Wuzhou Shipbuilding STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Turkter - Tersane ve Deniz Turkter - Tersane ve Deniz Vyborg Shipyard JSC Vyborg Shipyard JSC Usuki Shipyard Co Ltd Higaki Zosen Alcock Ashdown (Gujarat) Ltd Jinse Shipbuilding Co Ltd KY Heavy Industries Co Ltd Sekwang Heavy Industries Volharding Shipyards BV Volharding Shipyards BV Volharding Shipyards BV Volharding Shipyards BV Qiuxin Shipyard Zhejiang Jingang Shipbuilding Liaoning Hongguan Shipbuilding Yangfan Group Co Ltd www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Glusing Transport China Marine Bunker Tianjin Aegean Bunkering Services Inc China National Petroleum Corp Suardiaz Flota SA Shanghai Beifang Wanbang Gasnor AS Aegean Bunkering Services Inc COSCO Wisby Tankers Fortune Marine Co Ltd Fortune Marine Co Ltd Global Energy Asia Hyundai Merchant Marine Co Ltd Nepline Sdn Bhd OK Shipping Co Ltd OK Shipping Co Ltd Woolim Shipping Co Ltd Intersee Schiffahrts Norgas Carriers AS Schulte B Finans Denizcilik Garanti Denizcilik Kazmortransflot Kazmortransflot Unknown Owner Global Marine Service Co Ltd Seatankers Management Co Ltd Eitzen Chemical AS OSI Hong Kong Ltd Primera Maritime Hellas Ltd Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Moller AP Laskaridis Shipping Co Ltd TB Marine-Hamburg GmbH TB Marine-Hamburg GmbH

1340 3000 3800 4500 4500 5500 5550 5600 5800 5800 6500 6500 6800 7000 7000 8000 8000 8000 8000 8200 9300 10500 10500 12360 12360 12500 12700 12800 13000 13000 13000 14000 14000 14000 14000 16400 16500 16500 16500

1207 0608 0508 1207 0608 0909 1209 1209 1208 1209 0308 0608 0108 0608 1208 0309 0909 1208 0308 1210 1208 0608 1208 0107 0108 0710 1008 1209 0309 0708 1208 0107 0107 1207 1207 0408 0610 0310 0609

July 2007   Solutions 73


www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings Shipbuilder Hyundai Heavy Industries Samho Shipbuilding Co Ltd KY Heavy Industries Co Ltd Trapani Yangzhou Dayang Shipbuilding Meyer Werft GmbH Amurskiy Shipbuilding Factory Sekwang Heavy Industries Turkter - Tersane ve Deniz Turkter - Tersane ve Deniz Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Jiangnan Shipyard Dae Sun Shipbuilding & Eng Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd SLS Shipbuilding Co Ltd Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard Guangzhou Shipyard Intl SEVMASH - SMP Shipyard Aker Philadelphia Shipyard Inc Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Admiralty Shipyards NASSCO Hyundai Heavy Industries Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corp Kawasaki Shipbuilding Corp STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Brodosplit Shipyard Ltd Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Sungdong Shipbuilding & Eng Nantong COSCO KHI Hyundai Mipo Dockyard Co Ltd Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Samsung Heavy Industries Co STX Shipbuilding Co Ltd Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Hyundai Heavy Industries Jinling Shipyard Zhoushan Jinhaiwan Shipyard HHIC-Phil Inc HHIC-Phil Inc Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Hyundai Heavy Industries Nantong Rongsheng Shipbuilding Nantong Rongsheng Shipbuilding Hyundai Heavy Industries Bohai Shipbuilding Heavy Ind New Times Shipbuilding Co Ltd Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd 74 Solutions   July 2007

For further information Email sales@lrfairplay.com Tel +44 1737 379700

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

LPG Carrier Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Products Tanker Chemical/Oil Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker LPG Carrier LPG Carrier LPG Carrier Products Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker LNG Carrier Products Tanker LNG Carrier LNG Carrier LNG Carrier Products Tanker LNG Carrier Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Products Tanker Products Tanker LNG Carrier Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker

Naftomar Shipping & Trading Co Remi Mtme Seatramp Tankers Augusta Due Srl Harpain Shipping GasChem Services GmbH & Co KG Hanseatic Lloyd Unknown Owner Finans Denizcilik Garanti Denizcilik Eletson Corp Schulte B Prime Marine Management Inc Unknown Owner Unknown Owner Cido Shipping HK Co Ltd Rigel Schiffahrts GmbH & Co KG Rigel Schiffahrts GmbH & Co KG Ionia Management SA Changhong International China Shipping Dev Co Tanker Odfjell ASA OSG Ship Management Inc Golden Energy Management SOVCOMFLOT USS Vessel Management LLC Transpetrol Maritime Services Shinwa Kaiun KK Zodiac Maritime Agencies Ltd Interorient Navigation Co Ltd Stena AB Golden Energy Management Byzantine Maritime Corp SONATRACH Gulf Energy Maritime GEM BP Shipping Ltd Elcano Naviera Hoegh Fleet Services AS Unknown Owner Bluesky LNG Corp FAL Shipping Nanjing Tanker Changhong International Kaptanoglu Shipmanagement Mehmet Kaptanoglu Denizcilik Jebsen KG Qatargas Gungen Denizcilik IMCSC Thenamaris Ships Management SOVCOMFLOT Teekay Shipping Canada Ltd Dynacom Tankers Management China Merchants Steam Nav

16700 17000 17000 18000 18000 18110 18500 20000 20000 20000 22800 23200 23400 25000 37000 37000 37300 37300 40000 40000 42000 45000 45760 47000 47400 49000 50700 56000 56000 62000 65125 73800 74000 74900 75000 76000 77000 81000 81000 90000 105000 110000 110000 114000 114000 116000 125000 153000 156000 156000 158000 159000 163000 295000

1210 1209 0310 0608 0908 1210 1209 1209 0608 1208 0310 0210 1209 1210 0710 0310 0409 0809 0610 0608 1209 1011 0611 1208 1208 1014 0509 0310 1110 0108 0610 1208 1209 0609 0310 0109 0510 0310 1010 1210 0910 1209 0608 0610 0610 0111 0610 1209 1210 0609 1210 1210 1209 1210

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings


Shipbuilder Jiangnan Shipyard Jiangnan Shipyard Universal Shipbuilding Corp Nantong COSCO KHI SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial SADRA-Iran Marine Industrial Dalian Shbldg Ind Group Co Ltd Nantong COSCO KHI Dung Quat Daewoo Shipbuilding & Marine Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Heavy Industries Hyundai Samho Heavy Industries

www.fairplay.co.uk/newbuildings

Status

Shiptype Owner/Operator DWT Delivery

Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected Projected

Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker Crude Oil Tanker

Nanjing Tanker Dynacom Tankers Management Formosa Plastics Marine Corp COSCO National Iranian Tanker Co National Iranian Tanker Co COSCO SONATRACH PETROVIETNAM Gulf Energy Maritime GEM Metrostar Management Corp Unknown Owner Unknown Owner

297000 297000 298300 298500 300000 300000 302000 315000 316000 317000 317000 317000 318000

1210 0610 0812 0309 1210 1210 0610 0609 0610 0610 0510 0311 0611

July 2007   Solutions 75


ECHOsounder Royal honours on offer

letters: The Editor, Solutions Magazine, Lombard House, 3 Princess Way, Redhill, Surrey RH1 1UP, UK email: solutions@fairplay.co.uk

Danish Blue

While looking for material for this issue’s coatings feature Buying individual honours is very much frowned upon, at last month’s Nor-Shipping, Solutions was lucky enough as UK political parties have found out recently, but to see a real expert carrying out the perfect paint job in front of a small crowd that seemed perfectly happy at the applications for ‘corporate knighthoods’ in the form of a Queen’s Award for Enterprise is being actively prospect of watching paint dry. encouraged for organisations in the British marine Some of the gathered onlookers were even heard to say sector. Companies can apply for an award in one or that they wouldn’t have turned down the opportunity of more of the three categories – innovation, sustainable making sure the surface had been properly prepared and development and international trade – and stand a good rubbed down beforehand. chance of success if their achievements are deemed truly The body-painted young ladies from Denmark’s Orskov outstanding for their sector. Yard have become a familiar sight at shipping exhibitions “Over the years, the marine and shipping sectors over the last few years, although Solutions wonders just have been well represented in The Queen’s Awards, but how many of their admirers know exactly what the attracI’m convinced there are many more worthy firms out tive pair are promoting as they wander among the stands. there who could be in line for an award,” says Stephen Brice, secretary to The Queen’s Awards Office. Winners benefit from extensive publicity, boosts to staff morale and use of the Queen’s Award Emblem for five years. And 70% of After being portrayed as one of the villains in the Erika affair, Italian classification last year’s winners society RINA seems to have completed its rehabilitation back into the ranks of said that winning the respected. a Queen’s Award Last month RINA achieved recognition as the second best-performing had brought their classification society for 2006 in the Paris Memorandum of Understanding on Winner of the draw for the LR-Fairplay i-Pod company added Port State Control. at Nor-Shipping last month was Nils Magne Løvrak, commercial value. RINA CEO Ugo Salerno said, “It is very gratifying to see RINA included by senior vice-president procurement at Kruse Smith in Any UK-based the Paris MoU in the top echelon of classification societies”. Salerno went Kristiansand, Norway. business with two on to say: “RINA’s last three years’ financial results have been the best in its When told of his good fortune by telephone or more full-time history. This is confirmation that quality pays off in economic terms, as well Nils’ response was a delighted “Oh my God”. employees can apply in other respects. Shipping is an increasingly tightly regulated industry, and it He thinks his children will probably try for a Queen’s Award. is incumbent on all participating parties to observe the very highest safety and and take it off him. The deadline for entries is environmentally sympathetic standards of operation. RINA has always placed these midnight on 31 October 2007. issues at the top of its agenda.”

Nicely done Nils

From bad to good

The armchair cruiser’s guide to the world Passengers on Fred Olsen cruises can now experience much of their voyage before even setting foot on their chosen ship. The company is the first cruise line to incorporate Google Earth into its website, allowing visitors to the site to view selected aspects of long voyages. Google Earth uses satellite imagery to map the globe three-dimensionally and provides a web search function, allowing users to search for businesses, areas of interest or directions to their desired location. 76

Solutions July 2007

The revolutionary facility allows website visitors to track the course of a cruise across the globe and to zoom in on ports of call for aerial views. By clicking on a port armchair cruisers can call up a detailed description with local information, history, climate, rainfall details and much more. Shona Michell, new media co-ordinator for Fred Olsen Cruise Lines, said: “We are delighted to be breaking new ground with the launch of our Google Earth facility. It is so easy to use and really delivers the

sense that you are experiencing the cruise in advance of actually leaving home. I am convinced that it will enhance our customers’ enjoyment of their cruise holidays and may well influence the decision to book in the first place.” Of course it could backfire, with passengers deciding that experiencing the delights of the cruise from the comfort of their own sofa without the risk of seasickness or travel tummy is preferable to the real thing – and a fair bit cheaper. www.solutionsmagazine.co.uk


Practical Guides for Marine Professionals � Superintendent’s Handbook � Docking Handbook � Pollution Prevention Handbook � Ship Repair and Maintenance Handbook � Safety and Environmental Handbook � Classification and Statutory Surveys Handbook � Port Security Handbook Our commitment to quality is reflected in our ISO 9001:2000 certification. Lloyd’s Register - Fairplay is ISO certified for the provision of publishing and information services to the shipping industry. HB/HS/2007

For further information contact: Lloyd’s Register - Fairplay Ltd, Lombard House, 3 Princess Way, Redhill, Surrey, RH1 1UP, United Kingdom Tel: +44 1737 379000 Fax: +44 1737 379001 Email: customer.services@lrfairplay.com Web: www.lrfairplay.com


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First Class tankers: a new perspective KING

SL

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RS E K AN ERIOU

Germanischer Lloyd Aktiengesellschaft Vorsetzen 35 · 20459 Hamburg , Germany Phone +49 40 36149-0 · Fax +49 40 36149-200 headoffice@gl-group.com · www.gl-group.com

Tankers are like a work of art – the more quality they offer, the more valuable they are. Welcome to GL, your First Class partner in improving the operational safety and profitability of your tankers!


SOLUTIONS MAGAZINE  

Monthly maritime technical magazine provides solutions to operational and magagement problems.

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