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MOLONGLO AQUATIC SPORTS AND RECREATION CENTRE_ FEASIBILITY STUDY Prepared for Sport and Recreation Services October 2012


Issue

Date

Name

Checked

A

20/12/2011 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Facility Feasibility Study DRAFT Phase 1 Report

GS

Contact

B

KS

Glenn Scott Principal gscott@hassellstudio.com Kristen Saul Associate ksaul@hassellstudio.com

10/01/2012 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Facility Feasibility Study Phase 1 Report

C

31/05/2012 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Facility Feasibility Study DRAFT Feasibility Report

GS

D

12/07/2012 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study Feasibility Report

KS

E

03/09/2012 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study Feasibility Report - Revised

GS

F

06/09/2012 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study Feasibility Report - FINAL

GS

G

26/10/2012 Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study Feasibility Report - Preamble included

GS

HASSELL 88 Cumberland Street Sydney NSW Australia 2000 T +61 2 9101 2000 Š July 2012

HASSELL Limited ABN 24 007 711 435


Content

Section

Appendices

01 1.1

Introduction Purpose of study

02 2.1 2.2 2.3

Trends and best practice Trends in aquatic planning and design Facility and design precedents Sports participation trends in ACT

03 3.1 3.2

Molonglo community and recreation planning Future Molonglo community Recreational planning for Molonglo

04 4.1 4.2 4.3 4.4

Preliminary Facility Mix District or local catchment Viability of future ice facilities Sporting associations’ needs Preliminary facility mix

05 5.1 5.2 5.3

Location and site options Sites considered Alternate sites Preferred site

06 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 6.6 6.7

Concept design Design approach Planning and design objectives Recommended facility mix for Site 2 Site analysis Site layout options Concept design Site planning implications

07 7.1 7.2 7.3 7.4 7.5 7.6

Business Strategy Approach Management options Strategies Operational plan Financial analysis Funding options

08 8.1 8.2

Delivery Strategy Delivery Model Strategy Procurement Strategy

09

Conclusion

A B C

Concept Design Site Utility Services and Engineer Issues (Northrop) Site Costings Options B01 to C02 (Northcroft)


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Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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01

Introduction


Molonglo Release Area

Figure 1.1: Location of Molonglo


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

1.1

Purpose of study

Preamble The Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre (MARSC) Feasibility Study has been prepared to help guide future planning decisions regarding the potential provision of an aquatic/ leisure centre in Molonglo. It should be noted that the completion of the MARSC Feasibility Study does not commit this government, or any future government, to provide partial or full funding for the development of an aquatic/leisure centre in Molonglo within any specific timeframe. The progression of any new aquatic/leisure centre in Molonglo, including the final mix of facilities to be provided, will be subject to future detailed design processes including appropriate stakeholder consultation. Any financial commitment to deliver future facilities in Molonglo will also be subject to government approval and considered in the context of other priorities as part of the annual budget process.

Molonglo Release Area is a new greenfield development area on the west-central fringe of Canberra (refer Figure 1.1). At full development, Molonglo will accommodate nearly 60,000 residents. This study considers the feasibility of developing aquatic, sports and recreation facilities to accommodate the long term needs of Molonglo residents, neighbouring areas and the wider population of Canberra. Study objectives The key objectives of the feasibility study are to determine where, what land size and the facilities that are required to meet the future aquatic and indoor sport/recreational needs of the Molonglo community. These key goals and objectives are informed by appropriate market, demand and benchmark analysis. The specific goals of the feasibility study are to: _ Determine optimum site location (including Stromlo Forest Park, North Wright or other) _ Determine optimum facilities needed (sport, community, recreation, commercial, other) _ Determine pool size (25m or 50m) _ Determine overall land size required (including outdoor and indoor services) _ Generate four concept design options _ Ensure ESD principals are developed and integrated _ Ensure appropriate social and community services and connectivity _ Establish project budgets for the three concept options _ Establish and recommend project delivery model(s) _ Establish and recommend facility operation/management model(s) _Determine whether an ice rink should be integrated in a future facility.

Report Structure This report summarises the key findings of the study undertaken between September 2011 and September 2012. Specifically this report outlines: _Trends and best practice in aquatic facility planning and design in Australia and internationally (Section 02) _Outline of the population and recreational needs of the future Molonglo community (Section 03) _Facility mix of a future aquatic facility considering the long term recreational needs of the Molonglo community and existing sporting groups in the ACT (Section 04) _Site selection process to determine a preferred site (Section 05) _Concept design for preferred site (Section 06) _Business strategy for a future aquatic sports facility (Section 07) _Implementation strategy (Section 08) _Summary of key study findings and conclusions (Section 09). For the purpose of this study the future sports and recreation facility for Molonglo is referred to ‘Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre’ or MASRC. Project Team The Project Team for this study consists of: _HASSELL project lead, community planning and architecture _Graeme Watson Pty Ltd for recreational planning and business strategy _Northrop for engineering and site due diligence _Northcroft for quantitity surveyor services

1


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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02

Trends & best practice


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2.1 4

Trends in aquatic planning and design

Aquatic, sport and recreation facility planning and design has significantly changed in recent years. New facilities are tailored to local needs and act more as a community hub rather than a single use aquatic facility.

Aquatic facility planning The 2009, ‘Future of Australian Sport’ review found that sport and recreation facilities are generally not meeting demand consequently reducing the opportunity for Australians to participate in sport.

Section 02 considers the key trends in aquatic facility planning and design and reviews the design of comparable aquatic facilities in Australia and overseas to understand specific facility mix and design precedents.

Poor planning for facilities has been identified as one of the major factors in the under supply of sporting facilities. Best practice approaches both in Australia and internationally recognise that planning of facilities should be based on a local needs assessment instead of older and now generally obsolete population benchmarks for sports and recreation planning. They recommend a needs analysis should include an inventory of existing facilities and consultation with relevant sporting groups and government providers. The ACT Government has long recognised the need to take a strategic approach to aquatic and recreation planning and provision. The preliminary Draft Aquatic and Related Facilities: ACT Strategic Plan 2011-2030 (June 2011) was prepared to understand the supply and demand for aquatic facilities in the ACT and develop a strategic action plan to improve service provision. It is noted that this document is current being revised. This study builds on the draft Strategic Plan to take a local-needs approach to future aquatic facilities in Molonglo.


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

2.1

Trends in aquatic planning and design

Summary of key trends Aquatic facility planning and design is embracing holistic models which encompass a range of complementary recreational, community and commercial activities. This approach has influenced the way aquatic facilities are located, their facility mix and management models, as discussed across.

Co- location of facilities with other community facilities, retail centres and town centres to promote physical activity in day to day life

Facilities to provide a mix of recreation and non-recreation services to appeal to a wider community base and improve commercial viability

Strategic Management to ensure continuing viability, long term financial stability and that community needs are being addressed

This includes: _Co-location of community and recreation facilities to optimise utlisation of all facilities _Locating aquatic facilities in places that are easily accessible by all residents such as town centres and near major public transport networks _Precinct wide planning of community and recreation facilities to maximise integration and utilisation of facilities _Programming of services and activities across multiple community and recreation facilities.

This includes: _ Focus on creating a ‘community hub’ with services and facilities supporting social, health and wellbeing objectives _ Facilities designed to primarily serve community but also support amateur and elite sporting activities _ Facility mix informed by an overall ‘hierarchy’ of aquatic facilities that meet a range of needs through a systematic approach to local and regional aquatic needs _ Activities to promote social interaction for the elderly, young parents, disabled and other groups _ Use of aquatic facilities for festivals, events, fairs and seasonal carnivals.

_ The pursuit of funding, programming and management partnerships with educational, not for profit and private providers _ Broader use of facilities to maximise scheduling across the day, particularly in off peak periods _ Inclusion of a broader range of commercial facilities including restaurants, health facilities etc _ Integrated and centralised management and use scheduling _ Diversity in facilities to allow venues to support all levels of activity (social to elite) _Establish life cycle management strategies including operations, maintenance and renewal/ disposal _Ensure alignment with the relevant state’s provision objectives.

5


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Facility and design precedents

The following facility design precedents illustrate a range of innovative aquatic facilities across Australia and internationally. A summary of key features is provided in Table 2.1.

Regional Integrated Community and Sports Centre (Singapore) Singapore has developed a successful regional Community, Sports and Recreation model, which they are currently implementing. The location of the centre is based upon the current and future population growth, demographics, complementary services and transport links. The sport centre has been designed to cater towards elite athlete training and competition as well as general public recreation. The centre also includes adult education, community halls and a community theatre. Canberra International Sports & Aquatic Centre (ACT) Canberra International Sports & Aquatic Centre (CISAC) is Canberra’s largest indoor health and recreation centre. It was developed through a partnership between the ACT Government and a private developer Sports Centres Aust P/L. Spread over 14,000 square metres, the privately owned facility has over 700,000 visitors per year, and a membership of

over 7,000. CISAC caters towards both local and state competitions. The facility is privately operated by The Club Group P/L . Boroondara Sports Complex (VIC) The Boroondara Sports Complex is a multi-sport recreation facility. The facility comprises a four court multi sport stadium, outdoor heated 50 metre pool and multi purpose rooms. The central focus of the complex is the community centre component.

01_Regional Integrated Community and Sports Centre (Singapore)

The Boroondara Sports Complex is owned by the City of Boroondara and is managed by the YMCA. Maribyrnong Aquatic Centre (VIC) The Maribyrnong Aquatic Centre represents a first class municipal recreation facility for the community it represents. The centre is reflective of the unique characteristics of the culturally diverse community and provides improved opportunities for socialisation and interaction.

02_Boroondara Sports Complex (VIC)

03_Canberra International Sports & Aquatic Centre (ACT)


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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Facility and design precedents

Blacktown Leisure Centre (NSW) The Blacktown Leisure Centre at Standhope is a community focused multi sports venue. The complex was developed by Council and incorporates an aquatic facility, gymnasium, community facilities and a library. The complex is owned by Blacktown City Council and managed by Blacktown Venue Management Ltd, a company wholly owned by Council.

Cardinia Aquatic Centre and Sports Stadium (VIC) Cardinia Aquatic Centre and Sports Stadium is located within an established public recreational reserve. The areas immediately surrounding the facility is zoned for commercial use. The centre has a strong dynamic and civic presence, housing sports, aquatic and leisure facilities. Caroline Springs Stadium and Community Precinct (VIC) The stadium is designed as a multi-purpose facility. Positioned within an existing recreation

precinct that includes an indoor sports stadium, skate park and library and civic centre, the stadium and community precinct forms part of an integrated development for the Caroline Springs Town Centre. The stadium is adjacent to ovals for football or cricket. The Caroline Springs Stadium and Community Precinct was established under partnership between the Shire of Melton, Delfin Lend Lease and Department of Victorian Communities (DVC), an example of a successful management partnership.

7

provides a holistic mix of services and programs for recreational, community and commercial activities.

04_Caroline Springs Stadium and Community Precinct (VIC)

Cabravale Leisure Centre (NSW) Cabravale Leisure Centre was developed following extensive community consultation with over 1000 residents and presents as a village of identifiable built forms. The centre is intended to provide a vast array of services and facilities for the purpose of community well being and development. This is a new facility that has been developed to provide spaces for social interaction. Overall, the centre

05_Cardinia Aquatic Centre and Sports Stadium (VIC)

06_Cabravale Leisure Centre (NSW)


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Facility and design precedents

Table 2.1: Summary matrix of example facilities Sports and Programs

50m pool

Regional Integrated Canberra International Boroondara Sports Community and Sports

Sports & Aquatic

Centre

Centre

(Singapore)

(ACT)

Outdoor

Complex (VIC)

Maribyrnong Aquatic Centre (VIC)

Blacktown Leisure Centre (NSW)

Heated Outdoor

25m program pool

Cardinia Aquatic Centre and Sports Stadium (VIC)

Caroline Springs Stadium and Community Precinct (VIC)

Cabravale Leisure Centre (NSW)

8 lane indoor pool (25m) Toddlers Pool

Indoor

20m indoor pool

Diving pool Water play

Wave Pool

Spa/sauna

Indoor Spa

Pool spectator seating Indoor sports courts (2-4) Indoor sports courts (5+)

12 Badminton Courts

Gym

2 Gymnasiums (indoor courts converted into gym)

Group fitness Health club Community spaces

Library

Child care

Child Care and Creche

Creche

Cafe Retail Other

Adult Education Rooms Community Hall Community THeatre Outdoor Basketball Hockey Fields

Weight Loss Clinic

Stadium

Meeting and Training Facilities


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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Sports participation trends in ACT

Sport and recreation is becoming more important in the lives of ACT residents. Participation in both organised and non-organised sports has steadily increased with population growth in people over 15. In 2010 over 246,000 of ACT residents over the age of 15 participated in sports and recreation which represents approximately 85% of the population. The greatest growth has been in older age groups (55 years and over). Growth has also occurred by individual sports. Walking, aerobics, cycling, swimming and running have consistently remained the most popular sports and recreation activities by ACT residents over the age of 15. The most significant growth has been in aerobics which includes most organised gym classes.

65 and over 55 to 64 45 to 54 2010

35 to 44

2005 25 to 34

2001

15 to 24 0

10,000 20,000 30,000 40,000 50,000 60,000 Number of participants

There has been some decrease in swimming yet this may relate to the declining availability of swimming facilities in the ACT. Sporting participation statistics in the ACT support the continued development of recreational facilities in Canberra. This is considered by the draft Aquatic and Related Facilities: ACT Strategic Plan 2011-2030. The report identifies participation as a key indicator used to monitor the performance of facilities, which consequently can be used to evaluate and improve the service outcomes.

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Participation in Sport, ACT 2001-2010

Top Sports, ACT 2001-2010 Running Swimming Cycling

2010

Aerobics

2005 2001

Walking 0

20,000

40,000

60,000

80,000

100,000 120,000 140,000

Number of participants Source: Participation in Exercise, Recreation and Sport Survey, Annual Report 2001, 2005, 2010


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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03

Molonglo recreational needs


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Future Molonglo community

Molonglo is a new urban release area located on the western edge of Canberra. The land sits between the established urban areas of Cook/Macquarie in the north and Duffy/Holder and Weston in the south (refer Figure 3.1). Section 03 outlines the planned development and anticipated future community of Molonglo. It also summarises the approach to community and recreational planning for Molonglo to date. Development of Molonglo Molonglo will be developed in three stages with development commencing in the south. The areas will be linked by a new arterial road and public transport spine, John Gorton Drive. Stage 1 is currently under construction and includes the new suburbs of Coombs and Wright. It also sits adjacent to the new Stromlo Forest Park, a unique sporting and recreational park. Stage 2 occupies the area west of Molonglo River and will contain the group centre of Molonglo. Early planning is underway for Stage 2 with development foreseen in the next 5-10 years. Stage 3 is located to the north of Molonglo River and will be primarily residential with two smaller centres. Development is likely to commence in 10+ years. The project brief for this study indicates that the future aquatic facility is likely to be in either Stage 1 or 2 of Molonglo.

Figure 3.1: Staging plan for Molonglo


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

3.1

Future Molonglo community

Anticipated population When developed it is anticipated that Molonglo will have a population of 59,000 residents. Full development is not likely to occur for approximately 30 years with the population staging shown in Table 3.1. Staged population growth will influence the size of the facility as it will not be viable to develop the facility to accommodate the needs of 59,000 residents at day one. Therefore an aquatic and recreation facility at Molonglo will require a comprehensive staging strategy. The age structure is shown in Figure 3.2 shows that Molonglo’s future population is expected to be characterised by: _high proportion of young families with parents aged 25 to 40 years _high proportion of young children, particularly those aged 0-4 years _lower proportion of older people (50 years +)

The age structure suggests that a future aquatic and recreation facility at Molonglo would need to provide facilities suitable for young families. Aquatic facilities for older people will be in less demand in the short term but will be required in the longer term as the population naturally ages.

It is noted that early construction of aquatic and leisure facilities may support the establishment of the Molonglo community.

It is important to note that whilst Molonglo is likely to have a young population many of the established suburbs of Canberra, such as Woden and Weston Creek, have an ageing population. Figure 3.3 compares the anticipated population structure of Molonglo with Tuggerangong and Gungahlin. It is recognised that the populations outside Molonglo may utilise a new aquatic facility and the demographic requirements of such areas require consideration.

Figure 3.2: Projected Age Profile of Molonglo District

Source: Social Infrastructure for Molonglo Suburbs 3, 4 and Group Centre, Elton Consulting 2010

Figure 3.3: Anticipated age structure of Molonglo at full development

Table 3.1: Population staging of Molonglo Estimated stage population

Cumulative total population

Timing

Stage 1 (Wright and Combs)

7,800

7,800

0-5 years

Stage 2 (Suburbs 3 and 4)

15,500

22,800

5-10 years

Stage 2 (Group Centre)

4,800

27,600

5-10 years

Stage 3 (north of the river)

31,400

59,000

10+ years

Stage

Source: Social Infrastructure for Molonglo Suburbs 3, 4 and Group Centre, Elton

Source: Social Infrastructure for Molonglo Suburbs 3, 4 and Group Centre, Elton Consulting 2010

Consulting 2010

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Recreational planning for Molonglo

Recreational planning for Molonglo Preliminary planning for broader recreation facilities in Stage 1 and 2 of Molonglo has commenced. Whilst this planning does not consider specific aquatic facility needs it does provide a summary of trends and considerations for any recreational planning in Molonglo.

Urban model for community facilities The Molonglo area has an undulating topography and contains environmentally sensitive land. Consequently a result community facility planning has adopted an ‘urban model’ which minimises demand for land.

The urban model aims to provide community facilities in compact models which results in efficient These trends are taken from the use of land. This can involve Social Infrastructure for Molonglo co-location of multiple uses and using smaller land parcels for Suburbs 3, 4 and Group Centre, community development. Elton Consulting 2010.

Urban model locational principles Under the urban model, most community facilities will be primarily located in the group centre with smaller, more localised facilities located in smaller centres. The over-arching locational principles for community facilities are: _Central to the catchment area and provide equitable access to all potential users _Accessible by public transport _Connected to pedestrian and cycling networks _On a main street with a ground floor street presence for optimum visibility and accessibility _Clustered with other facilities, such as shops, schools and other community facilities _Near open space to allow for related outdoor activities and community events _Near sporting, recreation and leisure facilities to create a healthy and active focus _On sufficient land to enable expansion and adaptation as needs change

_Sited to avoid conflict with neighbouring uses.


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04

Preliminary facility mix


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District or local catchment

Defining a future recreational facility at Molonglo

Draft Aquatic and Related Facilities: ACT Strategic Plan 2011-2030

Consistent with best practice approaches, this study adopts a user based approach to defining the size and facility mix of future Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facilities at Molonglo. Such an approach requires understanding of: _Supply of existing facilities in the region _Estimated catchment of a future Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facility _Population trends of that catchment to influence the specific facility mix _Needs of specific recreational groups who may utilise the Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facility.

As discussed in Section 2.1 the ACT Government has prepared a preliminary Draft (June 2011) Aquatic and Related Facilities: ACT Strategic Plan 2011-2030 (the draft Strategic Plan) to understand the supply and demand for aquatic facilities in the ACT and develop a strategic action plan to improve service provision. It is noted that this report is currently being revised.

It is noted that this approach only defines the broad facility requirements of a future Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facility. More detailed consideration of facility mix occurred following site selection to ensure the facility mix complements and enhances any surrounding community or recreational facilities. Building on the understanding of community and recreational planning of Molonglo in Section 03, this Section considers the future catchment of an Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facility at Molonglo by reviewing the existing supply of aquatic facilities and how a new aquatic facility would sit within the ACT Aquatic Facilities Hierarchy.

The draft Strategic Plan recognises that Molonglo will require aquatic facilities to meet the needs of its future population. It also recognises that the new Molonglo population, combined with small population increases in Woden Valley and Weston Creek will contribute to existing calls for aquatic facilities to be provided for these districts. The ageing and outdated standard of Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre further reinforces this need to look at the provision of aquatic facilities at a district level. The draft Strategic Plan outlines the study parameters of this feasibility report for aquatic facilities at Molonglo. The draft Strategic Plan also develops a hierarchy of aquatic facilities which assists in defining an appropriate scale aquatic facility at Molonglo (refer following section).


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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District or local catchment

ACT Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facilities Hierarchy The preliminary Draft Aquatic and Related Facilities ACT Strategic Plan 2011-2030 (June 2011) outlines a hierarchy of aquatic facilities to ensure suitable coverage and provision of aquatic facilities to meet long term needs (refer Table 4.1). By considering the provision of existing aquatic facilities across ACT the draft Strategic Plan found that there is sufficient supply of national and ACT wide facilities. It considered that a future facility at Molonglo would provide either a district/sub ACT facility or a multi-suburb facility, dependent on the likely catchment of the facility. The remainder of this chapter considers how the future Molonglo Aquatic Sport and Recreation Centre (MASRC) would sit within Canberra’s established hierarchy of aquatic facilities.

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Table 4.1: ACT Aquatic Facilities Hierarchy Hierarchy

Population catchment

Typical facilities

Site requirements

ACT examples

Multi-suburb

25,000-30,000 ppl but capacity up to 50,000 people

_25m indoor or outdoor heated pool of 6-8 lanes _Small fitness gym _Warm water program pool _Small water play area _1 – 2 consulting suites _Meeting rooms _Café and social area _Partner facilities as identified

Built footprint 5,000-7,000sqm

Partial examples: Active Leisure Centre (Wanniassa) Lakeside Leisure Centre (Tuggeranong) Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre (Woden)

_25m and/or 50m indoor pool of 8-10 lanes _25m or 50m outdoor lap pool _Warm water program pool 25m _Spa pools _Sauna _Outdoor lawn, shade and picnic areas _Indoor and outdoor water play areas _Fitness gym 500sqm+ _2-3 meeting, club, activity rooms _Café _Retail area(s), professional suites, partner facilities _Unique elements i.e wave pool/standing wave

Built footprint 7,000-12,000sqm

As above plus: _Two 50m competition level pools _Diving facilities _Corporate _Club/association rooms/offices Specialist coaching _Fine dining, café, social areas

Built footprint 12,000-15,000sqm

_Elite sports- national and international standards _National tourist markets

No standard

District/ sub-ACT

ACT-wide

National Level

80,000-100,000 people OR 50,000 people

300,000-500,000 people

National/ international markets

Site area 15,000- 21,000sqm

Canberra International Sports and Aquatic Centre (CISAC) Belconnen

Site area 21,000- 36,000sqm

Site area 36,000-45,000sqm

There are no existing ACT wide aquatic facilities. The AIS is an elite training facility is occasionally used for events when the pools are free from AIS programs. The existing spectator space is limited and generally unsuitable for major events. Sleemand Sports Complex, Brisbane Wet’n’Wild Melbourne Sports and Aquatic Centre (MSAC)


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District or local catchment

ACT Aquatic, Sport and Recreational Facility locations Figure 4.1 illustrates the range and location of aquatic sports facilities across Canberra. It clearly shows the majority of aquatic facilities are located in the northern half of Canberra. All national or ACT-wide facilities are also located in the north. The AIS Aquatic Centre has limited public access. The swimming centre is open to the public, with both the 50m and 25m pools available, when not in use by the AIS program. The new residential area of Molonglo will primarily be associated with the southern half of Canberra, as the road connecting to Belconnen will be constructed as part of Stage 3. This area is considered by the draft Strategic Plan to be generally under served by existing aquatic facilities.

Figure 4.1: Aquatic facilities in Canberra


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District or local catchment

Aquatic Facilities around Molonglo As shown in Figure 4.1, there are currently only four multi-suburb facilities and no larger district or ACT wide facilities in proximity to Molonglo. The near by multisuburb facilities are described across.

Lakeside Leisure Centre Lakeside is a government owned facility and approximately 20 years old. It contains a 50m and 25m pool with play facilities, plus a small creche and gym. The facility provides an important swimming recreation facility for the southern half of ACT and the pool facilities are well utilised.

The draft Strategic Plan considers that Lakeside Leisure Centre, Active Leisure Centre and Manuka Swimming Pool can meet the needs of their local area, in some cases with upgrades.

Active Leisure Centre Active Leisure Centre is a government owned facility, operated on behalf of the Education Directorate. It is integrated with a neighbourhing secondary college and is part of a major centre incorporating theatre and a community library. The center contains a 25m indoor pool, health and fitness area, volleyball , squash and tennis courts plus a small theatre.

Manuka Swimming Pool Manuka Swimming Pool is located in Griffith and is a historic outdoor pool in a landscaped setting. The site is heritage listed and the historic value of the pool reduces the scope to expand the facility and the draft Strategic Plan recommends retaining the pool as a heritage summer only pool serving the needs of the inner southern suburb residents.

Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre Located adjacent to the town centre of Woden, the Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre is a privately owned and operated facility built in the late 1960s. The facility contains Canberra’s only ice rink and two outdoor pools. The age of the facility means it does not meet the needs of the Woden population. However upgrade of the facility is limited by its private ownership and the Territory Plan which states the site must have an ice rink and 50m pool. Redevelopment or a new aquatic facility at Woden is contingent on the size and catchment of a facility at Molonglo. Its future also requires consideration of the ice rink provision in Canberra as it is the only rink in the ACT.

03_Manuka Pool

04_Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre

The draft Strategic Plan recommends it remains a speaclised education venue which continues as a multisuburb venue to meet community needs.

It also recognises that there is a need for aquatic facilities to meet the needs of the existing population of Weston Creek and the future population of Molonglo. A facility to meet these needs would be interdependent on the future of Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre and the future provision of a facility to meet the needs of the Woden population.

01_Lakeside Leisure Centre

02_Active Leisure Centre

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District or local catchment

Aquatic Facility provision for Molonglo, Weston Creek and Woden As previously noted, the scale of aquatic facilities at Molonglo is dependent on the provision of aquatic facilities in Weston Creek and Woden. The close proximity of these three areas requires consideration at a district level to ensure efficient and effective provision of aquatic facilities. Molonglo, Weston Creek and Woden have a combined projected population of approximately 113,000 people in the next 10-20 years (ACT Government, 2010). Figure 4.2 shows that this population is primarily located in Molonglo with smaller populations in Weston Creek and Woden. For southern Canberra, the current distribution is one multi-suburb centre per 41,000 residents. The projected population growth for Molonglo and the addition of one centre will actually reduce the current supply to 1 per 45,000 residents. This demonstrates the need for a significant centre at Molonglo which could be a district/sub-ACT scale facility.

Figure 4.2: Existing aquatic facilities and population catchments in southern Canberra


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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District or local catchment 21

Recommended Catchment Based on the analysis in this Section, the recommended catchment for a future aquatic, sport and recreation facility at Molonglo has a long term primary catchment of 80,000 people covering the areas of Molonglo and Weston Creek. A secondary catchment extends to Woden, with a total extended catchment population of 113,000 people. Catchment boundaries are shown in Figure 4.3.

59,000

Total 81,000

Primary catchment

Secondary catchment

32,000 22,000

Figure 4.3: Recommended primary and secondary catchments for a future aquatic and recreation facility in Molonglo


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District or local catchment

Using the ACT Aquatic Facilities Hierarchy there is a number of options on how the Molonglo, Weston Creek and Woden areas are best served by aquatic facilities. These options are considered in Table 4.2. It can be concluded from Table 4.2 that Option 2 is most desirable as it creates a district facility serving primarily the aquatic needs of Molonglo and Weston Creek and has Woden as a secondary catchment to utilise district level facilities (ie larger pools, recreational spaces). The total population would be 80,000 people with a secondary catchment of 110,000 people. A district would enable a series of higher order aquatic facilities such as a larger pool, recreational, gym, club and wave pools. This option also allows Woden to remain self sufficient in terms of local level aquatic facilities which is consistent with existing community and political expectations along with the current planning direction for Woden Town centre. It is recognised that the opportunity of a multi-suburb aquatic facility at Woden is contingent on the future of Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre. This is considered in detail in the following section.

Table 4.2: Assessment of aquatic facility options for the Molonglo, Weston Creek and Woden areas Option 3 Option 1 Option 2 Multi-suburb facility serving Weston Creek One district facility to serve all three areas District facility serving Molonglo and Weston Creek and a multi-suburb facility at and Woden and a multi-suburb facility at Molonglo Woden Pros Efficient use of resources to provide one facility for the three areas

Pros Molonglo and Weston Creek combined are able to support a district facility

Population of sufficient size to support a district facility

Woden could be viewed with as a secondary catchment

Pros Local level access to each facility Ability to tailor facilities to demographic needs of each community

Responsive to existing community requests/ Retaining an aquatic facility in Woden would desires reflect community/political expectations and consistent with Woden Town Centre Master Plan Cons One facility to serve three distinct and spatially separated areas would reduce ease of access Would likely result in the removal of a facility at Woden in favour of a new facility at Molonglo. There may be community/political concern with the loss of an aquatic facility at Woden

Cons Require detail consideration on the future of Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre for both ice and aquatic facilities

Cons Potential doubling of local level facilities without the benefit of district level facilities Weston Creek likely to be too small to independently support a multi-suburb facility


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

4.2

Viability of ice facilities

Aquatic and Ice Facilities at Woden An objective of this Study is consider the viability of ice facilities at a future aquatic and recreation facility in Molonglo, taking into consideration the future of the existing ice facilities at the Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre in Woden. As noted in Section 4.1, this Study considers that Woden’s long term aquatic needs would best be met through the provision of local facilities (i.e. multi-suburb level) either through upgrading the existing Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre or through a new multi-suburb facility. Upgrading Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre to a mutlisuburb facility is consistent with the Woden Town Centre Master Plan and the existing planning restrictions which specify that swimming and ice facilities must remain on site. However, any upgrades are ultimately at the discretion of the private owner and the ACT Government has limited

opportunity to influence the timing or scale of such facility. Continued discussion with the private owner should assist forming a long term view on the potential of Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre and preliminary consideration should be given to an alternate aquatic facility site should Phillip not be further developed.

income and ice sports as a secondary market. Contemporary ice rinks are developed in conjunction with a major retail facility and offered as a complementary ‘entertainment/ leisure’ use. This is seen most recently in Australia at Macquarie Park Shopping Centre in Sydney but also across North America, Asia and Europe.

Ice Rinks at Woden & Molonglo

As such, it is considered that Molonglo will lack a large retail component to commercially support an ice rink. Molonglo is also located outside primary access routes through Canberra, reducing the access and commercial exposure required to support an ice rink.

The existing Ice Rink at Phillip poses similar issues. The ice rink is the only facility in Canberra yet is old and does not meet competition standards. Whilst there is strong community attachment with retaining an ice rink, the ice sports associations consulted believe that the age and standard of the facility limits existing activities and future opportunities to expand ice sports in the ACT. For these reasons the scope of this study includes consideration of an ice rink associated with an aquatic and recreation facility at Molonglo. Ice rinks rely on the leisure/ recreational market as primary

Future for Ice Rink

Based on the experience of other centres, long term government ownership of ice rinks has found to provide more equitable outcomes for all ice users. It is therefore important that the ACT Government develop a strategy to consider the future of ice facilities in the ACT. This would need to consider the options available at the Phillip Swimming and Ice Skating Centre along with alternate sites (preferably integrated retail sites) within Canberra.

01_Macquarie Ice Rink, Macquarie Centre

23

02_Macquarie Ice Rink, Macquarie Centre

Relying on the Phillip Ice Rink long term is problematic. Ice rinks are not strong commercial propositions and therefore redevelopment would require integration with a larger retail/ commercial development on the Phillip site.

03_Ice at the Galleria, Houston, Texas


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

4.3 24

Sporting associations’ needs

Sports and recreation groups The study team consulted with eight representative sporting associations who may potentially benefit from a future aquatic and recreation facility at Molonglo, through a series of face to face meetings. The discussions focused on: _ Size, past and anticipated membership growth of association _ Quality and suitability of existing facilities _ Opportunity for new facilities, particularly in the Molonglo area _ Any functional and locational requirements of future facilities The following sporting associations were consulted: _Canberra Ice Hockey Association _Canberra Ice Skating Association _Swimming ACT _Triathlon ACT _ACT Water Polo _Netball ACT _Basketball ACT _Capital Football (Futsal) Table 4.3 summarises the findings with each sporting association and this is followed by a discussion of facility requirements by type.


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

4.3

Sporting associations’ needs

Table 4.3: Consultation discussions with sporting associations Sporting associations

Comments on current environment

25 Future facility requirements

Canberra Ice Hockey Association

Phillip Ice Skating Rink _ Phillip Ice Rink is the only ice facility in the ACT and used by the Association for all training, local and interstate competitions _ Existing Phillip facility is undersized, has management issues and facilities are inadequate (ie maintenance, change rooms, ice rink below international size) _ High competition to use Phillip Ice Rink is restricting growth of Association _ Poor standard of Phillip Ice Rink prevents hosting national/international competitions _ Believes that there is limited future opportunity for ice hockey if it remains at existing facility

_Requires international sized and standard rink (30m x 60m) _Two adjoining rinks would allow sufficient space for training and competition of all ice sports _Audience seating 1,500-3,000 people _Minimum of four change rooms (male/female for home and away teams) _Storage and drying facilities _First aid, medical and physio areas (share with larger facility) _Commercial opportunities for pro-shop and repairs shop shared with other ice sports

Canberra Ice Skating Association

Phillip Ice Skating Rink _ Association has 200-300 members _ Competitions in a 12 month season _ Significant issues with the management and quality of existing Phillip Ice Rink _ Issue with the capacity of Phillip Ice Rink _ Management and facility of Phillip Ice Rink is impacting existing ice skating training (private and group lessons) and local/state _ Limited access to ice is restricting expansion of group, ability to run school programs or the Aussie Skate Program

_Requires international sized and standard rink (30m x 60m) _Two adjoining rinks would allow sufficient space for training and competition of all ice sports _Require full dressing room facilities, spectator seating (up to 3000 people), storage, areas for officials _Full audio and computer equipment _Opportunity for shared utilisation of ice skating rink as gymnasium, courts etc _Commercial opportunities for new ice skating rink including performances, dance, national/ international competitions, pro shop _Would prefer a co-operatative management arrangement for any future ice rink

Swimming ACT

_ Group of 10 swimming clubs _ Significant number of members, both competitive and general public _ Generally a shortage of swimming facilities in the south of Canberra (Lakeside at capacity) _ Lost 4 swimming pools in the past 10 years _ Phillip facilities are not adequate _ Access to AIS facility difficult

_ 25m pool is considered sufficient, however 50m pool is considered more preferable _ Important for new facility to accommodate special need programs and seniors programs

Triathlon ACT

_ Group of 600 members _ Focus is four major competitions per year for both local and national participants _ Currently utilise local roads for running/cycle legs and Lake Burley Griffin for swimming leg _ Use of Lake Burley Griffin is limited and unreliable due to blue green algae issue- Association hires ‘back up’ swimming pools _ Issues with accessing back up swimming pools

_ Acknowledges potential for Stromlo Forest Park to accommodate running/cycle leg, particularly advantageous for juniors from a road safety perspective _ Ability to secure consistent back up swimming pool would be advantageous _ Require sufficient space for transition zones outside facility with direct pool access _ Utilise full dressing room facilities, clubs/meeting rooms, catering, club kiosk, support spaces

ACT Water Polo

_ Association has 20 teams over 4 clubs _ Competition season is run all year _ Existing facility does not allow for state level competition, or national level competition _ Junior Water Polo Academy based at CISAC, Belconnen _ Limited access to training facilities _ Limited access to facilities as they are at near capacity _ Existing facilities have poor spectator space _Gungahlin Leisure Centre has been designed for water polo use but there is still a need for a facility in the southern half of Canberra

_ Demand for a range of pool including 50m even depth competition pool with partition, program pool and wet play/shallow pool _ Would require spectator seating, storage, meeting rooms with audio visual facilities, scoreboard and computer equipment, areas for officials, change room facilities _ Would require partition _ Demand for competition home and away facilities


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

4.3 26

Sporting associations’ needs

Netball ACT

_ 4,500 regular players _ 5 district associations manage locally based and independent competitions _ 500-1,200 players per district _ District associations generally own and manage netball facilities _ Considering significant upgrade of main netball centre at Lyneham. _ Existing facility for Woden District team has asbestos issues

_ Facility at Molonglo would need to support its own new district without impacting the size/ viability of surrounding districts _ May be a long term opportunity and should include both indoor and outdoor courts

Basketball ACT

_ 14 clubs, with additional school clubs, with 5,500 registered members _ Existing facility based at Belconnen has 4 courts with plans to expand to 7. _ Belconnen will remain main facility for ACT basketball _ Existing facility at Belconnen is at capacity _ Court allocation has reached saturation at Belconnen and Tuggeranong i.e. Tuggeranong has 5 courts but only 3 are available, with the other 2 used for other uses or sports. _ Considering growth opportunities to utilise Belconnen for day activities (ie modified basketball for seniors, disability, office workers etc) and schools development program _ Existing social programs emphasises post- game socialisation

_ 4-6 indoor courts to meet medium-long term needs of Molonglo _ No show court required _ Elevated viewing space with access to bar _ Require program, co-operative management to co-ordinate different seasons _ Require storage areas for clubs

Capital Football (Futsal)

_ Approximately 4,500 registered futsal players, with significant growth since 2009 _ Primarily a social sport competition with approximately 500 teams _ Utilises a range of courts across ACT _ Existing facilities are sufficient but would need additional facilities for long term growth _ Existing social programs emphasises post- game socialisation

_ Able to share 4-6 indoor courts _ Elevated viewing space with access to bar _ Some storage area for competitions


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

4.3

Sporting associations’ needs

Summary of user needs Consultation with the sporting associations (refer to Table 4.1) identified the need for ice, pool and indoor court sport facilities at a future aquatic and recreation facility at Molonglo. Below is a summary of the existing facility issues and needs grouped by sporting type.

Ice sports Ice sports have significant issues with the capacity, management and standard of the Phillip Ice Rink. They identified the need for two new ice rinks at international competition standard to allow the long term growth of ice sports in ACT. A new ice sport facility should incorporate spectator areas (up to 3000 seats), full lighting and audio equipment, four change rooms, club areas and access to sports medicine facilities. As discussed in Section 4.2, Molonglo is not the most appropriate location for new ice sport facilities. A separate study is required to consider the long term needs and planning for ice sport facilities in the ACT.

Pool sports Pool sports identified that any future pool facilities should accommodate local water polo and swimming needs. This would include a new swimming club based at the facility.

Indoor court sports Basketball and Futsal noted that a facility would easily accommodate both general growth in sports across ACT as well as future needs of the Molonglo area.

A 50m pool would be most suitable for local competitions and swimming clubs. The pool should also have a consistent depth to accommodate water polo needs.

4-6 courts would be readily utilised and should have some space for spectators and access to bar/kiosk to accommodate the social aspect of these sports.

Additionally, any new facility would require some spectator areas, audio visual facilities, storage etc Triathlon ACT would benefit from a dedicated ‘back up’ swimming pool, particularly co-located with Stromlo Forest Park. This would need to have a ‘transition’ area to access the pool.

It is anticipated netball will not likely use the facility as it doesn’t work with their current structure of District Associations, but there may be opportunity for some social indoor competitions.

27


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

INDOOR COURTS

4.4 28

Preliminary facility mix

GYM 3 x Courts

Facility Mix

FACILITY MIX

Based on the analysis and consultation discussed in previous chapters, the Figure 4.4 illustrates the recommended facility mix. This mix is based on comments from key Associations and the projected population growth for Molonglo.

600 sqm Gym Area Future expansion to 6 courts GYM

Yoga/Aerobics 200-300 sqm Spin 100-150 sqm MEDICAL

MEDICAL

Health Care Area

The final facility mix will be refined following site selection and consideration of locational needs.

Indoor Running Track - 300-400m

COMMUNITY

Amenities _Storage _Delivery Access

Rehabilitation Change Rooms COMMUNITY FACILITIES

INDOOR COURTS

AQUATIC

Community Spaces 50m Swimming Pool with boon Members Lounge

AQUATIC

1 x 25 metre Child Care (Creche)

HIGH LEVEL AREA SCHEDULE Building Footprint

Children’s Play Pool MISCELLANEOUS

COMMERCIAL AND RETAIL

7,000 - 12,000

Standing Wave Pool Kiosk/Cafe

25% Expansion Capacity Site Area

21,000 - 36,000

ADMINISTRATION Retail Suites

ADMINISTRATION

Reception

Figure 4.4: Preliminary facility mix

Office


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

29 29

05

Location & site options


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

Three sites were nominated for consideration as locations for a future aquatic and recreation facility at Molonglo. Two sites were nominated by the client (sites 1 and 2) with a further site put forward by the Project Team (site 3). The potential sites are shown in Figure 5.1 and are: _Site 1 located within Stromlo Forest Park

following section outlines the reasons why Site 1 and 3 can not readily accommodate an aquatic facility. As such the Project Team was advised not to proceed with a detailed comparative site analysis and assessment process for the three sites.

6WDJH

For this Section onwards, a future aquatic and recreation facility for Molonglo is referred to as MASRC.

1DWLRQDO $UERUHWXP &DQEHUUD

_Site 2 located in a community precinct being planned around North Wright and at the gateway to Stromlo Forest Park

3

6WDJH

_Site 3 located in the future Group Centre which will be developed as Stage 2 of Molonglo.

Transport Connection MOLONGOLO RIVER PARK

NORTH WRIGHT



6WURPOR )RUHVW3DUN 

TO CURTIN

&RRPEV 6WDJH

ER

RD

1

Figure 5.1: Potential sites for consideration



1DWLRQDO =RR $TXDULXP

2

TT

Each of the sites were inspected and discussed with key stakeholders (i.e. ACTPLA, TVE, LDA and other Government agencies) early in the consultation phase. Through these discussions it became apparent early on that Site 2 was the only viable location for a future aquatic facility. The

TO BELCONNEN

MOLONGOLO GROUP CENTRE

CO

30

Sites considered

Tuggeranong Parkway

5.1

/DNH %XUOH\ *ULIILQ


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

5.2

Alternate sites 31

Site 1: Stromlo Forest Park Site 1 offers the opportunity to fully integrate the MASRC with the developing sporting facilities at Stromlo Forest Park. However, Site 1 lacks a frontage to the main arterial John Gorton Drive reducing accessibility via both private and public transport and visibility to support the commercial aspects of MASRC. Its location within Stromlo Forest Park may also undermine the community basis of the future MASRC. Lastly, whilst the Stromlo Forest Park Master Plan considers the facility within the Park, there is limited space provided for such a facility.

Site 3: Molonglo Group Centre Site 3 provided obvious benefits with the co-location of a future MASRC with the retail, commercial and community hub of Molonglo. However, through discussion with ACTPLA it became evident that there was a lack of sufficient space in the group centre for a MASRC. This was primarily due to the high level of environmental constraints, reducing the availability of large land parcels and the resulting competition for land with the other community uses.


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

5.3 32

Preferred site

Preferred: Site 2 Site 2 is preferable for the following reasons: _Site 2 is 5ha which is more than sufficient space for an aquatic facility, additional land could be used for complementary use _Site 2 is a gate way site and has exposure and address to John Gorton Drive, the primary vehicular and public transport spine through Molonglo _Site 2 has linkages to the community precinct to the north _Site 2 provides opportunity for co-location with the MASRC and Stromlo Forest Park whilst maintaining a community focus _Site 2 has established linkages to the Molonglo open space network including the River Park.

North Wright Community Precinct

Figure 5.2: Range of community, recreational and open space uses around Site 2

Figure 5.3: Linkages between Site 2 and surrounding area


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

33 33

06

Concept Design


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.1 34

Concept design approach

The concept design process is a high level design resolution of the MASRC taking into account the preferred facility mix outlined in Section 4.3 on the preferred ‘Site 2’ adjacent to Stromlo Forest Park. Molongolo Group Centre

The process has sought to realise an integrated community and recreation precinct bringing together MASRC, the North Wright community precinct, Stromlo Forest Park and the Molonglo River Park in an holistic precinct. The process has been informed by the planning and design objectives in Section 6.2.

STAGE 2

The concept design has been an iterative design process, undertaken with ACT Sport and Recreation Services, ACTPLA and Territory Venues and Events.

MOLONGOLO RIVER PARK

The concept design has also been informed by: _Site analysis process including a site utility services and engineering issues report _Testing of four alternative site layouts assessed on planning principles, ability to achieve the design objectives and costing of each option _Resolution of a final design concept. COOMBS

Stromlo Forest Park

STAGE 1 J

WRIGHT

O

H

N

G

O

R

T

O

N

D

R

IV

E

TO WESTON 0

100

400

800m

Figure 6.1: Potential community and recreational precinct around MASRC


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.2

Planning and design objectives

Creating the community and recreation hub for Molonglo The proposed location of MASRC at the gateway of Stromlo Forest Park, the North Wright community precinct and connecting to the Molonglo River Park provides the opportunity for MASRC to become a central hub linking and supporting these facilities. This will enable broader utilisation base of MASRC to provide sporting, recreation, health and social facilities for a wider range of community members. It also creates the ability to integrate additional facilities such as a theatrette, stage and health/medical facilities which can be utilised by the broader community and therefore provide a supplementary income stream to MASRC. As detailed further in the Business Philosophy (Section 7.1) market differentiation will assist in the long term viability of MASRC. Acknowledging the ‘hub’ location of MASRC and the socio-economic standing of the

future Molonglo community, it makes sense to establish MASRC on the basis of quality services and facilities to the local community. The design vision should aim to provide a community club or country club, but one that is accessible to all. Creating community aquatic sports underpinned by high quality services and multipurpose uses differentiates it from others in the market and also allows it to comfortably accommodate a broader range of uses such as: _ Theatrette/stage facilities for use of community, school and sporting groups in conjunction with long term aspirations for elite sporting programs. _ Restaurant facilities to capitalise on the prominent location and views from the facility. _ On site catering facilities to support the internal kiosk and also support functions/ events in the broader community hub.

Referencing the character of Molonglo through high quality and environmentally responsive design

Indicative photos of high quality community facilities

Providing a high quality facility in the style of a ‘country club’ changes the focus of the facility from a typical sports and aquatic facility to a community destination. Incorporating a quality restaurant and additional health/medical facilities to provide a greater a range of services to the community and importantly providing an alternate revenue stream for the facility. A high quality facility constructed early in the development of Molonglo will also become an important marketing tool for prospective residents and contributes to the emerging character of Molonglo as a contemporary, community based and environmentally responsive locality.

Area of future Molonglo River Park

35


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.2 36

Planning and design objectives

Supporting long term development of Stromlo Forest Park & Molonglo River Park Stromlo Forest Park and the Molonglo River Park are in the early stages of planning and development, providing an opportunity for the MASRC to integrate functionally with these emerging facilities. The long term vision for Stromlo Forest Park is for a diverse recreational park which: _can host international sports and events _is a tourist destination with on-site accommodation planned for school, community and sporting groups _supports local and regional community recreational facilities. MARSC has the potential to provide facilities that would both support and attract groups to Stromlo Forest Park. The provision of on-site restaurant/ catering facilities, theatrette, health care and rehabilitation will benefit from the co-location of the MASRC and Stromlo Forest Park. MASRC should also provide flexible spaces which can be

utilised by Stromlo Forest Park. The inclusion of the 50m pool enables usage by events at Stromlo Forest Park and a transition space is provided between the two facilities to enable direct access between facilities during events. Similarly, MASRC could host media and communications during major events at Stromlo. The continued design and development of Stromlo Forest Park should engage with the MASRC concept design. For example, there is significant opportunity to provide an internal link road within Stromlo Forest Park which links the two facilities and further enhances the community utilisation. Molonglo River Park is envisaged as a unique parkland that will address conservation issues while providing an exceptional recreation resource for the future residents of Molonglo Valley. The MASRC site links into the park via Holden’s Creek Pond and there are pedestrian, cycle and equestrian links planned along the Pond into Stromlo Forest Park and directly past MASRC. The opportunity exists to utilise these linkages and enhance accessibility to MASRC.

Master plan for Stromlo Forest Park (January 2010)

Imagery of elite and community sports at Stromlo Forest Park (SFP Master Plan)


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.3

Recommended facility mix for Site 2

Taking into consideration the scope for additional facilities to support the North Wright community precinct, Stromlo Forest Park and Molonglo River Park the facility mix has been revised from that present in Section 4.4 to also include: _Stage incorporated into gym to provide an additional income for community/school events

MOLONGLO AQUATIC SPORTS AND RECREATION FACILITY ACT Sports and Recreational Services FACILITY MIX

FACILITY BREAK DOWN

GYM

Rev 3

PROJECTED NO. OF OCCUPANTS

AREA RATE PER PERSON (m²)

AREA (m²)

Gym Area Yoga / Aerobics Spin Change Rooms / Toilets

200 100 50 350

3 3 3 -

600 300 150 150 1,200

Health Care Area Rehabilitation Change Room / Toilets

7 7 14

10 10 -

75 75 25 175

Community Spaces Theatrette Members Lounge Child Care (Creche) Change Room / Toilets

100 250 50 40 400

1 1 1 4 -

100 250 50 160 25 585

3 Courts 3 Additional Courts (Expansion) Amenitites - Stage Amenitites - Green Room Amenities - Storage Amenities - Delivery Access Spectator Seating Change Rooms / Toilets (Spectator) Change Rooms / Toilets (Dry) Family Change Disabled Change Plant

100 3 250 -

22 30 0.6 -

2,220 (2930) 120 150 100 150 25 300 25 25 100 3,215

80 20 50 5 500 -

13 12.5 5 50 0.6 -

-

-

1,050 250 250 250 300 25 50 30 300 100 300 2,905

Sub Total MEDICAL

Sub Total COMMUNITY

Sub Total

_Theatrette incorporated into community spaces for use of groups at Stromlo Forest Park and support community arts programs. _Restaurant with expanded catering facilities to capitalise on the scenery and provide supplementary income by providing catering to the broader precinct. Further information on the inclusion of these facilities is outlined in the business case in Section 07.

INDOOR COURTS

Sub Total AQUATIC

353 50m Swimming Pool with Boom 25m Swimming Pool / Learn to Swim Pool Children's Play Pool Standing Wave Pool Spectator Seating Change Rooms / Toilets (Spectator) Family Change Disabled Change Change Rooms / Toilets (Wet) Storage Plant

Sub Total MISCELLANEOUS

655 Restaurant / Cafe / Bar / Lounge Retail Suites Change Rooms / Toilets Kiosk

Sub Total

The finalised facility mix also incorporates the required amenities, administration and ancillary spaces.

ADMINISTRATION

200 33 -

1.25 3 -

250 100 25 60 435

10 10 -

100 100 25 225

233 Reception Office Change Rooms / Toilets

Sub Total SUB TOTAL (Functional Areas Only) GROSS BUILDING AREAS (30% Grossing for Circulation and Services) CARPARK AREA

Issued 13.04.12

(300 Cars @ 30m² / car )

10 10 20 2,025

8,740

11,362 9,000

NOTES

Allow 150m²

Not included in this stage

Allow 300m²

Allow 300m² Allow 300m²

Includes 50m² for kitchen/storage

37


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.4 38

Site Analysis

Site Analysis A detailed site analysis is provided in Appendix A and summarised below. Site 2 is located on undulating land, with a maximum cross fall of 20m. The high point is in the north western corner of the site. The topography of the site affords views in all directions There is potential access from John Gorton Drive and from the proposed extension of Uriarra Road (east-west). The western boundary interfaces Stromlo Forest Park. This portion of Uriarra Road will be removed providing the opportunity for direct connection between MASRC and Stromlo Forest Park. Site 2 has a total area of 5ha. The future MASRC only requires approximately half of this area allowing half of the site to be developed for alternate and complimentary uses. Figure 6.2: Site analysis of Site 2


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.4

Site Analysis

Utility & Engineering Issues

Table 6.1 Summary of Utility and Engineering Issues

A Utility Services and Engineering Issues Report was undertaken for Site 2 (refer Appendix B). A summary of the key issues is provided in Table 6.1

Geology and soils

Sandy soils with varying clay components. Future excavation will need to consider varying depth of rock and footings should be located directly into rock.

Terrain

High point in north west creates well defined drainage paths to north and south. Site grades range 3% in west to up to 10%-13% in south east.

Stormwater and drainage

Stormwater follows drains to south eastern corner towards Holden Creek and will be contained in public reserves. Opportunity to drain to existing south-east connection points or towards the planned watercourse to the north-east of the site. Site is above the 2000 year ARI flood level.

Bushfire

The area is historically prone to bushfire. Likely that Asset Protection Zones (APZ) will be designed for surrounding precinct and may impact developable area of site. Further investigation required.

Sewerage

Sewer planned along John Gorton Drive. Early discussions required to enable extension of gravity fed sewer.

Utilities

Energy, electricity, gas and communications are planned along John Gorton Drive and will have potential to service the site.

Roads

John Gorton Drive is an arterial road level with separated carraige ways plus dedicated cycle ways. Preferred access into site be via the planned western extension of Uriarra Road. Uriarra Road will be downgraded south of the round about to Stromlo Forest Park.

39


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

L NT

FUTURE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

FUTUR RESIDEN DEVELOPM

Detailed massing plans for each option is contained in the Concept Design Plans (Appendix A) and the costing reports are in Appendix C.

FUTURE RESIDENT DEVELOPM IVE N DR RTO N GO JOH

FUTURE POND

FUTURE POND

BUILDING EXPANSION

EXPANSION OFF-STREET PARKING (204 CARS)

OFF-STREET PARKING (204 CARS)

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT BUILDING FOOTPRINT 12,000 sqm

PARKING EXPANSION

FUTURE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

BUILDING FOOTPRINT 12,000 sqm

FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

FUTURE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT

ENTRY ON-STREET PARKING (158 CARS)

ENTRY ON-STREET PARKING (158 CARS)

HOLD

HOLD M EN T

The four site layout options are presented across and assessed in terms of: _MASRC design objectives _long term planning of the whole site _construction cost of each option.

FUTURE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT T

IVE N DR RTO N GO JOH

With approximately half of the site required for the future MASRC it is important to consider how the facility will best located on the site having regard to connectivity surrounding uses and providing a viable development area on the remainder of the site.

M EN T

40

Site Layout Options

STROMLO FOREST PARK

STROMLO FOREST PARK

OFF-STREET PARKING (150 CARS)

OFF-STREET PARKING (150 CARS)

F RES

RE

Option B01_Central spine with eastern site

Option B02_Central spine with western site

Benefits _Continues the proposed north-south road from Community Precinct directly into site increasing connectivity and linkages. _Frontage to John Gorton Drive ensures its visibility to surrounds and may assist with patronage. _Provides a residual site of approximately 2.4ha for alternate complementary uses.

Benefits _Continues the proposed north-south road from Community Precinct directly into site increasing connectivity and linkages. _Direct frontage to Stromlo Forest Park allowing functional and visual connectivity between the two facilities _Provides a residual site of approximately 1.6ha for alternate use with good visibility to John Gorton Drive, allowing a wide range of commercial or community based uses. _Building elements can sit along the contours of the site.

Constraints _Lacks connectivity with Stromlo Forest Park. _Future use of residual site limited by lack of frontage to John Gorton Drive. _Eastern site area is steepest part of site.

Constraints _Reduced visual exposure to site from John Gorton Road; however locating the MASRC on the highpoint (north-west corner) will provide some visual links to John Gorton Road.

Preliminary construction cost estimate: $54.7m Preliminary construction cost estimate: $53.7m


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

Site Layout Options FUTURE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

FUTURE RESIDENTI DEVELOPME

FUTUR RESIDENT DEVELOPM

T

PARKING 9,000 sqm (300 CARS)

FUTURE POND

PARKING 9,000 sqm (300 CARS)

FUTURE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT ENTRY POTENTIAL ENTRY TO STROMLO FOREST PARK

BUILDING FOOTPRINT 12,000 sqm

IVE N DR RTO N GO JOH

IVE N DR RTO N GO JOH

FUTURE POND

41

FUTURE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

ENTRY

BUILDING FOOTPRINT 12,000 sqm

FUTURE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT EXPANSION

HOLD M EN T

EN T

HOLDE P

EXPANSION

STROMLO FOREST PARK

STROMLO FOREST PARK

FU RESI

F RES

Option C01_Central spine with southern site

Option C02_Western entry with central site

Benefits _Continues the proposed north-south road from Community Precinct directly into site increasing connectivity and linkages. _Provides frontage to John Gorton Drive and Stromlo Forest Park.

Benefits _Entry shared with a potential new entry to Stromlo Forest Park, creating a functional linkage between the two facilities (i.e. shared car parking). _Some direct frontage to Stromlo Forest Park.

Constraints _Provides a limited and poorly defined residual site. _Building footprint does not respond to the topography of the site. _Entry and main approach to site is through a large expanse of car parking. Preliminary construction cost estimate: $58.6m

Constraints _Poor connectivity into the community precinct; however this could be achieved through visual and pedestrian links. _Provides a limited and poorly defined residual site. _Building footprint does not respond to the topography of the site. _Entry and main approach to site is through a large expanse of car parking. Preliminary construction cost estimate: $60.0m


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

Assessment of Site Layout Options

Recommended Site Layout Option

The following is a summary of the assessment of the four site layout options against the selected criteria.

On the basis of the site layout option assessment, Option B02 is considered most preferable as it provides strong interface to Stromlo Forest Park allowing future functional connectivity between the MASRC planning and design objectives spaces. It also provides a residual site with good frontage to John All options provide an opportunity to functionally and visually link with Gorton Drive, enabling a wide range of community or commercial the future community precinct to the north, however Option C02 uses. provides the least interface as it does not provide a direct road connection between the two precincts. The Site Options Analysis was also presented to key stakeholders and it was confirmed that Option B02 was the preferred layout to take Connectivity to Stromlo Forest Park is considered to best be achieved through Concept Design. through direct interface, this is demonstrated in Option B02 and to a lesser extent by Options C01 and C02. L T

FUTURE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT

FUTURE POND

OFF-STREET PARKING (204 CARS)

PARKING EXPANSION

Construction cost Options C01 and C02 have the highest construction costs due to extensive site and excavation works. Option B01 is also more expensive than B02 due to excavation works. B02 presents the most economical construction costs at $53.7m.

FUTUR RESIDENT DEVELOPM IVE N DR RTO N GO JOH

Long term site planning The assessment of four options shows that Options C01 and C02 do not provide a well defined residual site, limiting the long term use and financial returns of the site. Options B01 and B02 provide a logical extension from the community precinct and also large residual development sites.

COURTS EXPANSION GYM (ABOVE) INDOOR COURTS

FUTURE RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT FUTURE DEVELOPMENT

AQUATIC ON-STREET PARKING (158 CARS)

HOLD M EN T

42

Site Layout Options

COMMUNITY

STROMLO FOREST PARK

OFF-STREET PARKING (150 CARS)

F

Figure 6.3: Site massing Option B02


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.6

Concept Design 

43



The Concept Design for Option B02 is outlined on the following pages and detailed in the Concept Design Plans.

   



 

The design features four pavilions cascading along the contours of the site. The building is brought together by a functional and amenity spine on the eastern side, addressing the new internal road.



ST R O M LO FO R E ST PA R K 



 

B



STORE  



ROOF TERRACE ROOF TERR RRA ACE C (PLANT ((PL PLA AN NT BELOW) BE OW)

WET CHANGE



A RR RIA DU

TERRACE

RD

NOTE FUTURE NOTE: R INDOOR D OR SPORTS O FACILITY Y EXPANSION EX S ON N OVER OVE CARPPARK RPP

STORE



OL

IINDOOR R COURTS TS

R RL+580.00 0 STANDING S DING WAVE WAV POOL

50M 0 POOL O L KIOSK

PLAY POOL

TERRACE E

MEMB BERS ERS & COMM MUNITY

The main entry is from the internal road and provides a linking space between pavilion 1 and 2.

CHILD CARE

HEALTH CARE

B

Figure 6.4:Entry Level Layout

RETAIL

RETAIL

RETAIL

STAGE R RECEPTION

LEA EARN EA N TO SWIM RL L+576.50

ENTRY PAVILION

A WET CHANGE



A

RAMP

Pavilion 1 contains three indoor courts, administration and facilities at ground level with a gym, spin room and yoga/ aerobics room at Level 1.

PLANT

TRANSITION ZONE (TRIATHLON)

 

The rear of the pavilions open up as a secondary frontage to Stromolo Forest Park, providing views and open space for MASRC and also allowing the facilities to operate in conjunction with one another for major events. A transition zone provides usable link for major events such as triathlon.

OFFICE

DRY CHANGE

REHABILITATION


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

 

 

 

 

Pavilion 2 houses the 50m pool with change rooms and kiosk. Spectator seating sits above the amenities space.

 

 

 

POOL PLANT

TERRACE

Pavillion 3 contains the smaller recreation pools for play, waves and learn to swim. It enjoys views directly across Stromlo Forest Park. Childcare and health care are provided along the internal road address.

STANDING S DING WAVE WAV POOL

LEARN RN TO SWIM RL+57 76.50 TERRACE

THEATERETTE EAT E AT ATERETTE TERETT TE

Theatrette Level (RL 570.0 - 573.5)

MEMBERS ERS & ERS COMM MUNITY U

CHILD CHIL D CA CARE RE

Terrace Level (RL 576.5)  



Pavillion 4 sits to the south and combines a restaurant, theatrette and community space over three levels.

PLAY POOL

 



SPECTATORS PECTATO S PECTATO

 

 

Car parking is located to the north of the facility and provides space for long term expansion of the facility.

COURTS S BELOW W

POOLS BELOW

The building by levels is illustrated across.

SPECTATORS S SPEC PEC A ATORS TORS

44

Concept Design

M MEZZANINE N

GYM

YOGA

Entry Level (RL 580)

Spectator Level (RL 585)

SPIN


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

Concept Design

Elevations

Eastern elevation

Western elevation

45


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5 46

Concept Design

Building design and materiality The design of the aquatic and sports facility takes it’s architectural inspiration from the surrounding landscape and geographical context. This landscape of rolling, undulating hills is punctuated intermittently with rocky granite outcrops and natural waterways and ponds. By carving out a series of terraces and defining them with ‘fingers’ of stone walls, the design mirrors the natural forms and waterways already present throughout the Molonglo valley area. The design is also then further characterised by a series of ‘floating’ roofs placed over these pools and platforms, giving a sense of lightness, transparency and cohesiveness. The spaces between the terraces and the roofs create the feeling of being ‘in the landscape’, along with the reflections of water from the pools below. These roofs also begin to function as ‘fingers’ in the landscape – simultaneously addressing Stromlo Forest Park to the west, and also the new street edge and future development to the east.

M O D U L AT I N G R O O F FO R M S OVE R

ST

RE

ET

ED

TRANSPARENT ENCLOSURE / MASSING, WITH RETAIL EDGE & INTERN AL ‘L AN E’ D E F I N E D BY T H R E AD O F M O R E SO L I D FO R M .

GE

IN

TE

RN

AL

‘L

AN

BUILDINGS BEGIN TO READ AS ‘FING E R S’ I N T H E L AN D SCAP E . E’

WALLS C R E AT E D F R O M LO CAL STO N E TO FORM EDGES TO TERRACES & R E TAI N TO P O G R AP H Y

CARVED TERRACES TO DEFINE SPACES & SUNKEN P O O LS

The design achieves a sense of ‘place’ through the extensive use of locally available stone for major wall elements and street edges, whilst the undersides of the roofs are of timber, forming a warm, undulating pattern and rhythm. In addition, glass forms the edges of these largely transparent pavilions. E X I ST I N G TO P O G R AP H Y ( 2 0 .0 M FALL AC R O SS SI T E )

Design and materiality influences


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

Concept Design

Illustrative perspectives

Illustrative view into play and learn to swim (LTS) pools

Illustrative view towards learn to swim pools, looking north east

47


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5 48

Concept Design

Illustrative perspectives

Illustrative view across 50m pool looking south

Illustrative view across play and LTS pools looking north


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5

Concept Design 49

Landscape Concept The landscape design concept uses green spaces to define public outdoor spaces, particularly those on the western side of the building looking across Stromlo Forest Park. A rooftop terrace is also located above the plant, adacent to the program pools. A continuity of green will bring together MASRC and Stromlo Forest Park and retain a landscape setting for the recreational precinct. The design draws from the local vegetation character, using a number of endemic species including native grasslands, Red Box (Eucalyptus polanthemos), Yellow Box (Eucalyptus mellidora), Blackely’s Red Gum (Eucalyptus blakelyi) and Apple Box (Eucalyptus bridgesiana).

Figure 6.5: Landcape Concept


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

6.5 50

Site Planning Implications

The Concept Design establishes a precinct within Site 2 and sets up a road structure and defined residual site. The 1.6ha site benefits from proximity to community and recreation facilities plus a strong frontage to John Gorton Drive. On this basis the site could be considered for: _Commercial recreation use such as gym, climbing centre etc _Restaurant/hotel use complementing the restaurant use at MASRC _Community focused use in commercial or public ownership such as theatre, child care. Figure 6.5 illustrates the key site principles for the residual site being: _Address both John Gorton Drive and new north/south internal road. _Provide east west linkages as either pedestrian or internal vehicular access to create smaller parcels and provide a high level of permeability. _Ensure building forms respond to topography.

Figure 6.6: Potential structure for residual site


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

51 51

07

Business Strategy


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

52


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.1

Introduction

The following section outlines a recommended strategy for the delivery and ongoing management of the proposed Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreational Centre (MASRC).

Business Philosophy Based on the information gathered during the course of the study it is recommended that MASRC’s operational focus providing quality facilities and services to its customers and with particular emphasis on local community.

The recommended strategy is based on the findings outlined in Section 02-06 of this report together with input from key stakeholders of the Environment and Sustainable Development Directorate (ESDD), With the above in mind it is suggested that the business philosophy being ACT Sports and Recreational Services , Land and Infrastructure be based on a differentiated strategy through the provision of value to the facilities customer base through enhanced performance in the Policy Branch and Territory Venues and Events. provision of quality and reliable services. In other words , offering unique services and benefits to the market in which the facility As a district aquatic and recreation facility, MASRC will play a major role within Molonglo as well as adjoining neighbourhoods of Weston. It operates. will also have a significant ‘community role’ in supporting the The success of such a strategy is based on creating value in the minds development of Molonglo which is projected to house approximately of the facilities customer base and by providing and maintaining a 59,000 residents. high quality facility together with services. With respect to customers, it will be essential for the facilities marketing strategy to embrace ‘the This community role will be significant as it will provide a very family’ and to ensure that families are satisfied customers and feel necessary community link for new residents, an ability to integrate that they are an integral part of the facility and its operation. residents in the community and provide a safe and secure meeting place. In addition MASRC has the potential to draw potential future The differentiated strategy is also based on services being provided residents to Molonglo given the anticipated population will have a to the local community at rates commensurate with government high proportion of young families ( 25 to 40 years ) and a high proportion of young children ( 0 to 4 years ) and the facility will offer a policy and not to satisfy commercial returns. It will be important that the new facility not compete in the same market as other full range of activities to meet their needs. commercially based leisure and fitness centres in Canberra. A further consideration in the development of the Business Strategy Business Strategy outline was the proximity of the new facility to Stromlo Forest Park, North Wright community precinct (including planned primary and secondary The Business Strategy presented in Section 07 comprises of: schools) and the Molonglo River Park. It is recommended that the new _Management Structure _Organisational Structure facility provide a support role to all these facilities and as such _ Management and organisational strategies for marketing, provide much needed infrastructure and services to allow ‘all’ community use, staffing, finance and operations facilities to operate efficiently and functionally and in the best _Operational plan interest of the local community and users. _Financial analysis _Funding options

53


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.2 54

Management Structure

There are three potential ownership and management structure options, each which take an alternate view of Government’s role in the running of MASRC: _Option 1 sees MASRC owned by government and managed by an inhouse team. _Option 2 retains ownership by government but management is out sourced to an external management company. _Option 3 utilises a government corporate structure to both own and operate MASRC. An assessment of the advantages and disadvantages of each option is identified in the following table.

Option 1 Facility owned and operated by government

ACT Government

Option 2 Facility owned by government and operated by independent external management organisation

ACT Government

Option 3 Facility owned by government and operated by a government corporate structure

ACT Government

Reporting

Reporting

Own

Sport and Recreation

Operating agreements

Sport and Recreation Venue

Manage

Venue Own

Manage

Sport and Recreation External Organisation

New Corporation

Board Manage

Functional support

Own Report

General Manager

Functional Support

General Manager Functional Support

Staff

Venue

General Manager

Staff Staff

Board


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.2

Management Structure Option 1 Facility owned and operated by government

Option 2 Facility owned by government and operated by independent external management organisation

Option 3 Facility owned by government and operated by a government corporate structure

In this option a government would establish an in-house team to manage and operate the facility.

In this option a government would engage an external management company to manage and operate the facility.

In this option a government corporate structure would be established to manage and operate the facility.

Advantages _Easy to establish and wind up _Community perception of government control _Management and accounting systems utilise existing government processes _Employees under government awards _Access to records and information by government is easy _No need for separate tax and insurance _Facility operated in accordance with government’s strategy _Ability to operate to meet community needs

Advantages _Minimise government’s financial risk and responsibilities _External management to operate at arms length to government and its policies _Ability for quick decision making _Government provided with financial guarantee for term of lease/license _Ability to mobilise specialist staff immediately _Ability to deliver expert industry and market knowledge

Advantages _Decision making not impeded by government acts/ policies _Community perception that corporate entity is more business like _Ability to act independently of government _Ability to focus on core activities without burden of government bureaucracy _Limited legal liabilities _Lesser role for non-commercial factors _Ability to employ staff from private sector and not engaged under government awards

Disadvantages _Compliance with government acts and policies for fees and charges _Subject to non commercial pressures _Finance and budgets can be influenced by government policy and budgets _Reduced flexibility in changing policy or budgets _Generally slower responsiveness to market trends/opportunities _Slower decision making

Disadvantages _Government at arms length of management _External management focused on commercial parameters and can overlook government/community goals/expectations _Focus of day to day management on high end users to detriment of community _Introduce separate and new accounting and reporting systems _Generally low standards of maintenance and house keeping _3-5 year leases/licences limit government’s ability to respond to market trends or policy _Scheduling can be inflexible and exclude community/ education groups

Disadvantages _Additional reporting/responsibilities under corporations law _Need to separate reporting/ accounting systems _Risk the board decisions may be contrary to government’s own best interest _Need for separate tax and insurance _More difficult to wind up if problems occur with directors being liable _Staff who operate facility not directly employed by government _Requires ministerial approval to establish

55


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.2 56

Management Structure

Existing Management Structures It is noted that the existing predominant management structure adopted by Sport and Recreation Services is similar to Option 2, which adopts an external private management organisation undertaking the operation of facilities including for example the Lakeside Leisure Centre. The other operating structure adopted by Sport and Recreation Services is the fully privately owned and operated model but developed on Government owned land under a lease agreement of which CISAC is an example. These operating approaches delivers the two following key benefits to Government; _Minimises governments overall financial risk, and _Minimises government staffing These facilities are considered to be operating in a satisfactory and functional manner and there is not a decisive need to change this approach immediately, but it is acknowledged that there is potential for improvement in community outcomes. The operation of these facilities is of course commercially driven which limits the attractiveness to provide a broader range of community programs and activities that have a small or limited audience in the ACT. In discussion with Sport and Recreation Services, during the course of this study, it is also acknowledged that departure from the existing ‘private operator’ management model towards a more direct management by Sports and Recreation Services, as could be achieved by Option 1 and 3, in the near future is limited by Government operating processes, but is not considered unachievable nor undesirable.

Suggested ‘Alternate’ Management Structure for MASRC In order to deliver the business philosophy most effectively, it is suggested that consideration be given by Sport and Recreation Services to ‘Management Structure Option 3’ as an alternative preferred structure for MASRC to the more standard ‘private operator’ model. This options allow the facility be owned by the Government and operated by a Government but with out the potential operational and staff limitations of direct Government management through the use of a ‘Corporate Structure’. This approach used successfully in Australia, would ensure the following essential operating ingredients are delivered on a daily basis which are crucial to the long term success of the business; _Management focus on delivering value for money _Differentiates the facility from competing commercial centres _Delivery of a government owned and operated facility which can increase benefits to and respond to the community needs _A facility which has the potential to link customers with a wide range of facilities other than the Aquatic Sports and Recreation Facility including but not limited to outdoor playing fields and Stromlo Park. _Delivers a facility which is developed and operated on a clear understanding of community needs and particularly young families and is able to deliver on those expectations. The suggested management structure shown in Figure 7.1 is not only for operating the new facility but also delivering the facility to the community. It is noted that the recommendation includes the establishment of a new ‘management vehicle’ which would be responsible for the overall management of the facility as well as it’s delivery. This vehicle is ideally a corporate based structure.


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

57

ACT Government

Sports and Recreation services

Territory Venues & Events

Other

Report

Board / Committee _Sport and recreation _Venues and events _Local Business _Commercial partners _Advisory group rep

Stromlo forest park

Management Vehicle

Advisory Group

Working Alliances/ Partnerships Manage/ Operate

Molongolo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Facility

_Investors _Events _Commercial operators _Others

Stromlo Outdoor Playing Fields

Figure 7.1: Suggested Alternative Management Structure for MASRC

_Board/ Committee Member _Sporting Groups _Local Community _etc

Other


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.2 58

Management Structure

Any of the preferred or suggested management structure discussed above may be adopted by Sport and Recreation Services but it is recommended that the following components be incorporated into either a ‘Private Operator’ contract model or Government controlled ‘Corporate Structure’ model; _Board or Committee _Advisory Group _Working Alliances/Partnerships The inclusion of the above groups within the overall management structure will ensure that MASRC plays a successful role in the new Molonglo community by allowing Sport and Recreation Services to influence community focused outcomes which are balanced with the commercial imperatives of the facility

Board or Committee It will be important for a board or committee to be established, through which the new management vehicle will report and who will also approve management and financial plans. The board or committee is to be chaired by Government and have representation from Sport and Recreation, local business and the advisory group. Representation could also include Territory Venues and Events by way of its Stromlo Forest Park connection as well as commercial partners.

Advisory Group It is proposed that an Advisory Group be established which formally establishes a forum for the new centres customer base to have an input into the operation and function of the centre and to ensure their needs are being met. The advisory group would be chaired by the CEO or GM of the centre and have representation from the sporting groups , local community groups , education and adjoining sporting facilities. The group would deal with issues such as event scheduling , forward planning security and safety and meet on a monthly basis.

Working Alliances / Partnerships It is also proposed that the new management vehicle look to establish long term commercial partnerships with organisations who wish to participate in the long term success of the centre. These partners may include organisations looking to establish major events through the centre, linking commercial business activities to the centre (accommodation etc ).


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.3

Organisational Structure

The following organisational structure is recommended for either the ‘Government Vehicle’ of a ‘Private Operator’ (refer Figure 7.2). However minor variations may be considered as long as the suggested focus is not in any way compromised or minimised. In addition to providing a recommended structure, functions to be undertaken by the various operating divisions are also provided. These functions are extremely important as they provide a clear focus on the delivery of the proposed ‘business strategy’. Key elements associated with the organisational structure to deliver a service commensurate with business philosophy are: _A business development division to focus on the defining of the market in which the new centre is to operate and to secure new business , particularly that associated with the local community. It is also proposed that the business development division will identify working alliance and partnership opportunities. _A marketing and membership division which will be responsible for the overall presentation and positioning of the new centre in the market and to promote the centres “ brand”. In addition the division will be responsible for the management of all memberships which are sold within the centre including but not limited to “ learn to swim and fitness. _An operations division will direct overall management of the centre activities and support services which will have four sub divisions or departments, separated by specific areas of service. These are; _Event Services Department who will be responsible for the running of all activities internally and externally in the MASRC _Facilities Development who will be responsible for delivering/ presenting all facilities within MASRC to the quality levels of the

highest standard and also undertaking immediate, preventative and predicative maintenance. _Turf and Pool Management Department will undertake and be responsible for delivery of all aquatic facilities to the required quality standards as well as all internal and external landscaping. _A Financial and Administrative Department which will be responsible for providing all key administrative support systems as well as financial support including reports, budgeting and audits. _A food and beverage division to accommodate the various market opportunities which have been identified during the study including but not limited to; servicing a restaurant/bistro area as well as a coffee shop and a licenced bar, servicing external catering needs of Stromlo Park and adjoining outdoor playing fields, provision of catering services to functions, conferences which are held at the centre as well as other adjoining facilities.

59


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.3

Organisational Structure

60 Management Vehicle (government or private vehicle)

Board or Committee

Advisory Group General Manager

Commercial

Business Development

Marketing and Membership

Functions _Market _Research _Segment _Planning _Forecast _Customer/client _Identity _Present _Manage _Service _Event _Identify _Secure

Functions _Marketing _Venues _Activities _Event _PR _Community Relations _Membership _Sponsorship _Merchandise _Advertising _Signage

Finance and Administration

Functions _Accounting _Planning _Management _HR _Contract admin _IT/data _Insurance _Legal _Payroll _Audit _Purchase _Event settlement _Hiring and Event agreement

Working Alliances/ Partnership

Operations

Food and Beverage

Facilities

Turf/Pool Management

Event services

Functions _Maintenance _Engineering _Services _Hydraulics _Electrical _Gas _Water _Lighting _Security _Contract services _Repairs

Functions _Maintenance _Lawns _Fields _Landscape _Gardens _Cleaning _Aquatic _Chemicals _Systems _Cleaning _Services

Functions _Event _Everlays _Staffing _Production _Scheduling _Program _Customer services _Patron safety _Security _Ticketing _Cleaning _Housekeep

Sub-Contract Functions Figure 7.1: Recommended Organisational Structure

Functions _Food _Ordering _Prepare _Delivery _Staffing _Budgeting _Cost control _Purchase _Customer service _Quality control _New business


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.4

Management and Organisational Strategies

This section outlines the following management and organisational strategies; _Management Vehicle & Staffing _Marketing _Community focus _Services and Operations _Financial _Facilities

Management Vehicle and Staffing Strategy Initially a decision needs to be made concerning the type of management approach Sport and Recreation Services wishes to proceed with, ‘Private Operator’ or the alternate suggested ‘Government Corporate Structure’. If the suggested ‘Government Corporate Structure Model’ is elected for MASRC then establishment of the ‘Management Vehicle’ needs to occur immediately for the purposes noted below. The following is also applicable for a ‘Private Operator’ who would establish their own ‘vehicle’ but would of course be enacted by that Private Operator independently. _Enable the new ‘vehicle’ to manage and co-ordinate the delivery of the new centre _Enable senior management staffing to be appointed to effect the delivery as well as establishment and development of business and operational plans for the operation on the new centre. In addition undertake the engagement of all full time staff together with the identification of part time staff to facilitate the opening of the centre. It will be important to engage a number of senior management staff to facilitate the delivery of the centre as well making refinement if necessary to the design to ensure a totally functional facility is delivered as well as developing business plans. In the case of the ‘Private Operator’ model ideally the operator would be signed up and able to input into the final design to ensure it is able to deliver the specifics of the business plan.

It is recommended that initially the following senior management would be appointed; _Chief Executive Officer or General Manager who should have a minimum of 10 years experience in the sports and leisure industry , ideally have managed successfully a business from ground up , government experience , have excellent business skills , good marketing and communications skills etc. _Operations Manager who should have a minimum of 5 to 10 years experience in the operation of a similar facility and possess the following skills: sound understanding of facility maintenance and in particular aquatic , excellent skills and experience in all aspects of event management with particular emphasis on customer service and safety. _Finance Manager with 5-10 years appropriate experience and background in this industry sector. They may not be ‘in-house’ to the team initially for the ‘Government Corporate Structure’ and could supplied from within Government to the project and support the above senior management in the delivery of the new centre and at the same time assist in the development of Business and Operational plans for the centre. _Commercial Manager who would have a minimum of 10 years in the business development and marketing disciplines . In addition the person would have excellent skills in market strategy , membership development , branding and positioning , sponsorship etc _Secretary / Receptionist to support the above managers and oversee day to day administration.

61


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.4 62

Management and Organisational Strategies

Marketing Strategy It will be essential for the new management to develop a marketing plan which is meaningful and effective and which will enable the business strategy to be delivered and support the overall delivery of the business’s objectives. The marketing plan will need to address the following key components of the business and develop effective strategies to optimise results; _Memberships _Partnerships / Working Alliances _Learn to swim programs _Medical / Rehabilitation services _Community group services _Food and Beverage services _Theatrette _Child Care _Indoor Arena ( Basketball , Netball , Soccer , Athletics , Schools activities etc ) It will be important that a name and overall brand be developed for the new centre which reflects its local identity and its operating philosophy and as a means of developing a strong brand identity which both promotes the centre and reinforces its position in the market place. In addition the plan should also provide for and be intrinsically linked to the sale of land and residential property within Molonglo and other adjoining neighbourhoods as a linkage for new residents and a promotion for the new area. To establish the centre as a safe and secure meeting place where residents and customers can meet and establish long term friendships and through all age groups.

Community Focus Strategy With the business strategy geared to target the local community as a major customer base it will be essential that the marketing plan be developed to maximise the opportunity and to ensure that it reinforces a differentiated strategy highlighted by excellent customer service to deliver satisfied customers It is recommended that the plan include for but not be limited to; _Establishment of a close and continuous relationship with the community at all levels, _Establishment of a working relationship with community ( social ) services groups and tied to their programs including , obesity , lifestyle , etc, _Establish programs together with the education department, and _Establish working associations with local business as well as health service providers.

Services and Operations Strategy As noted previously it will be essential that the services provided at the centre are of the highest quality and are sustainable. To do so will require excellent planning in the delivery of the services and in addition provision of staff who are well trained and committed to the delivery of excellence in all aspects of the work. Section 7.5 outlines the framework for an Operational Plan and highlights items to be addressed to provide quality services. The following key items are to be provided for within the strategy to provide excellence in services and the overall operation of the centre; _Develop an operational plan which establishes the standards of quality to be met and delivered at the centre _Develop a training program for ‘all’ staff.


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

Financial Strategy The financial objective is that the new centre can be developed and operate on a stand alone financial basis , and not require ongoing financial support funding from Government. The financial strategy to be developed by the management team should optimise income streams through the following key business activities; _Learn to swim programs, _Membership of the fitness programs, _Utilisation of the Indoor Hall to include; sporting groups , Schools for both sport and other activities including assemblies , and concerts, _Utilisation of Medical and Rehabilitation centre, and _Food and Beverage services Facilities Strategy As part of the provision of quality services it will be essential that the centre at all times be clean and tidy but above all be well presented and aesthetically pleasing facility. A Facilities Strategy is required to continually undertake reviews of the individual facilities within the MASRC. This strategy need to; review utilisation and efficiency levels, determine more effective ways to operate, and at all times ensuring that facilities meet the needs and expectations of the customers. A successful ‘Facilities Strategy’ is one that is a constant ongoing process of review and refinement that continually responds to customer and market demands.

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Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.5 64

Operational Plan

The following framework for the Operational Plan for MASRC addresses the critical areas of facilities operations necessary to deliver the overall business strategy.

Table 7.1 Operating Systems Manual Finance systems

_Reporting Procedures _Internal Controls

The management team will need to develop the operational plan in conjunction with the business plan to ensure that it supports the objectives and outcomes of the business plan.

Operating and capital budgets

_Operating budgets _Capital Budgets

Audits Purchasing

As such the following framework is proposed. Policies and Procedures Manual Development of a manual which addresses hiring , hours of work , termination, pay procedures, evaluation processes, personal conduct and other relevant issues. Operating Systems Manual Development of a manual which establishes detailed systems , procedures , accountability and responsibility for the operations shown in the table opposite.

Security and crowd control Patron and customer service Reception and box office Event bookings, scheduling and co-ordination Maintenance and housekeeping _Immediate _Preventative _Predictive _Scheduled Emergency planning Quality Assurance Program External/ outsource services Insurances Membership Sinking fund Asset management


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.6

Financial Analysis

The following financial analysis provides a broad understanding of the operational budgets associated with a select number of Aquatic Leisure Centres, a number of which had been identified in the Trends and Best Practice review (Section 02). The following financial operating budget is based on the adoption by Government of the alternate ‘corporate structure’ model (Option 3). It is noted that the budget is heavily weighted towards a higher level of staffing in order to support the servicing of the projected levels of memberships and learn to swim programs. The projections also takes into account a potential for the new facility to capture market share from existing leisure facilities as well as generating new customer bases from adjoining suburbs.

Financial Benchmarking Four leisure centres were analysed and used as benchmarks in the development of the financial operating budget. The information gathered from these facilities has informed the selection and proposed mix of programs nominated for MASRC as well as the identification of new trends in the development of leisure facilities. The findings are summarised in Table 7.2. Table 7.2 demonstrates that the Blacktown Leisure Centre is the facility potentially most similar to the MASRC as it is; Government owned and developed, a multisuburb scale facility and services a demographic of young family with and age profile 20-30 years. This facility is operated by a Government ‘Corporate Structure’ vehicle.

65

Table 7.2 Financial Benchmarking

Items

Blacktown Leisure Lakeside Leisure Centre Centre

Ownership

Blacktown Council ACT Government

Funding

Council and development contributions

Year developed

2003

Cabravale Leisure Centre

Cardinia Shire

Fairfield Council

ACT Government

Council $11.8m & Grants $500,00

Council

1993

2006 & 2009

2007

$9m

$11.3m and $5m

$13 million

25m pool, learn to 50m & 25m pool, play pool, small swim pool, play pool, gym, 3 sports gym & meeting spaces courts & library

25m pool, program pool and play pool, 8 sports courts, gym & outside recreation spaces

20 meter pool , small gymnasium , aerobics area , kiosk , Function / Meeting Rooms

Development cost Facilities

Cardinia Life

Primary catchment

Multi-suburb

Multi-suburb

Multi-suburb

Multi-suburb

Age profile

Young families

Older families

Young families

Ageing population

Locality age

20-30 years

20-30 years

20-30 years

50+ years

Staffing Management type

21 FT and 150 casual Corporation

Management term

9 FT and 14 PT External Contrator External Contractor

Council

n/a

5 years

3-5 years

n/a

Gross annual revenue

$5.3m

$2.5m

$3.6m

$1.1m

Gross annual expenditure

$5.2m

$2.39m

$3.3m

$1.4m

Memberships

1,840

760

3,256

881

Learn to Swim pupils

4,500 per year

1,545 per year

1,456 peryear

547 per term


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7.6 66

Financial Analysis

Financial operating budget The following draft financial operating budget is presented as part of the feasibility study report and is submitted as a guide only. It is based on the business philosophy and strategy outlined previously including the facility being operated and managed by the Government via a ‘Corporate Structure’ vehicle and in accordance with the recommendations contained within this report. The fundamentals outlined can be applied in general terms to a ‘Private Operator’ model as well which effectively replaces the Government ‘vehicle’ with a private one.

Table 7.2 Financial Operating Budget Start Up

Year 1

Year 2

Year 3

Income Membership (gym)

$1,050,000

$1,250,000

$1,300,000

Membership (other)

$150,000

$250,000

$300,000

Medical/rehabilitation

$100,000

$100,000

$120,000

Retail & merchandise

$100,000

$100,000

$120,000

Learn to Swim

$1,300,000

$1,450,000

$1,500,000

Aquatic other

$650,000

$750,000

$750,000

Sports halls/sports

$300,000

$350,000

$400,000

Sports halls/ other

$200,000

$250,000

$250,000

Meeting room hire

$50,000

$50,000

$50,000

Function

$50,000

$70,000

$70,000

Food and beverage

$1,150,000

$1,300,000

$1,325,000

Sponsorship

$150,000

$150,000

$150,000

Other

Nil

Nil

Nil

TOTAL INCOME

$5,250,000

$5,800,000

$6,175,000

Expenditure Staff (management)

$330,000

$630,000

$650,000

$675,000

Staffing (full time)

$200,000

$790,000

$850,000

$930,000

Staffing (part time)

Nil

$1,980,000

$2,180,000

$2,200,000

Administration

Nil

$220,000

$235,000

$240,000

Energy & water

$100,000

$520,000

$540,000

$570,000

Food & beverage

$100,000

$750,000

$810,000

$860,000

Maintenance

$25,000

$340,000

$370,000

$380,000

PR/Marketing

$100,000

$120,000

$125,000

$125,000

Other

$50,000

Nil

Nil

Nil

TOTAL EXPENDITURE

$905,000

$5,350,000

$5,750,000

$6,000,000

OPERATING PROFIT/LOSS

($905,000)

($100,000)

$100,000

$175,000


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.6

Financial Analysis

The following section provides further detail and insight into the projections of the draft operating budget.

Start up As outlined in the business philosophy and strategy , it is proposed that certain staff should be engaged early during the design and construction phase to assist in the development of the new facility as well as the development of numerous plans and systems including but not limited to , operational and maintenance plans , staffing procedures , operating systems and staff recruitment. The following recruitment plan has been used as a guide and to assist in the development of the operating budget ; _Three senior managers for 9 months prior to opening _Two further senior managers 6 months prior to opening _A further three managers 3 months prior to opening _All middle management (14) , 3 months prior to opening All other costs relative to the start up are costs associated with the set up of the facility as well as initial promotion of the facility.

Income Initial Health and Fitness Membership is projected at 1,400 and an annual membership fee of $750. This membership base is expected to grow gradually in line with the residential growth. Membership to other activities including aquatic , rehabilitation, club etc is projected to grow gradually with an initial membership base of 600 and an average annual fee of $250. Learn to swim demand is expected to be strong based on the forecasted demographic of the local community and initially a total of 3,250 pupil registrations annually and at an average of $400 per pupil per annum. The registration numbers are expected to grow in line with the local residential growth. Utilisation of the sports hall is an important element and it is expected it will generate business from the nearby schools for a range of activities , particularly the use of the stage area for assemblies , school plays , recitals etc

Food and Beverage income will be generated through the Restaurant and through a number of avenues including , serving patrons to the new facility, visitors/patrons of the restaurant, external catering functions to Stromlo Forest Park and other surrounding facilities.

Expenditure Staffing numbers have been estimated at up to 9 Management, 16 Support and 150 Part Time by the 3rd year of operation. Reference is made to both the Management and Organisations Structures in Section 7.5 of this report for further details. Staffing expenditure provides for all costs associated with the employment of staff including but not limited to , wages , superannuation , payroll tax , annual leave provisions , work cover etc. Food and Beverage expenditure provides for an allowance for cost of goods and sales as well as wages. An allowance of approximately 2% of total annual revenue has been provided for PR / Marketing to enable the facility to promote itself effectively within its market.

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7.7 68

Funding Options

The level and range of funding options for the development of Leisure Facilities within Australia has historically been restricted to limited number of sources, including: _Territory Funding _Federal Government Funding _Local development funding and levies _Management or Commercial Funding _Local Community Funding It is noted ,as a general comment, that the majority of leisure centres developed in Australia are funded primarily through a combination of Local , State and Federal Government funding together with the support of funds generated through local development contributions. These contributions generally originate from residential , commercial and retail developments within the local community and are paid for by private developers. Over recent years the industry has also witnessed the introduction of Commercial Funding through organisations who are seeking the management rights of the facility and based on long term management agreements.

Funding Strategy In the case of the Molonglo Aquatic , Sports and Recreation Facility the following strategy is recommended: The ACT Government provides the major funding contribution and in turn seek additional or support funding through the following sources. _Federal Government Funding through the Regional Development Australia Fund _Local development contributions or levies Under a Government Corporate Structure it would not be proposed that funding be sourced through the Management / Commercial options, however under a ‘Private Operator’ model this would be viable as discussed opposite. It is proposed that funding not be sourced through the Community option as it will be seen that such an option would diminish the potential to optimise general membership to the new leisure facility and potentially to adjoining facilities within Stromlo Forest Park.

Noting that the initial construction budget excluding contingency for the development of the new MASRC is in the order of $60 million (see Community funding is a further funding option to be considered which Section 7.7) a guide for funding would be as per the table below. This funding mix would alter in a ‘Private Operator’ model where depending operates similar to a debenture plan were an individual purchases a on the length of the lease agreement time period the ‘Operator’ may “foundation right “ to the facility. This funding has not proven to be contributes cap-ex funds. highly successful apart from one or two isolated cases.

ACT Government

$45 million

Federal Government

$10 million

Private Development

$5 million

Total Funding

$60 million


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

7.7

Funding Options

Project Cost Estimate The following project cost estimates are an ‘Order of Probable Cost’ and not a definitive price for the project. The summary costs below are from the Cost Plan developed by Northcroft based on the preferred Concept Design as drawn on the site neighbouring Stromlo Forest Park. More detail of the cost plan is included in Appendix C of this report.

Escalation Calculation The 5 to 10 year projections as noted in the cost plan have relied on the historical building price index data to calculate the projected costs. Please note that the 10 year projection may appear high because the change in building code and standards has been more dramatic over the past 10 years than the past 5 years. This is evident with the introduction of BASIX, BCA Part J, changes in fire resistance/safety and DDA requirements and changes in AS3000 to name a few. These changes are reflected with the building price index as they all cause the general rise in the cost of building/construction.

Order of Probable Costs Construction Cost

$60.718 million

Contingency - 10%

$6.072 million

Total

$66.79 million

5 Year Projection

$72.634 million

10 Year Projection

$93.529 million

Please note that the projections exclude the effect of carbon pricing as it is a recently introduced policy and it will turn into an Emission Trading Scheme (ETS) in 3 years time with the policy on whether to have a minimum price on carbon in 3 years yet to be determined. Government direction on a carbon pricing and/or ETS is not confident making future projections on associated costs difficult and unreliable.

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7.7 70

Funding Options

In addition to the funding options noted above it is also suggested that consideration be given , as part of the overall business philosophy and strategy , to develop the following options which potentially provide substantial commercial substance to the business. These options have the potential to provide both capital and or recurrent funding.

Naming Rights Provides the potential to sell the rights for a period of time , for example 5 to 10 years , to a business which considers that it is able to gain substantial exposure. Consideration should be given to how this might be linked to and embrace Stromlo Forest Park Sponsorship Potential to sell corporate sponsorships within the facility. This could include a range of options from organisations wanting to have their name and brand associated with the centre and being seen to be supporting the Facility and the community, event and activity sponsors, specific facility sponsor ( medical / rehabilitation ).

Membership Traditionally membership at a leisure centre has been restricted to the health and fitness activity base (i.e. gym memberships). For MASRC, it is suggested that consideration be given to expanding the membership to include a range of options as noted below , however not restricted to these options only: _Aquatic _Medical / Rehabilitation _Club ( leisure centre establishes clubs in various sports ) _Gymnasium _Leisure Facility _Links to Stromlo Forest Park _Links to other local community services and facilities _Links to local ‘professional’ sporting teams.

Supply Rights Potential to sell various supply rights to the new facility including but not limited to : _Soft Drinks / Energy Drinks etc _Beer and Wine _Pastries _Ice Cream _Dairy Products _Snack Foods _Financial services ( ATM ).


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08

Delivery Strategy


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

8.1 72

Delivery Model Strategy

The delivery approach to developing MASRC is critical to its long term success. Section 08 outlines the recommended delivery model strategy and procurement model strategy for MASRC.

Delivery Model Strategy There are four options which could be considered for delivery models: _Design-Build-Operate (Fully privatised model) _Build & Operate (Design only by Government) _Design, Build & Private Operator (Discrete packages) _Design, Build & Government Operator (Traditional procurement) Design-Build-Operate This is a fully privatised model with only a concept or reference design by Government and a written performance criteria/KPI for the facility inclusions and operations with the facility handed back to state at the end of a set period, usually 20-30 years. This model is the lowest risk to state in terms of capital expenditure and operational costs but usually requires the Government to provide long free leases on the facility and the land with reduced influence on the daily successful operations of the facility. The resulting outcome for

both the facility and its operations are highly financially driven with a focus on providing spaces and activities that generate the greatest return.

Government. Long lease periods usually also accompany this model having impacts on the Government’s influence and flexibility with the facility.

Community services and outcomes are often sacrificed to minimum standards to just meet KPI’s in order to maintain profit margins. Consultation and investigations in the ACT have shown this approach to deliver low community outcomes, where for example schools holding swimming carnivals while accommodated to meet contractual obligations are however not embraced.

The model can still have capital expenditure investment by the Government for the build but total costs may be reduced through a contractor/operator consortia offering a reduced build price offset by an operational model.

The building quality can also be compromised as materials and construction are selected to target the life cycle of the ‘lease period’ only. Build & Operate Similar comments to the ‘DesignBuild-Operate’ model in terms of operational and community outcomes however better building quality can be achieved along with the desired mix of facilities as the design process control is retained by the

Additional complementary services may also be proposed to be included by the bidding consortia that can off-set the build price and lower the Government’s investment. These ‘bolt-on’ services may include such options as ‘long child-care’, retail and professional suites which provide incomes through either direct operations or rental/ leases. Design, Build & Private Operator This is the more typical model over the last couple of decades where by the State or Government organisation (ie ACT Sport & Rec) procures a design, then tenders and builds it, and

then tenders out the operation the facility on 5-10 year periods. The approach reduces operational costs/risks to the Government organisation but this can be at the expense to community outcomes as again the focus is on driving the greatest financial returns rather than a broader spread of community services. The short lease periods also mean that the operators focus is on driving as much return out of the facility in the lease term and minimising operational overheads so maintenance of the facility can potentially be compromised requiring investment by the Government organisation to rectify. The medium to long lease periods can also limit Government flexibility to reorganise facilities or programs that respond to continually changing community demands and needs.


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

Design, Build & State Operator This is the older traditional model where by the Government organisation procure a design, then tenders and builds it, then operate the facility themselves. In recent times this approach has regained favour so that Government organisations such as ACT Sport & Rec can deliver more community focused outcomes and specific targeted programs that respond to community demand or changing government initiatives. These self operated models were not considered desirable due to the less flexible and more bureaucratic systems that Government organisations have to operate under and greater efficiency could be achieved by Private Operators. However a level of greater flexibility and therefore efficiency can achieved by creating an ‘operating company’ solely owned by the Government organisation. This ‘operating company’ can effectively operate the facility in a similar environment to a Private Operator but retain the ability to

remain community focused without being solely driven by maximising the profit margin. This is further discussed in more detail in the Section 07 Business Strategy of the report. Delivery Model Comparison Table 8.1 compares the four possible Delivery Models against five criteria: _Quality of the building’s design and construction _Capital expenditure costs to Government _Operational costs to government _Community benefits _Flexibility for change by Government

Table 8.1 Delivery model comparison matrix

Building Quality

Government Capital Expenditure

Operational costs to Government

Community Outcomes

Flexibility for change by Government

Design, Build, Operate

++

+++

+++

+

n/a

Build and Operate

++

++

+++

+

n/a

+++

+

+

++

++

+++

+

+

+++

+++

Time

Cost

Quality

R

R

Design, Build and Private Operator Design, Build and Government Operator

Table 8.2 Procurement model comparison matrix

Design and Construct (D&C) Traditional Lump Sum

Each criteria is rated out of 3 with 1 meaning it poorly meets the criteria and 3 meaning it satisfies the criteria well. As shown in Table 8.1 the Design, Building and Government Operator ranks the highest on most criteria.

73

R

R

Construction Managed

R

R

R

Project Managed- Fast Tracked

R

R

1/2

Delivery Managed

R

R

R


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8.1 74

Building Procurement Strategy

Within the “Design, Build & Private/State Operator” models there is sub-options for the ‘Building Procurement’ model which can help to reduce risk and improve value for money for the capital expenditure to the Government. Following we have included a discussion on the ‘Building Procurement Strategy’ to be considered for the MASRC. Building Procurement Strategy The best procurement strategy is usually defined by the basic rule of thumb ‘time-cost-quality’. In any project you need to include a minimum of two of these criteria to formulate the preferred delivery strategy. For example if ‘time and cost’ are your main drivers then a ‘D&C’ process is often adopted but at the expense of project quality and client control of the process. If ‘cost and quality’ are you main drivers then a ‘fully documented lump sum tender’ is often the best approach but requires the time needed by the design team to comprehensibly design and document the project to limit ‘variations’ on site.

In the case of ‘time and quality’ more investment needs to be made in the head contractor and additional ‘acceleration’ costs to increase the amount and quality of supervision on site so more works can be undertaken concurrently. Where a building will be retained and potentially operated by the Principal(owner) then ‘quality’ is paramount as all legacies of the design and build will become either the direct asset or liability of the Principal(owner). In complex projects like an indoor public swimming pool and leisure centre which is ultimately owned and potentially operated by the Principal(ACT Sport & Rec) for the long term ‘time-cost-quality’ will all come into effect in the choice for the correct construction procurement model. Based on the project type and complexity Northcroft have recommended that the procurement model be a ‘Construction Management Contract’ with early involvement of the main contractor during

design development/ documentation so the client has a better control of the quality and can also gain some advantages of choosing the most optimised construction methods with the early contractor involvement. The tendering process for ‘Construction Management Contract’ usually involves a ‘select’ group of Head Contractors who meet specific pre-qualification criteria or have been selected as part of an EOI process tendering their ‘Preliminaries, Management Rates and Profit Margins’ against a concept design and do not provide a full lump-sum price. The Head Contractor then tenders each of the trades open book with the client to a selection of sub-contractors in order to obtain competitive pricing. The majority of the project delivery risk lies with the Head Contractor with incentives in place for the Contractor to meet or better the stated project budget, but overall project risk is shared by the parties.

Recommendations The preferred delivery model approach suggested to ACT Sport & Recreation is for a ‘Design, Build & State Operate’ model where the State sets up a ‘operating company’ as further detailed in Section 07 Business Strategy. As an alternative the State Operating Company can be a Private Operating as also discussed in Section 07. Further it recommended that a ‘Construction Management Contract’ be used for the construction procurement of the building as discussed above


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09

Conclusion


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

09 76

Conclusion

This study has considered feasibility of developing an aquatic sports and recreation facility in the emerging locality of Molonglo. It has found that a district level facility located at the gateway to Stromlo Forest Park and near the Molonglo/Coombs community precinct and River Park is feasible. Importantly the facility could be developed as apart of a community and recreational hub for Molonglo by integrating and functionally supporting these other facilities. The key conclusions of the study are presented across.

Demand for facility The assessment of the catchment and optimal size of a future aquatic sports and recreation facility (Section 04) found that the facility could support a primary catchment of 81,000 people which encompasses the full development of Molonglo (likely by 2040) and Weston Creek. The facility would have a secondary catchment of Woden (32,000 people) which currently does not have sufficient aquatic facilities. Woden may assist in supplementing the primary catchment prior to the full development of Molonglo, alternatively the facility could be staged. Given the long term catchment size, a ‘district aquatic facility’ is considered most appropriate to serve the residents of Molonglo and Weston Creek. A district facility generally comprises of 25m and/or 50m pool, program pools, indoor/outdoor play area, outdoor recreation spaces, fitness gym, retail areas, cafe and meeting spaces. Typical building foot print is 7,000sqm to 12,000sqm.

Consultation Eight representative sporting associations were consulted. The key associations included Canberra Ice Hockey Association, Canberra Ice Skating Association, Swimming ACT, Triathlon ACT, ACT Water Polo, Netball ACT, Basketball ACT, Capital Football (Futsal). Following consultation key program inclusions identified were 50m swimming pool with a consistent depth, spectator seating, and 4-6 courts to accommodate indoor sports. Facilities for social aspects of sports associations would also be required. Ice rink Consultation with the sporting associations identified the need for ice, pool and indoor court sport facilities at MASRC. As discussed in Section 03, Molonglo is not considered the most appropriate location for a new ice sport facility. A separate study is required to consider the long term needs and planning for ice sport facilities in the ACT.

Preferred site Three sites were nominated for consideration for the location for the future MASRC. Each of the sites were inspected and discussed with key stakeholders. Following these discussions it became apparent that Site 2 was the only viable location for the future aquatic, sport and recreation facility. Therefore it was advised not to proceed with a detailed comparative analysis of the sites. Site 2 is a 5ha site located at the gateway to Stromlo Forest Park and a future community precinct. It benefits from exposure to John Gorton Drive and has direct links to Stromlo Forest Park, future community areas and the future Molonglo River Park. The site is undulating and has exceptional district views. Optimal facility mix Following consultation with the sporting associations and consideration of the potential linkages of Site 2 with the community precinct and Stromlo Forest Park it was considered the facility should incorporate:

_ Aquatic space (50m swimming pool, 25m program pool, play pool and learn to swim pool) _ Gym (600sqm gym area plus yoga/aerobics and spin room) _ Indoor courts (3 courts with long term expansion to 6 courts) _ Medical facilities (health care, rehabilitation and child care by commercial tenants) _ Community facilities (meeting rooms, members lounge and theatrette) _ Commercial and retail (restaurant/cafe and retail suites) _ Administration (reception/ office) The site’s direct interface with Stromlo Forest Park provides an opportunity to develop the two facilities in conjunction with one another. It is recommended that the MASRC incorporates facilities such as a theatrette, rehabilitation spaces and high quality gym and aquatic facilities which could support Stromlo Forest Park’s vision for a destination for professional sporting group programs. The inclusion of a stage in the sports hall also provides for wider


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

09

Conclusion

utilisation of the facility by schools, community groups, sporting groups and for entertainment purposes. Site layout and costing With only half of the site required for the future MASRC it was important to consider how the facility will be best located on the site having regard to connectivity surrounding uses and providing a viable development area on the remainder of the site. Four site layout options and costing scenarios were considered. Option B02 was considered most viable because it provides strong interface to Stromlo Forest Park allowing future functionally connectivity between the spaces. It also provides a residual site with good frontage to John Gorton Drive, enabling a wide range of community or commercial uses. The Site Options Analysis was also presented to key stakeholders and it was confirmed that Option B02 was the preferred layout to take through to Concept Design.

Design Concept The key site planning and design objectives for the MASRC were to: _ Create the community and recreation hub for Molonglo _ Reference the character of Molonglo through high quality and environmentally responsive design _ Support long term development of Stromlo Forest Park and Molonglo River Park. The concept design (shown across) comprises of: _ A series of pavilions which functionally and visually separate the building into four discrete components (sports halls/gym, 50m pool, recreation pools, community/restaurant space) linked together by a central service and administration spine. _ Pavilions that open up to Stromlo Forest Park providing views and connectivity between the two facilities. A dedicated transition zone is provided for shared events. _ Pavilions that respond to the topography of the site, each generally presenting as a two storey structure.

_ Car parking for 300 spaces located on site and allows opportunity for the long term expansion of the sports halls. _A landscape strategy provides a series outdoor public spaces and references the local landscape context. Business strategy The business philosophy for MASRC is for a community focused facility. The proposed management structure aligns with this philosophy by retaining MASRC in government ownership and operated either by a government corporate structure, or a private coporate structure with similar operating and reporting structures. The financial strategy focuses on providing a centre that can be developed and operated on a stand alone financial basis. This could be achieved by optimising income streams from Learn to Swim programs, gym memberships, utilisation of indoor sports hall for a wide range of uses (utilising the stage), medical and rehabilitation and food and beverage services. The financial analysis, based on

comparable facilities in NSW, ACT and Victoria, indicates that this model would operate a with a surplus from Year 2 onwards. The financial strategy is complemented by a range of marketing, staffing and community focus strategies outlined in Section 07. The recommended funding approach sees the ACT Government as the major funding contributor with some additional support by Federal Government Funding and private sector funding through developer contributions. Additional commercial funding options (i.e. naming rights, sponsorship, supply rights and membership) may provide supplementary funding. Delivery Strategy The preferred delivery model approach suggested to ACT Sport & Recreation is for a ‘Design, Build & State Operate’ model where the State sets up a ‘operating company’. This suggested delivery strategy is not absolute and alternative successful models are discussed in the report for consideration.

It is further recommended that a ‘Construction Management Contract’ be used for the construction procurement of the building.

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78

Illustrative view across 50m pool looking south

Illustrative view across play and LTS pools looking north eastt


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A

Appendix A Concept Design


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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B

Appendix B Site Utility Services & Engineering


Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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Molonglo Aquatic Sports and Recreation Centre Feasibility Study

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C

Appendix C Site Costings


MOLONGLO AQUATIC SPORTS AND RECREATION CENTRE_ FEASIBILITY STUDY