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Undergraduate Advising Services Center

Academic Advising Handbook


Welcome To WVU

Dear Students: On behalf of the Undergraduate Advising Services Center (UASC), welcome to West Virginia University. Our advisors will help you develop the strong academic foundation you need to succeed at WVU. The resources contained in this handbook will help you with everything from choosing a major and scheduling classes to planning for study abroad and accessing student services on campus. This handbook will prove to be a useful tool throughout your academic career. We sincerely hope that you enjoy your first year at WVU. If you have any academic questions, please feel free to contact our office at any time. Sincerely,

Anita G. Mayer Director

The Mountaineer, selected each year by the Mountain Honorary, first appeared at WVU sporting events in the 1934-1935 school year.

Make sure to look for the Mountaineer Mascot throughout this handbook! Wherever you see our mascot, you also will find a fun fact or important piece of information.

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Contents Why Do I Need An Advisor?

1

Great Expectations: My Advisor And Me

1

How Do I Schedule An Advising Appointment?

2

The UASC Freshman Advising Tutorial

3

The UASC Freshman Advising Workshop

3

What Do You Mean I’m Not In High School Anymore?

4

What Are Some Things I Can Do To Help Me Succeed?

5

What Is The General Education Curriculum?

6

What Is A Checklist?

8

How Do I Decode The Course Schedule?

8

What Do I Need To Know About Math And Chemistry?

9

What Is A Minor?

9

How Do I Calculate My GPA?

10

What Are Probation And Suspension?

11

What Are D/F Repeats And Ws?

11

How Do I Change My Major?

12

Where Can I Find Help Choosing A Major?

12

How Can The Career Services Center Help Me?

13

Been There, Done That: Advice From Alumni

13

What Do I Need To Know About Financial Aid?

14

How Do I Enroll In Summer Classes?

14

What Is A Matriculation Plan?

15

What If I Am A Veteran?

16

What Am I Going To Do After College?

16

What Is The Office Of Disabilities Services?

17

What Study Abroad Opportunities Are Available?

17

What Is The Honors College?

18

10 Things To Do On Campus Before You Graduate

18

How Can I Get Involved On Campus?

19

How Can I Get Involved In The Community?

19

How Do I Contact A Specific Academic College?

20

What Are Some Other Offices I Might Need To Contact?

21

Downtown Campus Map

22

Evansdale Campus Map

24

Health Sciences Campus Map

26

College Lingo 101

28

Where Can I Find Information On…?

30

What Do I Need To Remember?

31

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Why Do I Need An Advisor? WVU expects all students to meet and maintain certain standards and fulfill the requirements of the General Education Curriculum (GEC), the University, and the major. Simply put, navigating this process and making good choices can be challenging. Academic advisors are professional staff or faculty members who assist you in making academic choices, such as choosing a major or selecting the correct courses to take each semester.

The purpose of academic advising is to

The Student Services Center once served as the University’s infirmary, which was relocated to make way for the Mountainlair.

orient you to West Virginia University

teach you how to be responsible for your own academic choices

help you plan and develop academic goals

guide you through the process of choosing a major and planning an appropriate course of study

provide you with a direct connection to the University and its resources

Great Expectations: My Advisor And Me What Should I Expect From My Advisor?

What Does My Advisor Expect From Me?

Professional, accurate advice on majors and classes

Responsibility. Show up. Be on time. Be prepared.

Academic Support and a connection to University resources

Communication. Read your MIX email. Any email from an advisor is important.

Commitment to your academic success

Preparation. Think about and write down a list of majors and courses of intent and/or questions and concerns Commitment to your own academic success

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How Do I Schedule An Advising Appointment? All students are required to meet with an academic advisor at least once each semester to discuss academic progress and choose classes for the next semester. Your major and academic rank determine where you are advised, either at the Undergraduate Academic Advising Services Center (UASC) or in your academic department.

UASC Advising

Departmental Advising

UASC advises special populations, general studies students, and these pre-majors:

Your advisor is a faculty member or professional advisor in your major department. You may be advised in a group or individual session, depending on the department and/or advisor’s policies.

Biology Gen. St. Education Biochemistry Journalism Chemistry Math Comm. Studies Medical Lab. Science Criminology Nursing English Pharmacy Forensics Political Science Gen. St. Business Psychology Sociology

Contact your department to schedule an advising session and find out more about their advising process. You can find the

contact information for your department in the “A to Z Index” on the WVU website.

Freshmen advised by the UASC are required to complete the online freshman advising tutorial and attend a freshman advising workshop once a semester during the freshman year. Individual appointments

Walk-In Advising In The Residence Halls The UASC offers walk-in advising in the residence halls for students who need immediate help or have quick questions. This advising cannot replace your regular appointment but can help you with many other advising-related issues.

also are available for additional assistance throughout the year and for upperclassmen who are not required to attend the workshop.

My priority registration date for spring 20___ classes is __________________________________ at 8am; for summer/fall 20___ classes is ____________________________ at 8am.

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Contact the UASC at (304) 293-5805 for specific days and times.

Priority Registration

Advising Holds

Students are able to register for the next semester’s classes on or after their registration access date. Priority registration dates are assigned each semester, depending on academic rank, and can be found at registrar.wvu.edu/web_registration.

Once you have completed your advising session each semester, your advisor will remove an advising hold that has been placed on your account to prevent you from registering for classes without advisement. Regardless of your registration date, if you have not had your advising appointment, you will not be able to register for classes.


The UASC Freshman Advising Tutorial The freshman advising tutorial is a series of videos and quizzes that you complete online to be able to register for your freshman advising workshop. The tutorial will teach you about scheduling for classes, advising, major matriculation policies, and keeping track of requirements. The tutorial and the workshop are required once each semester during your freshman year. Here is some information about both of these resources.

Access the online freshman advising tutorial at uasc.wvu.edu. Log in using your MyID and password. Format 

2 modules

3 5-question quizzes

Pre-major checklist worksheet

Schedule your workshop

Saves your progress so you can go at your own pace

In 1984, Georgeann Wells, a player for the Mountaineers, was the first woman to dunk successfully in a college game.

My advising workshop is scheduled on ____________________________ at ________ in Room 202, Student Services Center.

Freshman Advising Workshop The freshman advising workshop is the advising method used for UASC freshmen. You will register for your workshop once you have completed your online freshman advising tutorial.

Preparation Where, When, How?

Bring a writing utensil.

Write down a list of questions and/or concerns to ask the advisors.

Room 202, Student Services Center (next to the Mountainlair bookstore).

Each workshop runs 1.5 hours in length.

Attention!

Students who arrive late will not be permitted in the workshop.

Complete the tutorial and schedule a workshop as early in the semester as possible, to avoid missing your registration access date.

Your workshop appointment is scheduled online through the freshman advising tutorial.

Students who miss two scheduled workshop appointments will not be permitted to reschedule until after their registration access date.

No UASC freshman will have a registration hold removed without attending an advising workshop.

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What Do You Mean I’m Not In High School Anymore? Living on your own is not the only difference between college and high school. Here are some differences you might not know.

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High School

College

Your teacher tells you what’s on the test.

If it comes out of the professor’s mouth or from an assigned reading, it’s fair game.

Important information is given in class.

Updates are to eCampus or MIX. Check them often.

You anticipate snow days and two-hour delays.

You go to class regardless of the weather.

Driving to school is convenient.

Parking is limited and can cost a lot of money.

Your parents monitor your social habits.

You are on your own and monitor yourself.

You receive periodic grade reports.

You keep track of your grades on your own.

There is a set routine. Someone is there to wake you up and remind you to do your homework.

You have more flexibility, so you have to manage your time and get to class on your own.

Your classes are small and often with the same people. You know your teachers; they know you.

Your classes can be large, and you can get lost in the crowd. Speak up.

You may not have had to study for tests, and it was easy to get good grades.

Your workload increases dramatically: learn good study habits if you want to do well.

You may have juggled school, work, and extracurricular activities.

You still can do a lot, but college is like a full-time job. It will be tougher to take on as much as you did before. Choose wisely.


What Are Some Things I Can Do To Help Me Succeed? This information may seem overwhelming. Just relax, take a deep breath, and understand that following a few simple rules will help get you through a successful college career. Here are a few tips designed to help you maximize your academic potential. PLANNING Make sure you have a weekly plan. Set aside part of your Sunday and organize your week. Create a priorities list. Write down your assignments, exams, and group activities and list them from most to least important.

STUDY TIPS Finding time to study is very important. You will need to develop a strategy that fits your learning style. Make sure to include time to study. For a three-credit class, you should study at least nine hours a week. (Put it in terms of working a full-time job.) Find a quiet, comfortable spot to settle down and study. Avoid as many distractions as possible. If your roommates are bugging you, head out to the library. When studying for tests, try to find out the format. For example, is the exam multiple choice or essay format? Don’t be afraid to ask your professor general questions about an exam. STRESS MANAGEMENT College can be stressful. Sometimes it may seem as if everything is due at once and you don’t know where to begin. Don’t wait until the last minute to start your assignments. In college, many of the papers and projects you are assigned take a lot more time and effort than high school work. Keeping up with your work will reduce stress and give you more time to enjoy yourself. Remember to set some time aside for yourself. For example, Saturday is a perfect ―me‖ day. Do what you want. Lie around the house, or hang out with friends.

Tutoring sessions are available in a number of departments—math, chemistry, psychology, English—as well as in the residence halls and the Mountainlair at WVUp All Night. Ask your advisor or RA about specific times and locations.

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What Is the General Education Curriculum? The General Education Curriculum (GEC) consists of nine objectives designed to give you A well-balanced education. You select courses from an approved list for each GEC. Sometimes your major has assigned a required GEC, but in general, you get to pick most of the classes you use to fill these objectives. Below is a worksheet that will explain each objective category and give you an opportunity to choose classes you might want to take. For a list of courses that are approved for each GEC objective, go to: registrar.wvu.edu/current_students/general_education_curriculum or courses.wvu.edu Consult your major checklist before selecting classes, as your major may have designated certain courses to be used for one or more of the nine GEC objectives.

Objective 1. Communication: 3 (credits)

English 101 (Required for all students) English 102 (Required for all students)

or English 103, which replaces 101 and 102 (Placement required)

Objective 2. Basic Mathematical Skills and Scientific Inquiry: 3-4

2a. Mathematics or Statistics Need For My Major _____________

4

2b. Laboratory Science (with lab)

Successful completion of one course in mathematics or statistics. Each major has more specific requirements.

(No more than ONE pair of GEOL 101/102, GEOL 110/111, GEOG 110/110 can be taken.) My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

3-4

2b. Laboratory Science (without lab) My Top Three

Successful completion of two courses in the natural or physical sciences, of which one course has a lab requirement.

_______________ _______________ _______________

3-4

2c. (or another 2a or 2b) Natural/Physical Science, Natural Resource, Environment My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

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Successful completion of one additional course in mathematics or statistics, natural or physical sciences, or natural resources and the environment.


What Is The General Education Curriculum? Objective 3. The Past and Its Traditions: 3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

Focuses on the historical, cultural, or intellectual development of society over time or on a particular period critical to that development.

Objective 4. Contemporary Society: 3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

Focuses on methods of critical thought and principles of inquiry concerning contemporary issues, ideas, and/or values as seen from a humanistic or scientific perspective.

Objective 5. Artistic Expression: 3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

Focuses on critical inquiry in art, dance, literature, music, or theater.

Objective 6. The Individual In Society: 1

WVUe 191 or equivalent (Required)

3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

Objective 7. American Culture: 3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

Objective 8. Western Culture: 3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________ _______________

Addresses personality motivation, cognition, behavior, social interactions, critical reasoning, ethical judgment, or psychological and physiological growth and development, health, or well-being. Explores issues that have shaped the development of society in the United States, including but not limited to issues pertaining to age, ethnicity, race, region, religion, or social class. Explores historical, cultural, and/or political issues pertaining to a Western nation in an international context.

Objective 9. Non-Western Culture: 3

My Top Three

_______________ _______________

______________

Explores historical, cultural, and/or political issues pertaining to a non-Western region or nation.

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What Is A Checklist? Checklists are forms used by every department on campus to track a student’s academic progress. Here are some important things you should know about checklists.

Each department uses a different format, but it is typically a single sheet of paper that lists the requirements for your major. You and your advisor will fill in your grades each semester.

Your advisor keeps a checklist and updates it regularly, but it is a good idea to maintain your own copy at home.

To obtain a copy of a checklist for your major used by the UASC, visit: advising.wvu.edu. For non-UASC advisees, or to see a full checklist for your major, go to your department’s website or contact their office.

Sometimes departments and instructors will let you enroll in classes that are restricted or full. To get ―signed-in,‖ contact the instructor/department and ask them to electronically override the restriction that is preventing you from registering.

How Do I Decode The Course Schedule? The Schedule of Courses (courses.wvu.edu) is the best way to look up courses you would like to take each semester, but it can be confusing to decode. You can use the course legend for help. Here are some of the abbreviations you will see most frequently.

24-Hour Clock

Other Common Abbreviations

All times on the course schedule are based on the 24-hour clock. This can be decoded with some simple math. Simply subtract 12 from the time listed to get your class time. The 24-hour clock only gets tricky after noon. Before noon, the times are the same as the times you are used to.

Days of the Week:

900 = 9:00 am 1700 = 5:00 pm

1030 = 10:30 am 1830 = 6:30 pm

For Example: WVUe191— Mondays at 1500 in G11 WDB -12 3:00pm

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M-Monday T-Tuesday W-Wednesday

R-Thursday F-Friday

Campus Code: (Listed with building)

Restrictions (EMI): (What prevents you from registering)

D-Downtown E-Evansdale H-Health Sciences A-Instructor Approval C-College L– Level (undergrad) M-Major R-Status (FR, SO...)


What Do I Need To Know About Math And Chemistry? The University requires that all students take a math placement exam called the Quantitative Reasoning Assessment (QRA) in order to be placed into math and chemistry courses. Here is some additional information about the QRA and placement into these courses.

QRA/Math Placement Exam

Math Workshop

The QRA is a one-hour, 50-question exam that is broken into two sections, basic algebra and calculus readiness.

The math workshop is a non-credit, one-semester course. The workshop prepares students to take college algebra but does not count for college credit.

Students may take the exam up to two times but must register online each time. To register, go to math.wvu.edu/drupal. Practice tests are available on the website listed above.

Visit advising.wvu.edu/planning/qra or contact an advisor for help determining which math or chemistry class you should take.

What Is A Minor?

Students register for the workshop online at math.wvu.edu/drupal. There is a $200 fee for the workshop that is due at the time of registration. Math 121 is NOT the same course as the math workshop and does not qualify a student to go on to a higher math course.

Taken EDP 101 already? Consider taking EDP 293, Math/Science Strategies. This course must be taken in the same semester as a math or science.

A minor is a set of courses taken in a specific area outside your major. Minors are a great way to complement your major or pursue another area of interest.

Current Minors Catalog

Things to Remember about Minors

Requirements for each minor currently offered at WVU are listed at:

You cannot officially declare a minor until you are accepted into your major; however, a student can begin the courses required for a minor at any time. Two courses required for the minor can also be used to satisfy GEC objectives for your major. Ask your advisor for more information about minors.

provost.wvu.edu/r/download/89580 Three minors in which I might be interested are: ___________________________________ ___________________________________ ___________________________________

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How Do I Calculate My GPA? Use the following worksheet to calculate your expected GPA for this semester. Visit advising.wvu.edu/planning/gpa_calculator to use a future GPA calculator that gives you an idea of how your GPA can improve over time.

1.

Directions Make a list of your classes in the bottom chart below.

2.

List your estimated grades for each class. Be honest

with yourself. 3.

Using the table below, determine the quality/GPA

= Cumulative GPA Total Credit Hours Total Quality/GPA Points

points you earned for each course. 4.

Use the formula to the right to calculate your GPA.

Grade

1 Credit

2 Credits

3 Credits

4 Credits

A

4

8

12

16

B

3

6

9

12

C

2

4

8

8

D

1

2

3

4

F

0

0

0

0

Sample Course

Credit Hour

Estimated Grade

Quality/GPA Points

GEOG 102

3

A

12

ENGL 101

3

B

9

MATH 126

3

C

6

UNIV 101

1

F

0

BIOL 115

4

B

12

Total

Course

14

Credit Hour

Your semester GPA:

14

= 2.78 39

39

Estimated Grade

Quality/GPA Points

Your semester GPA: =

Total

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What Are Probation And Suspension? Academic probation and suspension are very serious academic consequences. Freshmen CAN be suspended, so it is important that you contact your advisor early in the semester if you feel you might be at risk.

Academic Probation

Academic Suspension

You are placed on academic probation when your cumulative GPA falls below 2.0. Probation is a warning to the student: You must bring up your GPA to avoid suspension.

Academic suspension means you are not permitted to take classes at WVU for one academic year. You can be suspended from your college or school by your dean, if your cumulative GPA falls below that required for that particular college or school. You can be suspended from WVU if your GPA falls below the minimum required for the number of GPA hours you have accumulated.

Your advisor can suggest courses that teach time management and study skills or courses that you can D/F repeat to improve your GPA and refer you to tutoring centers on campus.

What Are D/F Repeats And Ws? If you are at risk for unsuccessfully completing a course, there are some options available to you. You should always contact your advisor prior to using either policy noted below, because there are consequences and limitations to both. The D/F Repeat Policy

Dropping a Class (Ws)

Any course in which you earn a D or F until and including the semester in which you complete 60 attempted GPA hours (including transfer credit) can be repeated any time until you graduate. The grade you earn the second time replaces the original grade. The original hours and grade will no longer affect your GPA. Read more about the D/F Repeat policy in the Undergraduate Catalog (page 53).

You have the option of dropping or withdrawing from a class. This can help you maintain your GPA but should be done sparingly. Remember the 67% Rule: You must complete 67% of attempted hours (Ws and Fs are considered attempts) to keep financial aid!

For any D/F repeat completed (repeated) prior to Fall 2011, your advisor must file the appropriate paperwork. Any D/F repeat completed Fall 2011 or later will be automatically recorded in STAR.

A drop can be done anytime up to the published deadline for the semester (usually around mid-semester). To drop a class, go to “Add/Drop� at http://star.wvu.edu/. A drop during the first week of classes will NOT result in a W on your transcript. After that, any classes you drop will remain on your transcript with grades of W.

Notice: All NR grades will change to Fs at the end of the following semester. Spring and summer grades will change at the end of fall.

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How Do I Change My Major? On game day, Morgantown , and Milan Pushkar Stadium, grow to the largest city in West Virginia with the influx of WVU football fans.

Switching Between UASC-Advised Majors Contact an advisor or call our main desk at(304) 293-5805. All you need is a special form that an advisor can fill out.

Make sure to talk to an advisor about changing your schedule to reflect your new major.

Switching Between Departments Go to your current major department (UASC advisees go to Room 103, Student Service Center) to request the paperwork to transfer to your new major or pre-major. There are requirements to enter every major. If you do not meet these requirements, you may be placed in a pre-major or general studies until you do.

Where Can I Find Help Choosing A Major? It’s okay to be undecided. Many students are undecided or unsure of their majors. Choosing a major can be confusing. Luckily, there are number of easy-to-use resources that can help you find the major that’s right for you.

Off-campus Websites Bureau of Labor Statistics bls.gov/oco/home.htm Occupational Outlook Handbook O*NET OnLine online.onetcenter.org Job descriptions Salary estimates Monster.com Major to career converter Mymajors.com Aptitude testing Recommended majors

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Academic Advising Undergraduate Advising Services Center (UASC) advising.wvu.edu Online access to pre-major checklists and general studies materials One-on-one advising with an academic advisor Major and Career Exploration Courses courses.wvu.edu Orientation (ORIN) 151, Career Exploring and Planning Orientation (ORIN) 161, Exploring Career Options Academic Majors www.wvu.edu/majors/index.cfm Brief descriptions of all majors on campus Undergraduate Catalog coursecatalog.wvu.edu Admission requirements, required courses, and sample schedules for many majors

Career Services Center careerservices.wvu.edu Aptitude testing What can I do with this major?


How Can The Career Services Center Help Me? Deciding on a major or career can be very difficult. Career counselors at the WVU Career Services Center can help you determine which majors leads to which careers, how to explore potential careers, and how to identify the right career and major for you.

Vocational Assessment Tools Career Decision-Making Difficulties Questionnaire (CDDQ) helps you figure out why you are having a hard time making this decision.

Focus is a self-paced, online career/education planning tool to help you select, change, or confirm your area of study. The Strong/Myers-Briggs Assessment Package offers a more in-depth analysis of your interests and personality. The Work Values Sort Sheet compares and ranks what you want to get from a job.

Contact the Career Services Center Located in the Mountainlair above the WVU Bookstore

(304) 293-2221 careerservices@mail.wvu.edu Walk-ins are welcome! careerservices.wvu.edu

Been There, Done That: Advice From Alumni Here are some tips from WVU alumni on the keys to success at WVU.

“Go To Class.” It seems simple, but the best way to improve your grades is to go to class. Often, attendance points can be the difference between an ‘A’ and a ‘B.’ When you go to class, you also get an extra review of the material that will be on tests. “Don’t Go Home Between Classes.” Try to schedule your classes back to back or find a quiet place on campus to do work between classes. If you go home, you’re likely to turn on the TV or take a nap and never get back to campus. “Be Professional.” When you are emailing your professors and other University staff or leaving voicemails, use proper English and be polite. If you offend your professors, they are not going to be willing to help you, and they may judge you by the way you communicate with them. “Get Involved.” Join at least one campus organization, or volunteer for a few hours every week. Graduate schools and employers want to see candidates with additional experience beyond their degree. Getting involved can help you be a well-rounded student and is a rewarding experience. “Treat Yourself.” Maintain balance. College is about more than just studying. When you do well on a test or finish a long study session, take a break and do something you love, such as running on the rail trail, shopping, or treating yourself to a dessert in the dining hall. “Don’t Procrastinate.” Waiting until the last minute doesn’t work in college. Block time in your schedule for studying or working on papers. Make studying mandatory, and your work will get done, and done better.

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What Do I Need To Know About Financial Aid? Much like academic suspension, students who receive financial aid may have that aid suspended if they fail to meet academic standards. At the Office of Financial Aid, academic performance is evaluated each semester. Students who fail to meet the GPA standard listed in the chart below and/or the required 67% completion rate are eligible for a one-semester warning period followed by suspension, if the required performance is not met. Attempted Hours

Required Overall GPA

1-28

1.6

29-58

1.9

59 or more

2.0

Financial aid recipients who are placed on financial aid suspension may appeal to the Financial Aid Appeals Committee.

―Take a class you think you will hate… you might find your passion.‖ –Emily Eddy, freshman, anthropology major

For more information about your specific aid package, visit www.finaid.wvu.edu or contact the Office of Financial Aid at (304) 293-5254 finaid@mail.wvu.edu or visit their office on the second floor of the Mountainlair. Check with your advisor to see when appeal materials must be submitted to the advisor for preparation. Advisors must have time to prepare materials by the deadline assigned by financial aid.

How Do I Enroll In Summer Classes? Taking summer classes at WVU? You register for summer classes the same way you would register for any other semester.

Some WVU students choose to take classes at another school over the summer. This is a good way to keep working toward your degree while at home, but there are some things you should know

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1.

Check out the Transfer Course Equivalency System (TCES) and Guide at tes.sa.wvu.edu to see if the course you would like to take will transfer to WVU.

2.

Don’t see your school or class on the TCES? Bring a copy of the course description with you to your meeting with an advisor. They can help you determine if the class will transfer or send you to the Office of Admissions with the appropriate paperwork.

3.

Before you register for the course, be sure to meet with your advisor to fill out a Transient Application Form. The transient form must be submitted to the Office of Admissions and is required, so make sure you make an appointment early.

4.

Transfer credit will show up on your WVU transcript only if you have a 2.0 GPA or higher. If you have below a 2.0, you may still take a class at another school in the summer, but it will not transfer back to WVU until you earn a 2.0 semester GPA.


What Is A Matriculation Plan? A matriculation plan is an outline of the classes you plan to take in order to reach a goal: entering your department or graduation. Use the worksheet below and a checklist for your major to find out how long it will take to get to your department.

Fall 20__

Spring 20__

Summer 20__

Total Hours:

Total Hours:

Total Hours:

Fall 20__

Spring 20__

Summer 20__

Total Hours:

Total Hours:

Total Hours:

Fall 20__

Spring 20__

Summer 20__

Total Hours:

Total Hours:

Total Hours:

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

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What If I Am A Veteran? WVU provides more than 600 veteran students with a number of academic resources, including a veteran advocate, veteran academic advisor, and specialized classes restricted to veterans. To get started, take the following steps.

Contact WVU’s Veteran Advocate at (304) 293-8262 to make sure all your paperwork is completed, in order to receive funding through the GI Bill.

Are you a general studies student or pre-major advised by the UASC? Make an appointment with the academic advisor to choose classes. (ROTC students are advised by ROTC.)

What Am I Going To Do After College? It’s never to early to start thinking about what you are going to do after graduation.

Tips for Preparing for Graduation 

Work on your resume or Curriculum Vitae (CV).

Go to the Career Services Center for resume help and mock interviews.

Start the job search early. It takes the average college graduate six months to find a job.

Attend job fairs. WVU offers a number of career fairs on campus and even provides transportation to larger career fairs in places like New York City.

Composed by alumnus Louis D Corson, the alma mater is sung prior to each home Mountaineer football game and during commencement ceremonies. Alma Mater Alma, our Alma Mater, The home of Mountaineers Sing we of thy honor Everlasting through the years Alma, our Alma Mater, We pledge in song to you. Hail, all hail! Our Alma Mater, West Virginia U

Is Graduate of Professional School for Me?

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Preparation for graduate school should start in your freshman or sophomore year of college.

You will need to start researching programs and preparing your application materials in your junior year.

Consider a Graduate School Prep Course 

Orientation 260, Preparing for Graduate Education, is offered in both the fall and spring semesters and helps you decided if graduate school is right for you. ORIN 260 also guides you through developing many of the materials you will need for graduate or professional school.


What Is The Office Of Disability Services? To register with the Office of Disability Services, schedule an interview with one of the counselors and be able to provide documentation of your disability.

The Office of Disability Services

Testing and Support Services well.wvu.edu

G-30 Mountainlair, P. O. Box 6423 Morgantown, WV 26506-6423 Phone: (304) 293-6700 Voice/TDD: (304) 293-7740 FAX: (304) 293-3861 Email: access2@mail.wvu.edu

WELLWVU and The Carruth Center for Psychological and Psychiatric Services provide testing and support services for all WVU students.

Academic Advising for Students Registered with the Office of Disability Services The UASC works closely with the Office of Disability Services. If you are registered with that office, you may request to schedule an advising appointment or freshman advising workshop designed for students registered with them. You also will have an early priority registration access date each semester. It is important that students make their advising appointments as early as possible, so they can they can register on time.

What Study Abroad Opportunities Are Available? There are many international travel opportunities available to you. Student Affairs and the Office of International Programs offer several certified programs.

Why study abroad?

Spring Break

Study abroad can complement your major, give you invaluable experience, help you to understand the world around you, and prepare you for work in a global economy.

Earn four credit hours through travel and in-class components

Visit studentaffairs.wvu.edu/xxstudy abroad for more information on these programs.

Several majors on campus offer study abroad opportunities. Contact your department to see if they have any trips planned and if they offer scholarships toward these programs.

Examples:

   

Spring Break Italy Greek Odyssey Explore Mexico Arabian Adventure

Summer Earn six credit hours and gain internship experience in your field of study

Example:

London Internship

Important: To receive course credit for any study abroad program, all students must register first with the Office of International Programs.

17


What Is The Honors College? Through the Honors College, you can create a unique educational experience. Students in the Honors College also enjoy many on-campus benefits, such as a small class each semester and early priority registration. To learn more about the Honors College, visit their website at honors.wvu.edu/index.php.

Requirements To Apply 14 - 34 earned credit hours

ASPIRE aspire.wvu.edu

A minimum 3.7 CGPA

ASPIRE is open to all students and provides

No I's or W's on your transcript

assistance pursuing prestigious undergraduate scholarships and graduate or professional school.

Contact ASPIRE or the Honors College (304) 293-2100 uhp@mail.wvu.edu

10 Things To Do On Campus Before You Graduate It’s easy to get caught up in academics and your social life, but there are a few things that every student should try to do before they graduate.

WVU ranks nationally for prestigious scholarships with 25 Rhodes Scholars, 21 Truman Scholars, and 33 Goldwater Scholars.

10. See a play or show at the Creative Arts Center. 9. Participate in one of the ongoing projects, such as the Appalachian Prison Book Project or the West Virginia Dialect Project, conducted by the English Department. 8. Watch or participate in club or intramural sports on campus. 7. Find a place to study outside. Try the Arboretum or Woodburn Circle. 6. Make pottery or stained glass at the SRC Craft Center, located in the basement of Braxton Tower.

5. Watch the current sky show at the Tomchin Planetarium and Observatory in Room 425, Hodges Hall. 4. Cheer on the Mountaineers at more than just football games. Go to a rifle match in support of our nationally ranked rifle team. 3. Play soccer, shoot some hoops, or read a book on the Mountainlair Plaza. 2. Participate in or watch the annual pumpkin drop at the Engineering Sciences Building. 1. Try to go at least one semester without missing a single class in all of your courses!

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How Can I Get Involved On Campus? Joining one or more student organizations is a great way to make friends on a large campus, demonstrate and use your leadership skills, and impact your community.

There are more than 300 recognized student organizations on campus, including fraternities and sororities, service clubs, professional organizations, recreational organizations, and honoraries. Visit sos.wvu.edu to learn about the different student orgs you can join. Don’t see something you like? Create your own student organization! The SOS provides a resource manual for groups that are just getting started. To become even more involved on campus, consider running for Student Government Association.

How Can I Get Involved In The Community? Service learning takes volunteerism to a new level by coupling meaningful service opportunities with instruction and reflection. WVU offers numerous opportunities to engage in service learning.

Center for Civic Engagement

Amizade

The CCE assists students who want to engage in meaningful service and academic study in the local community, as well as at the national and global levels. The Center offers for-credit service learning courses and coordinates civic engagement activities across campus and in the local community.

The word Amizade (ah-mee-zha-jee) means ‘friendship’ in Portuguese. Amizade is a non-profit organization that partners with schools to offer global service learning and volunteer opportunities with college credit in Africa, Europe, North America, and South America.

To start planning your project, visit cce.wvu.edu.

Visit amizade.org to find out which programs are running for next semester.

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How Do I Contact A Specific Academic College? For specific information about individual departments and colleges at WVU, contact them directly.

College of Business and Economics (304) 293-4092 be.wvu.edu College of Creative Arts (304) 293-4841, ext. 0 ccarts.wvu.edu College of Engineering and Mineral Resources (304) 293-4821 cemr.wvu.edu College of Human Resources and Education (304) 293-5703 hre.wvu.edu College of Law (304) 293-3501 law.wvu.edu College of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences (304) 293-3295 cpass.wvu.edu Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources, and Design (304) 293-2395 davis.wvu.edu

20

There are 86 steps to the stairs that lead from the Life Sciences Building to Woodburn Circle. Eberly College of Arts and Sciences (304) 293-4611 eberly.wvu.edu P.I. Reed School of Journalism (304) 293-3505 journalism.wvu.edu School of Dentistry (304) 293-2521 hsc.wvu.edu/sod School of Medicine (304) 293-6607 hsc.wvu.edu/som School of Nursing (304) 293-1386 hsc.wvu.edu/son School of Pharmacy (304) 293-5101 hsc.wvu.edu/sop


What Are Some Other Offices I Might Need To Contact? Did we forget something? Most information can be found easily by searching the WVU website. Here are some additional resources you may find useful. Campus Calendar

Mountainlair Student Union

calendar.wvu.edu

mountainlair.wvu.edu

Find information about academics, athletics, and

(304) 293-3701

other events occurring this week or month.

Get information about the games area or general WVU information.

Student Recreation Center (Rec) studentreccenter.wvu.edu Check out the group exercise schedule for this month, personal training opportunities, and facility hours.

Undergraduate Scholarship Office undergradscholarships.wvu.edu Oversees and provides support for students earning the Promise Scholarship and other undergraduate scholarships.

WELLWVU

Student Employment

well.wvu.edu

studentemployment.hr.wvu.edu

Take advantage of online wellness resources,

Get help finding on-campus and off-campus

and get contact information for the

student jobs and graduate assistantships.

Carruth Center for Psychological and Psychiatric Services and Student Health. OIT Housing

oit.wvu.edu/oit

housing.wvu.edu

(304) 293-4444

Apply for housing, get information on housing

Change your Master ID or mix password, and

policies and procedures, or submit

get tech support and password help.

work order for your dorm room. Libraries

Student Tickets

libraries.wvu.edu

studenttickets.wvu.edu

See if computers are available in the library, ask

www.wvugame.com

the librarian a question, or do research from home.

View the student ticket distribution policy and schedule, and request tickets for football games.

Office of Student Life studentlife.wvu.edu

Mountaineer Undergraduate Research Review

Find information about a number of student resources, including the Office of Multicultural

honors.wvu.edu/murr

Programs, legal services, commuter programs,

Submit a paper for publication, or read what

off-campus housing resources,

other WVU undergraduates are doing.

and much more.

21


Where Am I?

5 6

8 7

12

4

9 10

3

2

1

Downtown Campus 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

22

Honors & Summit Residence Halls (HON, SMT) Life Sciences Building (LSB) Business & Economics Building (BUE) Ming Hsieh Hall (MHH) built after photo Dadisman Residence Hall (DAD)

6. Stalnaker Residence Hall (STL) 7. Oglebay Hall (OGH) 8. Student Services Center (SSC) 9. Chitwood Hall (CHI) 10.Woodburn Hall (WDB)


Where Am I Going? 16

14

15

13

18

20

19

17

11

22 26

21 23 25

27 24

Downtown Campus 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16.

Martin Hall (MAR) Career Services Center Mountainlair (MTL) Boreman North Residence Hall (BRN) Boreman South Residence Hall (BRS) Arnold Residence Hall (ARH)

17. 18. 19. 20. 21. 22.

Stewart Hall Clark Hall (CKH) Downtown Library (LIB) White Hall (WHI) Eiesland Hall (EIE) Colson Hall (CLN)

23. 24. 25. 26. 27.

Hodges Hall (HOD) Stansbury Hall (STA) Armstrong Hall (ARM) E. Moore Hall (EMH) Brooks Hall (BKH)

23


How Do I Get There? 1 2

3

4

5 6

7 8

9

Evansdale Campus 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

24

Natatorium-Shell (NAT) Coliseum (COL) Child Care Center Creative Arts Center (CAC) Mineral Resources (MRB)

6. 7. 8. 9.

Engineering Sciences Building (ESB) National Research Center (NRCCE) Evansdale Library (EVL) Agricultural Sciences (AGS) not pictured, next to library


Where Is That? 2 6

4

11 10

16 13

12

14

15 17

18

19

Evansdale Campus 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Allen Hall (ALH)/Percival Hall (PER) Student Rec Center (SRC) Lyon Tower (LYT) Bennett Tower (BTT) Braxton Tower (BXT)

15. 16. 17. 18. 19.

Brooke Tower (BRT) WVU Art Museum Lincoln Residence Hall (LNC) Law Center (LWC) Milan Puskar Stadium

25


There Is More Than One Campus?

9 10 5

6 7

4 3 2 1

Health Sciences Campus 1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

26

Pierpont Extended Housing (EXT) Erickson Alumni Center Fieldcrest Hall (FCH) Medical Center Apartments Mountaineer Station (Parking Office)

6. Blanchette Rockefeller Neurosciences In. 7. WVU Eye Institute 8. Physician’s Office Center (POC) 9. Robert C. Byrd Health Sciences Center 10.Ruby Memorial Hospital

8


Huh?

11

12

10 15

13

14

Health Sciences Campus 11. 12. 13. 14. 15.

Chestnut Ridge Hospital National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Ronald McDonald House Law Center (LWC) Milan Puskar Stadium

27


Campus Lingo 101 The transition from high school to WVU comes complete with its own set of terminology used by students, faculty, and staff. Use this glossary, you will start sounding like a senior in no time!

DA Daily Athenaeum; WVU’s official incorporates coursework from across daily student newspaper; published the disciplines Monday through Friday in the fall and I Incomplete; a temporary grade spring semesters, weekly in summer given to students who do not Appeal Request by student for Dean Highest ranking academic complete the assigned work for a reevaluation of academic or financial officer in academic or student affairs class; must have contracted with the status; approval not guaranteed area instructor to complete the work by a specific date Bachelor of Arts Four-year degree Dean’s List Awarded each semester that usually requires core courses in a to full-time students who earn a 3.5 Internship Work experience often variety of subject areas and four GPA or higher with no incompletes or related to an academic area of semesters of a foreign language withdrawals interest; often unpaid Advisor Faculty or staff member who assists students in selecting classes for each academic term and is a resource for questions of all kinds

Bachelor of Science Four-year eCampus Online resource used by degree that requires more intensive instructors and students to post class math and science courses but does materials and hold online courses not usually require a foreign language Elective Optional class; may not Blue Book A small blank notebook count toward major requirements but required for many written exams (can most likely will count toward hours be purchased in Jack’s in the for graduation Mountainlair for around a dollar) FAFSA Free Application for Federal Checklist List of courses required for Student Aid; must be completed each a major; used to keep track of a year in order to receive financial aid; student’s academic progress helps the government determine how much aid a student is eligible to Clickers Remotes used to answer receive questions in some classes (often large lecture halls) so that everyone FERPA Family Educational Rights and can participate in the lecture. Privacy Act; form that allows a student to choose who can receive Commuter Student who does not his or her academic and financial live on campus information Corequisite Course that must be Freshman Advising Workshop A taken during the same term as mandatory group advising session for another; often usually are linked for UASC-advised freshmen; teaches registration purposes about registration and choosing classes for the following semester Course Schedule List of courses and other information necessary for a offered each semester, including successful academic career times, locations, instructors, etc. Credit Hours The number of hours earned for completing a course CRN Course Reference Number; a five-digit code assigned to each section of each class, used to identify and register for classes Cumulative GPA Average of all grades from all semesters

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Math Workshop A course required for students who do not place high enough on the QRA to enroll in M Full-Time 12 or more credit hours in a semester GEC General Education Curriculum; designed to ensure that students develop a foundation of skills that

Lair Mountainlair; WVU Student Union; houses dining options, meeting space, student organization offices, Office of Financial Aid, games, WVUp All Night, and other events Matriculation Plan Outline of the classes a student plans to take in order to graduate or get to a department. Meals Plus Money placed on a Mountaineer Card as part of many of the on-campus meal plans; can be used like a debit card at any on-campus location; does not carry over each semester Minor Area of emphasis outside the major; typically 15-18 credit hours of coursework


Campus Lingo 101 MIX Mountaineer Information Xpress; a web portal used by students and faculty to check e-mail, manage courses, find campus services, and view personalized announcements Mountaineer Card Student Identification Card used to access the PRT, SRC, residence halls, dining halls, buses, and athletic events, and more; keep this with you at all times

Sciences Center campuses QRA Quantitative Reasoning Assessment; math placement exam that determines the math and chemistry courses a student is qualified to take; required for all students RA Resident assistant; an upperclassman who lives in the residence for students living in the hall

Mountain Line Bus service that is free to WVU students with a student ID; operates throughout Morgantown and the surrounding area

Rec Student Recreation Center; located on the Evansdale campus; offers a full fitness center and free fitness classes

Mountaineer Maniacs The largest student organization; supports WVU athletic programs; offers priority seating at athletic events

Registrar Office that deals with all student records, such as transcripts, and with all registration policies and procedures

Mountie Bounty Money placed on a Mountaineer Card that can be used as a debit card at any locations on campus, including dining services and the bookstore

RFL Resident Faculty Leader; resource for students living in in each residence hall; provide academic and educational resources for students

RHC Residence Hall Coordinator; MTWRF Monday, Tuesday, manages residence hall and staff Wednesday, Thursday, Friday; how the days of the week are indicated on ROTC Reserve Office Training Corps; On-campus programs that prepare the Schedule of Courses students who seek military careers President’s List Awarded each following graduation; Army and Air semester to full-time students who Force earn a 4.0 GPA with no incompletes Scantron A sheet often used to take Plagiarism Using someone else’s multiple choice exams; can be work without properly citing them; purchased at on and off-campus carries serious consequences bookstores and Jack’s in the Lair Prerequisite Course that must be SGA Student Government completed before another class; Ex: Association; serves as a voice for ENGL 101 must be completed before students on campus; students can enrollment in ENGL 102 become elected and appointed Probation Academic probation is a warning for students who fall below a 2.0 GPA; financial aid probation is a warning for students who fall below certain grade and course completion requirements set by that office Provost Individual who oversees all academic programs and policies

members and officers Student Accounts Office that deals with tuition other payments; located in Stewart Hall Student LOT A football tailgate that is open only to WVU students; provides free food and prizes before every Saturday home football game

Lyon) located on the Evansdale campus Suspension Academic suspension is removal from courses for one academic year for not meeting academic standards; financial aid suspension is removal from financial aid for a period of time based on requirements set by that office Tutoring Often free; academic assistance for students in specific subjects UASC Undergraduate Advising Services Center; general studies students UF Unforgiveable ‘F’; given when a student engages in some form of academic dishonesty, such as plagiarism or cheating on an exam; grade not eligible for the D/F repeat U92 WVU campus radio W Shows up on a transcript when a student drops a class after the first week of classes; okay to get a few but not make a pattern of it Work Study part of a financial aid award; on-campus work that can be used to help pay tuition WVUP All Night Weekends from 7pm-12am in the Mountainlair; free food; discounted bowling; different activities every week; tutoring; and movies

West Virginia's nickname is the Mountain State and its motto is "Mountaineers Are Always Free."

PRT Personal Rapid Transit; Towers Evansdale Residential track-bound vehicles that connect the Complex; four connected residence Downtown, Evansdale, and Heath halls (Brooke, Bennett, Braxton, and

29


Where Can I Find Information On...? A

Financial Aid

14

QRA

9

Abbreviations

8

G

R

Advice

13

General Education

Research

Advising Holds

2

Curriculum (GECs)

Alma Mater

16

Glossary

28

Scheduling Appointments

2

Amizade

19

GPA Calculation

10

Scholarships Office

21

Appointments

2

Graduate School

16

Service Learning

19

ASPIRE

18

H

Signing In To Classes

8

B Been There, Done That

13

C

6

S

High School

4

Spring Break

17

Honors College

18

Stress Management

5

Housing

21

Student Employment

21

Student Government Assoc.

19

Student Life

21

Student Organizations

19

Student Rec Center

21

Student Tickets

21

Campus Calendar

21

I

Campus Lingo

8

I

28

L

Career Exploration

21

Classes

12

Libraries

Career Services Center

13

M

Carruth Center

21

Majors

12

Study Abroad

17

Map (Downtown)

22

Study Tips

5

24

Summer Classes

14 11

Center for Civic

21

Engagement

19

Map (Evansdale)

Changing Your Major

12

Math

9

Suspension

Checklists

8

Math Placement Exam

9

T

Chemistry

9

Math Workshop

9

Tips for Success

5

Choosing A Major

12

Matriculation Plan

15

Transfer Equivalency System

14

College Information

20

Mid-Semester Classes

11

Transient Form

14

Course Schedule

28

Minors

9

U

Mountainlair

21

UASC Advising

2

21

UF

29

Undergraduate Catalog

12

D Departmental Advising

2

MURR

D/F Repeat Policy

11

N

Disabilities Services

17

Notes

Dropping A Class

11

O

E

21

W

11

WELLWVU

21

Expectations

1

P

Freshman Advising Workshop

3

16

W

OIT

28

Veterans 6

9

FERPA

V

Objectives

EDP 293 F

31

Planning

5

Why Do I Need An Advisor

1

Priority Registration

2

Workshop

3

Probation

11

WVUp All Night

29

Q

Can’t find what you are looking for? Try Campus Lingo (page 28) or the A-Z Index on the WVU website.

30


What Do I Need To Remember? Remember to ask my advisor about ... ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ____________________ ____________________ ―Be sure to get to know your ____________________ professors early. You never know ____________________ when you’ll need a letter of ____________________ recommendation.‖ ____________________ Maria Sellas, ____________________ freshman, pre-pharmacy major ____________________ ____________________

31


Written and Distributed by Undergraduate Advising Services Center West Virginia University P.O. Box 6212 Morgantown, WV 26506 (304) 293-5805 (fax) (304) 293-4365 advising.wvu.edu email: uasc@mail.wvu.edu This Book Belongs To ____________________________ Anticipated Graduation Date ________

Edition 2 Printed November 2011 The Academic Advising Handbook is accurate as of the printed date but subject to change.


WVU UASC Advising Handbook