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Small Wind World Report 2012 Small Wind Market Statistics Worldwide Small Wind Industry Trend Analysis 20+ Country/Region Reports Special Reports on Policies, Standards, Certification & Testing 330+ WWEA Small Wind Manufacturer Catalogue Small Wind Market Forecast 2020

2012

Small Wind World Report Small Wind Market Statistics Worldwide Small Wind Industry Trend Analysis 20+ Country/Region Reports Special Reports on Policies, Standards, Certification & Testing 330+ WWEA Small Wind Manufacturer Catalogue Small Wind Market Forecast 2020

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From The Editor

W

elcome to the new WWEA Quarterly Bulletin! We are very proud that

capabilities. - The status of small wind in the world: For the

we can present the first edition

first time, WWEA has gathered global statistics on the

of this new magazine. Every year,

utilization of small wind turbines. Small wind represents a

four editions of the WWEA Quarterly Bulletin will be

completely different segment of the wind power market,

published, presenting the latest trends and important

facing already tremendous growth and until the year 2020,

updates of the situation of wind power all over the

a tenfold increase can be expected.

world. WWEA with its today more than 500 members

- Community power and local ownership models: Approaches to include local population in wind farm

in more than 100 countries represents one of the

projects can not only ensure a high degree of social

broadest renewable energy networks of the world.

acceptance. It can also make sure that a substantial

Through our members, we have direct access to first

proportion of the economic benefits resulting from a wind

hand information about wind energy utilization from

farm stay in the region where the project is located. The

all the major and also smaller wind power markets

WWEC2012 in Bonn (3-5 July 2012) will have a special focus

across the planet. We intend to make use of this vast

on such approaches.

information and make it better accessible for you, the

- The perspective of a new wind turbine manufacturer

readers of this bulletin. The WWEA Quarterly Bulletin

from a developing country: For WWEA, it has been a

will be distributed to all WWEA members, and also non-

special commitment since its foundation to foster new

members can subscribe to it.

markets, especially in the so-called developing countries.

This first edition of WWEA Quarterly Bulletin will presents some of the most interesting trends and key developments of wind power: - World market report: The overall size of the

In this context, we are very proud to present the winner of the World Wind Energy Award 2011, SWEG from Egypt. We hope that you will find the articles useful and interesting to read. Please feel invited to let us know

market for wind turbines set a new record in the year

your comments on this first issue, so that we can steadily

2011, reaching 239 Gigawatt, enough to cover 3 % of the

improve this quarterly publication.

world’s electricity demand.

Finally, I would like to thank all those who have

- Prospects of China’s and India’s wind market: The

contributed to this first edition of the WWEA Quarterly

two largest countries of the world represent also two of

Bulletin, especially all to my colleagues of the editorial

the most dynamic wind markets. The experience from

team, the authors and to the team of CWEA, namely Mr.

these two countries can inspire other countries how to

Yu Guiyong and Mr. Jiang Kunpeng.

develop national wind power strategies. Both countries also play a key role in the industrial development of wind power utilization, including manufacturing

Stefan Gsänger Secretary General of WWEA

1


Contents ISSUE 1 March 2012

Sponsored by World Wind Energy Association (WWEA) Produced by Chinese Wind Energy Association (CWEA) From the Editor

Editorial Committee Editor-in-Chief: Stefan Gsänger Associate Editor-in-Chief: Shi Pengfei

     Paul Gipe

     Jami Hossain

Editors: Frank Rehmet Yu Guiyong Visual Design: Jiang Kunpeng

Contact Frank Rehmet fr@wwindea.org Tel. +49-228-369 40-80 Fax +49-228-369 40-84 WWEA Head Office Charles-de-Gaulle-Str. 5 53113 Bonn, Germany A detailed supplier listing and other information can be found at www.wwindea.org

03  Welcome Address by WWEA President

News Analysis 04  No Evidence Found for "Wind Turbine Syndrome"

Global Market 06  World Market Recovers and Sets a New Record

Country Focus 08  2011 China Wind Power Development Status 18  Main Points of Wind Power Planning in     China for 2011-2015 20  The Situation of Wind Power in India 24  Community Power Update North America 2012

Small Wind 32  Small Wind World Report 36  World Summit for Small Wind 2012 Highlights Key     Markets and Technical Innovation

Yu Guiyong yugy@cwea.org.cn

Events

Tel. +86-10-5979 6665

38  Brief Report on 3rd International Wind Conference

Fax +86-10-6422 8215

    and Exhibition (WE 20 by 2020)

CWEA Secretariat

43  SWEG, the Winner of

28 N. 3rd Ring Road E., Beijing, P. R. China

   

A detailed supplier listing and other information can be found at www.cwea.org.cn

2

the World Wind Energy Award 2011


Welcome Address

I

t is with great pleasure that I express my

advancements, initiate new cooperative relations and discuss

welcome to the new platform of WWEA, the

policy mechanisms fit for wind energy industry. Personally I

Quarterly Bulletin, which come into reality

feel honored and obliged to be involved in the lofty work of

by the joint efforts of several continents.

WWEA.

The initiative for the Quarterly Bulletin came

The world is now facing the great challenges of energy

from WWEC 2011, at which some wise minds

shortage and climate change, and these challenges will

expressed their wishes to build a closer bond

remain in the foreseeable future. The fast environmental

between WWEA members as well as promote

deterioration and endless natural disasters have evidenced

WWEA’s mission in a more extensive way. We do

that human society has no way to follow the traditional route

hope this bulletin function as an important means of

of development, and has to renew concepts and accept

exchange of information and ideas in the world of

transformation. Only in this way can we hand over a better

wind energy.

world to our children with dignity. Fortunately, we have

For the past decade, WWEA has eye-witnessed

wind, the inexhaustible resource given by nature, and wind

and paralleled the development of wind energy

flies our visions high enough to see clearly a cleaner and

worldwide. Thanks to the excellent work of the

more prosperous future of the whole being on the planet. To

board, the secretariat and all members, especially

make this day happen as early as possible, what we need to

the former presidents Dr. Preben Maegaard and

do now is to break the boundaries and support each other

Dr. Anil Kane, today we are proud to say that

by multilateral cooperation during the long journey of wind

WWEA has made remarkable contributions to

energy development, and I do believe we will make it.

more than a hundred local wind markets and thousands of members by creating opportunities to exchange information on scientific and technical

Prof. He Dexin President of WWEA

3


News Analysis

ISSUE 1 March 2012

No Evidence Found for "Wind Turbine Syndrome" Best practice and community involvement maximize wind power benefits ◆World Wind Energy Association (WWEA)

T

he Massachusetts Department of Environmental Protection

and the Massachusetts

Department of Public

Health published recently

a scientific study on health impacts of wind

turbines. The study was undertaken by a

panel of independent experts “to identify any

documented or potential health impacts of

risks that may be associated with exposure to

wind turbines, and, specifically, to facilitate

discussion of wind turbines and public health

based on scientific findings”.

No scientific evidence could be found

that the so called “wind turbine syndrome”

exists. However, the authors suggests that

negative attitude against wind turbines should

be mitigated by best practices as successfully

implemented in many parts of the world. Such

best practices in wind farm planning should

include proper siting, provision of information

and community involvement, all of which can

minimize negative impacts and maximize

benefits from wind power.

Stefan Gsänger, WWEA Secretary

General: “In most countries using wind power

today, wind farms enjoy a very high degree

of public support and it is often rather the

local population that wants more wind power

and pushes politicians to support it as well.

Unfortunately there are some places where

misleading and wrong information is spread,

especially on health impacts of wind turbines. According to the Massachusetts health

study, people’s positive attitude towards wind

farms in their neighborhood mainly depends

on their level of information and involvement.

Previous scientific studies have demonstrated

that community-based wind farms lead to

significantly higher level of social acceptance.

Hence WWEA has identified community

involvement as a key for the success of wind

power and will organize the next World Wind

Energy Conference with the special theme The full report from Massachusetts can be found at: http://www.mass.gov/dep/energy/

wind/impactstudy.htm 4


News Analysis

ISSUE 1 March 2012

“Community Power - Citizens’ Power” in order to discuss appropriate business models.” Hon. Peter Rae AO, WWEA Special

Ambassador External Relations: “Surveys

worldwide show strong support for renewable

energy development and, in particular, for wind

power. In Australia a just published comprehensive multi state survey showed 80% public support for wind power. On the subject of health, the

Australian Clean Energy Council has pointed to a statement just issued by the Climate and Health Alliance, a coalition representing groups such

as the Royal Australasian College of Physicians and the Australian Psychological Society. This

statement also underlined that renewable energy such as wind power provides a safe alternative to

fossil fuels. A Parliamentary inquiry found no basis for a conclusion that adverse health impacts arise

from wind turbine operation. The support for wind farms is enhanced where communities can rely

upon the wind generators following the principles

of the ‘Guidelines for Sustainable Development of wind power’ which WWEA published more than six years ago."

5


Global Market

ISSUE 1 March 2012

World Market Recovers and Sets a New Record 42 GW of new capacity in 2012, worldwide total capacity at 239 GW Emerging markets are taking the lead, stagnation in several industrialized countries ◆World Wind Energy Association (WWEA)

T

he world market for wind

turbines set a new record in the year 2011 and reached a total size of 42 Gigawatt,

after 37,6 Gigawatt in 2010.

According to the preliminary data gathered by WWEA and published on the occasion of the

3rd WE20 by 2020 conference in Coimbatore/ India, the total capacity worldwide has come

close to 239 Gigawatt, enough to cover 3 % of the world's electricity demand.

Amongst the individual countries, China

kept its strong position and reached a similar market size like in the previous year 2010:

China installed around 18 GW of new wind

turbines within 2011, coming to a total capacity of 63 GW, more than one fourth of the global

wind capacity. The second largest market for

new wind turbines was again the USA with 6,8 GW, followed by India (2,7 GW), Germany (2

GW) and a surprisingly strong Canada with 1,3

GW of new installed capacity. Spain, France and Italy added each around 1 GW.

Many of the countries with high growth

For more information please contact:

World Wind Energy Association WWEA Head Office

Charles-de-Gaulle-Str. 5 53113 Bonn Germany 6

rates can also be found in Eastern and South

Eastern Europe: Greece increased its capacity

rom 1208 MW in 2010 to 1627 MW by end of 2011, Turkey from 1274 MW to 1799

MW, Poland from 1179 MW to 1616 MW,

Romania from 591 MW to 826 MW, and the

Ukraine almost doubled its wind capacity from

87 to 151 MW.

Also several Latin American countries

have shown encouraging growth, e.g. Mexico which also almost doubled its wind capacity from 521 MW to 929 MW.

A strong increase in wind power

utilization can be observed especially in the

emerging markets. This opens new windows for further growth, as these countries do

have an increasing need for electricity which can be matched by wind power in a very

economic, safe and timely way. On the other

hand, several of the major European markets showed stagnation or even decrease. The US

market presented itself stronger than in 2010, however, the mid-term prospects are not very bright, due to a lack of clarity regarding the

political support schemes. In Canada, especially Ontario with its Green Energy Act, adopted as a consequence of the WWEC2008, made sure

that the country now finds itself as number five in terms of new capacity.

WWEA President Dr. He Dexin: “Wind

power has become - as a low-cost, low-risk

and non-polluting energy option - a pillar of the energy supply in many countries. These countries have been able to create new

industries and hundreds of thousands of

jobs. Other countries should learn from this

experience and also set up the right policies.

Especially to enable the poorest countries also


Global Market

ISSUE 1 March 2012

to participate in and benefit from wind power

utilization, the world community should create

special financing tools and funds, such as the

Global Green Climate Fund and a global feed-in tariff programme, as suggested by WWEA and

the International Renewable Energy Alliance.”

WWEA Secretary General Stefan Gsänger:

“Although we can observe a recovery of the

overall market, the slow-down in some of

the industrialized countries, in conjunction

with uncertainties about future policies, is a

World Total Installed Capacity [MW] 300.000

250.000

200.000

150.000

100.000

50.000

matter of major concern. We call especially

0

for renewable energy and to continue its

In March 2012, WWEA will publish the

on the government of Spain to revise its

recent suspension of the support schemes

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

2006

2007

leadership role in wind power deployment.

World Wind Energy Report 2011, which will

policies should ensure and enable community

trends and installation figures from more than

Another crucial topic for the future success of

wind power is public support. To maximize this, involvement so that local communities benefit directly from wind farms in their vicinity.”

Country China * USA Germany Spain India * Italy * France United Kingdom Canada Portugal * Denmark Sweden Japan

2008

2009

2010

2011

include complete statistical information,

analyses of geographical and economic market

80 countries worldwide. It will be available for

download at www.wwindea.org.

Total Capacity Added Total Capacity Added Total Capacity end of 2011 Capacity 2011 end 2010 Capacity 2010 end 2009 [MW] [MW] [MW] [MW] [MW] 62.733 18.000 44.733 18.928 25.810 46.919 6.810 40.180 5.600 35.159 29.075 2.007 27.215 1.551 25.777 21.673 1.050 20.676 1.515 18.865 15.800 2.700 13.065 1.258 11.807 6.747 950 5.797 950 4.850 6.640 980 5.660 1.086 4.574 6.018 730 5.203 962 4.245 5.265 1.267 4.008 690 3.319 4.290 588 3.702 345 3.357 180 3.803 309 3.460 3.927 2.816 746 2.052 603 1.450 2.501 167 2.334 251 2.083

Rest of the World*

24.200

6.000

18.201

3.191

15.010

Total* *- Preliminary Data

238.604

42.175

196.629

37.642

159.766 © WWEA 2012

7


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

2011 China Wind Power Development Status â—†Chinese Wind Energy Association (CWEA)

8


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

·The report was completed by Chinese Wind Energy Association through investigation and statistics of China wind power market in 2011, from December, 2011 to March, 2012. To ensure the accuracy of the information contained in this report, the basic data and figures in this report are taken from wind power equipment manufacturers. Statistics have been verified by the equipment manufacturers, the local government agencies and the wind power developers. ·The “installed wind capacity”in this report refers to the wind farms which hoisting engineering completed, different to the capacity of grid -connected and during commissioning, as well as the capacity in commercial operation. ·Concerning data error: Although these statistics have been verified by the local DRCs and developers, due to different time periods and statistical specifications, this data is not identical to that of developers and related governmental departments.

9


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

In General

In 2011, 11,409 new wind turbines were

installed which equaled to 17.6 GW and made the total installed capacity to 62.4 GW, the annual growth rate is 39.4% .

Regional Status

In 2011, North China continued its leading

position in wind power growth and its total

wind power installed capacity achieved 20 GW, of which Inner Mongolia installed 17.6 GW, the

biggest wind powered province in China. Hebei installed 2.18 GW in 2011 that make its total wind power installed capacity close to 7 GW

and become the second biggest wind powered province. In addition, Shanxi also showed fast growth in the past year and had 933.6 MW

newly installation. Due to the grid integration

Newly

Â

Total Source: CWEA

Figure 1 2001-2011 China newly and total installed wind power capacity

All rights reserved. No part of this report may be reproduced and in any form or by any means without the prior written consent of the publishers. Any cites need to indicate the source of the statistics. No part of this report may be truncated and modificated against to the original intention. The information herein is taken from sources considered reliable, but its accuracy and authenticity cannot be guaranteed. The information in this report does not constitute the final operation recommendations regarding investment, legal, accounting and / or taxation. Chinese Wind Energy Association is not liable for any use of the information presented in this report.

10


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

barrier, wind power growth in the all northeren china areas had slowed down compared to the previous years.

Meanwhile, other areas in China installed

more wind power last year and the average growth rate in these areas surpassed 50%, especially in Southwest china like Yunnan

and Guizhou Provinces, the annual growth

rate achieved 129%. East China also had big

growth, in Shandong Province, 1.9 GW were

added in 2011 and the total capacity up to 4.6 GW, which made Shandong overtake Jilin to become the 3rd largest province with wind

power installation. The Central South China

area with low wind speed also made a success in transferring from one or two pilot projects to commercial large-scale development.

Source: CWEA

Â

Figure 2 2006-2011 China regional total installed wind power capacity

Acknowledgement List Yu Yi

Ma Xuemin

Ma Yingying

Wang Qing

Wang Meng

Wang Lei

Wang Zhongjiong Wang Yixuan

Lu Miaomiao Tian Heng

Tian Hongping Liu Li

Liu Si

Liu Ling

Liu Weihua

Liu Chundong Liu Haitao

Sun Honggang

Gong Dawei

Cheng Hongbing Yang Ming

Yan Chenmin

Yu Qinkui

Zhang Lei

Zhang Yunshui Lu Nake

Zhang Wenzhong Li Zhao

Du Baochun

Yang Cheng

Qiu Wei

Chen Hu

Chen Xi

Chen Lei

Chen Xi

Chen Wenjie

Chen Xiaoqian

Meng Fanling

Shang Luwei Zheng Beichao Zheng Chunliu Gong Jiahui

Shi Yongji

Zu Dan

Zhao Minghui Gao Hui

Lu Yin

Lu Yao

Ju Chunlin

Gao Feng

Dong Zhaowei

11


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Table 1 2011 provincial newly and total installed wind power capacity (MW) No. Province

12

2010 Total

2011 New

2011 Total

No. Province

2010 Total

2011 New

2011 Total

1

Inner Mongolia

13858.0

3736.4

17594.4

18

Henan

121.0

179.0

300.0

2

Hebei

4794.0

2175.5

6969.5

19

Anhui

148.5

148.5

297.0

3

Gansu

4944.0

465.2

5409.2

20

Hainan

256.7

-

256.7

21

Tianjin

102.5

141.0

243.5

22

Guizhou

42.0

153.1

195.1

23

Hunan

97.3

88.0

185.3

24

Beijing

152.5

2.5

155.0

25

Jiangxi

84.0

49.5

133.5

26

Hubei

69.8

30.7

100.4

27

Guangxi

2.5

76.5

79.0

28

Qinghai

11.0

56.5

67.5

29

Chongqing

46.8

-

46.8

30

Sichuan

0.0

16.0

16.0

31

Hong Kong

0.8

-

0.8

Sum

44733.3

17630.9

62364.2

4

Liaoning

4066.9

1182.5

5249.3

5

Shandong

2637.8

1924.5

4562.3

6

Jilin

2940.9

622.5

3563.4

7

Heilong

2370.1

1075.8

3445.8

8

Ningxia

1182.7

1703.5

2886.2

9

Xinjiang

1363.6

952.5

2316.1

10

Jiangsu

1595.3

372.3

1967.6

11

Shanxi

947.5

933.6

1881.1

12

Guangdong

888.8

413.6

1302.4

13

Fujian

833.7

192.0

1025.7

14

Yunnan

430.5

501.8

932.3

15

Shaan Xi

177.0

320.5

497.5

16

Zhejiang

298.2

69.0

367.2

17

Shanghai

269.4

48.6

318.0

32

Taiwan

519

45

564

Total

45252.3

17675.9

62928.2

Source: CWEA


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Size of Turbines

The average rated power of the new

turbines installed in 2011 was 1545.5 kW,

5.4% growth compared to 2010’s 1455.8 kW and the annual growth rate was 11% in the past 5 years. As late of the end of 2011, the

accumulative installed average rated power became 1358.9 kW.

Among the newly installed wind turbines,

1.5 MW was most installed type and 74%

of the newly installed wind turbines. 2 MW

wind turbines’ market share increased from

11.4% in 2010 to 14.7% in 2011. 2.5 MW and

above multi-MWs wind turbines’ market share achieve 3.5%, of which 24 units were 2.5 MW wind turbines, 123 units 3 MW turbines, one prototype of 3.6 MW, 5 MW and 6 MW was installed respectively.

kW Class, 2.4%

2100, 0.3% 2300, 0.3% 2500 and above, 3.5%

1000, 1.2%2000, 10.7% 1250, 1.3% 1650, 1.1% 1600, 0.3%

2000, 14.7%

2100, 0.2% 2300, 0.1% 2500 and above, 1.3% kW Class, 13.7% 1000, 0.9% 1200, 0.0% 1250, 2.2% 1300, 0.1%

1650, 1.1% 1600,1.1%

1500,74.1% Source: CWEA

1500,69.4% Newly

Source: CWEA

Total

Figure 3 Market share of different wind turbine size (kW) installed in 2011

Annual Average Turbine Size

Comulative Average Turbine Size

Source: CWEA

Figure 4 1989—2011 average wind turbine size installed

13


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Manufacturers

Goldwind installed 3600 MW in 2011 and

ranked No.1 with the market share of 20.4%, 0.7% increase compared to that of last year.

Those ranked No.2 to No.5 were Sinovel, United Power, Mingyang and Dongfang. The new

installations were 2939 MW, 2847 MW, 1177.5

MW and 946 MW respectively. The top 5 had taken 70% of the whole market, 5% growth;

however, top 10 market share had decreased from 87.3% to 83.2% in 2011. There are 15

manufacturers who installed more than 300

MW annually, while there was only Goldwind with more than 300 MW five years ago.

SANY, 179.5, 1.0%

Yinxing, 221.0, 1.3%

Xuji, 166.0, 0.9%

Envision, 348.0, 2.0% Gamesa, 361.6, 2.1% Windey, 375.0, 2.1%

HEAG,151.0, 0.9% Suzlon, 96.2, 0.5%

CSIC-Haizhuang, 396.0, 2.2%

Total, 259.4, 1.5%

GE, 408.5, 2.3%

Goldwind, 3600.0, 20.4%

CSR, 451.2, 2.6% Sinovel, 2939.0, 16.7%

CCWE, 625.5, 3.5%

Vestas, 661.9, 3.8%

SEWIND, 708.1, 4.0%

XEMC-Wind, 712.5, 4.0% Dongfang, 946.0, 5.4%

United Power, 2847.0, 16.1%

Mingyang, 1177.5, 6.7%

Table 2 Top 20 manufacturers by new installation in 2011 (MW) No.

14

Manufacturers

Capacity

Share

No.

Manufacturers

Capacity

Share

1

Goldwind

3600.0

20.4%

13

Windey

375.0

2.1%

2

Sinovel

2939.0

16.7%

14

Gamesa

361.6

2.1%

3

United Power

2847.0

16.1%

15

Envision

348.0

2.0%

4

Mingyang

1177.5

6.7%

16

Yinxing

221.0

1.3%

17

SANY

179.5

1.0%

18

Xuji

166.0

0.9%

5

Dongfang

946.0

5.4%

6

XEMC-Wind

712.5

4.0%

7

SEWIND

708.1

4.0%

8

Vestas

661.9

3.8%

19

HEAG

151.0

0.9%

9

CCWE

625.5

3.5%

20

Suzlon

96.2

0.5%

10

CSR

451.2

2.6%

Other

259.4

1.5%

11

GE

408.5

2.3%

Total

17630.9

100.0%

12

CSIC-Haizhuang

396.0

2.2%

Source: CWEA


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

With the fast growth of China wind power

installation, there are four Chinese wind

turbine manufacturers entered global top 10 in 2011 in terms of newly installed capacity,

namely Goldwind, Sinovel, United Power and

Mingyang. And Dongfang, XEMC and SEWIND are also among the top 15 in 2011. In the

meantime, Chinese manufacturers were also expanding international business. In 2011,

China has exported 220 MW wind turbines,

almost 15 times bigger than that of 2010, and

the leading enterprise Goldwind exported 124

wind turbines to the USA, Ecuador and Ethiopia which equaled to 189 MW.

Envision, 748.5, 1.2%

Nordex, 574.2, 0.9%

CSIC Haizhuang, 875.3, 1.4% Suzlon, 901.3, 1.4%

Yinxing, 473.0, 0.8% HEAG, 446.1, 0.7%

CSR, 916.5, 1.5%

China Energine, 355.2, 0.6%

Windey, 1098.0, 1.8% CCWE, 1308.0, 2.1%

Other, 2199.5, 3.5%

GE, 1575.5, 2.5%

Sinovel, 12977.0, 20.8%

SEWIND, 1781.5, 2.9% XEMC-Wind, 1801.5, 2.9%

Goldwind, 12678.9, 20.3%

Gamesa, 2785.9, 4.5%

Mingyang, 3123.0, 5.0%

Vestas, 3565.5, 5.7% Dongfang,6898.0,11.1%

United Power, 5282.0, 8.5%

Table 3 Top 20 manufacturers by total installation in 2011 (MW) No. 1

Manufacturers Capacity Sinovel

12977.0

Share

No.

Manufacturers Capacity

Share

20.8%

12

Windey

1098.0

1.8%

13

CSR

916.5

1.5%

14

Suzlon

901.3

1.4%

15

CSIC Haizhuang

875.3

1.4%

16

Envision

748.5

1.2%

17

Nordex

574.2

0.9%

18

Yinxing

473.0

0.8%

19

HEAG

446.1

0.7%

20

China Energine

355.2

0.6%

Other

2199.5

3.5%

Total

62364.2

100.0%

2

Goldwind

12678.9

20.3%

3

Dongfang

6898.0

11.1%

4

United Power

5282.0

8.5%

5

Vestas

3565.5

5.7%

6

Mingyang

3123.0

5.0%

7

Gamesa

2785.9

4.5%

8

XEMC-Wind

1801.5

2.9%

9

SEWIND

1781.5

2.9%

10

GE

1575.5

2.5%

11

CCWE

1308.0

2.1%

Source: CWEA 15


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Guodian Group, 3860.5, 21.9%

Other, 15073.4, 24.2%

Other, 4202.9, 23.9%

Suntien, 343.6, 1.9%

Suntien Green Power, 1278.6, 2.1%

Jingneng, 372.0, 2.1%

Datang Group,

CGN Wind, 527.0, 3.0%

Jingneng, 1686.3, 2.7%

Huaneng Group, 8578.0, 13.8%

2235.1,12.7% China Resource Powe, 1773.4, 2.8%

China Resource Power, 796.1, 4.5%

CGN Wind, 2891.5, 4.6%

China Power Investment Group, 866.3, 4.9% Huaneng Group,

Guohua Group, 1094.5 , 6.2%

2229.0,12.6%

Huadian Group, 1104.0, 6.3%

Developers

China Power Investment Group, 2944.9, 4.7% Guohua Group, 3440.1, 5.5%

Datang Group, 8007.1, 12.8%

Huadian Group, 3829.9, 6.1%

Table 4 Top 10 China wind developers by new installation in 2011 (MW) No.

Guodian Group, 12861.3, 20.6%

Capacity

Share

Table 5 Top 10 China wind developers by total installation in 2011 (MW) No. Developers

Capacity

Share

1

Guodian Group

3860.5

21.9%

1

Guodian Group

12861.3

20.6%

2

Datang Group

2235.1

12.7%

2

Huaneng Group

8578.0

13.8%

3

Huaneng Group

2229.0

12.6%

3

Datang Group

8007.1

12.8%

4

Huadian Group

1104.0

6.3%

4

Huadian Group

3829.9

6.1%

5

Guohua Group

1094.5

6.2%

5

Guohua Group

3440.1

5.5%

6

China Power Investment Group

866.3

4.9%

6

China Power Investment Group

2944.9

4.7%

7

China Resource Power

796.1

4.5%

7

CGN Wind

2891.5

4.6%

8

CGN Wind

527.0

3.0%

8

China Resource Power

1773.4

2.8%

9

Jingneng

372.0

2.1%

9

Jingneng

1686.3

2.7%

10

Suntien Green Power

343.6

1.9%

10

Suntien Green Power

1278.6

2.1%

Other

4202.9

23.9%

Other

15073.4

24.2%

Total

17630.9

100.0%

Total

62364.2

100.0%

Source: CWEA

Source: CWEA

End 16


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

《风能》杂志电子版请在

http://www.cwea.org.cn 下载

地址:北京市北三环东路 28 号易亨大厦 11 层 邮编:100013 电话:010-59796665-3953(编辑部) 010-64405232-3501(广告部) 传真:010-64228215 投稿邮箱:gaojian@cwea.org.cn

17


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

MAIN POINTS OF WIND POWER PLANNING IN CHINA FOR 2011-2015 ◆Shi Pengfei , CWEA

T

he Chinese

while the product quality still needs to

should be established, and it should

12th Five-Year

wind industry is expected to get into

power grid and a safe operation of the

government has formulated the

Plan (2011-2015)

of national economy development, in which wind power is one of

the industry developments to be

encouraged. During the 11th Five-

Year Plan (2005-2010) wind power

in China experienced a high growth,

the installed capacity increased from 1.3GW in 2005 to 44.7GW in 2010,

eventually eight times more than the original planning target of 5GW. The

electricity generated by wind in 2010 reached 50TWh, equivalent to 16

million tons of standard coal. This is a great achievement, however, new

be improved.

In the next five years, the Chinese

the large-scale development of a stable

and healthy stage,making an important contribution to the requirement of the Chinese government: The proportion of non fossil energy in the national primary energy consumption will reach 11.4% .

The main points of the wind

power development plan are as follows:

Considerations of the Development ·The wind power industry should

problems emerged: The installed wind

become well integrated and develop in

transmission and consumption of wind

of wind power in China.

capacity in commercial operation was 30GW, and power grid connection,

generated electricity have become the

a well-coordinated way, continuing to promote the large-scale development ·A complete wind power

new constraints.

equipment manufacturing chain

wind power equipment manufacturing

industry should be improved.

Driven by the rapidly growing

and huge wind farm market, the local industry was established. MW-class

should be established, and the

competitiveness of the complete wind ·The construction of power

wind turbine become mainstream, to

transmission lines for wind power

wind turbines dropped significantly,

suitable for wind power development

meet the needs of the domestic wind farm construction, and the price of 18

bases should be accelerated, and

power grid and operation systems

be made sure that the electricity

generated by wind can be fed into

grid can be guaranteed at the same time.

General development targets, to

be achieved by end of the year 2015: ·Eight 10GW scale wind power

bases will be formed.

·The cumulative wind power

installed capacity will reach 100GW. ·Wind generated electricity

will reach 190TWh, equivalent to 60 million tons of standard coal.

Planning principles

·Integrated and coordinated

comprehensive planning approaches should be developed: As the

fundamental basis for the development of wind power, it should include construction layout, technical

equipment, industrial system, etc. ·The national plan contains

regional distribution and guiding the local development. The provincial planning should be the specific

implementation plan of the national plan.

·The focus should be on the

coordination of wind projects and


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

power grid development planning.

of demonstration projects will

approval and construction. All planned

lead to the implementation of resource

·The national plan has the

regulatory capacity for project

wind power projects should be

included according to their annual and regional distribution. The projects not included in the planning and in the

annual development program would

not eligible to obtain the national price and financial support schemes.

Planning layout and focus of construction areas ·Speed up the construction of the

10GW scale wind power bases which

are located in Xinjiang, Gansu, west of

Inner Mongolia, east of Inner Mongolia, Jilin, Hebei, Shandong and Jiangsu

province and region. The cumulative

installed capacity of such centralized

wind projects should reach 70 GW by 2015.

·Actively promote the dispersed

inland wind energy utilization.

According to local conditions, the

construction of small and mediumsized wind power projects in the

following areas are to be encouraged: hills, valleys and lakes area in Henan,

Anhui, Jiangxi, Hunan, Hubei, Yunnan and Guizhou provinces, where wind energy resources are relatively rich and close to the electricity

consumption centers, and where the

wind turbines can easily be connected to the local power grid, . The

cumulative installed capacity of such decentralized wind projects should reach 30 GW by 2015.

·Accelerate the offshore wind

power development. The construction

drive the progress of offshore wind

technology and equipment and will assessment, of a marine hydro-

geological survey, and to preparatory work for the construction of offshore

wind farms. Amongst the 2015 target

of 100GW, offshore wind power will be 5GW.

Measures to realize the plan ·Establishment of a system

to appraise the renewable energy development targets.

- Renewable energy development

has to be included in the economic

and social development planning of all local governments.

- Large-scale energy production

and consumption enterprises have to take into account the social

implications and ensure social

responsibility of renewable energy development.

- The National Energy

Administration will be in charge of the establishment of the responsibility

assessment and information disclosure system.

·Implementation of a renewable

energy electricity mandatory market share system.

- For power grid enterprises,

a certain quantity of electricity

generated by non-hydro renewable

energy has to be purchased annually. - For large-scale power

generation companies, the proportion

of the investment in renewable energy power generation projects has to be identified.

- For provincial governments,

a certain quantity of electricity

generated by renewable energy has to be identified annually.

- A quota assessment and trading

system for electricity generated by

renewable energy will be developed. ·Improve renewable energy

pricing and taxation policies

- A price formation mechanism

for those energies will be established which reflects the external costs of the scarcity of resources and their damage to the environment, and

which also fully reflects the social and environmental value of renewable energy.

- In accordance with the principle

of renewable energy development

and economic rationality, the pricing mechanism for renewable energy products will be improved.

- The standard of subsidies to grid

enterprises, to compensate additional costs due to renewable energy power

grid connection and operation, will be determined in a reasonable way.

·Improve the renewable energy

industry system

- Establishment of a national

renewable energy center as well as national renewable energy R & D

institutions and supporting enterprises to establish a center of innovation. - Perfecting the systems of

standards, testing and certification of renewable energy products and

equipment, as well as of the related

qualification management system and quality evaluation system.

- Implementation of wind power

and solar power forecasting systems to improve power grid dispatching.

19


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

THE SITUATION OF WIND POWER IN INDIA â—†Anil Kane & Anagha Bhambri,India

Wind Energy Scenario Wind power has been the poster child

of India’s renewable energy programme. Data

released by the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy shows that between 1990 and 2011

about 13,000 MW wind power capacity was

added in India, propelling it to fifth position

among the wind power producing countries.

The Ministry of New and Renewable Energy has set a target of adding 15,000 MW of new wind

power capacity during the 12th Five-Year Plan (2012-17).

The potential States for development

20

of wind power include Tamil Nadu, Gujarat,

Rajasthan, Maharashtra, Madhya Pradesh and Kerala. Besides this, wind assessment is also underway in Uttarakhand; the State recently got its first wind power plant installed.

Indian Wind Energy Association has

estimated the Indian Wind Energy potential far more than 100 Gigawatt, recent studies see it even at 2000 to 3000 Gigawatt.

Offshore: Apart from this, the offshore

wind power potential has not yet been

measured. The sites that qualify for prospective offshore wind farming are the Gulf of Mannar


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Table 1 Details of Cumulative Grid-Interactive Renewable Power Installed Capacity (in MW) as on 31.1.2012 (Source: MNRE)

Renewable Energy Programme / Systems

Target for 2011-12

Achievement during the

Total achievement during

Cumulative achievement up

month of Jan. 2012

2011-12

to 31.01.2012 (in MW)

GRID-INTERACTIVE POWER (CAPACITIES IN MW) Wind Power

2400

101.00

2023.00

16,179.00

Small Hydro Power

350

48.00

as257.50

3300.13

25.00

145.50

1142.60

20.00

285.00

1952.53

1.20

1.20

20.20

Biomass Power Bagasse Cogeneration

460

Waste to Power -Urban

25

-

-

53.46

Solar Power (SPV)

200

291.60

445.55

481.48

Total

3435

485.60

3157.75

23129.40

-Industrial

in southern tip and coastal areas of Gujarat. In

identification of new sites for development and

Gujarat.

India.

a recent development, Suzlon has firmed up

plans to set up an offshore wind power plant in Technology-wise: Over the years, India

has experienced a gradual shift to bigger wind

turbines as a result of improved infrastructure and better economics. The average size of a

wind turbine has increased from 0.77 MW in 2004 to 1.12 MW in 2009 and the MW-class turbines now comprise over half of the new

wind power capacity installed in the country. This development is also leading many wind farm owners to consider re-powering of old

wind power plants as an option to maximize utilization of available resource potential on

land. Since most of the Class I sites have been explored, developers are left with putting

up wind farms in Class II and Class III sites. Designing a wind project on such sites

and achieving higher generation remains a

challenge. Besides, acquisition of private land, obtaining forest clearances, development of infrastructure on complex terrains,

implementation of evacuation infrastructure,

scheduling and forecasting generations are

some of the challenges faced by this sector in

Manufacturing segment: The favourable

policy framework coupled with low manpower cost, raw material availability, and vast market

potential resulted in significant growth of wind turbine manufacturing in the country. The

presence of a number of WTG manufacturers,

ranging from international WTG manufacturers like Vestas and Enercon, GE, Goldwind, Sinovel etc. and emergence of domestic wind turbine manufacturers such as Suzlon and Bharat

Heavy Electricals Ltd helped accelerate growth of the wind sector. The country presently has a

manufacturing capacity of 10,000 MW between 18 manufacturers. However, most of the

critical components such as control systems,

generators and gearboxes are still imported by a majority of manufacturers.

Policy Framework: So far only 16,179

MW has been installed in the country. The main contribution in this has come from

private sector players. The growth in the

21


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

wind energy sector has been possible due

re-launched in December 2009 by the

Some of the recently launched incentives by the

0.50 per unit, with a cap of approximately

to continuous Union and State government

support, preferential feed-in tariff and tax sops. Government of India such as the Generation-

Based Incentive, Renewable Energy Certificates and new guidelines for setting preferential

tariffs are attracting investment from global and local independent power producers. To

simplify its existing tax regime, the government

has introduced the Goods and Service Tax (GST) and the Direct Tax Code (DTC) Bill 2010. Both the DTC Bill and GST will become applicable from April 2012.

The support schemes for wind energy provided for at the Central government and State level are mentioned below: 1. Central Government Generation-based Incentive (GBI) –

Initially implemented in June 2008 and then 22

Union government for grid-connected wind

power projects, GBI provides a benefit of INR $33,000 per MW a year, totalling $1,38,000

per MW over 10 years of a project’s life. The scheme, being implemented through IREDA ( Indian Renewable Energy Development

Agency), is over and above the tariff approved by respective SERC and will be disbursed on a half-yearly basis.

Renewable Energy Certificates (RECs) – The trading of Renewable Energy Certificates

(RECs), one of the key growth drivers for the renewable energy industry, started in India

in March 2011. The RECs were introduced to enable all States to buy a certain proportion

of their total power purchase from renewable resources.

While the Central Electricity Regulatory Commission has stipulated floor and

forbearance price for non-solar RECs and solar RECs, respectively, the real price of an REC


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

is determined at the power exchanges. To be

consumer other than the

licensee at average power procurement cost.

from the wind project is

eligible for trading RECs, a RE generator must

sell its power to the host distribution utility or

2. State Governments Electricity tax exemption

Enabling utilities to a) Purchase wind

power; b) Power wheeling and banking facilities

Wind Energy Legislation

The Electricity Act, 2003 was instrumental

in the development of renewable energy.

It repealed all the earlier electricity acts of

1910, 1948 and 1998 and further defined the role of regulatory commissions in terms of

pricing, competition and transparency. The

Act provides for several enabling provisions

to promote power generation from renewable energy sources such as:

Section 61 (h) – It provides for the

framework for tariff determination and lays out directions for the formulation of the National Tariff Policy.

Section 86 (1)(e) – It mandates SERCs

to specify a percentage of RE power to be

procured for consumption, and provide suitable measures for grid connectivity.

National Electricity Policy 2005

Some of the provisions which are used to

promote power generation from Renewable energy sources are:

Open Access: As per the Electricity Act

2003, anybody can have an “open access” to grid for exchange of power with payment of necessary charge for use of the grid

infrastructure. In the case of wind power, the power can be wheeled for own consumption and sold to another consumer.

Banking: Since power generation from

wind energy is variable, there is mismatch

in generation and consumption if the power is used for self consumption or sold to any

utility. In such a scenario, the energy generated

“banked” with the utility and used whenever the consumption is more than the generation. Mechanisms for

treatment of such

banked energy differ in every State, with the banking period

extending from 1 month to 1 year. At the end of

the banking period the

full or part of the surplus energy is considered as sale to the utility.

Indian Electricity

Grid Code

The Union Government adopted the

Indian Electricity Grid Code (IEGC) in May 2010 to provide for detailed guidelines on the role of various players involved in the operation

of a power system. For the promotion of wind power, IEGC 2010 has made forecasting and

scheduling of wind and solar power generation mandatory with effect from January 2012.

In addition to this, IEGC 2010 incorporates

special provision for managing generation from variable sources like wind and solar power while ensuring grid security. Small Wind Turbines

The government of India also has a Small

Wind Energy and Hybrid Systems Programme in place since 1994. The programme

implementation was extended in April 2010 to

the financial year 2011-12. The government set a target of installing 500 kW aero-generated/ wind-solar hybrid systems and 25 water

pumping windmills with estimated budget of INR 50 million over 2010-12.

23


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Community Power Update North America 2012 ◆Paul Gipe1 for WWEA

Community power can refer to projects of any size. Though often small, they can be quite large.

C

ommunity wind energy as

found in continental Europe represents an extremely

small niche market in North

America, despite more than a

decade of effort by proponents in Canada and the USA.

Community wind represents less than 2%

of the nearly 47,000 MW of wind in the USA,

and an even smaller percentage of the slightly more than 5,000 MW of wind in Canada. If we define community solar

large central-station power plants developed and owned by remote corporate entities, traditional electric utilities or their subsidiaries.

In contrast, community power projects

projects often connected at distribution

voltages and owned in part or predominantly

surrounding area where the project is located.

It is important to note that while community

power projects in North America are typically

has decreased dramatically in Canada.

ghetto”. As seen in Europe, community power can

2006 the percentage of locally owned solar PV

Encouragingly, there are several thousand

megawatts of community-owned renewables at various stages of development in North America.

This analysis considers only wind and

solar PV. There is very little biogas generation in either Canada or the USA.

24

To most, community power projects are not

Tariff Program, most if not all of Canada’s solar PV was community-owned. However, since

pgipe@igc.org.

what it is.

by people living in the community or the

Until Ontario, Canada, launched its Feed-in

USA, www.wind-works.org,

widely. It is easier to define what it is not than

MW of solar PV developed in the USA qualify as “community solar”.

Bakersfield, CA 93305

community power in North America varies

are typically characterized by small, distributed

ownership, some two-thirds of the nearly 4,000

606 Hillcrest Dr.,

The definition of what constitutes

photovoltaics (solar PV) as including

residential, governmental, and non-profit

1

What is “Community Power” in North America?

small by North American standards, community

power should not be relegated to a “small project refer to projects of any size. Though often small, they can be quite large.

Growth of Wind & Solar in North America The commercial development of wind


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Wind Development in the USA       

                



Paul Gipe, wind-works.org

began in the USA during the early 1980s after

Canadian development of wind energy

the California wind rush from 1981 to 1985,

didn’t begin in earnest until 2006 when there

By the year 2000 there were only 2,600

As in the USA, growth of wind energy in

however, nearly two decades passed before

was 1,500 MW of cumulative capacity in

substantial growth resumed

service.

MW of wind capacity installed in the USA.

Canada has been relatively steady since 2006,

Through the first decade of the 21st century,

reaching 5,300 MW by the end of 2011.

wind grew relatively steadily, reaching nearly

Development of solar PV has lagged far

47,000 MW by the end of 2011.

behind that of wind energy. Nevertheless, by

Wind Development in Canada 

      











 

 

 

 

 





 Paul Gipe, wind-works.org 25


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Solar PV Development in North America

2

Community Wind Power

Ownership Schemes in

Europe and their Relevance to the United States by

Mark Bolanger, LBNL, 2001,

http://eetd.lbl.gov/ea/EMS/ reports/48357.pdf.

Paul Gipe, wind-works.org

the end of 2011 there was nearly 4,000 MW

of solar PV capacity operating in the USA, and more than 500 MW operating in Canada.

California accounts for nearly two-fifths

and New Jersey accounts for one-quarter of solar PV capacity in the USA.

Ontario accounts for more than 80% of all

solar PV in Canada.

Community Wind in North America The seminal research on community wind

development in the USA was conducted by

Mark Bolanger for Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories (LBNL) in 2001. The report

focused on how community wind was being developed in Europe and described various

approaches to its implementation in the USA. Since then, Bolanger has tracked community wind development in the USA and his data

appears in annual assessments of wind growth in the USA by LBNL.

The most recent assessment by LBNL

on wind development in the USA is for 2010.

Bolanger calculated that only 2% of the 40,000 MW in operation at the end of 2010, or 715 MW, was community-owned.

Bolanger defines community wind as

projects using turbines over 100 kW in size and completely or partly owned by towns,

Table1. Community Wind in the USA 2010 Newly Installed MW

%

MW

Community

91

2

715

Publicly-owned Utility

152

3

Investor-Owned Utility

602

12

Independent Power Producer

4268

83

Total

5,113 Source: Mark Bolanger, LBNL eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/reports/lbnl-4820e.pdf

26

Total

40,180


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

schools, commercial customers, or farmers, but

excluding publicly owned or municipal utilities. Windustry’s Lisa Daniels, argues that

community wind should include municipal and publicly-owned utilities as they are owned “by the people”. If these utilities are included, the

total of community-owned wind reaches 5% of cumulative wind capacity in the USA.

In addition, there are between 100 and

150 MW of small wind turbines that may be in

service in the USA. Because most if not all small wind turbines are used in applications that

might qualify as community power, small wind

Table 2. Community Solar in North America Residential & Other 2012 Total

Residential & Other

MW

%

MW

California

1474

63

929

New Jersey

564

25

141

Rest of Us

1,812

75

1,359

Total

3,850

63

2,429

turbines could add from one-quarter to onehalf percent of total installed wind capacity

represented by community wind in the USA.

Comparable data for small wind turbines

Table 3. Community Solar in North America

MW Garfield Community Airport Solar Array

Colorado

0.86

SolarShare WaterView

Ontario

0.43

SunSmart

Utah

0.10

FKEC Simple Solar Program

Florida

0.10

Clean Energy Collective

Colorado

0.08

Oregon Solar Pioneer

Oregon

0.06

Ellensburg Community Solar Project

Washington

0.04

Oregon Solar Pioneer

Oregon

0.03

Ellensburg Community Solar Project

Washington

0.02

University Park Community Solar

Maryland

0.02

Neighborhood Unitarian Universalist Church

Ontario

0.02

United Power Sol Partners

Colorado

0.01

Total

1.77

Projects 10 kW Adapted from http://www.newrules.org/sites/newrules.org/files/communitysolarpower2.pdf

Table 4. Ontario Feed-in Tariff Operational Community Power Projects 02-Mar-2012

Operational Units

MW

Biogas

3

1

Biogas on Farm

3

1

Biomass

0

0

Landfill

0

0

Solar PV Rooftop

4

1

Solar PV Groundmounted

1

0

Hydro

0

0

Wind on Land

1

1

Wind Off-Shore

0

0

Total

12

4

http://fit.powerauthority.on.ca/sites/default/files/Bi-Weekly%20FIT%20and%20microFIT%20Report%20March%20 2%2C%202012.pdf

27


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Table 5. Ontario Aboriginal and Community Adder Aboriginal

Community

1.28935

1.2666

1.28935

1.2666

€/kWh

$CAD/kWh

USD/kWh

€/kWh

$CAD/kWh

USD/kWh

Wind

0.012

0.015

0.015

0.008

0.010

0.010

PV Groundmounted

0.012

0.015

0.015

0.008

0.010

0.010

Hydro

0.007

0.009

0.009

0.005

0.006

0.006

Biogas

0.005

0.006

0.006

0.003

0.004

0.004

Biomass

0.005

0.006

0.006

0.003

0.004

0.004

Landifill Gas

0.005

0.006

0.006

0.003

0.004

0.004

http://www.powerauthority.on.ca/fit/Storage.asp?StorageID=10143

in Canada doesn’t exist.

Jersey only 25% of solar PV capacity has been

community-owned wind turbine in Canada, the

Jersey and California is primarily residential

There is even less community wind in

Canada than in the USA. There is essentially one 600 kW WindShare turbine developed by the

Toronto Renewable Energy Cooperative. Thus, only 0.01% of wind capacity in Canada meets

the traditional definition of community wind.

Community Solar PV in North America

Solar PV is even more modular than wind

energy and is well suited to extremely small

projects in distributed applications, such as on residential rooftops. Historically, most solar PV in North America has been installed on

residential rooftops. However, that has begun to change as solar PV has become more costeffective.

Under California’s Solar Initiative, two-

thirds of solar PV has been installed on

residential rooftops. This portion of the market owned locally will undergo dramatic change in the next two to three years as massive centralstation solar PV power plants are brought on line in California.

In contrast to California, New Jersey’s

solar program has always been oriented toward commercial development, and residential

applications are merely a byproduct. In New 28

installed on residential rooftops.

The market for solar PV outside New

rooftops. That is expected to change.

It is likely that two-thirds of all the solar

PV in the USA has been installed on residential rooftops and would qualify as locally-owned and, therefore, as community solar.

Of the nearly 4,000 MW of solar PV

installed in the USA by the end of 2011, only 2 MW was collectively or cooperatively owned.

This represents less than 1% of total installed US solar PV capacity.

While Ontario, Canada has the most

favorable policy environment for community solar in North America, very little has been

installed since the province’s Feed-in Tariff program went into effect in late 2010.

Currently only 4 MW of the solar PV

developed in Ontario, or less than 1% of total solar PV installed in Canada, qualifies for the province’s definition of community power.

Near-Term Prospects for Community Power in North America

Though community wind, and to a lesser

extent community solar, has lagged behind that

of community ownership in Germany, there are


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Table 6. Percent of Adder Relative to the Percentage of Local Controls 50 to 100 percent control

eligible for the full price adder

40 to 49 percent control

eligible for 80 to 99 percent of the price adder

25 to 39 percent control

eligible for 50 to 79 percent of the price adder

10 to 24 percent control

eligible for 20 to 49 percent of the price adder

http://fit.powerauthority.on.ca/Page.asp?PageID=122&ContentID=10380&Site NodeID=1103&BL ExpandID=260

Table 7. Ontario Feed-in Tariff Community & Aboriginal Applications 02-Mar-2012

Biogas

Aboriginal

Community

MW

MW

0

20

Biogas on Farm

0

5

Biomass

101

29

Landfill

0

10

Solar PV Rooftop

5

11

Solar PV Groundmounted

115

632

Hydro

144

10

Wind on Land

1,344

1,137

Wind Off-Shore

0

0

Total

1,709

1,854

https://fit.powerauthority.on.ca/sites/defautl/files/Bi-Weekly%20FIT%20and%20microFIT%20Report%20March%20 2%2C%202012.pdf

prospects that it could increase markedly in the

for a “bonus payment” under Ontario’s Feed-

environment for community power in North

technologies also receive a bonus payment

next few years.

Ontario has the most favorable policy

America. It is the only jurisdiction in North

America with a comprehensive feed-in tariff

policy like that in Germany, and it is one of only two jurisdictions in North America that has a specific policy for community ownership.

Ontario’s policy has specific provisions

for community-owned projects and for projects owned by aboriginal Canadians or métis

Individual farmers, community groups,

cooperatives, and other “local” owners qualify

in Tariff Program of $0.01/kWh for wind

energy. Locally-owned projects using other

based on their productivity relative to that of

wind energy. Aboriginal wind projects receive

a bonus payment of $0.015/kWh. The Ontario program was specifically designed to boost

participation in renewable energy by aboriginal

groups in Ontario and also boost their economic development. The Ontario program is the only one of its kind in North America.

The Ontario program apportions the

bonus payment based on the amount of local 29


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Table 8. Nova Scotia ComFIT Contracts 18-Mar-2012

Project

MW

Bowater

Biomass CHP

3.3

Fundy Tidal

Tidal

2.0

Fundy Tidal

Tidal

0.5

Cape Breton University

Wind

5.4

Celtic Current

Wind

0.9

Colchester-Cumberland Wind Field

Wind

0.1

Celtic Current

Wind

2.0

Colchester-Cumberland Wind Field

Wind

0.1

Halifax Regional Water Commission

Wind

4.6

Halifax Regional Water Commission

Wind

11.5

Lemoine Development Assoc.

Wind

3.5

Millbrook First Nation Band

Wind

6.0

Municipality of the District of Chester

Wind

2.3

Northumberland Wind Field

Wind

0.1

Scotian Wind

Wind

2.0

Town of New Glasgow

Wind

0.1

Watts Wind Energy

Wind

4.0

Watts Wind Energy

Wind

4.6

Watts Wind Energy

Wind

2.0

Total

19

54.7

https://nsrenewables.ca:44309/approved-comfit-projects-status

ownership. Local ownership of more than 50%

Nation, has been dubbed the Mother Earth

applications for nearly 3,600 MW of renewable

provinces, has implemented a feed-in tariff

qualifies the project for the full bonus payment.

By early March 2012, Ontario had received

capacity from more than 400 community and

aboriginal projects, roughly split between the two categories.

Community power and aboriginal projects

account for 4% of all applications in Ontario’s Feed-in Tariff Program, 17% of all capacity

applying for contracts, and 18% of all contracts awarded.

Despite the promise, however, no projects

have yet entered operation.

One 4-MW wind project of two turbines

on a 3-acre (1-ha) site on Manitoulin Island in Lake Huron is expected to enter commercial service sometime in April. The pioneering

project developed by the M’Chigeeng First 30

Renewable Energy Project.

Nova Scotia, one of Canada’s Maritime

program solely for community-owned renewables, what it calls ComFIT.

Considering the program’s strict

requirements, ComFIT has awarded a

surprising number of contracts since its launch in 2011. While some may argue over defining “community-owned” renewables to include a

biomass combined heat & power plant at a pulp mill, there are now nearly 60 MW of contracts awarded.

Millbrook First Nation of Truro, Nova

Scotia has won a contract for 6 MW project consisting of three turbines with a German

engineering and development company, Juwi. The German firm has been active in building


Country Focus

ISSUE 1 March 2012

community-owned or regionally-owned wind,

is the largest farmer-owned cooperative of

in the Lac St. Jean region north of the provincial

Conclusion

solar, and biogas projects in Germany.

In neighboring Quebec, a small community

capital of Quebec City has won a 25 MW

contract to build a locally-owned wind plant, Val-Éo, scheduled for completion in 2015.

In the USA, the state of Minnesota has

had the only policy specifically designed for community ownership. Its C-BED, or

Community-Based Energy Development has resulted in the most community wind in

operation in both the USA and North America. While Minnesota’s neighbor has no

organic growers in the USA. The two-turbine, 5-MW project is a first for Wisconsin.

Currently community power represents an

extremely small portion of the new renewables developed in North America. Nevertheless, several thousand megawatts of newly

contracted capacity are now on the books,

mostly in the Canadian province of Ontario. How much of that will be built is unknown. Even where the policy environment is

specific policy for community wind, Wisconsin’s

supportive--and much of North America has

developed for the Organic Valley cooperative

reasons, to bring community-owned or locally-

first community wind project came on line in

early 2012. The Cashton Greens Wind Farm was and Gundersen Health System. Organic Valley

no formal support for community power-it remains extremely difficult, for a host of owned projects to fruition.

31


Small Wind

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Small Wind World Report Published by WWEA in March 2012 World Wind Energy Association (WWEA)

its characteristic to produce small amount of

What is small wind? Where is the

boundary between small wind and large wind?

The de�inition of small wind is the utmost

urgent matter to be discussed and agreed upon in the industry. The word ‘small’ in the wind

industry has been and remains vague and everchanging. The lack of a credible unanimous

de�inition and casual practice of the industry

has formed a term that describes wind turbines with a rated capacity of 6 watt to as large as

300 kW.

Small wind was originally de�ined by

electricity for house appliances or to cover

various household-based electricity demand.

One single 40 inch LED television on the

market today consumes approximately 200 W.

Assuming that a battery can completely �latten off the �luctuation in supply and demand, it is estimated that an 180 W turbine can

suf�iciently sustain the television to be turned on for 4 hours per day. (The 180 W turbine is assumed to be installed on a site with an average annual wind speed of 5 m/s.) An

average American family uses 11’496 kWh of

electricity yearly. Under the same assumptions,

Cumulative Installed units

Total Cumulative Installed Units As of the End of 2010 500'000 450'000 400'000 350'000 300'000 250'000 200'000 150'000 100'000 50'000 '0

450'000

144'000 21'610 11'000

10'000 7'020

Countries

7'000

Countries

i

32

Figure 1 Total Cumulative Installed Units of the end of 2010

2'054

1'700

1'700


Small Wind

ISSUE 1 March 2012

a 10 kW turbine is needed to cover the full

leader of the industry, China overshadows all

Chinese household requires as small as a 1

REEEP estimates, however, that approximately

consumption. In comparison, a European

other major markets, the USA and the UK, with

household demands a 4 kW turbine while a

kW turbine. If it is to say that small wind is to supply the small consumption of households,

the issue of whether a 100 kW turbine may be

categorized as small wind needs to be brought onto the debate table.

Currently in the world, individual

its cumulative installed units of over 450’000. 250’000 of the 450’000 turbines continue

to produce electricity in China and the rest have been retired given that China’s �irst

establishment of the small wind market was in the early 1980s.

The total installed capacity around the

countries are setting up their own de�inition of

world has reached 372,3 MW as of the end

�inancial aid. The discrepancy of the upper

with a total of 179 MW. The accomplishment

small wind while conducting market research,

drafting renewable energy laws and providing capacity limit of small wind ranges between

15 kW to 100 kW. The general trend of today`s

upper limit capacity leans towards 100 kW.

This is largely caused by the establishment of the IEC61400-2 small wind standard.

Summary and Statistics

of 2010. The United States is responsible for

approximately 50 % of the installed capacity of the United States is attributed to the vast

market supported by nearly 30 different types of renewable energy policies and �inancial

aid of small wind projects from all levels of government.

Small wind is �inding applications

increasingly for on-grid power generation

As of the end of 2010, the world

cumulative installed small wind systems have

reached 672’564 units. Being the overwhelming

rather off-grid applications. Over the past decade, higher capacity SWTs (capacities

between 10 kW and 100 kW) are driving the demand in the western markets. In 2009,

Total Cumulative Installed Capacity As of the End of 2010 Cumulative Installed Capacity (kW)

200'000 180'000 160'000

179'000 166'000

140'000 120'000 100'000 80'000 60'000 40'000 20'000 '0

42'970 15'000 12'600

7'020 7'000 5'900 5'030 1'700 1'040

Countries Figure 2 Total Cumulative Installed Capacity as of the end of 2010

33


Small Wind

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Small Wind Manufacturers Worldwide Distribution by 2011

Turkey 2 Israel 2 Czech Republic 2

Cyprus 1

Brazil 2 Belgium 2 Switzerland 3 New Zealand 3 Ireland 3

Iran 1

Greece 1

Kenya 1 Mexico 1 Panama 1

Estonia 1

Peru 1 Poland 1 Portugal 1

Finland 3 Austria 3

Serbia 1

Total of 334 Small Wind Manufacturers in the World by 2011 (see WWEA Small Wind Manufacturer Catalogue for more details)

Unknown 1

Argentina 3 Ukraine 4 South Africa 4

USA 58

Denmark 5 Sweden 6

China 57

Japan 6 Australia 8 The Netherlands 9 France 9

UK 20

Italy 11

Canada 21

Germany 27

Spain 12 India 12 Chinese Taipei 12 Russia 13

Figure 3 Small Wind Manufactures Wordwide Distribution by 2011

approximately 34,4 MW of SWTs sold globally

the global industrialisation of small wind

Despite the large demand for SWTs

a cumulative total of 521’102 SWTs were

were grid-tied making up 82 % of the total

market, leaving 7,6 MW of off-grid systems.

observed in developed Western countries, the market remains fragile up to date. Sales and

production are still dependent on government

only in the past decade. As of the end of 2009,

installed, 415’874 of which were installed that

year. Within the year 2010, the total cumulative

installed units of small wind continue to

incentives in the form of supportive policies

demonstrate a 28% growth. Generating a total

Fully competitive small wind markets are

market reached over 215million USD of sales

or �inancial aid programmes, and only few

countries offer suf�icient support schemes.

rather found in the developing countries where off-grid and mini grid application prevails.

Small wind, in areas where electricity grid

cannot reach, is often economically feasible

without additional political support and poses

a true rationale in substituting the existing expensive and environmentally damaging

of over 182 gigawatt-hours (GWh) in annual

energy production worldwide, the small wind revenue in 2009.

The small wind industries in China, the

USA, and the UK have emerged as the largest markets, with China as the overwhelming leader in manufacturing and installation.

Numerous other countries have entered the

market, amounting to approximately 334 small

diesel generation.

wind manufacturers based in over 30 countries

the power generation abilities of wind since

Germany the UK and the USA) account for

Although rural residents of countries like

the USA, China, and Cuba have been utilising the 1960s with small wind turbines (SWTs),

34

energy has demonstrated remarkable growth

as of the end of 2011.

The �ive biggest countries (Canada, China,

over 50 % of the small wind manufacturers.


Small Wind

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Figure 4 Small Wind Manufactures Map Distribution Worldwide

By the end of 2011, there are over 330 small

in supplying off-grid and mini-grid electricity

an estimate of over 300 �irms supplying parts,

remarkable growth in the past decade as

wind manufacturers in the world offering onepiece commercialized generation systems and technology, consulting and sales services. A

global distribution of small wind manufacturers

can be found in the �igure below. The details of the manufacturers can be found in the WWEA

to the local residences.

The small wind industry has demonstrated

consumer interest was increasing and start-up

companies were entering the manufacturing and

distribution sector. More than 120 new small

wind manufacturers were established between

Small Wind Manufacturer Catalogue published

2000 and 2010 worldwide. China alone sold

turbine manufacturers, the development of

The UK market saw a denotes a 25 % growth by

in the Small Wind World Report 2012.

Based on the world distribution of

a total of 90’000 units of SWTs in 2009 and

100’000 in 2010, exhibiting an 11 % growth.

small wind remains clustered around the

sales revenue during 2009 and an impressive

demonstrate relatively slow progress. It is

installations in 2009, a 32 % growth from 2008,

developed countries in North America and Europe. Developing countries continue to

obvious from the map that the tremendous

wind resources of Africa, Southeast Asia and

South America, where many regions are ideally suited for small wind application, have not

been cultivated. Due to frequently obsolete and

de�icient grid systems of the above regions,

small wind systems have tremendous potential

65 % growth in installed capacity during 2010

to 14,23 MW. Canada sold 3,0 MW of small wind while the USA installed capacity grew by 18

% from 2008. Despite the remarkable growth worldwide, the small wind industry remains relatively small that the market behaviour

depends more heavily on individual product,

management, and capitalization than on global

or national trends.

35


Small Wind

ISSUE 1 March 2012

World Summit for Small Wind 2012 Highlights Key Markets and Technical Innovation 3rd World Summit for Small Wind WSSW2012 highlights key markets, technical innovations and main challenges for small wind WWEA’s Small Wind World Report will be launched: 700 000 small wind turbines have been installed worldwide ◆World Wind Energy Association (WWEA)

S

mall wind is getting more

China, Denmark, Germany, India, Poland, South

have reached remarkable

key challenges for small wind in their home

and more attention all over

the world, and some markets

sizes. The World Wind Energy

Association, in cooperation with New Energy Husum, the German Small Wind Association BVKW and the German Wind Energy

Association BWE, were invited to the 3rd World Summit for Small wind, taking place in Husum, Germany, from 15-16 March 2012.

WSSW2012 took place during the

trade fair New Energy where 300 exhibitors presented all types of renewable energy

equipment, amongst them 70 exhibitors from

the small wind industry. Up to 20 000 visitors visited the trade fair. With this huge public attention, New Energy fair was the perfect

location for the 3rd World Summit for Small Wind.

WSSW2012 covered two main areas,

“Markets around the World” and “New standards for innovation”.

On day 1, speakers from all over the world

presented the most interesting markets for small wind turbines. Experts from Canada, 36

Korea, Spain, the UK, USA and Zimbabwe presented current status, prospects and countries.

As a highlight of the WSSW2012, WWEA

launched the first edition of the Small Wind

World Report 2012. Some of the key findings of

the report were:

- Almost 700 000 small wind turbines

have been installed worldwide.

- China is by far the largest market for

small wind, with 450 000 installed units, followed by USA.

- There are more than 330 companies

manufacturing small wind turbines,

disseminated over more than 40 countries, and most of them in China, USA, Germany, Canada and the UK.

The first day ended with a panel

discussion that identified the most promising key markets for small wind.

Day 2 was dedicated to “New standards

for innovation”: The day started with a keynote address on general challenges that the small wind industry faces all over the world. The


ISSUE 1 March 2012

Small Wind

small wind industry needs appropriate

technical, economic and social standards in

order to foster innovation, increase confidence of investors, consumers and governments into this still young technology. Hence technical standards and certification schemes from

different parts of the world were presented, amongst them the international consumer

label as promoted by the International Energy Agency.

Also resource assessment as well as

approaches for establishing local small wind manufacturing in order to maximize local benefits were presented.

The second day concluded with a panel

discussion and the guiding question: “What are

the main challenges for small wind? Do current standards enhance innovation?”

For general requests, please contact: World Wind Energy Association WWEA Head Office

Charles-de-Gaulle-Str. 5 53113 Bonn Germany

Tel. +49-228-369 40-80 Fax +49-228-369 40-84 www.WWindEA.org

37


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

Brief Report on 3rd International Wind Conference and Exhibition (WE 20 by 2020) Exhibition - 5th to 7th February, 2011, Conference 6th and 7th February 2012 at CODISSIA Trade Fair Complex, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu, India organized by Indian Wind Power Association and World Wind Energy Association ◆Indian Wind Power Association

W

ith

time that the national governments

the single objective to find technical,

Climate

as well as more efficient harnessing

grid penetration (at least in local

increasing debate on

Change and

Energy Security related issues, wind energy has emerged as one of the

most promising energy resource. It is

38

recognize this and set ambitious

targets to enable faster deployment

of wind energy. Since, the year 2010, Indian Wind Power Association

is organizing this WE20 by 2020

Conference and Exhibition series with

financial, commercial, policy and

regulatory solutions to achieve 20% grids) in India by 2020 by drawing

in the best of the best from India and the World to deliberate and discuss

the involved issues. This means that


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

annual Wind Energy installations have

India. The Exhibition was for 3 days

Anil Kane, President Emeritus and Mr.

about 2,500 MW per year. From this

7th February 2012.

subjects in the conference.

to escalate to 5,000 MW to reach this target, from the present additions of

year, World Wind Energy Association,

from 5th to 7th February, 2011and the Conference was for 2 days on 6th and

Stefan Gsaenger, Secretary General, who also deliberated on various

Bonn, Germany with members in

Delegates

and regional wind energy events is

response from stakeholders

decorated Stalls of the WTG

knowledge based conference aiming

power generators, Wind turbine

Despatch Centre, C-WET etc. at the

more than 100 countries and which

organizes various continental, national also joining us in this crusade.

WE20 by 2020 series is a

to find technical, commercial, policy, regulatory and administrative

solutions to help achieve 20% grid

penetration in India by year 2020 by

calling in International and domestic experts, delegates and the audience.

Association has earlier organized two international conferences in 2010 and 2011 at New Delhi. This third

conference was organized at a time

when Wind Energy Development in the country is again at crossroads – more than 16000 MW capacity has been

achieved, new larger and efficient wind turbines are being offered, Individual

Power Producers are showing interest in large utility scale wind farms and policy and regulatory framework

Event witnessed unprecedented

representing the delegates

from different areas like, Wind

manufacturers, field workers from wind farm sites, utilities, Officials

from Ministry of New and renewable

Energy, National Load Dispatch centre. Southern Regional Load Dispatch

Centre, Research and Development consultants, Tamilnadu Electricity Board, Tamilnadu Electricity

Development Agency, Maharashtra

Electricity Development Agency, Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency, Centre for Wind Energy

Development, Consultants, private

sector, energy companies, technology

providers, service providers, students of management and energy subjects, Bankers & Insurance sectors etc.

We thank all of them for their

has evolved to include Renewable

participation and support that

we have many challenges. To address

wind energy. We also thank all the

Energy Certificate. Wind Energy has

emerged as a mainstream option but

these challenges WE20 by 2020 series is being organized every year and

the proceedings are being followed with the concerned Departments/ Ministries regularly. This year the

enabled us in coming out with Major Findings that will help in up-scaling

eminent speakers, leading experts and exhibitors, whose participation and

inputs supported us in our endeavour of mainstreaming the wind power. The delegation from China

3rd International Wind Conference

(Shanghai Electric Wind Power

Complex, Coimbatore, Tamilnadu,

Association was represented by Dr.

and Exhibition (WE 20 by 2020) was organized at CODISSIA Trade Fair

Equipment Co. Limited) also took part in the conference. World Wind Energy

Exhibition

50 well laid and Pompously

manufacturers, ancillary equipments,

service providers, IPP’s, National Load exhibition hall witnessed hundreds of thousands visitors all the days.

The event was covered by the print and television media extensively.

The live report of the exhibition and speeches at the conference was also

appearing on www.energetica-india. net all the 3 days. The was also a Energy Bus of Tamilnadu energy

development Agency attracting large crowds showing the various types

of renewable energy. The complete

nacelle mounted on 64 wheeled trailer was the centre of attraction for all

visitors. A paper presentation show

by the students of various institutes was also the part of the Exhibition showcasing encouragement of the budding talent in the field of wind energy.

A large number of B to B meetings

and B to C meetings were also

witnessed at the exhibition and during free hours at the meeting rooms at the venue. The overwhelming response received from the wind power

community reiterated the significance

of up scaling and mainstreaming wind energy for Energy Security, Climate

Change and Economic Development. It also showcased that the strides

39


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

made in this sector have surpassed

K.K Sasi,Mr.Selva kumar,Wing

ahead to attain 20 % wind penetration

is indeed proud for the over whelming

Management subjects taking part.

both the Accelerated Depreciation

predictions.

Indian Wind Power Association

response received from the investors

in the wind power industry. We thank

Hon. Minister MNRE and Government

Officials, our all sponsors, supporters, stall holders, delegates, organizing

committee members and CODISSIA Trade Centre staff Codissians for making this event a success and memorable.

Happenings In a largely attended function, the

exhibition was inaugurated by DR. A.V. Varadharajan,eminent Industrialist & Chairman, Sandfits Foundaries,

Coimbatore on 5th February 2012

at 10.00 am in the presence of Mr.

R.Palanisami,Chairman,Exhibitions

committee,who made such wonderful

&successful get up of this fair. 50 stalls –Around 25,000 visitors –A grand success.

Hon. Minister, Ministry of New

and Renewable Energy, Dr. Farooq

Abdullah launched the 2 MW nacelle of Gamesa on 5th February 2012

at 7.00 pm at the exhibition site in the presence of our great sponsor

Mr.Ramesh Kymal,CMD,Gamesa. A

beautiful cultural dance Programme by school and college girls was also

organized by Air Vice Marshal(Retd) Mr Seshachari after the launch of

the nacelle. The remarkable point of this Exhibition and Conference was that this event was managed by the future energy managers, guided by

their Professors like Dr.M.Arasu,Dr. 40

Cmdr(Retd) Kuber Kemkar and the students of the Energy Degree and

PSG Polytechnic College, Coimbatore, Amrita University and Park College of Engineering and Technology,

Coimbatore did a wonderful job of the event management. This gave them the chance of learning by doing it

remarkably well. Congrats youngsters ! Mr. Rajsekhar Budhavarapu,

Country Manager- India, GL Garrad Hassan was the Convenor behind

the success of the Conference with

Dr. R. Venkatesh, President, EPCOS, Nashik relentlessly organising

and managing the show all round.

Appreciable task. Mr. Jami Hossian,

Chief Mentor and Founder, WinDForce Management was the Programme Advisor, well done. Dr.Rishi Muni

Dwivedi, Secretary General,Mr. G.V.

Srinivasan, Chief Executive, IWPA and Mr.Shankar,Executive took care of

arranging for the Session Chairmen,

speakers and stalls. A job done well.

Conference Inauguration by the Patron of Wind Power In a colourful function attended

by a large gathering of around

650 delegates & 200 intellectuals

& dignitaries, the Conference was

inaugurated by Hon Minister of New and Renewable Energy Dr. Farooq

Abdullah on 6th February 2012 at

9.00 am. Prof. K. Kasthoorirangaian,

Chairman, IWPA and Vice president, World Wind Energy association

welcomed Hon. Minister and the elite audience and called for India to forge

by 2020.This needs encouragement

from the Government by continuing and Generation Based Incentive,

provide the evacuation infrastructure and ensure timely payment to the generators from the Utilities. Mr.

Mathias Steck, Senior Vice President & Head of APAC region, GL Garrad

Hassan presented a year wise growth graph upto 2020 & challenges to be met in the Key Note Address to the Conference.

Hon‘ble Dr Farookh Abdullah,

Hon. Minister, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Government of India inaugurated the Conference

and told that the wind energy sector should look for Indian Machines

and Indigenisation by focussing on

research and Certification by Centre

for Wind Energy Technology is must

for quality import and expediting the process of certification needed. He invited the Association to come to

Delhi and convince the Ministry about

their demands and in turn he will take up the matter with the Ministry of

Finance for fulfilling the demands of

the wind power generators and also to facilitate the wind mill installations in forest areas by faster permissions.

Contextual Presentation on WE

20 by 2020 was made by Mr. Sunil

Kumar, Director - Energy and Utilities,

Price water house Coopers followed by Mr. Rajsekhar Budhavarapu, Country Manager- India, GL Garrad Hassan

presenting the concept of WE 20 by

2020 Conference and Exhibition. Mr. Stefan Gsäenger, Secretary General,

WWEA presented vote of thanks for


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

the inaugural Session and informed

the experts in various fields and who

issues to be considered in design,

GW out of which 43 GW was added in

U.K. The presence of 625 delegates

ahead, Assessment of the Indian REC

that the whole world wind power

installed capacity has reached to 240

2011. India has positioned itself at no. 3 just behind China that has added 20 GW and US with 6.8 GW.

The Topics

WE 20 by 2020 was an effort

to provide a forum for international discussion on wind energy.

Accordingly, the conference was

carefully divided into twelve sessions

in 2 parallel Channels and an inaugural and a concluding session covering

all the areas of wind power industry. 58 speakers from all over world

deliberated on various subjects in the Conference. The speakers included

and who in the wind power industry

from India, China, Germany, U.S.A and made the conference lively with their Questions to & discussions with

implementation and operation of wind farms, Role and Scope for Wind IPPs mechanism and prospects ahead.

Speakers showing their eagerness

The Speakers

conference deliberated on the vital

cum Moderator and speakers for

evacuation & large scale integration of

Bhate, GE, Ravindra Utgikar, Suzlon

to know more and more on various

aspects of wind energy. The two day issues of WTG Technology, Need for project due diligence, Power

WE in grid, Adequacy assessment of

existing technical & policy regulatory framework, Asset management,

Indian Grid Code IEGC 2010, Wind

Forecasting and IEGC 2010 code, Scope & Prospects of Repowering & Action Plan ahead, Financing Wind Power Projects, Critical techno-economic

The Session Chairman

various sessions includes- Dr. S.

Gomathinayagam, ED, C-WET, Nitin Energy, M.P. Ramakumar, Regen

Powertech, Jami Hossain, WinDForce Management Services, M. K. De,

Consolidated Energy Consultants,

Erik Tuexen, GL Garrad Hassan, Dr. V.

Bakthavatsalam, U.S. Hydro Power, Mr. V.K.Agrawal, NLDC, POSOCO, Dr. K.

Balaraman, PRDC, A. D. Thirumoorthy,

41


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

TANGEDCO, Vikram Kailash, Mytrah

Reccani, Acciona Energy, Deepak

India and Tata Power.

PricewaterhouseCooper, Shruti Bhatia,

Shantanu Jaiswal, Bloomberg, Umesh

International, Energetica India, Power

Energy, Avinash Rao, CLP, Sunil

Jain, Green Infra, Vibhash Garg,

Vestas, Praveen Kakulte, Enercon, P.

Rajenthiran Gamesa, Sankalp Sharma,

WindForce Management Daniel Dexter, CLP, Daniel Maunsell, G L Garrad Hassan, Dr. Ravi Segal, GE Energy,

C.R. Srinivas, Mytrah Energy, Rajeev

B Samant, Tata Power, Jeremy Parkes, GL Garrad Hassan, Rupesh Singh,

WindForce, Dr Anil Kane, President

Emeritus, WWEA, President, InWEA,

New Delhi, D. A. F. Wilkinson, Gamesa, Amit Kansal, Vestas, A. A. Khatana,

IREDA, Srinivas Sista, Greenco, Vivek

Sharma, CRISIL, Dilip Nigam, Director, Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Govt. of India, Narayan

Kumar Ramakrishnan, Greenko, S. N. Roy, Techno-Electric(Simran Wind project), Dr. V. B. Rao, Suzlon, Glen

Sharma, IL&FS, K.V.S. Subrahmanyam, MSPL, Balaji Velury, SLRDC-POSOCO, Aggarwal, PricewaterhouseCoopers, G.N. Kamath, Karma Energy.

The institutional partners for the

event were the Ministry of New and Renewable Energy, Centre for Wind

Energy Technology, Indian Renewable Energy Development Agency, World Wind Energy Technology Platform, Maharashtra Energy Development Agency and Tamilnadu Energy Development Agency.

The event was sponsored by

Suzlon, Gamesa, Mytrah Energy, Enercon, Regen, Vestas, CLP, GE

Energy, Leitner Shriram, GE Energy,

Siemens, Techno Electric(Simran Wind project), IL & FS renewable Energy,

and supported by Indo Wind Energy, WinDForce,TUV Rheinland,

PricewaterhouseCoopers was

the Knowledge Partner with EQ

Insight and Global Energia as Media

Partners. Le Meridien and Vivanta by Taj surya took care of the guests by being the Hospitality Partner.

Enthused by the response of

the delegates and the speakers,

like last year, we are also bringing out the “Major Findings” of all the

deliberations. We are sure that these

Major Findings will act like a guiding

force for the continuing efforts for the development of wind power in India and the world.

The major findings of the

Conference will be sent to all the concerned Departments and the

Ministries and the follow up will be

made to see the 20 % Wind Energy by the year 2020.

WWEC2012 "Community Power –

organizations, will organize its 11th

energy deployment all over the world.

July 2012

(Germany) under the theme “Community

will be 15 February 2012.

Citizens’ Power”, Bonn, Germany, 3-5 The World Wind Energy Association,

in cooperation with the German Wind Energy Association and supported by a large number of international 42

World Wind Energy Conference in Bonn Power - Citizens’ Power” from 3-5 July 2012. The conference will especially

focus on how community-based wind farms can contribute to a faster wind

Deadline for the submission of abstracts For more information on WWEC2012 please visit: wwwwwec2012.net 


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

SWEG, the Winner of the World Wind Energy Award 2011 ◆Faisal Eissa, Managing Director, SWEG,Egypt

E

lsewedy Electric has

energy industry in terms of reliability,

MW” turbine in 2013.

economic growth

of technology. SWEG is offering

pre-qualified out from 34 applicants

become a significant contributor to the

in Egypt through its

development into a well-established group with extensive holdings,

both locally and beyond borders

in several other Middle Eastern &

African countries. With more than 10,000 employees working in 30

production facilities located in 14

countries around the world, Elsewedy is exporting a wide range of high

quality and safe products to more than 110 countries worldwide. With the establishment of SWEG –Elsewedy

for Wind Energy Generation, and the

acquisition of MTOI – M.Torres Olvega Industrial, Elsewedy Electric has

robustness and high performance with

low maintenance costs, at the forefront Turnkey Solutions & EPC. Integrating and utilizing all capacities within

Elsewedy Electric, SWEG provides specialized and complete services to the wind energy sector. SWEG

is operating and servicing all wind

energy components, and is also active in the Wind farm Co-Development.

SWEG explores Development & IPP business opportunities to support

clients and ensure successful projects. The company is currently offering

a “TWT1.65 MW” Turbine and will

launch the newly developed “TWT 2.5

In 2010 the consortium of SWEG

and TERNA ENERGY (Greece) was with nine other consortia for the

BOO project in Gabal el Zeit – Eastern Desert nearby the Red Sea. Based on TERNA ENERGY’s experience on the whole wind farm value chain, and

SWEG’s own expertise in WTGs and BOP matter’s and equipment, the

companies will jointly Design, Develop, Invest, Built and Operate the project. The contract will include the

right to sell the electricity to the

Egyptian Electricity Transmission

Company(EETC) for a period of 20-

25 years. It is expected that the first

become the first major wind turbine

manufacturer in Egypt, the Arab World and Africa.( For more information please visit www.elsewedy.com.)

SWEG, the winner of the WWEA

Award 2011, is offering all integrated Wind Energy Solutions. SWEG is

supplying the TWT wind turbines with M.Torres technology. The gearless TWT wind turbine represents a

unique contribution to the wind

43


Events

ISSUE 1 March 2012

SWEG is expecting the completion of

the Dernah project during 2012/2013. In October last year SWEG signed

a 25 MW Project in Bulgaria. Wind

project developer Double Energy 2 in Bulgaria and SWEG has signed a contract for Co-development and

construction of a wind farm in the region of Omurtag, Bulgaria.

The Turbines will be used are

fifteen TWT 1.65 MW and an option for two of the new developed TWT

2.5 MW model to deliver 24.75 MW of wind energy to the grid.

Double Energy 2 received the

request for proposals will be issued

between Elsewedy Electric and

construction permit and SWEG expects

to develop its private wind farm in

a unique contribution to the wind

go online in mid-2014.

Beginning Q2 in 2012.

SWEG also has its own plans

the range of 120 MW in Egypt. The

Egyptian market is expecting a change in the regulations that will allow the private sector to invest in their own wind farms.

In 2011 SWEG has delivered

the first 8 units of the TWT 1.65 MW to Dernah in the Eastern Region – Al

Fatayeh. Beginning January 2011 the shipment, including sets of blades

and towers, have arrived in Dernah

– Benghazi Ports. From there it was

transported directly to the site as the starting point of Libya’s first wind energy project.

Once construction is complete,

the Dernah wind farm will have a total of 60 MW with 37 units TWT 1.65

MW direct drive. The rotor diameter is 82 meters (LM blades) with a hub height of 71 meters. The towers are planned to be delivered from SIAG

Elsewedy Towers (SET), a joint venture 44

SIAG Schaaf Industrie AG. The TWT multipole wind turbine represents

energy industry in terms of reliability,

robustness and high performance with

low maintenance costs, at the forefront of technology.

The Public Electricity Works

Company (PEWCO), the state utility,

awarded the EPC (engineer, procure and construct) contract to SWEG –

Elsewedy for Wind Energy Generation. It includes the Supply and installation, startup and Operation & Maintenance

of the WTG (Wind Turbine Generator) and the BoP(Balance of Plant). After

the changes in the political situation,

the construction to start in mid-2012, the complete wind farm is planned to In Ghana the Volta River

Authority (VRA) invited sealed

Tenders from eligible and qualified Tenderers as partners in a Joint

Venture (JV) arrangement to develop

and implement a Wind Energy Project in Ghana of 50 – 75 MW. SWEG is

awarded to enter into Joint Venture

agreement with VRA in order to lead the effort to undertake the following

activities: Wind Resource Assessment,

EPC, Finance support and Operation &

Maintenance. Completion of the project is expected to be 2013 – 2014.

Part of the pictures used in this publication are from the following websites: http://www.trader-china.org/ http://thefutureofthings.com/pod/1096/repower-5m-largest-wind-turbine.html http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Albany_Wind_Farm,_Western_Australia.jpg http://www.nytimes.com/2006/09/28/business/worldbusiness/28wind.html http://www.csa.com/discoveryguides/india/review6.php http://creaprotect.de/index_en.php http://www.designnews.com/document.asp?doc_id=238756 http://nustarblog.metafocusclients.co.uk/?p=40 http://www.inwea.org/ http://www.rechargenews.com/energy/wind/article252480.ece?WT.mc_id=rechargenews_rss http://www.newenergynexus.com/2088/wind-energy-generation


OR!

WWEC2012

IBIT BECOME AN EXH BE A

SPONSOR!

BONN, GERMANY 3 – 5 JULY 2012

11th World Wind Energy Conference and Renewable Energy Exhibition:

Community power - citizens‘ power will host: WWEC2012 all renewables trade fair

WWEC2012 Fair:

Your exhibition stand and sponsoring opportunities The 11th World Wind Energy Conference & Renewable Energy Exhibition WWEC2012 is aimed at presenting, exchanging -and dis cussing the latest knowledge on the state of wind energy utilization, turbine technologies, and renewable energies in general. WWEC2012 will profile the special topic „Community Power – Citizens‘ Power“, referring to the development and ownership of renewable energy projects by local citizens and communities; - inclu ding farmers and landowners, cooperatives, municipalities, local and regional utilities, as well as other partners.

The WWEC2012 venue will held in former the home of the German Parliament - where the world‘s first feed-in law was enacted in 1991; where the first governmental internati onal conference for renewable energy Renewables 2004 was held; and where the International Renewable Energy Agency IRENA was founded in 2009. Media Partners

Supporting organizations (as of 01 March 2012)

EREF Ministerium für Klimaschutz, Umwelt, Landwirtschaft, Naturund Verbraucherschutz des Landes Nordrhein-Westfalen

EUROSOLAR The European Association for Renewable Energy

|Deutschland

More information: www.wwec2012.net

WWEA Quartely Bulletin - Ed. 1  

WWEA Quartely Bulletin - First edition

WWEA Quartely Bulletin - Ed. 1  

WWEA Quartely Bulletin - First edition

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