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THE WVU TECH MAGAZINE

TRACKS

Celebrating 60 Years of Engineering

SPRING

Focusing on Student Success

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Greetings from Montgomery! As I celebrate my first full year at WVU Tech, I am honored to work alongside such wonderful alumni, faculty, staff and students in our collective efforts to revitalize WVU Tech. Allow me to share a few of the great things we’ve accomplished in the past few months focusing on our three Rs: Recruit. Retain. Rebuild.

letter from the

WVU TECH CEO

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We’ve expanded our recruitment territories to include targeted areas in California, Florida, New York, Pennsylvania and Texas. We’ve completed renovations on the new Student Success Center that will provide advising, tutoring and other student services critical to the retention of our current students. We recently completed a three million dollar renovation to Old Main, expanded our Wi-Fi offerings on campus, and thanks to the West Virginia Department of Transportation, repaved the roads on campus. As you can see, great things are happening at Tech, but there’s still work to do. We are creating a new Alumni Recruitment Network to assist in our recruitment efforts, developing a campus-wide retention plan and exploring options for the former CoEd site. We’re working on permanently adding new academic offerings to our curriculum including aviation management, forensic investigation and secondary math and science education. This issue of Bear Tracks highlights campus updates, the sixtieth anniversary of the Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering & Sciences, our new Student Success Center and upcoming events. I’d like to invite you to reacquaint yourself with WVU Tech. Join the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association, follow us on Facebook and Twitter, come back for a campus visit and consider supporting the University’s annual fund. Most importantly, show your Golden Bear pride by wearing your WVU Tech gear and sharing the news about the great things happening at Tech! Warmest Wishes,


contents

2 Letter from the WVU Tech CEO 4 Campus Updates 8 Homecoming 2012 

Focusing on Student Success

2 A Worthwhile Investment 4 Sixtieth Anniversary of Engineering 8 Transforming Campus

West Virginia University Institute of Technology Campus Executive Officer Carolyn Long

Editor

Adrienne King

Design

Katrina Baker

Web

Bok Kwee Toh

Contributors

2 Class Notes 2 In Memoriam 22 Alumni Q&A 24 Upcoming Events

ON THE COVER: WVU Tech faculty, staff and students gather for a group photo on College Colors Day. West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin proclaimed October 5, 2012, “College Colors Day” in honor of College Application and Exploration Week.

Dr. Ronald Alexander, ’64 Rachelle Beckner Jason Hendrix Tara Hines, ’03 Dr. Ernest Nester Dr. Zeljko Torbica

Photographers

Katrina Baker James Holloway Rick Lee Bok Kwee Toh

Paulette Wright

Office of Relations & Communications

Old Main 201 Montgomery, WV 25136 wvutech.edu Tech-Relations-Communications@mail.wvu.edu

Change of Address

WVU Foundation PO Box 1650 Morgantown, WV 26504-1650 info@wvuf.org

Class Notes

WVU Institute of Technology Office of Alumni Relations 304.442.3131 Tech-Alumni@mail.wvu.edu alumni.wvutech.edu

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West Virginia University Institute of Technology is governed by the West Virginia University Board of Governors and the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. WVU Tech is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action institution.

wvutech.edu

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CAMPUS UPDATES

TGBAA hosted Almost Alumni luncheon

The Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association hosted the Class of 2012 for a special “Almost Alumni” luncheon on Friday, May 4.

WVU TECH CELEBRATED 113TH COMMENCEMENT WVU Tech celebrated the Class of 2012 during the 113th Commencement on the Montgomery campus on Saturday, May 5. This year’s ceremony recognized 178 graduates.

THE L AST HURRAH ALUMNI GATHERING Over 100 Tech alumni gathered in Beckley the first weekend in May for “The Last Hurrah” celebrating years of friendship and Golden Bear spirit. Upward Bound received $1.8 million in funding

WVU Tech was selected to receive more than $1.8 million to fund the Upward Bound program on campus. A TRIO program, UB provides support for high school participants in their precollege performance, and ultimately, in their higher education pursuits.

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Golden Bears hosted Statewide UB Olympics

Tech hosted the statewide Upward Bound Olympics on Wednesday, July 11. Nine Upward Bound programs consisting of more than 500 participants from across the state came to Montgomery for the day’s activities including events such as flag football, moon ball, tennis, basketball, mathletics and chess.


Camp STEM inspires high school students

2012 Hall of Fame Class Inducted

Held in Montgomery every summer, Camp STEM teaches high school students about science, technology, engineering and math – through hands-on application. The 2012 Camp’s 46 attendees had an opportunity to select from classes such as renewable energy, computer science and forensics.

The WVU Tech athletics department inducted six new members into the Hall of Fame on Friday, August 24. The 2012 class included Mike Bell, ’60; Pete Cosby, ’85; Don Davis, ’66; Ken Dillo, ’64; Don Thompson, ’56; and Ken Zigmond, ’72. College Application and Exploration Week

Tech partnered with Riverside High School on Wednesday, October 3, to celebrate the state’s third annual “College Application and Exploration Week.” Tech officials were available on the RHS campus to assist high school students with their college applications and answer questions about financial aid options. Golden Bear Family Day at Coonskin Park Dr. Zeljko “Z” Torbica named Dean

Dr. “Z” assumed his new role at WVU Tech on Wednesday, August 1. Prior to his position at Tech, he was the program director and associate clinical professor of construction management at Drexel University. He has 13 years of higher education experience in both public and private universities, in addition to his international private-sector business record. Nursing program reports 93% NCLEX passage rate

WVU Tech’s Department of Nursing announced that 93 percent of the 2012 class of nursing students successfully passed the NCLEX-RN licensure exam on their first attempt.

The entire WVU Tech community gathered for an old-fashioned potluck lunch on Sunday, October 21, in celebration of the Golden Bear men’s soccer team. The team defeated Southern State Community College 12-1.

REGIONAL ROSIES:

*

Appalachian Women in World War II

RICE LECTURE FEATURED DR. PAMELA EDWARDS

The fourth annual Otis K. Rice Lecture Series featured Dr. Pamela Edwards, part-time professor of history at Shepherd University, on Thursday, October 25. The event, sponsored by the West Virginia Humanities Council, City of Montgomery and the Montgomery Historical Committee, was entitled “Regional Rosies: Appalachian Women in World War II.”

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CAMPUS UPDATES

National Chemistry Seminar

In honor of National Chemistry Week, WVU Tech hosted Dr. Kenneth O’Connor from Marshall University for a special seminar on Thursday, October 25. State of Tech Address

Alumni, faculty, staff, students and friends gathered on the WVU Tech campus during homecoming weekend to hear the annual State of Tech Address presented by CEO Carolyn Long. In Long’s first-ever State of Tech Address, she reported on the University’s work towards the three Rs: Recruit. Retain. Rebuild.

202 ALUMNI OF THE YEAR

On Friday, October 26, the WVU Tech community honored the 2012 Alumni of the Year recipients at the annual banquet: Dr. Scott Glenn, ’99, from the College of Business, Humanities and Social Sciences and Gene Morgan, ’91, from the Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering and Sciences. Tech names Director of Development

Rachelle Beckner joined the University as the new director of development on Wednesday, November 14. Prior to her appointment at WVU Tech, she was a senior development officer at the CAMC Foundation in Charleston, W.Va. 48th Annual ASCE Fall Technical Conference

The WVU Tech American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) student chapter sponsored the 48th Annual ASCE Fall Technical Conference on Thursday, November 15, on the Montgomery campus.

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Golden Bears receive USCAA Academic All-American Honors

Eight of our student-athletes received Academic All-American honors for Fall 2012 (GPA of 3.5 or higher): Monika Becker, Zach Carnahan, Katie Harper, Casey Orndorff, Haley Pauley, Mario Paz, Michael Perrow and Kylie Whitney. AST Sorority Leads “Toys for Tots” Drive

The sisters of the WVU Tech Alpha Sigma Tau Gamma Mu Chapter sponsored a toy drive for the United States Marine Corps (USMC) Toys for Tots campaign. Holiday Open House

CEO Carolyn Long hosted a Holiday Open House for faculty and staff on Thursday, December 6, at the University’s Robinson House. Students were invited to celebrate the holidays with a pizza party that evening at the President’s House.

GOLDEN BEAR SOCCER TEAM IS NATIONAL RUNNER-UP

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HE MEN’S SOCCER TEAM PRODUCED ONE OF THE BEST STORY LINES OF ATHLETIC ACCOMPLISHMENT IN THE UNIVERSITY’S HISTORY, FINISHING AS THE NATIONAL

RUNNER-UP IN THE USCAA. THE 18-2-1 GOLDEN BEARS POWERED THROUGH A HIGHLY COMPETITIVE SCHEDULE WHERE THEIR RECORD HAD THEM RANKED EITHER #1 OR #2 THROUGHOUT THE ENTIRE SEASON.


LIGHT UP OLD MAIN FESTIVITIES WVU Tech partnered with the City of Montgomery to celebrate the holiday season with special festivities on Friday, December 7. The celebration included the annual city parade at 7:00 pm and concluded with the fourth annual WVU Tech Light Up Old Main event at 8:00 pm.

Tech’s national championship dreams ended when Cinderella-story Briarcliffe College defeated the Golden Bears in front of a packed crowd at the John B. Lewis Soccer Complex in Asheville, N.C. However, the team had many accomplishments individually, and as a whole, throughout the season. The Golden Bears set a total of 85 individual and team records this season. Junior forward Joe Jackson set the single-season (11) and individual career mark (22) for assists, while freshman

Rodrigo Manzanares set the single season records for shots (76), points (50), and goals (20). Captain and goalkeeper John Dunn left his mark on WVU Tech Athletics leaving the university as the most decorated student-athlete in men's soccer while holding every record for which a goalkeeper is eligible. “I am very proud of our team’s commitment, hard work and dedication on and off the field,” commended head coach Luis Cortell.

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By Adrienne King

H O M ECO M I N G

H

OMECOMING 202 WAS A WEEKLONG CELEBRATION LEADING UP TO THE OPENING OF THE WVU TECH WOMEN’S AND MEN’S BASKETBALL SEASONS. THE WEEK’S EVENTS INCLUDED TWO NEW CAMPUS

TRADITIONS: SPIRIT WEEK AND CAMPUS CUP. THE WINNERS OF THE FIRST CAMPUS CUP COMPETITION INCLUDED THE “ALCHEMISTS,” “TECH SOCCER” AND “PHI KAPPA TAU” TEAMS.

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2012


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Alumnus of the Year Dr. Scott Glenn, ’99, enjoys the homecoming tailgate. [2] Seniors Monika Becker and Jordan Brooksher were crowned homecoming king and queen. WVU Tech alumnus Ed Robinson, ’69, was honored as the parade marshal. [4] Senior David Rawlinson heads towards the basket. [5] Lady Golden Bears come together as a team before the start of the game. [6] Phi Kappa Tau participates in the annual homecoming parade. [7] Alumnus of the Year Gene Morgan, ’91, poses for a photo with his family. [8] WVU Tech students cheer on their Golden Bears. [9] Delta Kappa Theta ladies pose for a quick picture before the homecoming parade. [1]

[3]

On Friday, October 26, CEO Carolyn Long presented

her first ever State of Tech Address to alumni, faculty, staff, students and friends of the University. Her

Crown bearers were Sarah Hopkins and Logan Weese.

Hopkins is the daughter of Sharon and Paul Hopkins.

address included the presentation of the

homecoming video contest submissions. The celebration continued Friday evening with the annual Alumni of the Year

Her father is a 1997 Tech graduate and her

mother is a current Tech student in the nursing program. Weese is the son of Rodney and April Weese, ’99.

The women’s and men’s basketball teams

Banquet. This year’s recipients included

played before a packed house of Golden Bear

Saturday’s festivities included the annual

court was recognized at half-time during

Dr. Scott Glenn, ’99, and Gene Morgan, ’91. Alumni Association meeting, Homecoming

Parade and the Wild West Tailgate. Alumnus

Ed Robinson, ’69, was honored as the parade marshal in recognition of the 60 anniversary th

of the WVU Tech Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering & Sciences.

fans, winning both games. The homecoming the men’s basketball game. Seniors Monika Becker and Jordan Brooksher were crowned homecoming queen and king.

Homecoming t-shirt artwork created by senior Monika Becker who is majoring in interdisciplinary studies with an emphasis in graphic design and marketing.

IN CELEBRATION OF HOMECOMING 2012 WVU TECH SPONSORED A VIDEO CONTEST. STUDENTS WERE ASKED TO ILLUSTRATE WHY WVU TECH IS THEIR “HOME, HOME IN THE HILLS”. FIRST PLACE ($500):

THIRD PLACE ($100 PRIZE) TIE:

“Home in the Hills” by Phi Kappa Tau

“Living Life Like It’s Golden” by Monika Becker & Angel Thompson

SECOND PLACE ($250):

“WVU Tech: My Home” by Vincent Nealen

“Tech Softball Spirit” by the Tech Softball Team

VIEW THE STUDENTS’ VIDEO SUBMISSIONS

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By Adrienne King

Focusing on

Student Success

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WVU Tech students have a new location to hang out and study.

enerations of Golden Bears will remember the blue and gold paw prints painted on

the road leading visitors throughout the campus. This year, the paw prints lead to a

new destination — West Virginia University Institute of Technology’s new Student

Success Center. Offering a wide-range of programs and services aimed at assisting students in their educational success, the center houses offices for academic advisors and tutors, along with individual and group study spaces and a café lounge.


The Student Success Center is one of Tech’s newest

initiatives to fulfill CEO Carolyn Long’s mission to Recruit. Retain. Rebuild. “Our number one priority is student success,” explained CEO Long. “They are the present and

future of Tech.” Dean of Students Richard Carpinelli commented, “The center is a high-tech, comfortable place for

our students to study, have access to educational resources, including one-on-one

Our number one priority is student success,” explained CEO Long. “They are the present and future of Tech.

advising, tutoring services and educational

enrichment programs.” All first-year aca-

demic advising will be coordinated through

the center, as well as workshops covering

topics such as study skills and time man-

agement. The center’s computer

lab

will

include computers and

specialized software,

as well as laptop computers for use in the library. The

center’s staff will be available to provide ongoing academic success programs and advising services for students.

“Our goal for the center is to provide ongoing support

for our students from the time they enter, to the time

they graduate,” said Kelly Hudgins, WVU Tech’s new director of the Student Success Center. Hudgins joined the

University in February to lead the center’s programming, oversee freshmen advising and peer tutoring. Hudgins

has successfully led similar programs at Southern Oregon

University and Austin College. “I have a special place in my heart for students with ambition and goals, but just need a little bit of assistance.”

The project, totaling more than $400,000, was

funded by the West Virginia Legislature upon approval

from the Higher Education Policy Commission in May

2012. Renovations for the center, which is housed on the Top: WVU Tech’s APO organization paints the blue and gold paw prints that lead to the new Student Success Center. Above: Engineering students Craige Willoughby and Joseph Caudill discuss an upcoming assignment.

third floor of the Vining Library, began last summer. The

University is planning a grand opening celebration this spring for the new facility.

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By Rachelle Beckner

Joseph and Diana Haskett, ’81, chose to invest in the education of future Golden Bears with a planned gift to the University.

Investment: A Worthwhile

Providing Opportunities for Future Golden Bears

iana Ball Haskett, ’81,

Even though Diana reflects fondly

would one day work in the medical

college student at Tech, she doesn’t want

aged me to go to college,” Diana recalled.

knows the difficulties of

on these memories of struggles as a

college classes and a full-time job.

other students to have the same hard-

juggling a full load of

To save money her freshman year, she lived at home with her parents in East Bank. “When they went to work in the mornings, I went with them

and waited at Montgomery General Hospital until it was time to go to my classes,” she recalled recently. “After my classes were finished, I would go

money to attend college. Her parents

WVU Tech by providing a nursing

financial aid. Fortunately for Diana, she

$200,000 gift in their wills to support scholarship for future Golden Bears.

“I remember working as a student

and it was hard,” Diana said. “The

hospital assisted me throughout school.” For the Hasketts, who have no

children of their own, a gift in their

Her sophomore year, she married

of their wealth. “It’s money well spent,”

her high school sweetheart, Joe. “We lived in an apartment in East Bank

for six months and then moved to

Montgomery to live near the hospital. I walked to my classes or used my husband’s Camaro,” she said. 12 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B E AR

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But with four siblings, there wasn’t

ships.The Hasketts recently included a

back to the hospital and study until they went home for the day.”

field as well. “My parents always encour-

made too much money for her to receive grew up in Montgomery – the home of

WVU Tech, which at the time, offered a two-year nursing program.

“[Tech] was so close because my

parents lived there,” she said.

With no financial aid and no

wills to support Tech was the best use

money for college, she worked as a

Joe said. “It’s investing in the future.”

attending Tech. “I remember going to

“It’s a good feeling to invest in some-

one’s future; to know that I’ve helped a child go to college,” Diana agreed.

With parents who worked as re-

spiratory therapists, Diana knew she

nursing assistant at the hospital while college and thinking that it would be nice to have a scholarship,” she said.

The Hasketts moved to Virginia

in 1988, but are still loyal to their hometown and state. “We’re West


It’s money well spent,” Joe said. “It’s investing in the future.

Diana Haskett received her nursing degree from Tech in 1981.

Va. Diana works as an endoscopy reg-

We can help!

Center in Salem, Va. The couple makes

Thinking of making a gift to benefit WVU Tech through your will, living trust, IRA or other manner? If so, the proper wording is important to ensure that your gift fulfills the purpose you intended. Make sure your attorney uses this wording, “To the West Virginia University Foundation, Inc. (FEIN 55-6017181) for the benefit of WVU Institute of Technology.” To direct your gift to a specific purpose or program, additional wording is appropriate. Good choices are student scholarships, faculty support, library resources, technology funds or unrestricted. For assistance with the process, please contact Rachelle Beckner, director of development, at 304.442.1078 or Tech-Development@mail.wvu.edu.

istered nurse at LewisGale Medical a good living, but hasn’t accumulated

the wealth to make an immediate gift to Tech. For them, a bequest made

sense, and with the help of develop-

ment officers at the West Virginia University Foundation*, the gift was easy to establish.

The staff at the WVU Founda-

tion provided information for the

Hasketts and they took it to their lawyer to include in their wills. “Ev-

Diana Haskett remembers her time at Tech fondly, especially the nursing pinning ceremony.

erything was written out like I wanted it,” Diana said.

The WVU Foundation guided

the Hasketts through the process with Virginia people by heart,” Diana said. “We’d rather help people back home. I know people back home need assistance. We want to ensure that they have

money there to go to school at Tech.” Joe works as a semi-conductor

for Cobham Defense in Blacksburg,

such ease that they encourage other

Tech alumni to consider giving to their alma mater. They are proud of the impact their gift will have on future

Tech nursing students. “Tech gave me a

great education and it was a reasonable

price,” Diana said. “I wanted to make sure that someone else can go there.”

*In June 2011, WVU Tech entered into a partnership with the WVU Foundation to provide fundraising support for the institution. Donors who make a gift to support WVU Tech will receive a gift receipt for tax purposes from the WVU Foundation. Expenditures from WVU Foundation accounts for the benefit of Tech require the approval of the WVU Tech Campus Executive Officer or his/her designee.

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ENGINEERING

college of

By Adrienne King

Dr. Gifty Osei-Prempeh, assistant professor of chemical engineering, works with students in the lab.

ONG KNOWN FOR ITS ACADEMIC PRESTIGE IN ENGINEERING, WEST VIRGINIA UNIVERSITY INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY FIRST RECEIVED AUTHORIZATION FROM THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION TO OFFER A BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN ENGINEERING IN 1952. SINCE THEN TECH HAS BEEN AN INNOVATOR IN THE VARIOUS FIELDS OF ENGINEERING, ESTABLISHING ITS REPUTATION AS ONE OF THE STATE’S LEADING UNDERGRADUATE STEM INSTITUTIONS.

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The first engineering degrees awarded by Tech were

in electrical engineering in 1955. The class of five were the first-ever Tech engineering graduates. “Enrolling at Tech and in the electrical engineering program changed my life forever,” explained Tom Dressler, ’55.

“I would have never had the opportunities I was given

during my 40 year career without the engineering program and my degree from Tech,” Dressler said.

In 1956 then-president Dr. William Axtell hired

Dr. Leonard C. Nelson as Tech’s first director of engineering. “At the time I was working as an associate professor in the mechanical engineering department at North Carolina State,” Nelson explained. Nelson first heard about the

job at Tech from a Tech faculty member who passed his

From the drafting tables of the past to today’s cutting-edge technology, Tech’s engineering students graduate prepared for industry.

Dr. Lyle Blackwell served as the director from 1966–72

name along to the president. President Axtell had written

and dean from 1972–85. Under Blackwell’s leadership, the

challenge, and which might very well interest you, is that

the addition of computer science in

to Nelson: “A further reason which makes this position a

it is a young program and the potential for developing a top-notch engineering program is great.”

After accepting the position, Nelson realized indeed

just how much potential lie in the program, despite

its embryonic state. He described the first few years,

1970s were full of continued growth for the College, with 1970 and a master’s degree program in

engineering in 1979, which was later discontinued. Chemical engineering was accredited by ECPD in 1972.

Tech awarded the first Master

“Our challenge was to establish the various engineering

of Engineering degree in 1981 to

accreditation.” At the time, Tech had three engineering

Kettlewell, ’71. The electronic engineer-

departments and strengthen them so that they could pass

civil engineering graduate Raymond

A r e f l e cti o n o n th e pa s t

60 YEARS t h e f u t u r e AND A GLIMPSE AT

I would have never had the opportunities I was given during my 40 year career without the engineering program and my degree from Tech. - Tom Dressler, ’55

departments: electrical, mechanical and chemical. “I attribute

ing technology program received ABET accreditation in

heads. I simply orchestrated their efforts.”

in 1983. Dr. Robert Gillespie served as dean in 1985, prior

our success to the people I hired. We had good department

In 1961 Nelson became the institution’s fifth president

1982, and a 23,000 sq. ft. addition to ELab was completed

to his role as the University president from 1986–1992.

and served until 1987. Lloyd Ritchey replaced Nelson as

Dr. Ernest Nester assumed the role of dean in 1986 and

for the next three years, during which Tech added civil

Tech added a master’s degree in control systems engineer-

director in 1962 and served as the engineering director engineering to its curriculum offerings.

The current engineering building was completed in 1967,

served in that capacity until 1994. During Nester’s tenure ing, which was discontinued in 2007.

In honor of President Nelson’s service to Tech, the

which allowed all of the engineering programs to be housed

College was officially renamed the Leonard C. Nelson

when, in 1968, civil, electrical and mechanical engineering

us an identity,” explained Nelson.

under one roof. Nelson’s accreditation objective was successful

became accredited by the American Engineers’ Council for

Professional Development (ECPD), today’s Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).

College of Engineering in 1986. “I believe the naming gave

The University saw tremendous changes during

the next two decades. In 1996, Tech became a regional

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division in 2007. After a legislative mandate in 2009,

Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering & Sciences

all West Virginia community & technical colleges were

Degrees awarded through December 2012

TOTAL

separated from their four-year counterparts. WVU Tech continues to share its campus with Bridgemont Community

BS Chemical Engineering

622

education courses.

BS Civil Engineering

1348

BS Computer Science

377

BS Computer Engineering

48

BS Electrical Engineering

1743

BS Mechanical Engineering

1150

BS Engineering Technology

52

BS Electronic Engineering Technology

67

BS Engineering Technology Civil Emphasis

49

BS Engineering Technology Environmental Emphasis

1

BS Engineering Technology Mechanical Emphasis

31

BS Industrial Technology

7

TOTAL BS

5495

MS in Engineering

86

MS in Control Systems Engineering

22

TOTAL MS

108

need to adapt to these changes by becoming

5603

alternative sources of revenue, such as increased

& Technical College, and the two institutions collaborate on issues such as facilities maintenance and general

As industrial needs have evolved, so too have Tech’s

academic offerings, including the introduction of a 2+2 aerospace engineering program in 1999 in collaboration

with WVU. Both the civil and mechanical engineering

technology emphases received ABET accreditation in

2001. A separate computer engineering program was started in 2005 and accredited in 2007.

Dr. Zeljko “Z” Torbica was named dean in 2012.

With more than 13 years of higher education experience

in both public and private universities, in addition to his international private-sector business record, Torbica will lead the College through its next phase of challenges and opportunities for growth. “A ‘tectonic shift’ is taking place

in the funding of public higher education in the United States, and West Virginia is no exception. We less dependent on state funding by finding

enrollment, funded research, fundraising and

TIMELINE

offering more revenue-generating services to the market,” stated Torbica.

1952 BS in engineering authorized

“One of our proudest legacies has been our strong

1955 First degrees in electrical engineering

traditional engineering curriculum with a practical orientation.

al engineering rees in mechanical and chemic

1956 First deg

This approach has served our programs and reputation well,” he explained. Torbica sees the future of engineering

Tech Accredits Colleges ed blish esta r e t d hap dde ent c ga stud n E i g r E IE ee rin 1957 gin ee n n e i g ild ivil en bu r 0C ivil o cto 196 t c t a s in an re gr ile ree g s e e np td giv o irs n arb F o i c 3 iss 196 m m Co gy r e En ic m o At

ciation of ntral Asso e C h rt o N

in integration, with many engineering and science subdisciplines converging. “I also believe that in order

to produce top-notch engineers of tomorrow, our

engineering student Raymond Kettlewell

1981 First master’s degree awarded to civil

Engineering program

1979 Final approval to start Master of

1975 First degrees in computer science

Eta Kappa Nu authorized

1974 Zeta Omicron Chapter of

W.Va. Beta Chapter of Tau Beta Pi chartered

accredited by ECPD

1972 Chemical engineering

nd m tric al a

elec ivil, T RAC K S

1968 C

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ech let anic ed al e acc n g red i n e ited e by E ring CPD 1970 Co mpute r Scien ce add ed

co mp

ing

ild

bu

ng ine er ing

196 7E

5 196

AS CE

St u

de

nt

Ch ap te r

es t

ab

lis

he d

curriculum needs to be carefully balanced


to emphasize the development of both ‘how to produce’ and ‘what to produce’ capabilities.”

Shae Shamblen, senior chemical engineering major,

explained, “WVU Tech was my college choice for several

reasons: the accredited engineering program, smaller

classroom setting which enhances my learning and friendly atmosphere given from students and staff. I hope to gain a

lifetime of opportunities, including a successful career, with the education and experiences that I obtain.”

When asked about Tech’s role in the future of

engineering, Nelson commented, “there is no question

that there is, and will continue to be, a need for quality engineering graduates to provide innovation and product

development now and in the future.” Torbica added, “Educating top-notch engineers, technologists, scientists and mathematicians who can go out into the world and

have a positive impact on peoples’ lives takes a lot of hard work and resources. I’m confident that with the support of our alumni and friends, Tech is up to the challenge.”

Research contributions by Dr. Ronald Alexander, ’64; Tara Hines, ’03; Dr. Ernest Nester and Dr. Z. Torbica.

“One of our proudest legacies has been our strong traditional engineering curriculum with a practical orientation.”

Master of Science in control system engineering discontinued

accredited by ABET

2007 Computer engineering

2005 BS in computer engineering offered

mechanical engineering technology programs accredited by ABET

2001 Civil engineering technology and

1999 BS in aerospace engineering (2+2) offered

program discontinued

1992 Master of Engineering

systems engineering offered

1991 Master of Science in control

to the ELab completed

1983 A two-story addition (23,000 ft²)

program accredited by ABET

1982 Electronic engineering technology

- Dr. Z. Torbica

Top Right: Dr. Bernhard Bettig, associate professor of mechanical engineering, works with a student on his computer drafting assignment. Above Left: Prospective students tour the robotics lab during an open house event. Above Right: Mechanical engineering students Don Raymond, ’86, Scott Minor, ’86, Debbie Cashdollar Wadell, ’87, and Kevin Welch, ’85, put the finishing touches on their baja buggy.

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By Tara Hines, ’ 03

TRANSFORMING

CAMPUS W

VU Tech’s campus landscape is changing, bringing with it new opportunities to create a vibrant and thriving atmosphere. As part of the Revitalization Plan the CoEd dormitory was razed to create additional green space. The idea was to create a space with the students’ wants and needs in mind. Tech CEO Carolyn Long

explained, “It is important for us to give the students a place to utilize and to call their own.”

At a Student Government Asso-

“Every year I encourage my students

on campus were polled in order to

fall, Long asked those in attendance

the community. This is a project that

On December 5, 2012, the

ciation (SGA) student forum this past to think about how they envisioned

the space. The top responses were to turn the former dorm site into a

to pick a project that benefits Tech or

is very important to the students and

seniors presented their final project

Under Leftwich’s direction, senior

Tech civil engineering faculty and

Tech campus.”

recreational space with a basketball

civil engineering students Randall

volleyball court or a pit for horseshoe

Katie Harper got to work. Immedi-

court and either a picnic pavilion, a and cornhole games.

The SGA partnered with the

integrated civil engineering class as they took on the space redesign as part

of their senior project. Civil engineering

professor Dr. Steve Leftwich, ’75, said, 18 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B E AR

T RAC K S

develop the idea for the project.

Ashworth, Randal Blankenship and ately after the deconstruction of the

CoEd dorm they surveyed the area

and then asked Tech students how

they wanted to utilize the space. Based on the options presented at the

student forum, 100 random students

“Replacing CoEd” to the WVU

members of the administration. All three options presented included a

basketball court on the lower level of the property, benches and greenery

on the upper area and a welcome

wall to the far left. The student survey results showed that of the three options provided, 49% liked the

picnic pavillion, 27% favored the sand


volleyball court and 24% liked the

idea of a horseshoe and cornhole area. West Virginia University has

given WVU Tech $50,000 to help

with the redesign of the green space. Long’s plan is to put in the basketball court first because it was the most

popular among students. After the installation of the basketball court the plan is to look at putting in a picnic

shelter with the remaining funds. Long has even suggested the idea of trying

to raise additional funds in order to

be able to put in a larger picnic area. Once the final bids for the project are received the University will begin the site redesign process.

Since its opening in 1969, CoEd

has been a home away from home for

Tech alumni John Jarrett of Jarrett Construction and Ed Robinson of E.L. Robinson Engineering partnered with the TGBAA to create conceptual drawings for the wall project. They have donated their time and resources to give WVU Tech a landscape design and a cost estimate summary for each phase of the project.

You can leave your legacy with

many alumni. When the plans to raze

the purchase of a brick that will

year, the Tech Golden Bear Alumni

$100, you can have a brick engraved

the former dorm were announced last Association (TGBAA), in partner-

ship with WVU Tech, immediately went to work planning a fundraising

campaign to build a permanent sign

on the site to welcome future generations of Golden Bears.

become part of the welcome wall. For

with a commemorative message. Brick sales will be open to all alumni, faculty, staff, students and friends

of the university. The Association’s

fundraising goal is $30,000 and the campaign is expected to launch by

Leftwich,

’74

Steve Claywell,

Commencement in May.

“We have taken on this project

This is a project that is very important to the students and Tech campus.” Dr. Steve

“Our names will forever be linked with Tech through a one-time donation to the school that taught us so much.

because we see this as a way to create

Claywell added, “CoEd gave

a legacy for all of us that love Tech,”

many of us memories that are still

president. “With this project, our

we made lifelong friends, fell in love

said Steve Claywell, ’74, TGBAA

names will forever be linked with

Tech through a one-time donation to the school that taught us so much.”

For an additional $50 donation

to the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association you can own a piece

with us today. It was the place where (and maybe even fell out of love), pulled all-nighters and relaxed after

long days of classes and activities. What better way to honor those memories than through this project.”

The CoEd site project promises

of the bricks that were saved

to bring new potential to WVU

assisting the TGBAA can e-mail

alive. Students and alumni collabo-

from CoEd. Those interested in

TechAlumniAssoc@mail.wvu.edu or check the alumni website at alumni.wvutech.edu for updates.

Tech while keeping its history rating for Tech’s future illustrates the pride that all Golden Bears share for our University.

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CLASS NOTES

950s Calvin J. McMillion, ’50, was inducted into the Maryland Senior Citizens Hall of Fame on October 18, 2012. Helen Fitzwater Lodge, ’57, was elected to the House of Delegates of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Virginia based civil engineering firms ever to be included.

970s

960s

J. Wallace “Wally” Grant, (above), ’65, was conferred the “Kevin P. Granata Faculty Fellow Emeritus of Engineering Science and Mechanics” title by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

Dr. Richard McCormick, (above), ’71, was named as the first recipient of the Outstanding Civil Engineering Educator of the Year Award by the West Virginia Section of the American Society of Civil Engineers. Dennis Bone, ’73, retired as the president of Verizon’s New Jersey area after 12 years and after 34 years with the company. B. Stephen Claywell, ’73, was named president of the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association. Garth Thomas, ’73, was named treasurer of the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association. Valori Bond Ranson, ’78, was named vice president of the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association.

980s Virgil R. Hazelett, (above), ’67, retired as the Henrico county manager in Virginia on January 16 after serving 20 years in the position. Matilda Bailey Webb, ’68, published a book titled “0% Chance of Survival” after the birth of the first grandson. Edward Robinson, ’69, announced that his company, E.L. Robinson Engineering, was inducted into the 2012 edition of the Engineering News-Records 500 at number 485, one of the few West 20 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B E AR

T RAC K S

Dave Hardy, ’80, opened his own law firm, Hardy Pence PLLC. Hardy also serves as the Kanawha County Commissioner in W.Va. Elaine Davis, ’81, was elected to the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association Board of Directors. Ernest “Randy” Spradling, ’81, was elected to continue serving as the secretary for the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association. Fredrick Friend, ’82, was promoted to manager of distribution standards for

AEP and was transferred to their corporate office in Columbus, Ohio. Dr. Charles Patrick, ’82, was named chief academic officer and professor of engineering at Penn State Worthington Scranton. Robert Stark, ’82, is a partner with ProTech in Monroeville, Pa. Linda Torre, ’83, received the 2012 “Because of You” Women in Mining award. Bill Keaton, ’88, was hired by The Chazen Cos. as the senior director of multiple engineering.

990s Thomas Thompson, ’92, was hired as a senior software engineer at Blizzard Entertainment in Los Angeles, Calif. Anthony Mampilly, ’94, works as a management consultant for large scale organization transformation projects. Michael Herald, ’95, joined Heartland of Charleston as an administrator. Stacey Daniel-Fragile, ’96, was named chapter liaison for the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association. Amelia Yates McClure, ’98, started her own business, Hope Engineering, PLLC. Dr. Scott Glenn, ’99, is authoring a new book titled “American Christianity: Truth or Tradition? A Personal Perspective”. Glenn was also the keynote speaker at the 2012 WVU Tech fall convocation ceremony.

2000s Jennifer Wood Cunningham, ’01, married Adam Cunningham on October 18, 2012. Ara Hopkins, ’01, was elected to the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association Board of Directors. Ronald Keith Hatfield, ’02, was elected to the Tech Golden Bear Association Board of Directors. Danny Scalise, II, ’02, was hired as the chief executive officer for EnAct.


In Memoriam 950s Daniel Wood, ’55, of Meadow Bridge, W.Va., passed away July 28, 2012.

960s Justin Hines, ’03, and Tara Thomas Hines, ’03, welcomed their second son, Eli Morgan, (above), on May 24, 2012. James “Anthony” Pratt, ’03, was elected to the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association Board of Directors. Eric Smith, ’03, and his wife Krystal welcomed their first child, Hunter Gregory. Jason Smith, ’08, was inducted as the president of the Gauley Bridge Lions Club.

Arlin D. Jividen, ’60, of Moundsville, W.Va., passed away Sept. 3, 2012.

970s James Lawrence Ware, ’74, of Lexington, S.C., passed away April 19, 2012. Bobby Stone, ’79, of Lizemores, W.Va., passed away June 5, 2012. Stone was an academic lab manager for Tech in the Leonard C. Nelson College of Engineering.

980s Benjamin Lloyd Huff, ’86, of Cottageville, W.Va., passed away July 18, 2012.

Robert P. “Bob” Simile of Pratt, W.Va., passed away May 18, 2012. Simile taught ceramics, painting and art appreciation for 26 years at Tech where he touched the lives of many students. Simile also started the wrestling program at Tech,

Jessica Durst, (above), ’09, married Ryan Bailey, ’10, on May 12, 2012.

serving as the head coach for three years. The ceramic letters that are currently displayed on the front of

200s

the David S. Long Alumni Center were

Joshua Cook, ’12, was elected to the Tech Golden Bear Alumni Association Board of Directors.

students. On June 12, 2012, 25 former

handmade by Simile and one of his students and colleagues gathered at Conley Hall to complete the pottery that was started by Simile.

TO SUBMIT CLASS NOTES, PLEASE E-MAIL US AT TECH-ALUMNI@MAIL.WVU.EDU.

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Richard “Dick” Hart, ’62 Major: Accounting Job: Adjunct instructor/counselor at Wake Technical Community College City: Holly Springs, N.C. Name:

Coach Baisi

Q&

WHICH FACULTY/STAFF PERSON HAD THE GREATEST IMPACT ON YOU?

alumniA

VIEW MORE ALUMNI Q&A.

Describe your experience at Tech in five words.

A giant step towards life.

What do you miss most about Tech?

Athletics and the fun times

What was your most memorable moment at Tech?

Beating Morris Harvey and becoming SGA president What was your favorite meal in the dining hall?

Sunday lunch or maybe mystery meat

’62

Diane Frisby Beard, ’86 Major: Social Studies Job: Teacher at Fayette County Schools City: Dixie, W.Va. Name:

Describe your experience at Tech in five words.

Challenging, enjoyable, frustrating, engaging and [home] Where was your favorite place to study at Tech?

Third floor Vining Library

What advice would you give to current students?

You have the opportunity to receive a great education, plus the chance to help Tech grow. Which faculty/staff person had the greatest impact on you?

Dr. Ron Alexander. He was amazingly insightful. What was your favorite class?

Psychology of Learning

22 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . B E AR

T RAC K S

WHAT WAS


Derick Meadows, ’95 Engineering Job: Customer quality assurance manager at Axiall, LLC City: Houston, Texas Name:

NEW TECH GOLDEN BEAR

Major: Chemical

ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

lifetime members

Describe your experience at Tech in five words.

Fantastic education for the money.

Where was your favorite place to study at Tech?

Library, second floor, or in later years, one of my ChemE classmates’ apartment

What advice would you give to current students?

James E. Ball, ’62 William Bone, ’72 Charles Butcher, ’93 Dr. Mayy Deadrick, ’86 Michael Deadrick, ’87 Stacey Daniel-Fragile, ’96 Douglass Hirneisen, ’70

Challenge yourself to learn as much as possible, build relationships with your peers, participate in student government/organizations and give yourself as much as you can.

WHAT DO YOU MISS MOST ABOUT TECH? The camaraderie of my Phi Kappa Tau fraternity brothers and my fellow ChemE classmates.

’95

What do you wish you knew then that you know now?

That my time at Tech would pass much too quickly.

Phillip “Flip” Dempsey, ’04 Major: Business Management Job: General adjuster at Engle, Martin and Association City: Charlotte, N.C. Name:

ASSOCIATION MEMBERSHIP is extended to all dues-paying alumni of New River State College, West Virginia Institute of Technology, the Community and Technical College of West Virginia Institute of Technology and West Virginia University Institute of Technology.

annual dues

lifetime dues

per person

per person

$25 $250

While supplies last, those paying lifetime dues will receive a free lifetime member t-shirt.

Describe your experience at Tech in five words.

Fun, demanding, challenging, [rewarding] and memorable

What advice would you give to current students?

Appreciate your time in college and appreciate the friendships you develop.

YOUR MOST MEMORABLE MOMENT AT TECH?

Graduation day. My father stressed through the years the importance of a college degree. I was never more proud to walk across that stage while he watched. Which faculty/staff person had the greatest impact on you?

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK AT GOLDEN BEAR ALUMNI

There are several that left a lasting impression on me: Mr. Amin and Mrs. McCormick to name a couple, but the one that made the biggest impact on my life was Mrs. Angelia Russell.

405 Fayette Pike

Marketing. To this day I can still hear Mrs. Russell asking the students to identify the four “P’s” of marketing. She would be very happy to know that I still know them.

alumni.wvutech.edu

What was your favorite class?

Montgomery, WV 25136 304.442.3131 TechAlumniAssoc@mail.wvu.edu

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405 Fayette Pike | Montgomery, WV 25136-9980 1.888.554.8324 | wvutech.edu

April 6

Montgomery Community Clean-Up

May 11

Commencement Alumni Association Board Meeting Open to all dues paying members

June 16–21 Camp STEM

[

Events Upcoming

August 16–18

Welcome Weekend

August 17

Alumni Association Board Meeting Open to all dues paying members For more information about these events, please contact the Office of Alumni Relations at Tech-Alumni@mail.wvu.edu or 304.442.3131, or visit alumni.wvutech.edu.

E H T E V A S IN G 2 01 3 H O M E CO M 2 5 –2 6 O C TO B E R

DATE!

]


Bear Tracks - The WVU Tech Magazine Spring 2013