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Connecting People, Nature & Economy WWF-Kenya Country Strategy 2020-2030

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WW F-INT Annual Review 2018 page 38


#NiSisiSote Imag ec redits p55

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WW F-INT Annual Review 2018 page 39

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Where We Work

Naivasha Narok

KEY

Nairobi

Unganisha: South of Kenya North of Tanzania Landscape (SOKNOT) Coastal Kenya Land and Seascape (Programme) CKP Kenya Rift Lakes Landscape (KRL)

Mombasa

Our Vision

A healthy Natural Environment Supporting People and Sustainable Development In Kenya 4


TABLE OF CONTENTS Our Goal & Guiding Principles 6 Executive Summary 9 The Context for our Strategy 11 Our Response to this Context 13 Our Delivery Model 15 Our Place-Based Work 17 Place-Based Programmes – Strategy Map 19 National Programme - Strategy Map 20 Landscape and National Programmes: Theory of Change 21 Operational Strategy Map 22 Cross-Organisational Ways of Working 23 Kenya Rift Lakes Landscape 25 Unganisha - South of Kenya Landscape 27 Coastal Kenya Programme 29 Sustainability31 Evidence32 People33 Budget Summary 34

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1.Thriving Wildlife 2. Functioning Habitats

OU GOA

3. People Benefitting

OUR GUIDING PRINCIPLES Respect people’s rights in accordance with customary, national and international human rights laws;

© Jürgen Freund / WWF

Enhance the natural assets and climate resilience

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Aim to enhance the natural assets and climate resilience of local communities, particularly the marginalised;


UR ALS

4. Footprint Greened 5. Policy Change Secured 6. Operational Excellence

Address weak governance taking into account cultural and political contexts;

Address the inequities in (i) the distribution of environmental costs and beneďŹ ts and (ii) unsustainable production and consumption patterns. 7


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Executive Summary This is the second strategy that WWF-Kenya has written as a National Office. In the light of this status, we have worked together in articulating a strategy that reflects our ambition to expand our partnerships, build our national identity and grow our income in order to deliver sustainable conservation and environmental change in Kenya. We have six over-arching goals and twelve key result areas underpinning (i) our work in three landscapes, within which we plan to expand areas of programme intervention; (ii) our national partnerships and influence and (iii) the ways we work together as an organisation. We are working within a Kenyan context of a powerful youth voice with high levels of disenfranchisement; rampant development, increasing pressures on natural resources resulting in conflict between societal needs and nature – and on top of this we need to consider the Covid19 outbreak as it drives our nation and the world into economic crisis. In this setting, WWF-Kenya is poised for a strategic response - drawing on our expertise in climate informed and responsive environmental management that benefits people, nature and the economy; our experience in financial sector processes and our role as a valued partner in advocacy and policy development: our strategy seeks to meet the needs of people, while protecting biodiversity and building a climate resilient future.

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The Context for our Strategy Biodiversity and the ecosystem services provided remain the mainstay of Kenya’s economy, supporting many sectors and livelihoods. Globally the recognition of the link between national development and the environment is enshrined within the expected global policy decisions of the 2020 Super Year (SDGs, BBNJ, CBD and UNFCCC). Using these and building on our learning from the past few decades, WWF Kenya is well placed to make the case for the conservation and sustainable utilization of the environment, land and natural resources from which ecosystem services are provided as being crucial for the country’s development. There are significant opportunities for WWF Kenya to seize. Leveraging the recognition and respect we have at both national and local government levels means we are well placed to use the opportunities – and address the challenges - of the policy environment to enable sustainable conservation approaches. Similarly, strengthening our focus on sustainable economy approaches, both nationally and locally leverages other opportunities – to influence spatial planning, to monitor the application of environmental impact assessments in development and to ensure that social and environmental principles are embedded into investment decisions WWF’s mission is to stop the degradation of the planet’s natural environment and to build a future in which humans live in harmony with nature, by conserving the world’s biological diversity, ensuring that the use of renewable natural resources is sustainable and promoting the reduction of pollution and wasteful consumption. The reason for this mission is precisely because of the sort of challenges that Kenya is facing now: a country where the needs of Kenyans for natural resources are in conflict with the needs of wildlife for habitat; a country where national income from tourism is in conflict with national infrastructural decisions that are driven by foreign investors; and a country where climate change, agricultural production and poverty are combining to diminish the “ecosystem services” that soil, forests, freshwater, the air and the oceans provide for people and for wildlife. And into this space comes the still-to-be-understood-but-very-real impacts of Covid19: wrecking the nature tourism industry that is so important for rural livelihoods; changing the face of the economy, pushing people back to extraction from forests and oceans, potentially increasing illegal killing of wildlife and sending donors scurrying for cover. Will the plan we set out below even get off the ground? Yet it still feels like the right direction of travel for the coming 10 years.

Opportunities Kenya's national policy environment

The 2010 constitution of Kenya

Devolution of decision making to the 47 counties

Increasing focus on green and blue economy principles

Growth of the renewable energy agenda

WWF Kenya's position as a respected actor in specific areas

Weakly regulated FDI decisions that lock Kenya into debt

Increasing pressure on wildlife populations

Challenges plus the new one: Covid 19 Human population growth outpacing the economy

Severe land degradation including in biodiversity rich areas

Climate change: more severe weather impacts

Poorly aligned and conflicting policies

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Our Response to this Context In the light of the context analysis as summarised above, WWF Kenya has articulated this Vision:

Our Vision A healthy natural environment supporting people and sustainable development in Kenya A healthy natural environment includes wildlife habitats, the natural resources within them and the ecological services that they provide; ensuring that aquatic and terrestrial species can thrive in harmony with people. The vision also recognises that for this to happen there is a need for wider system change to deliver environmentally sustainable progress. Keeping these two aspects of the vision in balance and managing the trade-offs between them is fundamental. To that end, WWF Kenya has articulated two types of goals:

Our 2030 Impact Goals: 1. Thriving Wildlife. Populations of priority terrestrial and marine species are stable or increasing. 2. Functioning Habitats. Terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems / habitats within priority places are secured, extended, protected and restored.

These 3 goals reflect the change that is needed “on the ground� in responding to the challenges articulated above. Indicators regarding species populations, well managed habitats (coverage and quality) and of human wellbeing have been agreed and baselines are being established. Targets will then be agreed and tracking approaches operationalised.

3. People Benefitting. Environmentally sustainable rural livelihoods and economies delivering improvements in social wellbeing.

Our 2030 Enabling Goals:

4. Footprint Greened. The impact of infrastructure and production on habitats, fisheries and wildlife is reduced and a low carbon development pathway is pursued. 5. Policy Change Secured. Key policies, legislations and standards are implemented to create an enabling environment for sustainable Natural Resources Management and governance.

These 3 goals reflect the changes that are needed to deliver the impact goals above. Changing the way that businesses and people use and manage natural resources will enable the protection of habitats for people and for wildlife. Securing such changes demands a stronger policy environment. And for WWF Kenya to play its part in all these aspects we need to deliver excellence throughout our organisation.

WWF Global Context: Network Vision and Goals

6. Operational Excellence. WWF Kenya is an efficient and effective organisation, working together to achieve our goals and vision.

By 2030 we protect and restore nature for the benefit of People and the Planet

Our WWF Kenya vision and goals align to, and contextualise, the WWF Network vision: By 2030 we protect and restore nature for the benefit of people and the planet; and the Network goals as summarised in this diagram. We work with the Network to deliver these goals, and we leverage the strength of the Network to deliver our Kenya specific goals 13


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Our Delivery Model

Southern Kenya (SOKNOT): Integrated Landscape approach in Greater Mara, AmboseliChyulu Hills & Tsavo

Kenya Rift Lakes (KRL): Integrated Landscape approach in Naivasha- W. Aberdares, BaringoBogoria & E Mau- Nakuru

Policy Change

Footprint

Livelihoods

Habitats

Wildlife

In analysing the Theories of Change for each of these goals several common approaches were identified, which together provide the synergy needed to create systemic change to deliver our organisational strategy. Thus twelve “Key Result Areas” emerged as cross-cutting approaches, as in the diagram below, to enable delivery of the goals. Monitoring of strategy progress will be aggregated from the programmatic work at the level of the Key Result Areas. Although there is some natural grouping of the KRAs as in the diagram below, the cross-cutting nature of particular KRAs and the mutual support of all should also be noted.

Coastal Kenya: Landscape (Kwale-Kilifi and Lamu-Ijara) and whole coast, Seascape approach

National: Policy, Regional advocacy, National priority species, Sustainable Economy

Enabling: Leadership, Partnerships, Constituency building (youth & environmental education), Research, Innovation, Communication, Environmental and Social Safeguarding, Fundraising, M&E, Financial management, Risk, IT, Procurement, Organisational development and Practice support/delivery

An important component of the conservation delivery model is how our work is structured and where it is delivered: • Our conservation goals will be delivered through a model that includes programmes based in each of three land or seascapes along with national level interventions. • This place-based work is underpinned by, and dependent on, integrated professional support from a wide range of enabling functions working from offices situated within the landscapes or in Nairobi.

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Our Place-Based Work In analysing the Theories of Change for each of these goals several common approaches were identified, which together provide the synergy needed to create systemic change to deliver our organisational strategy. Thus twelve “Key Result Areas” emerged as cross-cutting approaches, as in the diagram below, to enable delivery of the goals. Monitoring of strategy progress will be aggregated from the programmatic work at the level of the Key Result Areas. Although there is some natural grouping of the KRAs as in the diagram below, the cross-cutting nature of particular KRAs and the mutual support of all should also be noted.

All of our strategic goals and Key Result Areas will be delivered in each of these geographies, but with different emphases dependent on their respective uniqueness.

1. Kenya Rift Lakes Landscape (KRL):

There will be three sub-landscapes within the KRL, covering (i) the Naivasha-Western Aberdares; (ii) the Eastern Mau-Nakuru and (iii) the Baringo-Bogoria sub-landscapes. This region is dominated by two key water towers (Mau and Aberdares) and five lakes (Naivasha, Elementaita, Nakuru, Bogoria and Baringo) and significant areas of irrigated land for food and flowers: for the nation and export.

2. Unganisha: South of Kenya Landscape (SOKNOT):

The Unganisha SOKNOT landscape is a transboundary landscape that covers the North of Tanzania as well. On the Kenya side, the landscape divides into three programmes (or sub-landscapes): (i) the Greater Mara, (ii) Amboseli-Chyulu HiIls and (iii) Tsavo. This landscape is rich in biodiversity and home to over 60% of Kenya’s wildlife, including the largest population of elephants in East Africa. It is also home to over 2 million people, benefiting from the (usually) vibrant tourism sector, livestock rearing and agriculture.

3. Coastal Kenya Land and Seascape (Programme) CKP:

We plan to manage this region under 3 sub-landscapes: terrestrially Kwale-Kilifi and Lamu-Ijara sublandscapes and the Coastal Kenya seascape. Current work covers mainly marine and some terrestrial, ecosystems conservation and management while responding to the economic system changes that are driven by the growing urban areas. 17


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Place Based Programmes – Strategy Map WWF KENYThriving A STRATWildlife EGY Populations of priority FY 21-30 terrestrial and marine

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species are stable or increasing

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Policy Change Secured: Key 2. Functioning HabitatsFootprint Greened: The impact3. People Benefiting People Benefiting policies, legislations and standards Terrestrial, freshwater and marine of infrastructure and production Environmentally sustainable, climate Populations marine ecosystems / habitats of priority Environmentally sustainable, are implemented to create an ecosystems / habitats within priority on the climate, habitats, fisheries climate smart, rural livelihoods smart, rural livelihoods and economies terrestrial within priority placesand are marine species enabling environment for sustainable places are secured, extended, protected, and wildlife is reduced and a low and economies deliver deliver improvements inand social wellbeing secured, extended, protected, are stable or increasing climate smart Natural Resource and climate resilient carbon development pathway is improvements inrestored social wellbeing restored and climate resilient Management and Governance pursued. Functioning Habitats 1. Thriving Terrestrial, freshwater and

Wildlife

3

5

4

A Healthy Natural Environment 4. Footprint Greened: The impact of infrastructure and production on the climate, habitats, fisheries and wildlife is reduced supporting People and and a low carbon development pathway is pursued. Sustainable Development Policy Change Secured: Key policies, legislations and standards are implemented to create an enabling environment for A Healthy Natural5.Environment supporting People and Sustainable Development in Kenya in Kenya sustainable and climate smart Natural Resource Management and Governance Integrated operational and cross workstream delivery

Wildlife

Habitats

Livelihoods

KRA1: Community and wildlife co-existence enabled: HWC, poaching and IUU are mitigated effectively; Zero poaching framework and SAFE System approach institutionalized by national wildlife agencies. KRA2: Wildlife areas and habitat management strengthened: Improving habitat management; improving habitat health; protecting and opening wildlife . (timber & fisheries and abstraction; corridors; halting illegal extraction Adaptive wildlife and fisheries management based on scientific findings institutionalised and being implemented by national agencies KRA3: Community benefits from natural resource management improved: Natural Resource Management & Nature based Solutions strategies agreed with the communities and implemented

Footprint

KRA4: Environmental considerations prioritised in decision making: Decision makers follow integrated planning processes to address both development and environment demands KRA5: Nature based, sustainable & equitable impact solutions: Promotion of Green/blue investments; Green/blue production & consumption systems; strengthening of marketing practices

KRA7: Key land and seascape specific policy changes adopted: Influence development of or changes to: policy, legislation or standards (local to national) that will support creation of an enabling environment for natural resources management and governance KRA8: Strengthened strategic Partnerships: Develop partnership engagement and/or capacity plans for co-delivery, enabled or partner-owned implementation and advocacy

Policy Change

KRA6: Climate Resilience built in WWF landscapes, policy frameworks and operations Climate change adaptation & mitigation mainstreamed in all interventions Sustainable energy security improved: Introduction of access to, and approaches for, productive use of energy

KRA9: Regional Work: Ensure key Regional policies and practices that govern/drive integrated Network regional strategies on finance, IWT , forestry, fisheries, geospatial planning

Summarised Results and Strategies

Support from: Programmes & Policy; Regional team; Finance; Communications; Fundraising; Planning & Performance; HR, IT

PLACE-BASED DELIVERY OF WWF KENYA STRATEGY


National Programme - Strategy Map WWF KENYThriving A STRATWildlife EGY of priority FY 21-30 Populations terrestrial and marine

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species are stable or increasing

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Functioning Habitats 2. Functioning Habitats Policy Change Secured: Key Footprint Greened: The impact 3. People Benefiting 1. Thriving Wildlife People Benefiting Terrestrial, freshwater and policies, legislations and standards Terrestrial, freshwater and marine of infrastructure and production Environmentally sustainable, climate Populations marine ecosystems / habitats of priority Environmentally sustainable, are implemented to create an ecosystems / habitats within priority on climate, habitats, fisheries and climate smart, rural livelihoods smart, rural livelihoods and economies terrestrial and marine species within priority places are enabling environment for sustainable places are secured, extended, protected, wildlife is reduced and a low deliver deliver improvements socialsmart wellbeing secured, extended, are protected, stable or increasing and economies andinclimate Natural Resource restored and climate resilient carbon development pathway is improvements in social wellbeing restored and climate resilient Management and Governance pursued.

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5

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A Healthy Natural Environment 4. Footprint Greened: The impact of infrastructure and production on climate, habitats, fisheries and wildlife is reduced and supporting People and a low carbon development pathway is pursued. Sustainable Development Policy Change Secured: Key policies, legislations andSustainable standards are implemented to create an A Healthy Natural5.Environment supporting People and Development inenabling Kenyaenvironment for in Kenya sustainable and climate smart Natural Resource Management and Governance Integrated operational and cross workstream delivery

Wildlife

Habitats

Livelihoods

KRA1: Community and wildlife co-existence enabled: Zero poaching framework and SAFE System approach institutionalized by national wildlife agencies; National rhino planning; transboundary elephant & wildlife security collaboration; Anti-trafficking processes supported; Innovation integrated

KRA3: Community benefits from NRM improved: Providing technical advice, innovation, mentoring and on the ground support

KRA2: Wildlife areas and habitat management strengthened: Providing technical advice, innovation, policy support, mentoring and on the ground support.

Policy delivery of above: NRM rights enshrined in law with compliance; NbS supported in legal frameworks

Policy Change

Footprint

KRA4: Environmental considerations prioritised in decision making: Providing innovative technical advice, mentoring and on the ground support KRA5: Nature based, sustainable & equitable impact solutions: Promotion of Green/blue investments; Green/blue production & consumption systems; strengthening of marketing . practices :

KRA6: Climate Resilience established: Enhancing of national climate & energy targets through public advocacy approaches in coordination with a wide network; Technical support for climate change mainstreaming across programmes KRA9: Regional Work: Ensure key Regional policies and practices govern/drive integrated Network regional strategies on finance, IWT, forestry and fisheries

KRA7: Key land and seascape specific policy changes adopted: Advocacy for policy, legal and institutional frameworks that create an enabling environment for sustainable natural resources management and governance KRA8: Effective programme delivery through partnerships: Support – or lead - partnership engagement and/or capacity plans for co-delivery, enabled or partner-owned implementation and advocacy

Summarised Results and Strategies

Support from: Programmes & Policy; Regional team; Finance; Communications; Fundraising; Planning & Performance; HR, IT

NATIONAL CONSERVATION PROGRAMME DELIVERY OF WWF KENYA STRATEGY

National Conservation Programme work both supports our Place-Based delivery – and has significant delivery at national and regional level: note KRA9 which represents the important role that WWF Kenya plays in supporting the WWF regional programmes. The KRAs are essentially the same as for Place Based work, but the strategies employed are different.-


Landscape and National Programmes: Overall Theory of Change

Demand for continued economic growth in Kenya to support a growing population and reduce poverty; Weak implementation of existing policies and frameworks; Wildlife conservation not being “recognised” as one of the viable land use options; Unsustainable exploitation of natural resources; Climate Change

Threats

Increasing anthropogenic pressure on sea, land and habitats coupled with markets for wild meat and trophies * Ineffective management and governance of habitats and natural resources coupled with over use and over extraction/abstraction and pollution * Inequitable distribution and governance of access to, and distribution of, natural resources * Unsustainable production and consumption systems coupled with large * scale expansion of agriculture Poorly planned infrastructure developments coupled with increasing foreign and local trade and investment * Adverse effects of climate change and failure to implement climate and energy policies and plans * A lack of value placed on environmental resources and inadequate public participation in decision making * Lack of sustainability into our work because as partner capacity remains weak * Regional trends affect Kenya; Kenya affects regional trends poor coordination limits WWF effectiveness

Opportunities

Kenyan constitution and many environmental laws; * Strength of conservation and development partners to co-create and co-implement; * WWF Kenya’s established relationships with Government of Kenya officials nationally and at county-level; * Growing capacity of Kenya Civil Society; * Increasing awareness of environmental issues and Green finance & Blue economy opportunities; * Integrated ways of working of WWF Kenya as an NO

Strategies Mitigation of drivers of HWC and of poaching, including trafficking; Zero poaching framework and SAFE System approach institutionalized by county wildlife agencies; * In conjunction with communities and Government Agencies: Improving habitat management; improving river health; protecting and opening wildlife corridors; halting illegal extraction / abstraction & reducing pollution NRM & Nbs strategies as agreed with the communities implemented (X-ref KRA2 and KRA7); * Decision makers enabled to follow integrated planning process to address both development and environment demands; * Establishing and financing of Green enterprises; strengthening of marketing practices in key places in Landscapes * Introduction of approaches for productive use of energy; Establishing Climate change adaptation & mitigation interventions in land/seascapes Influence development of or changes to: policy, legislation or standards (local to national) that will support creation of an enabling environment for natural resources management and Governance * Support partnership engagement and/or capacity plans for co-delivery, enabled or partner-owned implementation and advocacy: within existing and new partnerships * Promote key Regional policies and practices that govern/drive Network regional integrated strategies on finance, IWT, forestry, fisheries, geospatial planning

Key Results

KRA1: Community and wildlife co-existence enabled * KRA2: Wildlife areas and habitat management strengthened * KRA3: Community benefits from NRM improved * KRA4: Environment-first decision making processes prioritised * KRA5: Nature based, sustainablen& equitable impact solutions * KRA6: Climate Resilience established * KRAT: Key land and seascape specific policy changes adopted * KRA8: Effective programme delivery through partnerships * KRA9: Regional work: delivery for the Network and for WWF Kenya

Goals

Thriving Wildlife

Functioning Habitats

People Benefiting

Footprint Greened

Policy Change Secured


Operational Strategy Map WWF KENYA STRATEGY FY 2 1 - 3 0

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Thriving Wildlife Populations of priority terrestrial and marine species are stable or increasing

1. Thriving Wildlife

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2. Functioning Habitats

Populations of priority terrestrial and marine species Functioning Habitats are stable or increasing People Benefiting

Terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems / habitats 4. Footprint within priority places are secured, extended, protected, restored and climate resilient

A Healthy Natural Environment supporting People and Sustainable Development in Kenya

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3. People Benefiting

Terrestrial, freshwater and marine ecosystems / habitats within priority places are secured, extended, protected, Footprint Greened: The impact restored and climate resilient

Environmentally sustainable,

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of infrastructure and production

5

Environmentally sustainable, climate smart, rural livelihoods and economies deliver improvements in social wellbeing Policy Change Secured: Key policies, legislations and standards

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Operational Excellence: WWF Kenya is an efficient

are implemented to create an climate, habitats, fisheries Greened: The rural impact of infrastructureonand production on theand climate, habitats, fisheries and wildlife is reduced and a low climate smart, livelihoods and effective organisation, and economies deliver improvements in social wellbeing

5. Policy Change Secured: Key policies,

enabling environment for sustainable and climate smart Natural Resource Management and Governance to create an enabling environment

wildlife is reduced and a low carbon development pathway is pursued.

carbon development pathway is pursued.are implemented legislations and standards

and climate smart Natural Resource Management and Governance

working together to achieve our goals and vision

for sustainable

6. Operational Excellence: WWF Kenya is an efficient and effective organisation, working together to

A Healthy Natural Environment supporting People and our Sustainable Development in Kenya achieve goals and vision Integrated cross team functions

Resource Mobilization & Partnerships

KRA11: WWF Kenya’s brand is strong and engaging, supporting resource & citizen mobilisation and conservation impact Excellent media & digital engagement; Increasing numbers of Kenyans engaged in protection of nature – taking action and giving financially

Operational and Leadership Support

KRA12: Effective delivery of all our organisational goals Planning, Design, M&E, Learning , KM Governance, Vision, Risk Management

People & Culture

Leadership, Strategy, OD, Internal Comms

Administration, Procurement, IT

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Programme Direction, Research, Innovation

Functions

KRA10: WWF Kenya’s financial sustainability is strengthened through diversified income streams Year on year increase in income across all income streams; Improved fund utilisation.

Communications & Marketing

Summarised Results and Strategies

Mutual Support of & from Land, Seascape & national delivery teams in: South of Kenya, Kenya Rift Lakes Kenyan Coast National Office

OPERATIONAL DELIVERY OF WWF KENYA STRATEGY

Financial Management

Social, Environmental and Conservation goals such as ours are utterly dependent on the strength of the operational structures: the summary above represents the foundation that these important roles provide, so that WWF Kenya can achieve the vision we all aspire to see realised.


Cross-Organisational Ways of Working In order to deliver this strategy, WWF Kenya will build on its current values (credible, responsive, innovative, determined, inspiring, collaborative) and all that has been learnt over previous years, especially since becoming a National Office. However, some specific areas merit highlighting as ways of working for our new strategy: Partnerships: for implementation, communication and fundraising. We have always worked through partnerships, but as we expand our work across a wider geography and into more wholistic conservation approaches, we need: (i) a wider set of partnerships for intervention, advocacy and funding, and (ii) to become more strategic about our partnership approaches. Hence KRA9 as way to push us to build partnership strategies which we will monitor and adapt. All partnerships will be underpinned by MoUs to capture our mutual roles and expectations. Inclusive Conservation and Safeguarding: will be particularly embedded into our wellbeing / livelihood work but will inform and underpin all the Key Result Areas across both land / seascapes and national work, as a way to do good, not just to do no harm. Monitoring of compliance against the Network Environmental and Social Safeguards Framework (ESSF) will be ensured by the audit team and tracked through operational KPIs. Using the strategy: The Key Result Areas and Goals will inform our design of our new Conservation Action Plans and the underpinning projects, programmes, campaigns and partnerships; they will be used to structure the country budget; delivery of them will inform personal and team objectives; they will enable monitoring and inform review of progress. The strategy will inform our communication and negotiations with partners, donors and the general public. Integrated working: Mutually supportive delivery across Goals and Key Result Areas; between conservation and organisational teams. Everyone will be taking on responsibility to deliver all of WWF Kenya’s goals and vision. No-one works in a silo: we all work to support each other to ensure that the strategy is delivered, seeing all the goals and all the Key Result Areas as being our responsibility. Accountability: While each of us will be accountable for delivery against targets and KPIs; there will be designated responsibility of individuals to oversee – and hold us accountable for - the collective delivery of Goals, Key Result Areas and land/seascapes and national strategies. Everything matters: Operational excellence – is a fundamental enabler that everyone in WWF Kenya aspires to deliver. While we will look specifically at our fundraising and communications as KRAs 10 and 11; we will also track effective delivery of all our cross organisational targets through KRA 12, informed by tracking KPIs across the whole organisation. We will develop a transparent approach so that we all know what is going well – and what is not; in both Operations and in Conservation – and we will support each other to strengthen our approaches.

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Kenya Rift Lakes Landscape KRL is a region that encompasses 2 water towers - the source of many rivers, fisheries, wildlife sanctuaries and 5 of Kenya’s lakes-all Ramsar sites with 3 under World Heritage listing. All these lakes are designated as Important Bird Areas. Lake Nakuru is home to black rhino populations and with Lake Bogoria, provides migratory feeding grounds for up to two million lesser flamingos. Parts of the landscape are rich agricultural – and floricultural - production areas, so we aim to expand, protect and restore integrated freshwater-forest-farm ecosystems to safeguard biodiversity, livelihoods and the economy. KRL will be an exemplar landscape for freshwater and catchment management in Kenya and a test ground for the Freshwater Emergency Recovery Plan to bend the curve on biodiversity loss. In the light of the unique biodiversity and economic opportunities in this area, the range of projects under the KRL landscape plan, will adopt and deliver all of our Strategic Key Result Areas and Goals. Sub-landscape 1: Naivasha – Western Aberdares: As at the start of FY21 there are 5 projects & programmes matching to the new strategy; this is seen as a growth landscape, as we increase our work in the Aberdares. Sub-landscape 2: Eastern Mau – Nakuru: Thus far in FY21 we have only 1 funded project: this is our first major growth landscape; requiring investment in development of programmes, partnerships and capacity building approaches. Sub-landscape 3: Baringo-Bogoria: WWF Kenya worked in this area in the past but has no current programmes: this is a future growth area to develop partnerships and seek funds.

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Unganisha - South of Kenya Landscape Unganisha is home to the highest population of elephants in East Africa, black rhinos and many other species including the rare hirola antelope. The Mara-Serengeti ecosystem is known for the annual great herbivore migration that involves over 1.5 million wildebeest. Tourism revenue from this region is a vital part of the local and national economy. The landscape is also home to over two million people, representing one of the fastest growing human populations in East Africa, driven partly by immigration. The indigenous peoples, Maasai and Ogiek are also resident in key parts of the landscape. This area produces the highest volume of wheat and has the highest livestock density in Kenya. Unganisha represents the Kenyan side of the transboundary SOKNOT landscape programme (the goals of which relate to wildlife population, habitat functionality, community benefit and trans-boundary governance). Our work in Unganisha will deliver to SOKNOT targets through synergy with Goals 1-3 and 5 and many of our KRAs, with related indicators. Sub-landscape 1: Greater Mara and corridors to Amboseli: 6 current contracts, all matched under the new strategy. Immediate growth area: Loita; Sub-landscape 2: Amboseli-Chyulu Hills: 0 projects currently funded for FY21; Sub-landscape 3: Tsavo: the national black rhino programme funds some work here. Both of these represent future growth landscapes Cross-landscape: 1 cross Unganisha contract.

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Coastal Kenya Programme The coastal seascape has huge potential to build a resilient blue economy environment for nature and for development. Currently Kenya obtains only 6% of its fisheries from the Indian Ocean and 94% from inland fisheries. Mobilising this huge potential through a combination of sustainable marine ecosystem management and investments in fisheries will be an important strategy over the coming years. The landscapes include the sacred Kaya forests that have sacred value for the 9 indigenous Mijikenda tribes. The region has high biodiversity of both terrestrial and marine species including sea turtles, dugongs, seagrass, corals, sable antelope, elephants. Coastal Kenya is also the new frontier for development: linear, sea ports and extraction all of which put pressure on the fragile ecosystems. In the light of the unique biodiversity and economic threats and opportunities in this area, the range of projects under the KRL landscape plan, will adopt and deliver all of our Strategic Key Result Areas and Goals. Sub-landscape 1: Lamu - Ijara: 0 current projects: long term growth area Sub-landscape 2: Kwale – Kilifi: 1 current project: short term growth area Sub-Seascape 3: Kenya Seascape: 6 current projects: maintain and grow

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Sustainability Our conservation programmes will be designed to have continuation of benefits after the support has ended. Sustainability of interventions will increase the longterm benefits and these should be resilient to risks. The designing, planning and implementation of programme activities will be done with the involvement of stakeholders. Capacity building and institutional strengthening will be critical factors for sustainability. Besides, a well-planned exit from conservation initiatives is critical to sustainability. WWF programmes will typically exit in a phased approach and scale down and change support towards the end of an initiative. Focus will gradually shift more towards monitoring of performance, identification of problems and subsequent provision of targeted support and capacity building for the partners to overcome challenges experienced when programme support is reduced.

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Evidence

We are working on creating a process of monitoring that will enable each area of work (places, national work and operations) to adopt standard indicators, to work towards annual targets and aggregate into an organisational monitoring and tracking tool as summarised below. The aim is that we will have information at all the right parts of the organisation to enable informed and adaptive decisions – and to enable us to say what it is we are achieving as an organisation working together. Goals

Thriving Wildlife

Indicator Summary

Population data of key species

KRAs

1. Community & wildlife co-existence enabled

Indicator Summary

Progress on SAFE, zero poaching and measures of illegal killing

X-cutting KRAs & indicators

Functioning Habitats

People Benefitting

National SDGs Area and quality and placemeasures for based wellbeing each habitat trends

Footprint Greened

Policy Change Secured

Operational Excellence

Metrics on greening of investments, infrastructure, production; CO2 emissions

Assessment of implementation status of environmental policies

Metrics on financial sustainability, talent retention and Organisational Development

2. Wildlife areas & habitat management strengthened

3. Community benefits from NRs improved

4. Environmental considerations prioritised in decision making

5. Green/ blue financing systems adopted

Progress of METT scores in (M)PAs and outside of PAs

Changes in household income and perceptions of access to and conflict over NR

Progress on influencing infrastructure design, spatial planning and certification

Progress on influencing financial systems, bond markets and green jobs

10. Income generation and management

11. Our brand is strong and engaging

12. Effective delivery of organisational targets

Progress # of species, Progress on on income RE adoption, habitat, social and generation and footprint related energy improvements policies (etc) efficiencies and in CC adaptation making actual management progress implementation of funds

Change in brand awareness and metrics about level of support by people

Delivery against team KPIs (including tracking of ESSF progress)

6. Climate resilience enhanced

7. Key policy changes being progressed

8. Regional support from WWF Kenya to WWF in Africa: regional wildlife, finance, forestry, fisheries and geospatial targets met 9. Strengthened and new partnerships: numbers by category, capacity, partnership agreements, funds managed and transformational relationships


People To ensure that the staff capacities mirror the SP ambition, we shall need a strong team in place – (To be further informed by Conservation Action Plans which will be developed per landscape to operationalise the SP) • •

Recruitment of additional team members will be phased as programmes grow and resources are mobilised Employees are the greatest asset of the organization and therefore we shall: • Strive to make Organizational Expectations and Goals clear • Strive to create an open and honest work environment • Strive to provide opportunities to grow, learn and advance • Strive to recognize and reward performance • Strive to identify candidates who are a good fit for both the job and the organization and • Strive to retain talent

Organogram – Senior Leadership Team Governing Board

Head of Internal Audit Chief Executive

Head of Programmes

Head of Fundraising

Head of Finance, Procurement, IT

Head of Communication

Head of People and Culture/Admin

Head of Planning and Performance

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Budget Summary We have projected the costs we need to start to build our organisation to a place where we can deliver the goals. This is the ideal scenario. In a post-Covid world, it will no doubt have to be refined: this is part of the adaptive strategy we are seeking to develop. Cost Per Year/ Per Landscape Direct cost excl core costs recovery - in million, local currency

Management is cognizant that the financial sustainability of the organization is hinged on: 1. Diversification of funding sources with special attention on raising unrestricted funds 2. Identification of suitable investment opportunities for generating additional income 3. Building a healthy funding pipeline for the entire strategic period 4. Cost containment and achievement of cost efficiencies 5. Optimal funds utilization and cost recovery 6. Constituency building and strategic partnerships 7. Development of a robust Financial Sustainability Plan.

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Connecting People, Nature & Economy WWF-Kenya Country Strategy 2020-2030

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Profile for WWF-Kenya

WWF Kenya Country Strategy 2020-2030  

WWF Kenya Country Strategy 2020-2030  

Profile for wwfkenya
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