Page 1

2019

REPORT

No . 1 i n rur a l p r i m a ry c a r e

2020


No. 1 in rural primary care

The mission of the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine (WVSOM) is to educate students from diverse backgrounds as lifelong learners in osteopathic medicine and

4

MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR

and develop graduate medical education training;

to advance scientific knowledge through academic,

5

MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT

6

LEADERSHIP

and foremost, the state of West Virginia

7

BOARD OF GOVERNORS

care in rural areas.

8

WVSOM ADJUSTED DURING A PANDEMIC

complementary health related programs; to support clinical and basic science research; and to

promote patient-centered, evidence based

medicine. WVSOM is dedicated to serve, first and the health care needs of its

residents, emphasizing primary

10

22

28

42 48

CONTENTS

FACULTY AND STAFF

GRADUATE MEDICAL EDUCATION/MSOPTI

GRADUATE DEMOGRAPHICS

CENTER FOR RURAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH

FINANCIAL OVERVIEW

12

ACADEMICS AND OUR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

RURAL HEALTH INITIATIVE

24

ADMISSIONS

26

STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS

32

RESEARCH

38

COMMUNITY SERVICE

46

WVSOM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION

52

CAMPAIGNS AND GIFTS

45 50

HEALTHY CHILDREN’S INITIATIVE

WVSOM FOUNDATION

2 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

20


ACHIEVEMENTS INSTITUTIONAL AWARDS AND RECOGNITION

In addition to the success of our students and alumni, progress can be measured in a variety of ways. Because our mission is securely aligned with serving others, it is significant to note that WVSOM

is number one in the state, the region and the nation in the percentage of graduates who practice rural medicine. Rural care supports some of the most underserved areas in the country.

22

Consecutive Years

WVSOM has been recognized as one of the

NATION’S TOP MEDICAL SCHOOLS

WVSOM POINTS OF PRIDE

for 22 consecutive years.

WVSOM was recognized for the eighth time as a

GREAT COLLEGE TO WORK FOR. The Chronicle of Higher Education

U.S. News & World Report

$133.6 MILLION PER YEAR

IS THE TOTAL ECONOMIC IMPACT ASSOCIATED WITH WVSOM and its affiliated Robert C. Byrd Clinic and WVSOM Foundation, as well as the expenditures of students, faculty and staff.

1

No.

WVSOM is number one in the nation among all medical schools

GRADUATING PHYSICIANS WHO PRACTICE IN RURAL AREAS. Academic Medicine

1

No.

WVSOM is number one in West Virginia providing

PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS AND PHYSICIANS IN RURAL AREAS. W.Va. HEPC Health Sciences and Rural Health Report

1

No.

WVSOM is number one in the nation graduating

PRIMARY CARE PHYSICIANS WHO PRACTICE IN RURAL APPALACHIA. Academic Medicine

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 3 www.wvsom.edu


MESSAGE FROM THE CHAIR Steven C. Sarver

CHAIR, WVSOM BOARD OF GOVERNORS

Serving as chairman of the WVSOM Board of Governors is an honor. Each day brings new opportunities and challenges. WVSOM serves students, the community and the medical profession with passion and expertise. Our faculty and staff are second to none, providing a close-knit family atmosphere and a highly trained professional team of administrators, professors, clinicians, scientists, technicians and support staff. Our facilities present a magnificent campus appearance and provide students with a pleasing and practical atmosphere to pursue their medical studies. WVSOM will continue to maintain and expand our physical facilities, efforts that will attract more applications from top students and enhance the experience of current students. WVSOM greatly increased its community presence in 2020. The new Clingman Center for Community Engagement, in Lewisburg, and the expanding Statewide Campus system provide great examples that WVSOM reaches beyond its beautiful campus in Lewisburg. The school’s administrators, led by President James W. Nemitz, Ph.D., continue to lead at the local, state, regional and national levels in many areas, including the response to the COVID-19 pandemic and the opioid epidemic. Our faculty excel academically and medically. Many of our faculty and staff publish papers and present new medical research at seminars and conventions throughout the U.S. Our faculty members contribute to medical textbooks and oversee important national and international workshops.

4 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

WVSOM plans to aggressively pursue new programs in 2021. These programs will enhance WVSOM’s prestige, financial strength and sustainability as one of the best medical schools in the U.S. New programs will provide our students with additional opportunities to gain successful and meaningful employment in the medical profession. As board chairman, I want to extend an open invitation to students, employees and the community at large to reach out to Dr. Nemitz or any board member if you have an opportunity or concern that may be relevant to WVSOM’s success. WVSOM is family. WVSOM is academically and financially strong. WVSOM’s campus is a beautiful place where students learn to become caring, compassionate osteopathic physicians who serve the community. WVSOM will not rest on its laurels. The people who care about our school wake up every morning and ask, “How can we achieve more?” Sincerely,

Steven Sarver, Chairman


MESSAGE FROM THE PRESIDENT James W. Nemitz, Ph.D. WVSOM PRESIDENT

COVID-19 has upended the world. While presenting WVSOM with unprecedented challenges, the magnitude of this pandemic has also been the source of hope, inspiration and gratitude as I have watched higher education institutions respond to unparalleled circumstances with mutual regard and cooperation. The pandemic has also provided our students an opportunity to experience a historic response to a public health crisis, an event rarely encountered in medical education. The leadership and faculty of WVSOM has had to find new ways to teach a discipline that is inherently hands-on. We have taken extraordinary safety measures, including the move to virtual deliveries of lectures and exams, the use of personal protective equipment during in-person labs and diligently keeping up with the evolving science of how to keep the school and our surrounding communities safe. We have also found ways to serve others during this demanding time by turning our focus outward. Someone wiser than I said, “The way to respond in a moment of tragedy is to reach out.” WVSOM has donated personal protective equipment to emergency personnel, partnered with other organizations to provide meals to at-risk seniors and set up a hotline to assist the local health department in scheduling COVID-19 vaccinations for the community. WVSOM had many accomplishments in addition to our response to the pandemic. We earned a five-year re-accreditation from the Higher Learning Commission, demonstrating that WVSOM continues to deliver a quality education to students and is meeting its mission to be a state, regional and national leader in rural primary care. This medical school’s commitment to rural health was further rewarded when members of our staff were selected as presenters at the World Organization of National Colleges’ World Rural Health Conference. It placed WVSOM on an international stage and allowed us to share examples of how we have combated the opioid epidemic using methods that can be replicated in other areas of the country.

These national and international forums are a common thread at WVSOM. Our outstanding faculty is engaged in research that has the potential to make a difference in communities around the world, as well as engaging our students in their work to create the next generation of physician scientists. We are particularly proud of introducing the Clingman Center for Community Engagement in this report. A bridge between WVSOM and the communities we serve, the facility provides a valuable venue for employees and students to help regional residents lead healthier lives. WVSOM’s continued focus on community engagement played a significant role in Greenbrier County’s receipt of the West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources’ “Healthy People Healthy Places” Gold Award, celebrating communities and leaders committed to supporting healthy choices. The award recognizes the implementation of programs helping residents eat better, stay tobaccofree and become more active, while making an impact on the state’s economy. We have also approved a five-year strategic plan incorporating the categories of academic excellence, research, community outreach, infrastructure and reputation. Posted on the WVSOM website, it provides a template for continuing our move forward and living out the school’s mission to serve our students, our communities and the state of West Virginia. As we look back on a year that was filled with obstacles, let us celebrate our many successes and recommit to working together in addressing future challenges. Thank you for your continued support of WVSOM,

James W. Nemitz, Ph.D.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 5 www.wvsom.edu


GET TO KNOW OUR LEADERSHIP TEAM

James W. Nemitz, Ph.D. President

Leslie W. Bicksler, MSW Vice President of Human Resources

Edward Bridges, Ph.D. Vice President for Administration and External Relations

Drema G. Mace, Ph.D. Vice President for Community Engagement and Development

6

Craig Boisvert, D.O., FACOFP Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean

Marilea Butcher Vice President for Communications and Administrative Affairs

Marietta D. Harvey Administrative Assistant Senior

ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care

www.wvsom.edu

Larry Ware, MBA, CPA Vice President for Finance and Facilities

Jeffrey M. Shawver, J.D. Vice President for Legal and Governmental Affairs and General Counsel

Debbie Green Administrative Assistant Senior


WVSOM’S CURRENT BOARD OF GOVERNORS

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Board of Governors members are appointed by the governor of West Virginia and provide valuable expertise to the institution. WVSOM is honored to have them serve in this capacity.

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RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 7 www.wvsom.edu


WVSOM made adjustments during COVID-19 pandemic Nearly overnight, WVSOM made adjustments in the way it delivered curriculum to students, kept employees working during a statewide lockdown and established safeguards to keep the campus in Lewisburg, W.Va., safe due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Maintaining safety, keeping medical students on track to graduate, keeping employees working and considering what can be done for the community during the pandemic have been the key concerns for WVSOM President James W. Nemitz, Ph.D., throughout the pandemic.

WVSOM switched from on-campus to remote learning at the end of March, after spring break. At that time, WVSOM’s media services and information technology departments ensured lectures were livestreamed, and preclinical education staff generated calendar invitations for each lecture so that students could easily “attend” live classes using their school-issued laptops. Approval for the changes was sought and obtained from the Higher Learning Commission, the largest accrediting agency for postsecondary educational institutions in the U.S., and the American Osteopathic Association’s Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation.

“The safety of our community and our students is of paramount importance,” Nemitz said. “We are doing everything we can at WVSOM to keep everyone safe during this pandemic.”

At WVSOM, a student’s first two years of a four-year program are spent on campus in Lewisburg, while the latter two years are spent on rotations in clinics and hospitals throughout WVSOM’s Statewide Campus. At the start of the pandemic, a majority of the school’s third- and fourth-year students had in-person rotations paused by the recommendation of the Coalition for Physician Accountability, which includes the American Osteopathic Association, the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine and other physician organizations. Predoctoral education students completed a predetermined number of interactive cases online and completed additional reading requirements. In one instance, faculty worked with WVSOM’s media services team to create a video about a patient encounter in which students took a patient’s history and wrote a physical — an objective often enhanced by a face-toface encounter. Craig Boisvert, D.O., WVSOM’s vice president for academic affairs and dean, oversees the school’s COVID-19 task force, which is made up of six administrators and faculty members. He said he is confident that WVSOM planned the most effective protection to prevent the spread of the coronavirus while continuing to deliver the curriculum in order to keep students on track. “WVSOM considered many different factors in keeping the school as safe as possible while keeping in mind safeguards for our employees and members of the community. We feel like we have taken the necessary steps to do our part in limiting the spread of the virus,” he said.

8 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

Many of the school’s in-person summer and spring events, including graduation and awards ceremonies, were moved to virtual events. WVSOM employees stepped up to show their support and become involved in community service during the pandemic. They did so by hand-sewing masks to be distributed to all WVSOM students, employees and staff at the Robert C. Byrd Clinic. WVSOM, the Greenbrier County Health Department, the Greenbrier County Board of Education and other local agencies partnered in March on the 3-D production of masks modeled after N95 masks to aid in the supply of personal protective equipment. Four months after making adjustments to a complete shift of its operations, the school introduced a detailed plan that allowed firstand second-year medical students to begin the new school year and employees to return to campus. Online clinical rotations were once again shifted at the beginning of summer 2020, and by July most hospitals and clinics were once again allowing in-person rotations with the use of personal protective equipment and other safety protocols. Delivering content to students is the most critical responsibility of any medical school. WVSOM is no exception, and although the school’s mission goes beyond educating tomorrow’s physicians, priorities continue to shift to ensure that students receive the quality osteopathic medical education for which WVSOM is renowned, even in the midst of a pandemic. WVSOM strives to prepare its students to be frontline workers and to enter the health care profession as proud alumni.


RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 9 www.wvsom.edu


FACULTY AND STAFF

295

WVSOM’S OVERALL

UL

AF

F

AC

F

WORKFORCE

57

During the fall of 2019, the WVSOM community introduced a number of programs designed to build community, develop collaborations, and further engage each member of the WVSOM community. WVSOM held a series of trainings and discussions with faculty, staff and students. This series focused WVSOM’s understanding of our current strengths and assets, how to apply our energy and resources, what WVSOM can do to strengthen our operations and collaborations, and to identify resources that we may need to achieve goals.These trainings, initiatives and collaborations were helpful as WVSOM responded to the COVID-19 pandemic in 2020. In early spring, WVSOM operated remotely for a short time, and through the leadership of James W. Nemitz, Ph.D., WVSOM’s president; Craig Boisvert, D.O., WVSOM’s vice president of academic affairs and dean; and others, the school was able to successfully continue educating students.

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238

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WVSOM WAS RECOGNIZED IN NINE CATEGORIES WVSOM was recognized for the eighth time as one of the best schools in the nation to work for, according to The Chronicle of Higher Education’s annual report on academic workplaces. The main factor in determining the recognition was employee feedback. WVSOM was one of 221 institutions that participated in the Great Colleges to Work For survey, and was also included on the publication’s Honor Roll, a distinction awarded to institutions that are cited most often across all recognition categories.

EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDING

Since the initiation of the Educational Development program in 2010, 56 employees have benefited. The goal is to enhance professional knowledge or skills and improve the academic and professional credentials of employees. Funding is provided to employees in pursuit of degrees, non-degree studies, research, presentations and other academic or professional programs that would not normally fall under funds awarded for job-related professional development.

TOTAL AWARDED SINCE 2010

11%

► Teaching environment ► Tenure clarity and process

► Job satisfaction

2019 - 20 EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDING ALLOCATION

$19,617.98 EMPLOYEES WERE GRANTED $19,617.98

DEGREE, TWO EARNED A BACHELOR’S DEGREE AND TWO COMPLETED CONTINUING EDUCATION CERTIFICATION COURSES THAT WERE NOT APPLIED TOWARD A DEGREE PROGRAM.

56

26%

EMPLOYEES HAVE ENHANCED THEIR

PROFESSIONAL KNOWLEDGE OR SKILLS THROUGH THE Master’s

Associate

10 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

and security

► Respect and appreciation

DEVELOPMENT. EIGHT EMPLOYEES EARNED A MASTER’S

OVERALL PERCENTAGES OF FUNDING

Continuing Education

► Facilities, workspaces

development programs

ALLOCATION TOWARD THEIR EDUCATIONAL

49%

Bachelor’s

► Confidence in leadership

► Professional/career-

FROM THE EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FUNDING

2%

Doctorate

► Compensation and benefits

12

$232,137.96 12%

► Collaborative governance

EDUCATIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM SINCE 2010.

Participating staff received up to $2,000 per fiscal year for educational development.


AS OF JUNE 30, 2020, WVSOM HAD

29 EMPLOYEES WITH AT LEAST 20 YEARS

OF SERVICE TO THE SCHOOL.

W. Alder

K. Ayers

B. Baker

P. Bauserman

D. Beatty

D. Bird

C. Boisvert

P. Boothe

M. Butcher

A. Cobb

J. Cobb

J. Dowdy

B. Foster

R. Hughes

K. LaBrie

C. Loudermilk

A. Nazar

J. Nemitz

S. Phillips

E. Piercy

J. Reinholt

B. Sanders

R. McMahan D. Montgomery

B. Shires

J. Thatcher

S. Warren

K. Williams

B. Wingler

FACULTY EMERITUS

The honor of emeritus status is granted at retirement selectively in recognition of meritorious service. The faculty member is nominated and recommended by the faculty to the dean and then recommended by the dean to the president. Lastly, the WVSOM Board of Governors approves the faculty member for professor emeritus status. For the 2019-20 academic year, Malcolm Modrzakowski, Ph.D., was awarded emeritus status. Modrzakowski was a professor of microbiology in the WVSOM Department of Biomedical Sciences from 2003 through his retirement. Modrzakowski began his career at WVSOM as the associate dean for Problem-Based Learning. He also served as the associate dean for research and sponsored programs as well as vice chair of the biomedical sciences department while at WVSOM.

Malcolm Modrzakowski, Ph.D.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 11 www.wvsom.edu


ACADEMICS AND OUR LEARNING ENVIRONMENT Our rigorous educational program produces physicians who are dedicated, disciplined and committed to mastering knowledge and embracing a compassionate bedside manner. The patient-centered, evidence-based curricular structure offers a clinically integrated approach to medical education.

FIRST AND SECOND YEARS: PATIENT PRESENTATION CURRICULUM

WVSOM’s Patient Presentation Curriculum (PPC) integrates the basic and clinical sciences and stresses student engagement, allowing students to take an active role in their education. The PPC is centered on the most common ways patients present to their physician. Faculty use case openings and closings to engage students in discussions about presenting symptoms of the patient, physical signs they may expect, what the cause could be and what disease processes are occurring. The use of flipped classrooms, TeamBased Learning (TBL) and application exercises allow students to apply the knowledge they are learning. In clinical labs, students acquire and hone the skills necessary to treat patients. During Clinical Skills 1, students learn to conduct patient interviews and perform physical exams. The Clinical Skills 2 course enables students to spend time in provider offices and have the opportunity to participate in skills labs such as scrub, suture and ultrasound. The Osteopathic Principles and Practice course teaches students the skills to evaluate, diagnose and treat patients using osteopathic manipulation. Sessions with standardized patients, 25 high-fidelity human-patient simulators and interprofessional experiences further enhance the learning experience.

12 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

PATIENT-CENTERED FROM THE START: Flipped classrooms Team-Based Learning Application exercises Clinical skills labs Osteopathic manipulation integration Cadaver dissection Standardized patients Human-patient simulators Interprofessional experiences


140 ACADEMIC SUPPORT The West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine offers several programs that support academic performance.

ACADEMIC SUPPORT PROGRAMS AT WVSOM INCLUDE: ► Academic Support and

Intervention Resources (ASPIRE)

► Center for International Medicine

and Cultural Concerns (CIMCC)

► Clinical Evaluation Center (CEC) ► Exam Center ► Faculty coaching program ► Library services ► Office of Assessment and

Educational Development

► Office of National Boards ► Peer Mentor Program ► Peer Tutoring Program (accredited through

the College Reading and Learning Association)

STUDENT MENTORS FROM THE CLASS OF 2022 ASSISTED STUDENTS FROM THE CLASS OF 2023

THE WVSOM PEER MENTOR PROGRAM Soon after arriving on campus for the fall semester, first-year students are introduced to the Peer Mentor Program. Prior to orientation, first-year students are each assigned a second-year student to assist them in making the transition to medical school. During the 2019-20 fiscal year, 140 members of the second-year class (Class of 2022) formally mentored the entire first-year class (Class of 2023). Due to the increased efforts to build rapport and camaraderie between the firstand second-year classes, many students established mentoring relationships on an informal basis as well.

► Rural Health Initiative (RHI)

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the stay-at-home order by West Virginia’s governor, students who left the state for spring break in March 2020 were not permitted to return to campus. WVSOM requested approval from the Higher Learning Commission to deliver the curriculum online and the American Osteopathic Association’s Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation to modify the curriculum in order to remain compliant with the accrediting bodies. Modifications were made for first- and second-year students at the end of the academic year so that coursework could be completed and students would not fall behind. Lectures were livestreamed from the classroom through Webex, which allowed polling options and a chat feature for faculty to interact with students live. Small group activities such as Team-Based Learning could also occur. Testing normally is delivered online in the classrooms, but students instead took exams at home using proctoring software.

Labs also were adjusted. Clinical skills labs for first-year students were either moved to the second year, shifted to a virtual platform or recorded at home and submitted for grading. The remaining Osteopathic Principles and Practice labs were incorporated into the second-year curriculum, and the final anatomy labs and practical exam were conducted virtually. Second-year students had just completed an OSCE review, so students wrote SOAP notes for six video encounters with standardized patients. The Basic Life Support component was moved to third-year orientation in July.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 13 www.wvsom.edu


CLINICAL EVALUATION CENTER

WVSOM’s Clinical Evaluation Center (CEC) is where students receive handson experiences that allow them to put their knowledge into practice. Students participate in a variety of experiences and labs, including practicing clinical encounters and communication skills with standardized patients, airway management, nasogastric tube insertion, peripheral intravenous catheter placement, suturing, a COVID-19 seminar and more. During the COVID-19 pandemic, students continued to practice clinical encounters with standardized patients via telesimulation using a telehealth platform donated by SaluberMD. The CEC was re-accredited by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare in 2018. WVSOM’s simulation center is one of more than 100 programs from 10 countries certified as meeting the society’s accreditation standards for simulation. The CEC received recognition for best practices in electronic health records, the standardized patient program, the physical space and modalities available, and for having a clinical psychologist on staff. WVSOM has 25 human-patient simulators ranging in age from newborns to adults, has more than 100 task trainers and works with 60 to 70 standardized patients who undergo extensive training to play the role of a patient.

WVSOM’s CEC was the first in the state accredited by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare in the area of teaching/education. Most recently, the facility received additional accreditation in the area of assessment.

340 7 IN-PERSON EXPERIENCES

VIRTUAL EXPERIENCES

33,821

IN-PERSON CONTACT HOURS

1,199

VIRTUAL CONTACT HOURS

10,082

IN-PERSON STUDENT INTERACTIONS

678

VIRTUAL STUDENT INTERACTIONS

SIMULATION WEEK Every year, the Clinical Evaluation Center celebrates Healthcare Simulation Week, sponsored by the Society for Simulation in Healthcare, honoring professionals who use simulation to improve the safety, effectiveness and efficiency of health care delivery. Simulation-based training encompasses a range of experiences, including the use of task trainers, human-patient simulators, standardized patients and hybrid simulations that are a combination of the above. Although on hold due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the CEC has hosted two student simulation wars, with first-year students battling second-year students. This friendly competition allows students to showcase their clinical skills, demonstrate “closed loop” communication and show how medical teams can improve patient outcomes by effectively working together. 14 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu


TELESIMULATION

ULTRASOUND CURRICULUM WVSOM continues to expand ultrasound education for students. In addition to a summer ultrasound elective for students entering their second year of medical school, first- and second-year students may participate in elective ultrasound labs in which small groups of students get together to learn to perform an ultrasound on various regions of the body under faculty guidance. The summer ultrasound elective includes a variety of activities, including directed learning activities integrating anatomy, physiology and sonography for normal and abnormal presentations. In-class time includes practicing scanning and discussing journal articles. The elective culminates with each student giving a presentation on the integration of ultrasound technology into clinical care. The incorporation of ultrasound technology into our future physicians’ resources allows them to improve patient care, as ultrasound can help to diagnose medical conditions at the bedside and improve patient safety during medical procedures.

Telesimulation allows for educational training and/ or assessment to learners at an off-site location using various telecommunication platforms. In 2018, the CEC began “virtual” interprofessional education (IPE) activities that incorporated aspects of a telehealth visit and consultation. These activities occurred with pharmacy students from University of the Pacific (California) and Shenandoah University (Virginia). During the COVID-19 pandemic, the CEC continues to work alongside WVSOM faculty in offering telesimulation educational activities such as standardized patient clinical encounters via a telehealth platform called SaluberMD as well as other types of virtual clinical encounters. The CEC continues to work with other schools in delivering virtual IPE activities, giving our students the opportunity to work with nursing and pharmacy students as well as physician assistants. Collaborating institutions include Bluefield State College, West Virginia University Institute of Technology, University of Charleston, West Virginia Wesleyan College and Dabney S. Lancaster Community College.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 15 www.wvsom.edu


61

THIRD AND FOURTH YEARS: STATEWIDE CAMPUS

TOTAL SITES

21

40

BASE SITE HOSPITALS

ADDITIONAL HOSPITALS

WVSOM students provide approximately

1,050,000 HEALTH CARE HOURS

In their third and fourth years, students are assigned to one of seven regions in the state where 21 hospitals serve as base sites for their medical education. Additionally, 40 other hospitals in the region serve as training sites for third- and fourth-year students. Within the Statewide Campus (SWC), third-year students fulfill the majority of their core clinical rotations, which include eight weeks each of family medicine and internal medicine, plus four weeks each of general surgery, psychiatry, pediatrics, OB-GYN and emergency medicine. In their third year, students complete four weeks of an elective and four weeks of a Dean’s Selective rotation. In addition, WVSOM’s Rural Health Initiative provides students interested in rural medicine the chance to enhance and expand their rural rotation experiences. Students take advantage of international experiences through clubs and elective rotations.

across the state and beyond per year

SWC regions are supported by

16 STAFF MEMBERS AND 8 REGIONAL ASSISTANT DEANS

4,936 PRECEPTORS

In their fourth year, students are required to complete rotations of eight weeks each in surgery, internal medicine and family medicine. Additionally, students must complete four weeks of pediatrics and 10 weeks of electives. The fourth year may be completed at their current Statewide Campus site, another SWC site or an approved site of their choosing.

BENEFITS OF STATEWIDE CAMPUS ► Benefits for students

The Statewide Campus gives students an opportunity to see quality patient care provided in rural communities. The program also emphasizes the importance of establishing strong doctor-patient relationships and of helping patients navigate the health care system to receive the care they need. Students have the opportunity to work with resident physicians. ► Benefits for West Virginia

When students complete their rotations in West Virginia, they are more likely to complete a residency in West Virginia and, ultimately, they are more likely to stay in West Virginia as physicians. 16 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

WVSOM president James Nemitz, Ph.D., and students participate in the ribbon cutting for a new computer lab at Logan Regional Medical Center.


ROTATION UPDATES WVSOM entered into an agreement with Charleston Area Medical Center to expand its presence in Charleston, W.Va., and placed a total of 40 students there starting with the 2020-21 academic year. The Statewide Campus system increased the number of students rotating through the South Central region because of Charleston’s opportunities to accommodate more students. Support for these students was increased by adding an additional regional assistant dean, director and administrative assistant to the region. This expansion helps address student placements affected by hospital affiliation changes or closures in West Virginia.

Fourth-year students who were preparing to graduate at the end of May had only one or two required rotations to complete. Most of those students had matched to residency locations in March, just before social distancing guidelines and stay-at-home orders were put into place.

Like most medical schools in the U.S., WVSOM paused in-person rotations for third- and fourth-year students in March 2020. Third-year students were ending the school year with approximately two rotations remaining. Students who had completed part of their core rotations in hospitals moved to completing their rotation online, and syllabi were modified for an online format. Students completed a predetermined number of interactive cases online and completed additional reading requirements. Students who were completing their entire core rotations online then were required to complete the clinical portion during their fourth year. RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 17 www.wvsom.edu


STATEWIDE CAMPUS REGIONS AND SITES

Hancock B1

B2

Brooke

1

Ohio D

A

C

Marshall

2

Tyler

A 1 3

2 6

Wirt A

4

Mason

1 5

B

2 22

Cabell

Wayne

Lincoln

Kanawha

C

A 5 3

6

Wyoming

Raleigh

McDowell

B

Monroe

2

Mercer

CENTRAL WEST

WVU MEDICINE BERKELEY MEDICAL CENTER Martinsburg, W.Va.

A2

WVU MEDICINE JEFFERSON MEDICAL CENTER Ranson, W.Va.

B

FREDERICK HEALTH HOSPITAL Frederick, Md.

C

GRANT MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Petersburg, W.Va.

WHEELING HOSPITAL Wheeling, W.Va.

D

MERITUS MEDICAL CENTER Hagerstown, Md.

1

HERITAGE VALLEY HEALTH Beaver, Pa.

1

2

SISTERSVILLE GENERAL HOSPITAL Sistersville, W.Va.

MARTINSBURG VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER Martinsburg, W.Va.

2

3

WVU MEDICINE WETZEL COUNTY HOSPITAL New Martinsville, W.Va.

WVU MEDICINE POTOMAC VALLEY HOSPITAL Keyser, W.Va.

3

WAR MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Berkeley Springs, W.Va.

4

WINCHESTER MEDICAL CENTER Winchester, Va.

MARIETTA MEMORIAL HEALTH SYSTEM Marietta, Ohio

B

ST. MARY’S MEDICAL CENTER Huntington, W.Va.

B

B1 TRINITY HEALTH SYSTEM

1

CABELL HUNTINGTON HOSPITAL Huntington, W.Va.

WVU MEDICINE CAMDEN CLARK MEDICAL CENTER Parkersburg, W.Va.

1

B2 WEIRTON MEDICAL CENTER

2

CAMC TEAYS VALLEY HOSPITAL Hurricane, W.Va.

APPALACHIAN BEHAVIORAL HEALTHCARE Athens, Ohio

2

C

3

KING’S DAUGHTERS MEDICAL CENTER Ashland, Ky.

HOLZER HEALTH SYSTEM - ATHENS Athens, Ohio

3

D

4

PLEASANT VALLEY HOSPITAL Pt. Pleasant, W.Va.

HOPEWELL HEALTH CENTERS Athens, Ohio

WASHINGTON HEALTH SYSTEM Washington, Pa.

4

5

RIVER PARK HOSPITAL Huntington, W.Va.

JACKSON GENERAL HOSPITAL Ripley, W.Va.

5

MINNIE HAMILTON HEALTH CARE SYSTEM Grantsville, W.Va.

6

OHIO HEALTH O’BLENESS HOSPITAL Athens, Ohio

7

ROANE GENERAL HOSPITAL Spencer, W.Va.

B

LOGAN REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER Logan, W.Va.

C

THOMAS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL South Charleston, W.Va.

1

BOONE MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Madison, W.Va.

2

CAMC TEAYS VALLEY HOSPITAL Hurricane, W.Va.

3 4

HIGHLAND HOSPITAL Charleston, W.Va. MONTGOMERY GENERAL HOSPITAL Montgomery, W.Va.

5

ST. FRANCIS HOSPITAL Charleston, W.Va.

6

TUG VALLEY APPALACHIAN REGIONAL HOSPITAL Williamson, Ky.

7

WILLIAMSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Williamson, W.Va.

WVU MEDICINE REYNOLDS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Glen Dale, W.Va. Steubenville, Ohio Weirton, W.Va.

A1-2

A1 DAVIS MEDICAL CENTER

Elkins, W.Va.

A2 WVU MEDICINE ST. JOSEPH’S HOSPITAL

Buckhannon, W.Va.

B C 1

2

3 4 7

MON HEALTH MEDICAL CENTER Morgantown, W.Va. WVU MEDICINE UNITED HOSPITAL CENTER Bridgeport, W.Va. WVU MEDICINE BRAXTON COUNTY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Gassaway, W.Va.

LOUIS A. JOHNSON VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER Clarksburg, W.Va. STONEWALL JACKSON MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Weston, W.Va. WILLIAM R. SHARPE JR. HOSPITAL Weston, W.Va.

18 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

A

SOUTH EAST CENTRAL EAST

EASTERN A1

A

CHARLESTON AREA MEDICAL CENTER Charleston, W.Va.

Virginia

Northern Central West Central East Eastern South West South Central South East Letter indicates base hospital Number only indicates additional hospital

NORTHERN

HOLZER HEALTH SYSTEM Gallipolis, Ohio

A

A #

C

A

SOUTH CENTRAL

Hardy

SWC REGIONS

Greenbrier

Summers

Jefferson

7

4

1 A1 A2

BECKLEY AREA Beckley, W.Va. A1 - BECKLEY APPALACHIAN REGIONAL HEALTHCARE HOSPITAL A2 - RALEIGH GENERAL HOSPITAL

B

GREENBRIER VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER Ronceverte, W.Va.

C

PRINCETON COMMUNITY HOSPITAL Princeton, W.Va.

1

1

2 2 3

BECKLEY VETERANS AFFAIRS MEDICAL CENTER Beckley, W.Va. CATAWBA HOSPITAL Catawba, Va.

3 4

PLATEAU MEDICAL CENTER Oak Hill, W.Va.

4 5

POCAHONTAS MEMORIAL HOSPITAL Buckeye, W.Va.

5

WVU MEDICINE SUMMERSVILLE REGIONAL MEDICAL CENTER Summersville, W.Va.

6

B

Randolph

Pocahontas

5

A2

Hampshire

D

4

Pendleton

Nicholas

B

SOUTH WEST

C

A1

Upshur

1 A1

Grant

Webster

Clay

4

Mineral

Tucker

1

3

Logan 7

Barbour

Morgan Berkeley

2

Preston

C

A2 C

Lewis

3

Maryland

Fayette

1

Mingo

3

Braxton

7

Boone

Kentucky

Calhoun

4

Gilmer

Roane

Putnam

3

Ritchie 5

Jackson

4

2

Doddridge

Wood

Ohio

B

Marion

Harrison Taylor

Pleasants B

Monongalia

Wetzel

3

Pennsylvania

West Virginia School of

Osteopathic Medicine

wvsom.edu


A GLOBAL PERSPECTIVE MEDICAL EXPERIENCES IN

WVSOM STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL EXPERIENCES

25 COUNTRIES

Rotation sites and number of students who visited each site between 2009 and 2019.

1 1

GERMANY

1 POLAND

NETHERLANDS

2

1 ITALY

120

34

1

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

MEXICO

67 GUATEMALA

REPUBLIC OF GEORGIA

11

NICARAGUA

INDIA

COSTA RICA

3 ECUADOR

21

1

SIERRA LEONE

KENYA

27 PERU

5 TANZANIA

1 BOLIVIA

2

BANGLADESH

LEBANON

10

25

6 HIMALAYAS

2 VIETNAM

1 CAMBODIA

3 PHILIPPINES

2 BALI

38 SOUTH AFRICA

WVSOM’S CENTER FOR INTERNATIONAL MEDICINE AND CULTURAL CONCERNS: INTERNATIONAL STUDIES PROGRAM In 2009, WVSOM formally established the WVSOM Center for International Medicine and Cultural Concerns (CIMCC). The CIMCC provides students the opportunity to participate in global medical training experiences while ensuring academic integrity. In the 2019-20 academic year, there were five international rotations scheduled along with a DOCARE international service trip. They were all canceled due to the COVID-19 pandemic. WVSOM prides itself on producing firstclass, dedicated physicians, with its main mission focused on rural and primary care medicine for the residents of West

Virginia and the Appalachian region. WVSOM also recognizes the importance of creating well-rounded, culturally sensitive physicians who are aware of global health issues. Prior to 2009, fewer than three WVSOM students took part in international rotations. Since then, 389 students have participated in international medical experiences, typically in rural, underserved areas. These experiences occurred either as required and elective rotations or through the DOCARE and the Christian Medical and Dental Association (CMDA) Club medical service trips during spring breaks.

389

STUDENTS HAVE EXPERIENCED RURAL HEALTH ON A GLOBAL SCALE SINCE 2009

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 19 www.wvsom.edu


RURAL HEALTH INITIATIVE (RHI) WVSOM’s RHI is answering the call for leaders in rural medicine.

2019-20 FUNDING The West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission awarded WVSOM’s RHI a grant for

$587,000

RHI MISSION

The Rural Health Initiative’s mission is to enhance the rural primary care curriculum at the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine in order to produce graduates uniquely qualified to practice medicine in rural/underserved communities of West Virginia.

A two-week Wilderness Medicine rotation took place July 29-Aug. 11, 2019, and included two full weeks of didactics and outdoor workshops including swift water rescue and rope rescue training. WVSOM’s RHI co-sponsors this rotation for fourth-year medical students and medical residents.

20 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

As a portion of the RHI program, thirdand fourth-year RHI students participate in industry activities or field experiences related to West Virginia’s workforce. Examples include medical simulations in coal mines and meeting with West Virginia legislators during Rural Workforce Day.


RURAL PHYSICIAN SERVICE PROGRAM

The Rural Physician Service Program incentivizes WVSOM students to remain in West Virginia to practice. Students selected receive a monetary award in exchange for agreeing to practice in an eligible rural/ underserved service site in West Virginia for one year. Additionally, students receive enhanced rural health training during medical school through the Rural Health Initiative program. Through the Rural Physician Service Program and Rural Physician Scholarship Program, $176,000 was awarded to seven WVSOM medical students during the 2019-20 fiscal year.

$176,000 AWARDED

TO SEVEN WVSOM STUDENTS

45 WVSOM STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN THE RHI PROGRAM - 13 from the Class of 2020 - 11 from the Class of 2021 - 12 from the Class of 2022 - 9 from the Class of 2023

12

PRE-MED/UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

participated in WVSOM’s RHI Green Coat Program, a pipeline program to support West Virginia students who hope to attend WVSOM.

8

STUDENTS

HEALTH EDUCATION RESOURCE LIBRARY

The WVSOM RHI began a new initiative to further community outreach support. The Health Education Resource Library expands upon the health education materials available to community groups, medical students and K-12 and undergraduate schools through RHI for instate health education-related events. The resource library provides education and demonstration materials tailored toward various ages. Some topics include prevention of substance use disorder, nutrition, hygiene and mental health. To address concerns related to the current pandemic, the library has resources available to educate on the prevention of the spread of respiratory viruses such as COVID-19. Additionally, items such as hand washing stations and thermometers promote proper sanitation and screening at the educational events.

from University of Charleston

- Charleston Area Medical Center, Charleston, W.Va.

2

STUDENTS

from Davis and Elkins College

- Davis Health System, Elkins, W.Va.

2

STUDENTS

from West Virginia Wesleyan College

- Davis Health System, Elkins, W.Va.

5 RHI GRADUATES FROM THE CLASS OF

2020 WERE ACCEPTED INTO WEST VIRGINIA RESIDENCY PROGRAMS. • Charleston Area Medical Center - Charleston, W.Va. (2) • Greenbrier Valley Medical Center - Ronceverte, W.Va. (1) • WVU Medicine United Hospital Center - Bridgeport, W.Va. (1) • WVU School of Medicine - Morgantown, W.Va. (1)

45 RHI STUDENTS

received encouragement from

15

RURAL PHYSICIAN MENTORS

to participate in rotations that enhanced rural primary care, reinforced student interest in rural primary care practice and demonstrated the quality of life in rural communities.

RHI is a program of the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine. This program is presented with financial assistance as a grant from the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission. RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 21 www.wvsom.edu


GME/MSOPTI Mountain State Osteopathic Postdoctoral Training Institutions Inc. (MSOPTI) is an accredited graduate medical education training consortium consisting of WVSOM and affiliated training institutions.

SPECIALTIES

Residents in MSOPTI-sponsored programs include WVSOM graduates as well as graduates of other medical schools across the nation. MSOPTI primary care residencies (family medicine, internal medicine and transitional year) account for 79% of positions.

LOCATION OF MOUNTAIN STATE OSTEOPATHIC POSTDOCTORAL TRAINING INSTITUTIONS

MSOPTI 2019-20 75

(54%)

FAMILY MEDICINE

30

(22%)

INTERNAL MEDICINE

24

(17%)

EMERGENCY MEDICINE

(4%)

OSTEOPATHIC NEUROMUSCULOSKELETAL MEDICINE

6 4

(3%)

TRINITY HEALTH SYSTEM

Wood

Steubenville, Ohio

TRANSITIONAL YEAR Jackson Mason

Cabell

Wayne

The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and American Osteopathic Association (AOA) have been working together to ensure a smooth transition to the single accreditation system (SAS). AOA-approved programs and sponsoring institutions must have achieved ACGME Initial Accreditation by June 30, 2020.

Putnam

Boone Mingo

Logan

Wyoming

McDowell

ACCESSHEALTH TEACHING HEALTH CENTER Beckley, W.Va.

www.wvsom.edu

Kanaw

Lincoln

MSOPTI, as an ACGME sponsoring institution, submitted applications for all its partner programs. All MSOPTI programs have achieved ACGME Initial Accreditation. Several programs under MSOPTI ACGME sponsorship will seek Osteopathic Recognition (OR).

22 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care

R


Hancock

Brooke

CORNERSTONE CARE TEACHING HEALTH CENTER Mount Morris, Pa.

Ohio

Marshall

Monongalia

Wetzel

Pleasants

d

Harrison

Ritchie

Wirt Calhoun

Roane

wha

g

Morgan

Marion

Tyler

Preston Taylor

Hampshire

Doddridge Barbour

Tucker

Upshur

Hardy

Randolph Pendleton

Braxton Webster

Clay Nicholas

Pocahontas

MERITUS MEDICAL CENTER

Fayette

Greenbrier

Raleigh

Jefferson

Grant

Lewis

Gilmer

Berkeley

Mineral

Summers

Hagerstown, Md.

Monroe

Mercer

GREENBRIER VALLEY MEDICAL CENTER Ronceverte, W.Va. RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 23 www.wvsom.edu


ADMISSIONS

5,429 ADMISSIONS APPLICANTS

2.4% INCREASE IN SUPPLEMENTAL APPLICATIONS

TRAVEL During the 2019-20 admissions cycle, WVSOM recruiters met 1,355 applicants during their travels. The COVID-19 pandemic eliminated spring travel by recruiters.

ON CAMPUS RECRUITERS MET

1,355

APPLICANTS DURING THEIR TRAVELS.

24 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

The number of prospective students attending on-campus events during the 2019-20 cycle was limited due to the pandemic. There were 218 prospective students who attended on-campus events, including 191 prospective students at open house events, 27 individual campus tours and other small group events. Additionally, WVSOM’s admissions office hosted the annual Health Professions Advisors Conference. Nineteen advisors from 14 different institutions in West Virginia, Virginia, Tennessee, Pennsylvania and Maryland attended the day-anda-half conference.


SESSION WITH

94

PARTICIPANTS

3

VIRTUAL FAIRS WITH

1,003

590

INTERVIEWS INTERVIEW CYCLE During the interview cycle, 590 applicants were interviewed. The office saw a 2.4 percent increase (2,976 total) in supplemental applications from the 2018-19 cycle to the 2019-20 cycle. In July 2020, WVSOM enrolled 205 new students. The average MCAT score for accepted students was 501. The average science GPA of accepted and matriculated applicants was 3.51.

PARTICIPANTS

170

PARTICIPATED

VIRTUAL ACCEPTED STUDENTS DAY The admissions team and a student panel welcomed newly accepted students in a virtual event with 170 participants. The agenda included a welcome from the president and session topics including curriculum, rotations, research, Student Life, Rural Health Association, ASPIRE and financial aid.

COMMUNICATING WITH PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS The admissions office increased its communication with prospective students from the time they are accepted to the time they matriculate. Additionally, an e-newsletter was distributed as a way to stay in touch with college advisors throughout the admissions cycle. The office hosted a Facebook Live session to better engage prospective students and provide them an opportunity to ask questions of admissions counselors and current students. The session was attended by 94 participants.

218

TOTAL ON-CAMPUS CONTACTS

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 25 www.wvsom.edu


STUDENT DEMOGRAPHICS WVSOM students hail from across the United States. The number of applications is strong each year. This past year, 5,429 students applied for about 200 available seats. WVSOM makes mission-driven decisions based on each applicant’s academic success, extracurricular experiences and passion to become an osteopathic physician.

Home State of WVSOM Students 2019-2

HOME STATE OF 2019-20 WVSOM STUDENTS WA-3 MT OR-3

ID-3 WY

205

NV-1

total students in the firstyear class

CA-30

UT-10

AZ-11

91 FEMALES

114 MALES

Compared to 91 (42%) in 2018

Compared to 124 (58%) in 2018

44%

56%

26 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care

MN-9 WI-13

SD-2 NE-2

CO-9

NM

KS-2 OK-1

TX-19

IA-3 IL-15 MO-4 AR-1 LA

MS1

AK-2

Map Created 9/2

HI www.wvsom.edu

ND

Total Students


26%

32%

54 MINORITY STUDENTS

65 25 YEARS OR OLDER

First-year students

809

20

First-year students

Home County of 2019-20 WVSOM Students HOME COUNTY

OF 2019-20 IN-STATE WVSOM STUDENTS

TOTAL

First-year through fourth-year students; map created Sept. 21, 2020

178

Brooke-2

ME-7

IN9

OH49

PA-95 WV178

TN-10 AL-2

Monongalia-14

SC-4

Wirt-1

Cabell-9

Jackson4

Kanawha-25

Logan7

FL36

Mingo-1

21/2020

Hampshire1

Barbour1

Braxton-1

Hardy-1

Berkeley5

Jefferson-2

Pendleton-1

Webster-1

Nicholas-1 Fayette6

Boone-2

Preston2

Upsh.1

Roane1

Putnam6

Lincoln1

GA-5

Harrison6

Wood-9

Mason-1

NC-18

Marion-4

Tyler-1

Pleas.-2

RI-0 CT-4 NJ-31 DE-5 MD-35 DC-1

VA-53

KY-4

TOTAL

First-year through fourth-year students; map created Sept. 21, 2020

Marshall-3

NH-4 VT-0 MA-4

NY-59

MI-52

Ohio-5

Pocahontas1

Greenbrier-16

Map Created 9/21/2020 Total Students from West Virginia - 178

Raleigh-11 Wyoming-2

Summ.Monroe-4 3 Merc.-13

- 809 PR

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 27 www.wvsom.edu


OUR GRADUATE DEMOGRAPHICS

876

TOTAL GRADUATES

ALL SPECIALTIES

Map created Sept. 21, 2020

These maps show the total distribution of WVSOM graduates in 51 of 55 counties and all 50 states. WVSOM is the leader in producing physicians who practice in West Virginia.

GRADUATES FROM 1978-2017 PRACTICING IN WEST VIRGINIA

GRADUATES FROM 1978-2017 PRACTICING IN THE U.S.

3,216

TOTAL GRADUATES

Map created Sept. 21, 2020

28 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

27 % OF WVSOM GRADUATES ARE PHYSICIANS IN WEST VIRGINIA


RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 29 www.wvsom.edu


PRIMARY CARE The maps on this page illustrate WVSOM primary care physicians located in all 50 states nationwide. In West Virginia, 49 counties have WVSOM graduates practicing primary care medicine which includes family medicine, internal medicine and pediatrics. WVSOM is number one in West Virginia for providing primary care physicians and in the top five of all medical schools for graduates who enter primary care residency.

680

TOTAL GRADUATES

Map created Sept. 21, 2020

GRADUATES FROM 1978-2017 PROVIDING PRIMARY CARE IN WEST VIRGINIA

GRADUATES FROM 1978-2017 PROVIDING PRIMARY CARE IN THE U.S.

2,184

TOTAL GRADUATES

Map created Sept. 21, 2020

30 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

89 % OF THE COUNTIES IN

WEST VIRGINIA HAVE WVSOM GRADUATES

PROVIDING PRIMARY CARE


RURAL MEDICINE

490

The maps on this page show that WVSOM graduates practice medicine in rural areas all over the country but especially in Appalachia. WVSOM is the number one medical school (osteopathic and allopathic) graduating physicians who practice medicine in rural areas.

TOTAL GRADUATES

Map created Sept. 21, 2020

GRADUATES FROM 1978-2017 PRACTICING IN RURAL WEST VIRGINIA

GRADUATES FROM 1978-2017 PRACTICING IN RURAL AREAS IN THE U.S.

1,099

TOTAL GRADUATES

Map created Sept. 21, 2020

85 %

OF THE COUNTIES IN WEST

VIRGINIA HAVE PHYSICIANS FROM WVSOM PRACTICING RURAL MEDICINE

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 31 www.wvsom.edu


RESEARCH

169

EMPLOYEES

28

joined a research project or other scholarly activity.

STUDENTS

peer reviewed journal articles or book chapters with employee or student authors.

98

STUDENT AUTHORS participated in posters/oral presentations.

171

STUDENTS

NON-RESEARCH SCHOLARLY ACTIVITY FORMS RECEIVED

joined a research project or conducted other scholarly activity.

79

STUDENTS AND EMPLOYEES made presentations.

22

19

STUDENTS AND RESIDENTS

were listed as authors on journal articles.

NEW RESEARCH REQUESTS 32 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

74

58

PRECEPTORS and other collaborators participated on a research project or scholarly activity project with WVSOM employees and students.


TOTAL AMOUNT UNDER MANAGEMENT

9

RESEARCH GRANTS TOTALING

$612,654

2017-18

$5.5 M

2018-19

2019-20

$5 M $4.5 M $4 M $3.5M

25

NON-RESEARCH GRANTS TOTALING

$4,765,975

$3M $2.5M $2M $1.5M $1M

$1,930,947 $3,160,889

$5,378,629

RESEARCH GRANTS

$5,000

WVCTSI Pilot Grant: Comparison of keratin 18 gene DNA methylation in brain metastasis of breast cancer. (10/1/19-3/31/20) WVURC (NIH) PI – Tuoen Liu, M.D., Ph.D.

$5,000

WVCTSI Pilot Grant: Metabolic syndrome gender differences in cardiovascular function. (7/1/19-12/31/19) WVURC (NIH)

PI – Shinichi Asano, Ph.D.

$8,250

Neuronal fatty acid methylation by protein arginine methyltransferase. (1/7/19-6/30/20)

LSU HSC (AHA)

PI – Jacob Neumann, Ph.D.

$10,000

Examining the efficacy of mobile device use in capturing and reporting entrustable professional activity data. (7/1/19-6/30/21)

$112,363

Rural West Virginia responds to opioid injection epidemics: from data to action. (8/15/18-11/30/19)

AACOM

WVURC (NIDA/NIH/CDC/SAMHSA, ARC)

$39,900

$332,141

(5/12/20-7/31/20)

(7/1/19-6/30/20)

PI – Machelle Linsenmeyer, Ed.D.

West Virginia INBRE Equipment Award. MURC (WV INBRE/NIH)

PI – Kristen Stover, Ph.D.

PI – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute grant. WVURC (NIH)

PI – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

$50,000

West Virginia INBRE Equipment Award. (5/8/19-7/31/19)

MURC (WV INBRE/NIH)

PI – Jandy Hanna, Ph.D.

PI indicates principal investigator. RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 33 www.wvsom.edu


NON-RESEARCH GRANTS

$23,698

$21,243

PD – Kathleen Martin, M.D.

Prescription Drug Overdose Toolkit (9/1/18-8/31/19) SAMHSA, WVBHHF PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

$7,500

$864,600

$105,000

$650,000

$747,639

$5,700

$20,000

Perinatal Partnership (4/2/20-12/31/20) WV HEPC

Diversity for Equity (7/1/19-6/30/21) WV HEPC PD – Rebecca Morrow, Ph.D. Scholarships for Disadvantaged Students (7/1/19-6/30/20) HRSA PD – Rebecca Morrow, Ph.D.

$15,000

FY20 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (10/1/18-9/30/19) Community Connections PD – Terri Baker

$15,000

FY21 Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment (10/1/19-9/30/20) Community Connections PD – Terri Baker

$12,000

West Virginia Foundation for Rape Information and Services (10/1/19-3/31/21) FRIS OVW PD – Rebecca Morrow, Ph.D.

$30,000

Rural Health Residency (9/4/18-7/31/20) WV HEPC PD – Victoria Shuman, D.O.

$25,000

Title IX Investigator Training (7/2/19-10/11/19) WV HEPC PD – Leslie Bicksler, MSW

FY19 State Opioid Response Program (1/1/19-9/30/19) SAMHSA, WVBHHF PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

FY20 State Opioid Response Program (10/17/19-9/29/20) SAMHSA, WVBHHF PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

$709,000

State Opioid Response Program (11/1/19-9/29/20) SAMHSA, WVBHHF PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

$600,000

West Virginia DHHR Block Grant (7/1/19-9/30/19) SAMHSA, WVDHHR PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

$57,691

Greenbrier County Health Alliance Contract for Program Management (11/1/18-10/31/20) SAMHSA, WVDHHR PD – Sally Hurst

$587,000

Rural Health Initiative (7/1/19-6/30/20) WV HEPC PD – Craig Boisvert, D.O.

$5,000

All of Us Community Engagement Through Public Libraries (5/1/19-4/30/20) NIH PD – Heather Bladen

PD indicates project director. 34 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

Hub and Spoke Model (7/1/19-6/30/20) US DHHS PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

Maternal Opioid Misuse Project (4/1/20-12/31/20) SAMHSA, US DHHS PD – Drema Mace, Ph.D.

First2 Network - High Rocks Collaboration (4/27/20-8/24/20) NSF PD – Jandy Hanna, Ph.D.

$13,000

Provost Mini Grant (5/18/20-12/31/20) WV HEPC PD – Roy Russ, Ph.D.

$123,518

CARES Act Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund – Part 1 – Student Aid (4/25/20-4/24/21) US DOE PD – Larry Ware, MBA, CPA

$123,518

CARES Act Higher Education Emergency Relief Fund – Part 2 – Institutional Portion (5/4/20-5/3/21) US DOE PD – Larry Ware, MBA, CPA

$2,020

Returned due to COVID-19 Census 2020 Complete Count Grant (3/5/20-4/30/20) WV HEPC PD – Rebecca Morrow, Ph.D.

$4,608

Returned due to COVID-19 Anatomy Lab Experience (12/5/19-6/30/20) WV HEPC PD – Karen Wines


PUBLICATIONS

WVSOM employees • WVSOM students*

Osteopathic Medicine Pipeline With Student Teaching Opportunities. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 119(7):456–463. doi: 10.7556/jaoa.2019.082. (July 1, 2019) Wines, KS

Phenibut Addiction in a Patient with Substance Use Disorder. Cureus. 11(7): e5230. doi:10.7759/ cureus.5230. (July 24, 2019) Zheng, K*, Khan, A*, Espiridion, ED

In Vitro dsRNA Synthesis by Rotavirus Polymerase Mutants With Lesions at Core Shell Contact Sites. Journal of Virology, JVI-01049. (July 25, 2019) Steger, CL, Brown, ML, Sullivan, OM, Boudreaux, CE, Cohen, CA, LaConte, LE, McDonald, SM

Acute-Onset Mania in a Patient With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer. Cureus. 11(8): e5436. doi:10.7759/ cureus.5436.

(Aug. 20, 2019) Warren, KN*, Katakam, J, Espiridion, ED

An Uncommon Case of Arthrogryposis, Renal Dysfunction, and Cholestasis (ARC) Syndrome and Review of the Renal Involvement: Answers. Pediatric Nephrology. 35(2): 247-248. doi: 10.1007/s00467-019-04338-z. (Aug. 28, 2019) Duong, MD, Rose, CM*, Reidy, KJ, Del Rio, M

Practices of Patients Consuming Antibiotics and Knowledge About Antibiotic Resistance in Hail Region - Saudi Arabia. Future Science OA. 5(10):FSO420. (Sept. 27, 2019) Benmerzouga, I, Al-Zammay, SA, AlShammari, MM, Alsaif, SA, Alhaidan, TM, Aljofan, M

Toward a Theory of the Mechanism of High-Velocity, LowAmplitude Technique: A Literature Review. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 119(10):688–695. doi: 10.7556/ jaoa.2019.116. (Oct. 1, 2019) Hennenhoefer, K*, Schmidt, D

Our Experience With Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement Medication Outcomes From 2013 to 2016. Cureus. 11(10): e6030. doi:10.7759/cureus.6030. (Oct. 30, 2019) Herron, R, Nanjundappa, A, Annie, FH, Wood, M, Embrey, S, Heatherly, C*, Tager, A

The Multi-Scale, ThreeDimensional Nature of Skeletal Muscle Contraction. Physiology. 34(6):402-408. doi: 10.1152/ physiol.00023.2019 (Nov. 1, 2019) Roberts, TJ, Eng, CM, Sleboda, DA, Holt, NC, Brainerd, EL, Stover, K, Marsh, RL, Azizi, E

Feasibility of a mHealth Approach to Nutrition Counseling in an Appalachian State. Journal of Personalized Medicine. 9(4): 50. (Nov. 20, 2019) Olfert, MD, Barr, ML, Hagedorn, RL, Long, DM, Haggerty, TS, Weimer, M, Golden, J, Maurer, MA, Cochran, JD, Hendershot, T, Whanger, SL, Mason, JD, Hodder, SL

Genetic Variations in the Dopamine Reward System Influence Exercise Reinforcement and Tolerance for Exercise Intensity. Behavioural Brain Research. 16:375 doi: 10.1016/j. bbr.2019.112148. (Dec. 16, 2019) Flack, K, Pankey, C, Ufholz, K, Johnson, L, Roemmich, JN

Dental Molding Compounds and Casts. Dental Anthropology Journal. 33(1), 17-22. doi: 10.26575/daj.v33i1.290. (Jan. 9, 2020) Kelso, RS, Hulsey, BI, Driscoll, KR

The Influence of Social Media on Acne Treatment: A Cross-Sectional Survey. Pediatric Dermatology. 37:301-304. doi: 10.1111/ pde.140912020. (Jan. 15, 2020) Yousaf, A, Hagen, R,* Delaney, E, Davis, S, Zinn, Z

Diversity of Extracellular Matrix Morphology in Vertebrate Skeletal Muscle. Journal of Morphology. 2020; 281: 160-169. doi: 10.1002/ jmor.21088. (Feb. 1, 2020) Sleboda, DA, Stover, K, Roberts, TJ

Annals Graphic Medicine - Med School Valentine. Annals of Internal Medicine. 172:W64-68. doi: 10.7326/G19-0055. (Feb. 11, 2020) Chisler, L*

Perivascular Adipose Tissue Mediated Aortic Reactivity Data: Female Lean and Obese Zucker Rats. Data in Brief, 105290.

(Feb. 15, 2020) Tilley, MA*, Hatcher, AS, Chantler, PD, Asano, S

A Heretical View: Rather Than a Solely Placental Protective Function, Placental 11β Hydroxysteroid Dehydrogenase 2 Also Provides Substrate for Fetal Peripheral Cortisol Synthesis in Obese Pregnant Ewes. Journal of the Developmental Origins of Health Disparities. March 10: 1-7. doi: 10.1017/S2040174420000112. (March 1, 2020) Ghnenis, A, Odhiambo, J, Smith, A, Pankey, C, Nathanielsz, P, Ford, S

Biomechanics of Loris Locomotion in Nekaris, K, Burrows, A (Eds.)’ “Evolution, Ecology and Conservation of Lorises and Pottos (Cambridge Studies in Biological and Evolutionary Anthropology) pp. 138-152.” Cambridge: Cambridge University. doi: 10.1017/9781108676526.038. (March 31, 2020) Hanna, J

Assessment of the Research Interests and Perceptions of First-Year Medical Students at 4 Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine. Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. 120(4):236–244. doi: 10.7556/ jaoa.2020.040. (April 1, 2020) Nguyen, V, Kaneshiro, K, Nallamala, H, Kirby, C, Cho, T, Messer, K, Zahl, S, Hum, J, Modrzakowski, M, Atchley, D, Ziegler, D, Pipitone, O, Lowery, JW, Kisby, G

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 35 www.wvsom.edu


A Cohort Comparison Analysis of Fixed Pressure Ventriculoperitoneal Shunt Valves With Programmable Valves for Hydrocephalus Following Nontraumatic Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Operative Neurosurgery. 18(4):374-383. doi: 10.1093/ons/ opz195.

(April 1, 2020) Orrego-González, E, Enriquez-Marulanda, A, Ascanio, JC, Jordan, N*, Hanafy, KA, Moore, JM, Ogilvy, CS, Thomas, AJ

Low Back Pain and Swelling as an Atypical Presentation of IgA Vasculitis. Clinical Practice and Cases in Emergency Medicine. 4(2):241-243. doi:10.5811/cpcem.2019.11.44574. (April 14, 2020) Winkler, CT, Dobson, RW*, Tranovich, MJ

A Very Rare Cause of Splenic Injury: Splenic Hematoma Following a Diagnostic Upper Endoscopy (Esophagogastroduodenoscopy) and Biopsy of Gastric Ulcer. Journal of Clinical Medicine Research. 12(4): 269271. doi: 10.14740/jocmr4134. (April 15, 2020) Eter, A, Belliveau, R*

ACTIVE PROJECTS

Pulmonary Edema and Stunned Myocardium in Subarachnoid Hemorrhage. Cureus. 12(4): e7746. doi:10.7759/cureus.7746.

(April 20, 2020) Naum, R*, Filatov, A, Alusma-Hibbert, K, Espinosa, PS

Sleep Endoscopy Findings in Children in Supine Versus Left Lateral Position. International Journal of Pediatric Otorhinolaryngology. 134:110056. doi: 10.1016/j.ijporl.2020.110056. (April 21, 2020) Carr, M, Phillips, D*

Hypomethylating Agent Azacitidine Is Effective in Treating Brain Metastasis Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Through Regulation of DNA Methylation of Keratin 18 Gene. Translational Oncology. 13(6):100775. doi:10.1016/j. tranon.2020.100775.

(May 1, 2020) Butler, C, Sprowls, S, Szalai, G, Arsiwala, T, Pushkar, S, Straight, B, Hatcher, S, Tyree, E*, Yost, M*, Kohler, WJ*, Wolff, B*, Putnam, E, Lockman, P, Liu, T

SC411 Treatment Can Enhance Survival in a Mouse Model of Sickle Cell Disease. Prostaglandins,

FACULTY AND STAFF ► Department of Biomedical Sciences

Krajacic, P.

Cochran, J. Kendall, B.

Landvoigt, M. Lot, L.

Lovett, G.

STUDENTS ► Center for Rural and

Gerlach, D.

Mohre, K.

Gribble, M.

Morgan, K.

Baker, J.

Harrah, G.

Murugesan, U.

Balakrishnan, M.

Hedden, M.

Noel, D.

Barr, T.

Hennenhoefer, K.

Pirtle, J.M.

Bernhard, Z.

Hernandez, M.

Powell, T.

Betterton, L.

Holodnik, O.

Ramkissoon, P.

Swarm, G.

Bolger, J.

Hulse, D.

Ray, L.

Calderwood, J.

Hurlburt, G.

Redden, J.

Ziner, E.

Canapp, S.

Keith, S.

Romaniello, C.

Nazar, A.

Caplan, A.

Kent, L.

Sahni, S.

Thomas, E.

Carder, S.

Kepfinger, J.

Shamma, A.

Castagna, A.

Khalil, J.

Sharp, J.

Colebank, A.

Kohler, W.

Smith, D.

Coleman, A.

Kubiak, J.

Tilley, M.

Collins, J.M.

Lam, R.

Van Allen, J.

Cook, A.

Lane, S.A.

VanDusen, G.

Cox, A.

Lee, T.

van Zyl, C.

Croce, P.

Leichner, P.

Ward, J.

Debord, C.

Lin, W.

Wolff, B.

Eagar, H.

Lopez, R.

Yasgur, B.

Flynn, B.

Maguina, S.

Forren, N.

Mannan, A.

Gauthier, C.

Marzouk, D.

Gazda, H.

McKinney, C.

Community Health

Morris-Wiman, J.

Heinsberg, H.

Pankey, C.

Holt, B.

Scopa Kelso, R. Stover, K. Ward, P.

Martin, K.

McGuffin, A.

Hereford, C.

Carrier, R.

Conley, G. Hanna, J. Kelso, A.

Linsenmeyer, M.

Schaper, D. Webb, D.

Haller, M.

Mann, J.

Hrutkay, L.

Morrow, R.

Rubin, A.

► Osteopathic Principles and Practice Foster, R

Schmidt, D

36 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

Hurst, S.

Mace, D.

► Other departments

► Statewide Campus Hamric, H.

(May 26, 2020) Jarrett, T, Cochran, J, Baus, A

Aswad, A.

► Department of Clinical Sciences Bernardino, L.

Applying the Medications at Transitions and Clinical Handoffs Toolkit in a Rural Primary Care Clinic: Implications for Nursing, Patients, and Caregivers. Journal of Nursing Care Quality. 35(3): 233-239. doi: 10.1097/ NCQ.0000000000000454.

Arbus, S.

Neumann, J.

Griffith, B.

(May 23, 2020) Chen, P-Y, Cu, CY-C, Clemons, GA, Citadin, CT, Couto e Silva, A, Possoit, HE, Azizbayeva, R*, Forren, NE*, Liu, C-H, Shanaka Rao, K-N, Krzywanski, DM, Lee, RHC, Neumann, J, Lin, HW

Misiaszek, S.

Boudreaux, C. Eleazer, C.

Stearic Acid Methyl Ester Affords Neuroprotection and Improves Functional Outcomes after Cardiac Arrest. Prostaglandins, Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. doi: 10.1016/j.plefa.2020.102138.

Genovese, N.

Liu, T.

Bridges, K.

(May 3, 2020) Wu, CY-C, Lopez-Toledano, MA, Daak, AA, Clemons, GA, Citadin, CT, Sancilio, FD, Rabinowicz, AL, Minagar, A, Neumann, J, Lee, RHC, Lin, HW

Abood, D.

Benmerzouga, I. Benson, M.

Leukotrienes and Essential Fatty Acids. doi: 10.1016/j. plefa.2020.102110.

Morrow, R. Quick, J. Wise, C.


MSOPTI RESEARCH DAY POSTER PRESENTATION WINNERS

STUDENTS

RESIDENTS

CASE STUDY CATEGORY

CASE STUDY CATEGORY

1ST: MADELEINE C. GWINN, OMS II “Bilateral Exertional Compartment Syndrome With Endoscopic Fasciotomy Surgical Intervention in a High School Athlete: A Case Study”

1ST: CRYSTAL KARLO, D.O., PGYI - BRITTANY WEST, D.O. “Treatment of Low Back Pain Utilizing OMT: A Case Study”

2ND: KACY HARM, OMS II - JASMEEN GURON, OMS II - ERIC LUCAS, OMS II - PETER J. WARD, PH.D. “Split Cord Malformation: Anatomical Presentation in a Cadaver” 3RD: ASHLEY GEBO, OMS III - JORDAN HUNTER, D.O. - MICHAEL IANNETTI, M.D. “The Window Period: How an Asymptomatic, Suicidal Patient Gets a Diagnosis of Acute Hepatitis”

2ND: MICHAEL GRAY, D.O., PGYI - KIMBERLY BALLARD, D.O. “Continuity of Care in FM in Multiple Healthcare Settings” 3RD: CHELSEA FEAGER, D.O., PGYI - JANET KOWALSKY, D.O., PGYI JOCELYN FORD, FNP-BC - VICTORIA SHUMAN, D.O., FACFP “Post Surgical Pain in the Pediatric Patient: An Osteopathic Case Presentation” PEOPLE’S CHOICE: HANNAH MICK, D.O., PGYI - AMY BROWN, D.O. “Stevens-Johnson Syndrome”

RESEARCH CATEGORY 1ST: JAMES MITTON, OMS II - MD TORIUL ISLAM - JORDAN TUCKER JINJIN CAI - VENKATESWARA REDDY GOGULAMUDI - WEIQUAN ZHU - ANTHONY J. DONAT - LISA A. LESNIEWSKI “Genetic Deletion of Endothelial ARF6 Results in Systemic Insulin Resistance in Mice” 2ND: REINA LOPEZ, OMS IV - REBECCA SCOPA KELSO, PH.D. “May the Loading Force Be With You: The Association Between Femoral Neck and Knee Angles With Bipedal Walking” 3RD: NIMRAH IMAM, OMS II - DAVID NYE, OMS II - MAPLE LANDVOIGT, M.D. “Screening for Childhood Wheezing by Parental Report in Southern West Virginia” PEOPLE’S CHOICE: MATTHEW TILLEY, OMS II - AMANDA S. HATCHER PAUL D. CHANTLER, PH.D. - SHINICHI ASANO, PH.D. “Perivascular Adipose Tissue Mediated Aortic Reactivity Pilot Study: Female Lean and Obese Zucker Rats” Bold lettering indicates WVSOM employees, students and alumni. RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 37 www.wvsom.edu


COMMITMENT TO SERVING OTHERS DEDICATION TO COMMUNITY SERVICE WVSOM believes that a commitment to helping others is integral to the education of future osteopathic physicians. The school works hard to foster in its students an eagerness to give back to people in the local area as well as communities in need around the world. It does so through a variety of programs, from smaller, year-round local fundraising events and donation drives to participation in national initiatives. Two examples of community service efforts at WVSOM are the Translating Osteopathic Understanding into Community Health (T.O.U.C.H.) program and the annual Heart of the Holidays event.

282

STUDENTS

participated in community service

30 CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS

unite WVSOM students in volunteer efforts pertaining to their interests

38 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

7,905

TOTAL HOURS

of service were logged


NONPROFITS AND ORGANIZATIONS THAT BENEFITED Lewisburg Fire Department

$18,512

White Sulphur Springs EMS

West Virginia Breast Health Initiative Central Greenbrier Little League Fruits of Labor

West Virginia Kids Cancer Crusaders Camp Victory

RAISED BY CLUBS AND ORGANIZATIONS ACROSS CAMPUS

Recovery Point of West Virginia Lewisburg Food Pantry

Greenbrier County Humane Society Family Refuge Center

Alzheimer’s Association Right from the Start

T.O.U.C.H. PROGRAM

Women’s Health Center of West Virginia

The T.O.U.C.H. program is a national initiative by the Council of Osteopathic Student Government Presidents (COSGP) and has been a part of WVSOM student life since 2007. The program encourages medical students to volunteer for community service work throughout the year, rewarding those who log more than 50 hours in a 12-month period with the designation of “silver” status and those accruing more than 100 hours with “gold” status. The student with the highest number of service hours each year is awarded “platinum” status.

Prostate Cancer Foundation Project Linus

Communities in Schools

Children’s Home Society Davis Stuart Inc.

During the 2019-20 academic year, WVSOM clubs and organizations collectively raised $18,512. The funds went to charities, nonprofit organizations and service trips.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 39 www.wvsom.edu


VISION OF WELLNESS ONGOING, ADAPTIVE PURSUIT OF OPTIMAL EMOTIONAL, PHYSICAL AND SPIRITUAL BALANCE THE WVSOM WELLNESS COMMITTEE IS COMMITTED TO: Fostering health and wellness in the work and educational environment

Ensuring accreditation standards and procedures related to health and wellness

DIVERSITY COMMITTEE

During this fiscal year, we built upon our already solid foundation of diversity-related work in two specific ways: The Diversity Committee hosted a Moderator Training with the West Virginia Center for Civic Life and two follow-up “Difficult Dialogues” events, and the committee hosted an educational series focusing on basic medical Spanish and an understanding of the relationship between Latinx cultures and access to health care. Both activities were aimed at helping students gain tangible communication skills that will serve them well as they move into leadership positions within their communities following graduation. Moderator training was provided by Jean Ambrose, program coordinator with the West Virginia Center for Civic Life. Ambrose provided moderator training for four different formats: World Café, What’s Next, Living Room Conversations and Open Space. Members of the WVSOM community subsequently hosted Open Space meetings on most Tuesdays from late September 2019 through January 2020 as well as a World Café on Work-Life Balance on Jan. 30, 2020, and a Living Room Conversation on empathy on March 10, 2020. The Medical Spanish Series was conceptualized as a five-part series that would teach WVSOM students, especially those scheduled to participate in a medical service trip during spring break, the basics of 40 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

WELLNESS COMMITTEE

During its third year on campus, the WVSOM Health and Wellness Committee focused on increasing its visibility and expanding its impact. The committee’s webpage provided wellness resources on an ongoing and asynchronous basis. At the same time, the committee sought to increase the engagement of all members of the WVSOM community through the highly accessible activity of walking. In order to help structure the fun of getting active through walking, the committee contracted with an outside company, Walker Tracker, which allows for setting up walking competitions along virtually mapped theme courses. Five competitions took place during the fiscal year: “Real Pirates of the Caribbean,” a five-day solo challenge during which participants were introduced to real pirates of yore; “Spooky USA,” a tour highlighting haunted locations across the country, for a monthlong team challenge; “Turkey Trot,” a monthlong individual challenge in which participants mapped out a turkey design; “Harriet Tubman’s Underground Railroad,” a monthlong solo challenge; and a Virtual 5K that took place on Memorial Day Weekend. The WVSOM Health and Wellness Committee has extended its contract with Walker Tracker through the next fiscal year.

communication and culture. All sessions were designed and delivered by five WVSOM students who were native Spanish speakers or otherwise fluent. Three sessions occurred in person during February and early March 2020. Because of the COVID-19 pandemic, the fourth session and a final exam took place virtually. Additionally, the committee chair, Rebecca Morrow, Ph.D., serves as a member of the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine Diversity Council. Efforts for the next fiscal year will focus on training members of the WVSOM community on “Developing Effective Allyship” across a variety of diversity categories including race, sex, ability and LGBTQ+ identity.


JUST SAY KNOW TO NEUROSCIENCE WVSOM’S JUST SAY KNOW WEEKLONG CAMP MAY HAVE MOVED TO A VIRTUAL FORMAT THIS PAST YEAR, BUT THAT DIDN’T STOP ITS HIGH-SCHOOLAGED ATTENDEES FROM LEARNING ABOUT SCIENCE, MEDICINE AND THE OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL SCHOOL. The switch to a viral format, prompted by the COVID-19 pandemic, allowed organizers to expand the camp’s reach beyond West Virginia and deliver interactive education to young people as far away as Colorado. Forty campers participated in the most recent program, which was titled “Neuroscience: Perception or Reality” and focused on the body’s sensory systems. Just Say KNOW is designed to introduce ninth- through 12th-graders and recent high school graduates to topics related to science and medicine. The camp is taught by WVSOM student interns and an undergraduate intern under the supervision of faculty. In addition to lectures, the camp emphasizes education through hands-on activities designed to appeal to young learners. In the program, campers built models and drew images of anatomical structures within the eye and ear, listened to sound clips illustrating different levels of hearing loss, attempted to describe unseen objects based solely on their sense of touch, smell or taste, and discovered how medical imaging techniques such as X-rays, MRIs and CAT scans can help diagnose illnesses. Campers also learned about medical professions, osteopathic manipulative medicine and WVSOM. Staff from the school’s Rural Health Initiative spoke about the program and showed photos of medical students exploring issues related to health concerns that are common in West Virginia. An employee of the school’s Clinical Evaluation Center provided a video tour of the facility, and select WVSOM faculty members shared information about research they have conducted. As with past camps, this year’s program also included a showcase that allowed attendees to demonstrate to their families what they learned.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 41 www.wvsom.edu


WVSOM CRCH MISSION AND VISION MISSION

Driving engagement in rural health.

VISION

The CRCH builds infrastructure that empowers communities to reach their highest level of health and wellness through evidence-based, community-engaged outreach, education and research.

VALUES We are committed to excellence and innovation through: ► Service to others. ► Trust and integrity in relationships. ► Respect for communities. ► Strength-based collaboration. ► Inclusivity and social responsibility.

42 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

CENTER FOR RURAL AND COMMUNITY HEALTH (CRCH) 2019-20 FUNDING

FEDERAL, STATE AND FOUNDATION GRANTS, CONTRACTS AND PURCHASING AGREEMENTS

$2,853,081


MAJOR PROJECTS

CRCH PROJECTS AND PROGRAMS ► Research and scholarly activity: engaged medical

students, faculty, clinical and community stakeholders in 17 projects across West Virginia, in collaboration with the West Virginia Clinical and Translational Science Institute, the West Virginia Higher Education Policy Commission, West Virginia University, Marshall University and other statewide partners.

► Website: aiming to enhance engagement and

partnership across the state and beyond, the CRCH launched a new website in May 2020: crch.wvsom. edu. The site allows visitors to explore the CRCH’s three core branches: Education and Training, Research and Community Engagement, and provides stakeholders with resources, opportunities and direct collaboration with CRCH staff.

► CHERP (Community Health Education Resource

Person) Online Training Platform: will launch in spring 2021. Now an ally organization member of the National Association for Community Health Workers. CRCH has developed the WVSOM virtual training platform to offer opportunities in continuing medical education, health education, and related trainings that promote population health.

► Health Index Score and Health Enhancement

Response (HIS & HER) campaign: developing a marketing and distribution plan to promote a health literacy campaign through a national licensing program.

► Motivational interviewing: completed statewide to

each of the West Virginia Behavioral Health Regions reaching 156 participants.

► Symposium: under contract with the CRCH,

Charleston Area Medical Center conducted symposiums for 280 participants on “A Multidisciplinary Approach to Substance Use Disorder.”

► Naloxone certification/medication-assisted treatment

training: delivered to 262 participants.

► Behavioral Health Learning Collaborative: partnered with

12 institutions of higher learning statewide to develop a recruitment and retention plan for West Virginia’s behavioral health workforce.

► CMEs: under contract with the CRCH, the WVSOM

Alumni Association offered CMEs to help educate and update physicians with medication treatment for substance use disorder to 339 participants.

► PSAs: three PSAs ran statewide as an anti-stigma

campaign. (WVVA reaching 380,000; WOAY/WVNS reaching 279,630; WDTV reaching 429,559; WSAZ reaching 385,772 people).

► Anti-stigma educational campaign: provided monthly to

242 employees at the Robert C. Byrd Clinic.

► Scholarships: WVSOM students received more than

$100 each for completion of the CRCH opioid educational series. Six $5,000 scholarships were provided to WVSOM students working in an area of West Virginia at high risk for substance misuse and overdose.

► AmeriCorps: three CRCH AmeriCorps workers provided

assistance and training in community outreach and education, with a focus on small town sustainability throughout Greenbrier Valley.

► Thriveasaurus: a coping skills curriculum developed by

WVSOM residents, completed its final revision. Bridget Morrison, D.O., and residents provided the program to 120 students at Rupert, Smoot, and Frankford elementary schools.

► Hearts United: a partnership was formed with the CRCH

and Hearts United to provide CPR training to 52 individuals.

► CPR: CRCH provided CPR for 150 high school students

at Greenbrier East High School.

► Prescription Opioid and Heroin Awareness Toolkits:

created and disseminated for McDowell and Berkeley counties.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 43 www.wvsom.edu


IN RESPONSE TO THE COVID-19 PANDEMIC: ► Participated in the Greater Greenbrier County

COVID-19 Taskforce: collaborated with major agencies and stakeholders across Greenbrier Valley to share response expertise, resources, and initiatives.

► Mask Production: collaborated with Greenbrier

County Health Department and County Schools to produce over 1400 N-95 respiratory masks and face shields with WVSOM students, staff and volunteers. Coordinated more than 500 masks for distribution to community, faculty, staff and students. Created and distributed over 150 mask clips across Greenbrier County.

► County PPE Order: coordinated, funded and

distributed Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to all EMS and Emergency Services organizations in Greenbrier County.

► Trucker Food & Safety Bags: approximately 50

bags were made and distributed to truck drivers and essential workers traveling through Greenbrier County.

► County Schools

Feeding Program: assisted with Greenbrier County Schools to deliver over 60,000 meals to students with Greenbrier Long-Term Recovery.

► Feeding Seniors/

Saving Businesses: partnered with local volunteers and 8 local businesses to provide over 7,000 meals to 700 seniors.

► Feed More in 24: partnered with WVSOM stakeholders to raise over $16,000 statewide to local food charities.

► MRV Meals: coordinated the Meadow River Valley Meals

Program (MRV Meals) to provide over 400 locally-sourced meals per week to Greenbrier Valley residents. public celebrations.

WVSOM CLINGMAN CENTER FOR COMMUNITY ENGAGEMENT

Major advances in partnership with the Greenbrier County Health Alliance (GCHA) and Center for Rural and Community Health (CRCH)

► Dedicated the WVSOM Clingman Center for

Community Engagement on October 29, 2019

► Partnered to deliver 77 new programs, trainings, and opportunities for 795 citizens of Greenbrier Valley to learn skills and practices to actively improve health equity and manage healthier lives

► Developed fully equipped, industrial kitchen utilized for culinary training and outreach initiatives

► Grew evidence based self-management programs and

partnerships by utilizing West Virginia Health Connection. Through West Virginia Health Connection, pilot partnerships with local healthcare providers will link patients to community-based health promotion programs, such as the Chronic Disease and Chronic Pain Self-Management program which are offered locally through the CRCH and GCHA.

► Accepted the inaugural Healthy People Healthy Place Gold Award on behalf of Greenbrier County, recognizing the exceptional work of various partners across the county who engage in a shared vision for improving everyone’s health, especially the health of people in need.

► Partnered with a team of community stakeholders to develop the

Rupert Elementary School campus for community revitalization. Marvel Early Childhood Development Center opened in the fall of 2020 as an early childhood education center.

44 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu


HEALTHY CHILDREN’S INITIATIVE For nine years, the Healthy Children’s Initiative has helped children learn to make healthy choices and encourage active lifestyles to prevent diseases such as obesity, heart disease and diabetes from occurring as they reach adulthood. The initiative includes the Emmy awardwinning television series Abracadabra, live events for community and school programs, classroom visits and resource materials.

300

STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN ABRA CLASSROOM 2019-20

300+

STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN ABRA LIVE! 2019-20

4,500

STUDENTS PARTICIPATED IN ABRA CLASSROOM TO DATE

In an effort to reach young children during the COVID-19 pandemic, the Healthy Children’s Initiative focused on messages to educate about the virus and the importance of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention safety guidelines. Social media and online efforts also included videos of healthy snacks, science experiments and magic tricks to keep children engaged during stay-at-home and quarantine periods. These educational and fun messages reached thousands of viewers.

18,000+

TOTAL OUTREACH IMPACT Although Abra Live! and Abra Classroom visits were interrupted due to the COVID-19 pandemic this year, these programs have reached more than 18,000 children since the show’s inception.

SPONSORED BY:

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 45 www.wvsom.edu


WVSOM ALUMNI ASSOCIATION $15K AWARDED IN STUDENT SCHOLARSHIPS

SPOTLIGHT ACTIVITIES

The WVSOM Alumni Association awarded $15,000 in student scholarships during the 2019-20 fiscal year. Additionally, the association presented the WVSOM Foundation with $3,100 to supplement existing scholarships in order to raise their value to a minimum level of $2,000. The WVSOM Alumni Association sponsored a number of successful “Alumni After Hours” events with alumni and students around West Virginia and during the 2019 OMED conference in Baltimore.

CME ATTENDEES AND REVENUE (as of June 30, 2020)

2020

MID-WINTER

339

$108,306

132

SUMMER

$19,175

2019

277

$72,263

155

$16,272

915

TOTAL LIFE MEMBERS

2018

250

$70,788

167

$24,816

Virtual seminar

46 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

4,036 TOTAL ALUMNI

WHITE COAT CLUB (as of June 30, 2020) 11K 10K 9K 8K 7K 6K 5K 4K 3K 2K 1K

$10,512 $7,805

*$2,400

2020

2019

2018

*Delayed start due to pandemic


SPONSORSHIPS

The WVSOM Alumni Association provided Platinum level sponsorship for the 2019 WVSOM Gala fundraiser, benefiting student scholarships.

DISTINGUISHED ALUMNI OF THE YEAR 2020 award winner Charles Davis, D.O.

STUDENT SUPPORT The WVSOM Alumni Association provided support for the following events: ► Sponsored a Wilderness Medicine rotation dinner in

August 2019.

► Participated in Hospital Day in September 2019.

► Hosted a “Thanks for Giving” event in November 2019.

► Sponsored Professionalism and Leadership in the Medical

Setting student dinners throughout the year.

► Purchased yard signs to be placed around the parade field

and sent to each Class of 2020 graduate, and gifted each graduate with a brick to be placed on the newly remodeled walk in front of the main building.

SOCIAL MEDIA CAMPAIGN In spring 2020, the WVSOM Alumni Association organized an effort to show appreciation to alumni who were working to keep the public safe during the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. Employees in various WVSOM departments created and posed with signs of appreciation for the sacrifice and dedication of the school’s alumni, and the association shared photos of them through the #thanksWVSOMalumni campaign.

ALUMNI WEEKEND

GRANT PROPOSALS

During the annual Alumni Weekend in August 2019, the WVSOM Alumni Association presented continuing medical education sessions and hosted social events for WVSOM alumni. WVSOM’s Convocation and White Coat Ceremony, which marks the beginning of new students’ school journey, took place in conjunction with the weekend. Some alumni assisted in the ceremony by presenting white coats to students.

The following grant proposals were approved and funded:

$2,500

was awarded to the Student Osteopathic Medical Association to help with transportation to the American Osteopathic Association’s annual D.O. Day on Capitol Hill. The event was canceled due to COVID-19.

$5,000

was awarded to Elizabeth Ziner, D.O., for faculty ultrasound training.

$5,000

was awarded to Aaron McGuffin, M.D., for student board preparation programs and Universal Notes.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 47 www.wvsom.edu


FINANCIAL OVERVIEW The following is a summary of WVSOM’s financial strength as of June 30, 2020.

$ ADDITIONAL DONATIONS

69.9%

$269,750

STUDENT TUITION AND FEES

18.7%

STATE APPROPRIATIONS

SOURCES OF REVENUE

11.4%

SCHOLARSHIPS

$72,990

FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2019-20 ONLY.

OTHER

2.1% 1.1% 6.3% 1.9%

Investment income Auxiliary revenue Contracts and grants Misc.

CAPITAL CAMPAIGN

$5,796

TOTAL INCOME RECEIVED (NOT PLEDGED) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2019-20 ONLY.

SOUTHEASTERN AREA HEALTH EDUCATION CENTER

OPERATING EXPENSES

61.2%

Total operating expenses for fiscal year 2020 were $45,451,283.

Classified staff continued to be fully funded on the Mercer Schedule.

$114,500

SALARIES, WAGES AND BENEFITS

TOTAL INCOME RECEIVED (NOT PLEDGED) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2019-20 ONLY.

ANNUAL FUND

27.0%

11.8% OTHER

SUPPLIES AND OTHER SERVICES

OTHER

Depreciation

Utilities

Loan cancellations and write-offs

Fees assessed by commission for operations

48 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

$44,526

TOTAL INCOME RECEIVED (NOT PLEDGED) FOR THE FISCAL YEAR 2019-20 ONLY.

$31,938

FOUNDATION UNRESTRICTED (CONTRIBUTIONS/RENTALS) FISCAL YEAR 2019-20 ONLY.


STATEMENT OF REVENUES, EXPENSES AND CHANGES IN NET ASSETS Year ending June 30, 2020 (in thousands of dollars)

2020

2019

2018

40,451

40,369

39,363

45,451

46,511

44,088

(5,000)

(6,142)

(4,725)

10,661

11,886

9,896

5,661

5,744

5,171

143,810

138,066

132,556

149,471

143,810

138,066

Operating revenues Operating expenses 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Operating income Non-operating revenues - net Increase in net assets Net assets (beginning of year)

145 140 135 130 125 120 115 110

Net assets, end of year

GROWTH OF NET ASSETS DURING THE PAST THREE YEARS Year ending June 30, 2020 • (in thousands of dollars)

2020

2019

2018

81,463

75,562

69,335

6,070

5,885

5,205

75,020

75,893

76,187

162,553

157,340

150,727

Current liabilities

4,907

4,424

4,410

Non-current liabilities

8,175

9,106

8,252

13,082

13,530

12,662

Invested in capital assets

75,020

75,893

76,187

Restricted - expendable

11,378

11,232

11,158

Unrestricted

63,073

56,685

50,720

149,471

143,810

138,065

ASSETS Current assets Non-current assets Capital assets TOTAL ASSETS LIABILITIES

TOTAL LIABILITIES NET ASSETS

TOTAL NET ASSETS

As the data shows, WVSOM’s financial position improved during this period. Total assets grew from $157M to $163M during the previous year, while total liabilities decreased by approximately $448K, resulting in a $5.7M increase in net assets. RATIO OF CURRENT ASSETS 2019 2020

17:08:1 16:6:1

The 2020 ratio decreased.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 49 www.wvsom.edu


WVSOM FOUNDATION

1

55,25

0

$

This year the WVSOM Foundation’s growth initiatives continued developing new ways to reach and engage loyal and new donors.

28

FACULTY AND STAFF DONORS

56 651 44

CASH RECEIVED

81

ALUMNI DONORS

GIFTS RECEIVED

SUSTAINED GIVING CAMPAIGN Through an ongoing partnership with GoMart, the WVSOM Foundation launched the Give a Latte sustained giving campaign to fund scholarships and other resources to support WVSOM student doctors. For as little as $5 a month, or what someone might spend on coffee, donors receive a travel mug with free GoMart coffee refills as well as other gifts with higher levels of giving.

SOCIAL MEDIA OUTREACH With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, the WVSOM Foundation team’s social media focus pivoted from efforts to raise money to providing health and wellness guidance. The “Advice From Our Docs” campaign featured tips from WVSOM alumni in the form of videos and still images that addressed COVID-related issues and best practices. The public service messages were designed to inform and protect the wellbeing of West Virginians and those who follow the WVSOM Foundation on social media. 50 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

23

FIRST-TIME DONORS

BUSINESS DONORS

18

87 SCHOLARSHIP DONORS

SHORT-TERM STUDENT LOANS GIVEN

SCHOLARSHIPS GIVEN

$10,000

ASSISTANCE PROVIDED TO STUDENTS FROM THE STUDENT EMERGENCY FUND

90,800 1 $ GIVEN IN SCHOLARSHIP AWARDS

$6,582

IN STUDENT SUPPORT


SECURING NEW DONORS

FOCUSING ON SUPPORT

In the past year, the WVSOM Foundation has secured 44 new donors, two new Annual Fund partners and two new scholarships.

During these difficult times, the WVSOM Foundation still provided needed support to the West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine. Our ultimate goal is to grow an endowment large enough to provide some level of financial support to every student at WVSOM.

ANNUAL FUND PARTNERS NEW! PARTNERS

“When I found out that I had received a scholarship, I was overjoyed and felt exceptionally blessed. Not only does it lessen the financial burden associated with attending medical school so I can concentrate more on becoming a good physician, it also improves my ability to stay in West Virginia and practice in a primary care specialty after I complete my training.”

MANCHIN

C linic

WEST VIRGINIA OSTEOPATHIC MEDICAL ASSOCIATION

- MADDEE GWINN, CLASS OF 2022

GROWING OUR ASSETS ANATOMY OF DONATIONS UNRESTRICTED

$65,332.29

RESTRICTED

$89,917.54

WVSOM FOUNDATION

PERFORMANCE VS BENCHMARK NET FEES/ANNUALIZED

6%

$39,990,671 5.09%

5% 4%

NEIGHBORHOOD INVESTMENT PROGRAM (NIP) TAX CREDITS

3%

$5,551,602 3.60%

3.51%

2%

$71,250

RAISED BY LEVERAGING

$14,250

IN WEST VIRGINIA NIP TAX CREDITS

1.18%

1% 0%

$5,329,971

$30,219,099

WVSOM Foundation Investments

WVSOM Managed Investments

Inception June 1, 2017

“I’m so grateful for the scholarship that I received through the WVSOM Foundation. It allows me to focus on my studies here and be less concerned about the expense of going to medical school.” - RAEKWON TIMMONS, CLASS OF 2023

NEW! CROWDFUNDING PLATFORM The WVSOM Foundation launched a new crowdfunding online donation tool at dogive. wvsomfoundation.org. Capable of hosting donation links for several campaigns at once, this tool is graphics-friendly, with back-end technologies to make giving seamless and easy for donors.

Inception June 1, 2017

Benchmark (%)

Performance (%) since inception

EXPANDING SCHOLARSHIPS The WVSOM Foundation added two new scholarships to our expanding portfolio: The Jarrell Family Scholarship and the Libby Kokott, D.O., Memorial Grant.

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 51 www.wvsom.edu


CAPITAL CAMPAIGN STUDENT CENTER TOTAL GOAL:

STUDENT CENTER AND CLINICAL EVALUATION CENTER (CEC)

RECEIVED

$560,000

OUTSTANDING

$30,000

COMMITMENTS NEEDED

$1,155,000

CEC FUNDRAISING TOTAL GOAL:

Remaining spaces

RECEIVED

$674,553

STUDENT CENTER

Large Conference Hall with stage ($500,000) Dining Lounge ($125,000) Quiet Student Study Lounge ($100,000) Open Student Study Lounge ($100,000) Campus Store ($100,000) Amphitheater ($100,000) Student Promenade ($50,000) Four Student Government/ Student Life Offices ($20,000 each)

ADDITIONAL NAMING OPPORTUNITIES Center for Technology and Rural Medicine First-Year Lecture Hall ($250,000) Center for Technology and Rural Medicine Second-Year Lecture Hall ($250,000)

Main Building Lecture Hall 1 ($100,000) Main Building Lecture Hall 2 ($100,000)

CEC 11 Human-Patient Simulator Labs ($35,000 each) 21 Standardized Patient Labs ($25,000 each) TO DISCUSS A GIFT OPPORTUNITY, CONTACT: James Nemitz, Ph.D.

304.647.6368 jnemitz@osteo.wvsom.edu

Marilea Butcher

304.647.6367 mbutcher@osteo.wvsom.edu

Shannon Warren

304.647.6382 swarren@osteo.wvsom.edu

52 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu

Drema Mace, Ph.D.

304.647.6374 dmace@osteo.wvsom.edu

OUTSTANDING

$9,947

$1,745,000

$1,594,500

COMMITMENTS NEEDED

$910,000


NETWORK OF SUPPORT LIFETIME GIVING LEADERS

President’s Council Donors $100,000+

Drs. Michael and Cheryl Adelman* James Harless Ray Harron, M.D./The Harron Foundation Roland Sharp, D.O. Marlene Wager, D.O. Gary White Businesses Encova Foundation of West Virginia, formerly BrickStreet Foundation The Greenbrier Hotel Corp. Hildegard P. Swick Estate Hollowell Foundation WVSOM Alumni Association*

Founder’s Club Donors $50,000-$99,999 Christopher Beckett, D.O. Sean Brain and Jandy Hanna, Ph.D. Charles Davis, D.O./Davis Eye Center* James Deering, D.O., and Jodi Flanders, D.O.* John Manchin II, D.O./Manchin Clinic*

William McLaughlin, D.O. Michael Nicholas, D.O.* Patrick Pagur, D.O., and Billie Wright, D.O.* Mr. and Mrs. David Rader* Carole Stookey Drs. Andrew and Tiffany Thymius* Mrs. John Tirpak Harold Ward, D.O. Dr. and Mrs. Badshah Wazir/ Spring Hill Cardiology* Lydia Weisser, D.O.* Businesses National Osteopathic Foundation West Virginia Osteopathic Medical Association*

Patron Donors $25,000-$49,999 Manuel Ballas, D.O.* Catherine Bishop, D.O. Jeffery Braham, D.O.* Clyde Brooks III, D.O. Cathy Dailey, D.O.*

GIFTS TO WVSOM July 1, 2019–June 30, 2020

President’s Council Donors $100,000+

Businesses West Virginia Osteopathic Medical Association* WVSOM Alumni Association*

Founder’s Club Donors $50,000-$99,999 Christopher Beckett, D.O.* Charles Davis, D.O./Davis Eye Center * James Deering, D.O., and Jodi Flanders, D.O.* Sean Brain and Jandy Hanna, Ph.D. John Manchin II, D.O./Manchin Clinic* Drs. Andrew and Tiffany Thymius* Lydia Weisser, D.O.*

Patron Donors $25,000-$49,999 Catherine Bishop, D.O. Dr. Steven and Lori Eshenaur/Haven Ltd. Samuel Muscari Jr., D.O. James Nemitz, Ph.D. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas J. Obrokta Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Rubin/ Carmel-Greenfield Charitable Trust* Businesses BB&T West Virginia Emulation Endowment Trust West Virginia State Medical Association Alliance

Dean’s Council Donors $10,000-$24,999

Heather Antolini* Michael Antolini, D.O.* Hal Armistead, D.O., and Amelia Roush, D.O.* Helen Baker, Ph.D. Craig Boisvert, D.O. Lois Bosley, D.O.* Drs. Edward and Kristie Bridges Robert Flowers, D.O. Robert Foster, D.O. John Garlitz, D.O. Abdollatif Ghiathi, D.O.* Robert Holstein, D.O. Dr. and Mrs. Gregory Jarell Susan Ketchem Cynthia Mayer, D.O. Richard McClung, DDS Deena Obrokta, D.O./Liberty Pediatrics Pete Palko III, D.O.** Alan Snider, D.O. Robert Stanley, D.O. Phillip Triplett Jr., D.O. Thomas White II, D.O.* Businesses Bailey & Wyant PLLC CAMC Health Education and Research Institute Greenbrier Valley Medical Center

Dr. Steven and Lori Eshenaur/Haven Ltd. Lawson Hamilton J. Robert Holmes, DDS Drs. Robert and Rachel Hunter* Samuel Muscari Jr., D.O. James Nemitz, Ph.D.* Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Obrokta Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Rubin/ Carmel-Greenfield Charitable Trust* Rosa Stone, D.O.* Lori Tucker, D.O.* Drs. Rafael and Letetia Villalobos* Lewis Whaley, D.O.* Businesses BB&T City National Bank

Highmark Humana Foundation Robert C. Byrd Clinic Smith Kline & French Laboratories West Virginia Emulation Endowment Trust West Virginia State Medical Association Alliance

Morgan Stanley Smith Barney LLC Raleigh General Hospital

Benefactor Donors $5,000-$9,999

David Brown, Ph.D. Cynthia Butler, D.O.** Joseph Cincinnati, D.O. Donald Gullickson II, D.O.** Lisa Hrutkay, D.O. Buddy Hurt, D.O. Malcolm Modrzakowski, Ph.D. Dodi Montgomery Andy Tanner, D.O., and Dewayne Duncan George Triplett, D.O. Businesses MAKO Medical Laboratories Mason & Barry Meritus Health West Virginia State Medical Association ZMM

* Capital Campaign donor ** Class of 1982, 1983, 1990 and 2003 Capital Campaign donors

RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 53 www.wvsom.edu


Sponsor Donors $2,500-$4,999

Richard Burdeaux Sr., D.O. J.P. Casher, D.O. David Cummings, D.O. Allison Evans-Wood, D.O. Monte Finch, D.O.** Michael Grillis, D.O. Raymond Harron, D.O. Ray Hayes, D.O.** Afeworki Kidane, D.O. Forrest Lane Jr., D.O. Gretchen Lovett, Ph.D. Richard Meadows, D.O. William Moore, D.O. Andrea Nazar, D.O. David Nicholas, D.O. Stephen and Cynthia Olson Sherry Phillips Ryan Runyon, D.O. Jason Shull Jessica Shull Stefanie Shull Scott Spradlin, D.O. Natalie Stepputat Robert Vass

Businesses Grant Memorial Hospital Jim Lively Insurance United Bank

Associate Donors $1,000-$2,499

Patrice Bauserman Leslie Bicksler Charles Bou-Abboud Thomas Brandt Jr., D.O. Leslie Buchanan, D.O. Marilea Butcher John Carvalho Elizabeth Clark, D.O. Drs. Shawn and Heidi Clark Zachary Comeaux, D.O. Michael Cope, Ph.D. Suzanne Courtney, D.O.** Richard Durham, D.O. Troy Foster, D.O. Darla Gallentine, D.O. Bradley Goad, D.O. Kathy Goodman, D.O. Kristy Huffman, D.O. Charles Kirkland, D.O. Drema Mace, Ph.D.

Satish Menon, D.O. Karen Miller, J.D. Gary Mitchell Rebecca Morrow, Ph.D. Rebecca Perry, D.O. Mary Pozega, D.O. Michael Pyles, D.O. Thomas Richardson, D.O. Madonna Ringswald, D.O. Linda Smith, D.O. Jeanne Wahl, D.O. Samuel Yates, Ph.D. Sherri Young, D.O. Businesses WVU Medicine Camden Clark Memorial Hospital WVU Medicine Reynolds Memorial Hospital St. Joseph’s Hospital West Virginia Society of ACOFP

Friend Donors $500-$999 Randall Belt, D.O. Dan Breece, D.O. Kathy Fry, M.S. Tim Holbrook Robin King-Thiele, D.O. Howard Lafferty Jr., D.O. Wesley Lockhart, D.O. Frederick Morgan, D.O. James Paugh II, D.O. Emily Thomas, D.O. Russell Winter James Wright, D.O. Mahmoud Younis

Caduceus Donors $50-$249

Marie Bechtel David Bennett, D.O. Chad Brady, D.O. Lorraine Ciarfella Matthew Deitz Nicole Dotson Cheryl Ferrebee Zachary Halsey, D.O. John Happel, M.D. Tommy Holbrook II, D.O. Wendy Lee, D.O. Margaret Leef Amelia McPeak, D.O. Donette Mizia Bobbi Morgan Robert Murphy Mary Norris Laura Oleson Julianna Quick Daniel Rossi, D.O. Roy Russ, Ph.D. Eric Schneider, D.O. Lisa Vaughn, D.O. Donald Williams Harry Young Jr., D.O.

Supporter Donors $250-$499

Edward Brennan II, D.O. Kaitlyn Brunner, D.O. David Dietz Roderick Doss, D.O. Richard Eades Tharon Jack Scott Keller, D.O. Cindi Knight Corinne Layne Stuart, D.O. David Oliver, D.O. David Pickering, D.O. Victoria Roane Sharon Shelton, D.O. WVSOM Department of Biomedical Sciences

* Capital Campaign donor ** Class of 1982, 1983, 1990 and 2003 Capital Campaign donors

54 ANNUAL REPORT 2020 • No. 1 in Rural Primary Care www.wvsom.edu


RESPONDING TO A PANDEMIC • ANNUAL REPORT 2020 55 www.wvsom.edu


West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

400 Lee Street North • Lewisburg, WV 24901

Profile for West Virginia School of Osteopathic Medicine

WVSOM 2019-2020 Annual Report  

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