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Art+Design 16 17


The College of Art is a community of designers and artists. At WashU, you will learn to make things with many different materials; examine people, communities, and situations carefully and with empathy; communicate with diverse audiences; and create positive change in the world. Your studies will be rigorous and fun. Washington University is an internationally recognized research institution where you can take courses in art history, psychology, gender studies, computer science, literature, business, science, and everything in between. Our courses are taught by leaders in their fields, who are working on local and global challenges.


Your WashU education brings together a strong liberal arts foundation and a major in art or design. As a BFA student, your liberal arts foundation is built on a combination of required academic courses, art history and visual culture courses, and elective courses. There is time and space to explore fields across our undergraduate divisions—Architecture, Arts & Sciences, Business, and Engineering & Applied Science. A BFA degree requires a total of 128 credits of course work, with a minimum of 39 credits taken in Arts & Sciences. With proper planning, you can pursue a minor or a second major. Dual degrees are also possible and typically take five years to complete.

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Art & Design BFA Degree Credit Requirements Academic Requirements 12 credits Writing I 3 Natural Sciences/Math 3 Humanities 3 Social or Behavioral Sciences 3 Art History & Visual Culture Classes 15 credits Art, Architecture, Design History I & II 6 Art History & Visual Culture Electives 9 Foundation Classes 14 credits Drawing I & II 6 Practices I & II 2 2-D & 3-D Design 6 Major Classes 42 credits Architecture/Art/Design Electives 9 credits Additional Elective Classes 36 credits Total 128 credits


YEAR 3

Focus your study. In your junior year, you dive into your major, choosing among rigorous studio courses taught by faculty with diverse expertise.

Drawing I

2-D or 3-D Design

Practices I

SPRING

YEAR 2

Choose your path. As a sophomore, you select courses across art and design, taking a digitally oriented class and choosing from introductory courses in fashion design, graphic design, illustration, painting, photography, printmaking, sculpture, and typography. During your second semester, you select your major.

FA L L

YEAR 1

Build a foundation. In your first year, your required studio course work includes two semesters of drawing, two-dimensional design, three-dimensional design, and a weekly lecture course.

Drawing II

2-D or 3-D Design

Practices II

YEAR 4

Culminate with capstone. As a senior, you take a yearlong capstone course, which provides a bridge to your future after college. You begin with research that results in finished work and a public exhibition.

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Major in Art The art major is built on two central ideas: first, you will become a maker with technical and conceptual depth; second, you will drive your own education with the choices you make about what classes to take and what projects to take on. You can decide to leave your art studio education open, or you can choose to concentrate in a specific discipline, including painting, photography, printmaking, or sculpture. Your choices begin in your sophomore year, when you select two of four Material & Culture studios: painting, photography, printmaking, and sculpture. In addition, you take a digital studio course, which focuses on technology and the moving image.

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Art Practice Courses During your junior and senior years, you take seven Art Practice courses; we offer them in a range of areas and topics every semester. These courses help you to acquire technical and conceptual strategies as you move toward independent work. Methods & Contexts Courses Taught by teams of faculty during your junior year, Methods & Contexts courses help you understand your own artistic interests within the contemporary, professional field of art.

Capstone In your senior capstone course, you commit to an artistic position— evidenced through studio production, presentation, and writing. Your work culminates in a spring exhibition.


YEAR 3

Art Practice

Art Practice

YEAR 4

Art Practice

Art Practice

Methods & Contexts I

Capstone I

SPRING

Material & Culture

FA L L

YEAR 2

Digital Studio

Material & Culture

Art Practice

Art Practice

Art Practice

Capstone II

Sample classes include:

Methods & Contexts II

Body Image Large Format Photography The Printed Image Material as Metaphor Public Practice Time-Based Media

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Major in Communication Design The communication design major is a collaborative program at the intersection of graphic design, illustration, and interaction design. Our faculty have backgrounds in illustration, information design, graphic design, social impact design, user interface design, and advertising. You can choose to design interfaces for mobile devices and the web, make pictures for games and motion graphics, illustrate stories, create comics, and design printed posters and books.

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Some projects allow you to apply design skills to social problems in the community in areas such as public health and urban education. Others provide the chance to study the history of printed images, comics, and adver­ tising through our Modern Graphic History Library. In your sophomore year and the fall semester of your junior year, you take courses such as Digital Design, Word & Image, Typography, and Interaction Foundations. Starting in the second semester of your junior year, you choose all of your own major courses.

Capstone As a senior, you pursue a capstone project in design or illustration that culminates in an illustrated book, zine, screen-based presentation, graphic novel/mini-comic, or digital experience. Your final project is displayed in a public exhibition.


YEAR 3

YEAR 4

Word & Image II

Digital Design

Elective

Type II

Capstone I

SPRING

YEAR 2

FA L L

Sample classes include:

Type I

Word & Image I

Interaction Foundations

Major Elective

Major Elective

Major Elective

Capstone II

Major Elective

Pictures for Communication Type and Letterform Material & Culture (Art)

Major Elective

Interaction Design: User-Centered Applications Illustration Concepts & Media/Visual Journalism Content to Cover: The Design of Books Design for Social Impact Art PracticeÂ

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Major in Fashion Design The fashion design major provides experience in designing for mass production, as well as one-of-a-kind pieces. Courses provide a working knowledge of industry standards and procedures, informed by history and current trends. During your sophomore year, you build a foundational understanding of fashion research, culture, and design. In your junior year, you undertake projects exploring a spectrum of garment design problems, fabrication strategies, textiles, and illustration, supported by digital tools.

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Capstone As a senior, you focus on your own aesthetic through the realization of a signature collection. Students have drawn inspiration from dance, science-fiction genres, sustainable design, and architecture for recent collections. Guided by faculty and professional mentors, you work through the full design process, from initial research and conceptual design to pattern and muslin stages to the final construction of each garment. Your designs are featured on the runway in the annual WashU Fashion Design Show.


SPRING

Fashion History & Research

Textile Design

Special Topics in Fashion Design

2-D Fashion Design

3-D Fashion Design

Digital Fashion & Textile Design

Patternmaking Lab

Capstone II

Digital Design

Intro to Fashion

YEAR 3

Patternmaking & Production

Capstone I

YEAR 4

FA L L

Fashion Illustration

YEAR 2

Portfolio Development

Digital Lab

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Your real-world experience begins right here in St. Louis. Experience what it takes to teach. Since 2003, WashUCity has given WashU design students the opportunity to develop curriculum, teach, and mentor graphics students at University City High School. Engage in human-centered design. Design for America at WashU brings together students from majors across campus, challenging them to use human-centered design for local impact, addressing topics such as food access and waste reduction.

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Use photography to tell your story. The Documentary Photography & Social Practice course, taught by professor Stan Strembicki, focuses on philosophical, aesthetic, and tech­nical approaches to photographing our contemporary, human-altered landscape. Find out what it takes to make public art. Now in its 31st year, the University City Public Art Series provides students with hands-on experience in developing site-specific works. Participants choose locations, estimate costs, design models, and make professional presen­tations before University City’s Municipal Commission on Arts & Letters. Winning projects are constructed in the community.


Address sustainability issues. Sustainability Exchange allows students to work in transdisciplinary teams to discover innovative solutions for reducing energy use on campus, and to develop recommendations for advancing net-zero energy design and construction. Use word and image to become a visual reporter. For professor Douglas Dowd’s Visual Journalism and Reportage Drawing course, students act as visual reporters, weaving together text and image.

Create films and videos to document communities. Taught by associate professor Denise Ward-Brown, the course Tale of Two Cities: Documenting Our Divides uses the medium of film to document local grassroots reform efforts, spurred in part by the 2014 events in Ferguson, Missouri.

Share your experiences with high school students. Fashion design students participate in studio activities with visiting high school students.

Use design thinking to work on patient health care challenges. Interaction design courses allow students to learn research methods and collaborative processes in design thinking. Students often work on innovative, digitally delivered solutions for health care challenges.

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Your degree will help you impact your community and your profession.

De Andrea Nichols

Check out how some of our alums are applying their WashU educations across the country and around the world.

Michael Alm, BFA06 Mixed media sculptor Seattle, WA

Shelby Shadwell, BFA03 Artist and faculty member

LEVI STRAUSS & CO. YOUTUBE

Laramie, WY

PIXAR SHUTTERFLY

SF GOOGLE

FACEBOOK

FROG MOZILLA

IDEO

VELASLAVASAY PANORAMA NICKELODEON ANIMATION STUDIO

Louise Smythe, BFA10 Story artist at Pixar Animation Studios MONKEY DEUX 72ANDSUNNY

LA DREAMWORKS ANIMATION

Joey Brooks, BFA01 Owner/designer of Elle & Jae

San Francisco, CA

Paul Dillinger, BFA94 Vice president and head of global product innovation at Levi Strauss & Co. San Francisco, CA Sandy Speicher, BFA96 Partner and managing director of Education practice at IDEO San Francisco, CA

Nicole White, BFA06 Artist Tulsa, OK Paula Wilson, BFA98 Artist and faculty member Carrizozo, NM

Douglas Powell, BFA88 Design principal at IBM Design Austin, TX

Sharon Silverberg, BFA10 Design director at Impossible Ventures Austin, TX Tina Ho, BFA05 Senior user experience designer at HomeAway.com Austin, TX Regina Allen, BFA91 Artist and faculty member Austin, TX

SPREDFAST

CA TECHNOLOGIES IMPOSSIBLE VENTURES

Los Angeles, CA

AUS

HOMEAWAY.COM

Jonathan Yukio Clark, BFA09 Mixed media artist Makawao, HI

FURMAN + KEIL ARCHITECTS IBM

Yu Araki, BFA07 Video artist and filmmaker Tokyo, Japan

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Sandy Speicher


Sarah Ettinger, BFA15 Assistant designer for childrenswear and womenswear at Kate Spade New York, NY Aaron Duffy, BFA06 Creative director and visual narrative mastermind at 1stAveMachine + SpecialGuest New York, NY Julia Kuo, BFA07 Freelance illustrator

Adam Rubin, BFA05 New York Times best-selling children’s author New York, NY

Chicago, IL

De Andrea Nichols, BFA10 Social entrepreneur and founder of Civic Creatives St. Louis, MO

KATE SPADE

CHI

NEW YORK MAGAZINE TORY BURCH

INTERBRAND

Katy Scoggin, BFA05 Film director and producer

JENNIFER BEHR

RALPH LAUREN

PACE PRINTS NANETTE LEPORE

PHI

GRAVITYTANK

DEREK LAM

METROPOLITAN MUSEUM OF ART

NY

PHILADELPHIA MUSEUM OF ART

FIREBELLY DESIGN

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY

VERA WANG DIGITASLBI PENTAGRAM

CALVIN KLEIN WHITNEY MUSEUM OF AMERICAN ART

SHEDD AQUARIUM

LAPIN DESIGN

PENGUIN GROUP

ISAAC MiZRAHI

Brooklyn, NY

STUDIO BLUE

OGILVY & MATHER

TOMMY HILFIGER

GAGOSIAN GALLERY MONICA + ANDY

NATIONAL GALLERY OF ART

QUAD/GRAPHICS CHEREE BERRY PAPER SIX MILE SCULPTURE WORKS WHITE FLAG PROJECTS

FLEISHMAN-HILLARD

STL

TOKY BRANDING + DESIGN REGIONAL ARTS COMMISSION

St. Louis, MO

John Witty, BFA10 Doctoral candidate in Italian Renaissance art history Atlanta, GA

J. CREW

DC

THEORY

THE ATLANTIC

Tom Friedman, BFA88 Artist Plymouth, MA Heather McPherson, BFA06 Artist and faculty member Providence, RI

Tucker Pierce, BFA15 Founder of Westminster Press artist space

GLAMOUR MAGAZINE

Isaac Howell, BFA15 MFA candidate in painting and printmaking New Haven, CT Michelle Komie, BFA97 Executive editor of art and architecture at Princeton University Press Princeton, NJ Mary K. Bryson, BFA88 Founder of Bryson Medical Illustrations Langhorne, PA Benjamin Guthorn, BFA10 Judicial law clerk for Judge Dan Friedman, Maryland Court of Special Appeals Baltimore, MD

ARTIST ASSISTANT TO TARA DONOVAN

DIANE VON FURSTENBERG NATIONAL PORTRAIT GALLERY

Benjamin Lowy, BFA01 Award-winning photojournalist New York, NY

Jordana Warmflash, BFA07 Founder/designer of NOVIS New York, NY

Nina Buxenbaum, BFA96 Artist and faculty member Jamaica, NY

Judy Pfaff, BFA71 Artist Kingston, NY Ian Monroe, BFA95 Artist London, England

NOVIS collection by Jordana Warmflash

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IBM Design Studio, Austin, Photo courtesy of IBM Corporation

Levi Strauss & Co., San Francisco Cheree Berry Paper, St. Louis. Photo: Tyler Stephens, CORE10 Architecture

Professional development is an integral part of your studio education. Starting in your junior year, our career development staff integrates professional programming into your course work. You will be guided through specialized programs and learn how to structure an internship and job search. In addition, you will have access to personalized career advising and resources to find prospects for the best internships, residencies, fellowships, graduate schools, jobs, or other professional placements. You are also encouraged to become actively involved with professional organizations and to attend conferences.

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Professional Practices The Pro Practices program includes sessions on rĂŠsumĂŠ, cover letter, and portfolio development. It also includes skill-building sessions on networking, interviewing, and professional etiquette. Road Shows Road Shows offer students a chance to travel to major markets to visit agencies, studios, and professionals, and to connect with alumni currently working in the field. Recent Road Shows have been held in Chicago, Minneapolis, New York, and Silicon Valley.


Our faculty are practicing artists, designers, and architects. Nationally and internationally distinguished, our faculty exhibit in galleries, have successful design and studio practices, publish articles and books, conduct human-centered research, create interactive media, consult, and participate in a range of other creative activities. You’ll get to know your faculty well. Their research and studio practices are often interwoven with the courses that they teach.

Faculty Profiles If you ask associate professor John Hendrix—who has authored and illustrated several children’s books and completed assignments for publications such as Sports Illustrated,

Entertainment Weekly, Rolling Stone, The New York Times, The New Yorker, and Esquire—the sketchbook is a vital tool for illustrators, providing a “personal playground” for conceptualizing ideas and honing drawing skills. For his course The Illustrator’s Sketchbook, students make images that explore visual narratives. Senior lecturer Jennifer Ingram, BFA04, knows the challenges of designing a collection for the annual Fashion Design Show. “It’s a balance of freedom and restriction,” says Ingram, who coordinates the public showcase. “You can be creative and think outside the box, but you also have to make sure the garment works for a manufacturer and a clientele.”

An internationally recognized artist, professor Lisa Bulawsky’s innovative approach to teaching stems from her research interests and investment in the philosophical and political qualities inherent to printmaking. Her role as director of Island Press epitomizes this convergence of practice and education. The research-based printmaking workshop hosts professional artists for intensive studio residencies, and their visits are incorporated into the curriculum.

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You will have access to work spaces with the latest technology and tools. Studio and Making Spaces All students have their own studios beginning in their junior year, providing a space to work, collect, and be inspired. These spaces are an important part of our community-oriented culture and provide the opportunity for informal peer review and discussion, as well as individual faculty visits. From large-scale etching presses to laser cutters to book production facilities to wood and metal shops, you’ll have access to professionally equipped making spaces.Â

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Resources outside your studio will inspire your work. Island Press Island Press is a research-based printmaking workshop that is committed to creating and publishing innovative prints and multiples. Students have the opportunity to work with visiting artists, participating in the development of artistic ideas and gaining access and insight into both the technical and conceptual challenges of each project.  Public Lecture Series Each semester, the School brings nationally and internationally recognized artists, designers, architects, historians, and critics to campus, giving students the chance to hear from some of the most important creative and inspiring voices of our

time. Past speakers include Mark Dion, Xu Bing, Carrie Mae Weems, Jon Kolko, Trevor Paglen, Alfredo Jaar, Michael Bierut, and Abbott Miller.

Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum The Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum is located right across the plaza from students’ studio spaces. With over 5,000 objects, it is one of the finest university collections in the United States with strengths in 19th-, 20th-, and 21st-century European and American paintings, sculptures, prints, installations, and photographs. The Museum’s exhibition program focuses on both contemporary and historical forms of art, architecture, and design and the unique points of

intersection between those areas. Faculty often incorporate exhibitions into their courses. The Museum offers all WashU students a free membership, giving you access to special exhibition previews and events. Other opportunities for student involvement include the Kemper Student Council, Museum internships, and a curatorial fellowship.

Nancy Spirtas Kranzberg Studio for the Illustrated Book A collaboration between the College of Art and WashU Libraries, the Kranzberg Book Studio is a working book and print production facility that includes equipment for letterpress and intaglio printing, photopolymer plate, and silkscreen printing.

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This is what happens when the Sam Fox School goes to Florence. If you choose to study abroad, you can spend a semester, typically in your junior year, immersed in the rich artistic and cultural environment of Florence and the surrounding Tuscan countryside. The curriculum includes intense studio work in addition to courses in Italian language, Renaissance art history, and Italian art and design culture. You can choose to travel to destinations across Europe during semester break.

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Another option is to spend nine weeks of your summer in Florence. Our offerings vary by year, but they frequently include drawing, painting, and communication design courses, which are supplemented with lan­ guage and art history course work. You can also access the broad range of study abroad opportunities offered through other WashU programs.


MIL

VEN

RAVENNA

FLO AREZZO

MARCIANA MARINA

ROM

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Admission & Scholarships Admission

sculptures, storyboards, websites, or other types of work that seem relevant. The primary considerations for Choose 10-20 pieces of your best and undergraduate admission are artistic most recent work. and intellectual promise and academic There are three ways to submit record. You must have graduated from your portfolio; however, if you would high school, received a recommenlike to be considered for an academic dation from your teachers or other scholarship, you must submit a digital responsible officials of the school, and portfolio. taken an appropriate distribution of high school subjects. Digital Portfolio To Apply for First-Year Admission Submit images through the SlideRoom function of the Common Submit the Common Application Application. Each image/file can be at commonapp.org or the up to 5MB. When you upload your Coalition Application at materials, you will be able to include coalitionforcollegeaccess.org. information such as title of work, The Early Decision deadline is medium, dimensions, and date. November 15, 2016, and the Regular Decision deadline is January 15, 2017. There is no additional fee.

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assistance counselor. Our financial assistance application process is simple with our free Family Financial Profile, ffp.wustl.edu. Financial assistance information for international students can be found on the International First-Year Student Financial Aid page of admissions.wustl.edu. Merit-based and need-based scholarships are also available, but may require separate applications. Academic scholarships offered by the University, regardless of financial circumstances, include:

Conway and Proetz Scholarships Each year, up to one full-tuition scholarship and five partial scholarships are awarded to first-year students in the Your application must be accompanied National Portfolio Day College of Art whose artistic and acaby a $75 nonrefundable application At National Portfolio Days, held in demic potential is judged outstanding fee. You must also submit your major cities throughout the country, by a faculty selection committee. The official second­ary school transcript, you will have the opportunity to scholarships are renewable for four a teacher recommendation, SAT or receive a personal portfolio review years of undergraduate study, assuming ACT scores, and essay. by one of our representatives and the student maintains a satisfactory ask questions about the School. academic record. Art applicants who To Apply for Transfer Admission For more information about the wish to be considered for the Fred Transfer admission to Washington Conway Scholarship and Arthur and events we will be attending, visit University is selective and competitive. Esther Proetz Scholarship are required samfoxschool.wustl.edu/npd. In any given year any academic to submit portfolios by 5:00 p.m. division may have from zero to a Visit Campus Central Time on January 15. No special small handful of slots available. We Schedule a visit to Washington application form is needed.You must recommend the strongest candidates University and have your work reviewed select Art as your division on the for admission present proof of a on campus. A visit to campus or to Common Application. high school diploma or equivalent a National Portfolio Day can count and proof of a high level of academic as your portfolio submission, or you Other Academic Scholarships success at their current institution. may use this feedback to improve In addition, students may apply for Transfer applicants are required your work before submission. the following opportunities: to submit a portfolio, along with – Enterprise Holdings Scholars transcripts reflecting all collegiate Program work undertaken. Submit the Common Scholarships & – Entrepreneurial Scholars Application at commonapp.org Financial Assistance Program or the Coalition Application at We meet 100 percent of need for all – John B. Ervin Scholars Program coalitionforcollegeaccess.org. Your admitted students. Awards range – Annika Rodriguez Scholars application must be accompanied by up to the full cost of attendance, Program a $75 nonrefundable application fee. including no-loan packages for High school seniors on our families who need them. Students mail­ing list receive our scholarships Portfolio apply for financial aid year by year, brochure; applications and Required for admission to the College and we are committed to helping you instructions can be found at of Art, a portfolio can include anythroughout your undergraduate years. admissions.wustl.edu. thing from drawings and paintings, Each family is assigned a dedicated to photographs, illustrations, videos, Washington University financial


Visit us! It’s the best way to learn about Washington University. Meet current Washington University students and faculty. See the campus. Go to visit.wustl.edu, e-mail visit@wustl.edu, or call 800.638.0700 or 314.935.6000. Our visit coordinators will take care of everything, so that you can see and experience what is most relevant to your interests. Get answers to specific questions regarding admissions, financial assistance and scholarships, or transfer admission by contacting the Office of Undergraduate Admissions: phone

800.638.0700 or 314.935.6000

e-mail

admissions@wustl.edu

online

admissions.wustl.edu

Washington University encourages and gives full consideration to all applicants for admission, financial aid, and employment. The University does not discriminate in access to, or treatment or employment in, its programs and activities on the basis of race, color, age, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, national origin, veteran status, disability, or genetic information. Applicants with a prior criminal history will not be automatically disqualified from consideration for admission. Inquiries about compliance should be addressed to the University’s Vice Chancellor for Human Resources, Washington University, Campus Box 1184, One Brookings Drive, St. Louis, MO 63130.


NONPROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

p ai d

ST. LOUIS, MO PERMIT NO. 1256

Office of Undergraduate Admissions Campus Box 1089 One Brookings Drive St. Louis, Missouri 63130-4899 800.638.0700 / 314.935.6000 http://admissions.wustl.edu

Art+Design 16 17 SAM FOX SCHOOL OF DESIGN & VISUAL ARTS COLLEGE OF ARCHITECTURE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE & URBAN DESIGN COLLEGE OF ART GRADUATE SCHOOL OF ART MILDRED LANE KEMPER ART MUSEUM

Printed on 100% If you receive more than one of this mailing or prefer post-consumer not to receive paper mail, recycled paper please contact the Office of Undergraduate Admissions at admissions@wustl.edu.

Installation view, From Picasso to Fontana—Collecting Modern and Postwar Art in the Eisendrath Years, 1960–1968, Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in St. Louis,  spring 2015. All works are in the collection of the Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum, Washington University in St. Louis. Clockwise from left: Antonio Saura, Gina, 1958–59. Oil on canvas, 64 1/16 x 54 3/8". Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Weil,

1963; Antonio Saura, Crucifixion, 1961. Collaged paper, tempera, and ink on canvas, 27 11/16 x 40 3/16". Gift of Phoebe and Mark Weil, 2005; Antoni Tàpies, Blanco y Grafismos (White with Graphism), 1957. Mixed media on canvas, 79 x 69". Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Weil, 1963; and Eduardo Chillida, Rumor de limites #4 (Rumor of Limits #4), 1960. Forged iron, 38 1/8 x 38 1/8 x 26 1/4". Gift of Mr. and Mrs. Richard K. Weil, 1962.

2016-2017 College of Art Viewbook  

Washington University College of Art Viewbook, 2016-2017

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