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Editorial

Magazine Layout: MoniKe Editors: WilliamK and MoniKe

Letter from the Editor

Articles and Sounds by: WilliamK www.william-k.com Zachariah Weckter www.strict-9.net

Articles by: Adrian Earnshaw - aka Biodiode www.biodiode.co.nr Blake Attebury DamBros Especial thanks to Claudia Picchi Daniel Kemp David Keenum Jon Schorah - NuGen Audio www.nugenaudio.com info@nugenaudio.com Wouter Dullaert - aka Kyran www.kyran.wayouthere.co.uk

Sounds by: Kevin Breidenbach - aka synthgeek www.skincontact.com/synthgeek Les Productions Zvon www.lesproductionszvon.com Laika Audio Productions Reason Lahalla TeamDNR Music Management - FatKidz Sound www.rlahalla.net

12 months, 365 days, 8760 hours. You can measure in any way you want, all I have to say is: it was a long ride. Wusik Sound Magazine (WSM) is now one year old, and we are very proud. We now present you with our special anniversary edition. Some may say 13 is an unlucky number, but not for us. Issue #013 is here, and with it, several new additions. New contributors, new articles, new sounds and even new effects. We really hope that you enjoy this issue. Armed with some of the best talent from the Wusik community, we plan to offer even more sounds, in-depth reviews, tutorials, insights, and tools in WSM over the coming year. We always welcome new contributors, and value all feedback. In fact, your comments directly influence the direction we take with the magazine – your magazine. Don't forget to drop us a line in our forum or Email us directly. Once again, we would like to give thanks and recognize all of the contributors who helped us from the start, and the new ones who joined the WSM fold more recently. The magazine will continue to grow thanks to your efforts.

Proof-Reading by: Kevin Burke www.kevinburke.ca

Cover and Back Cover by:

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Alan - aka Maniacal

Pictures: www.dreamstime.com

WilliamK and MoniKe


Getting Heard: Cutting Through The Clutter by Zachariah Weckter Creating Sounds: Modularity - Part 1 by WilliamK

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X Effects: Glitchy FX by WilliamK

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Quantizer FX by WilliamK

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Loop Recorder FX by WilliamK

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Bad Organ by WilliamK

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Modularity - Part 1 by WilliamK

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Mastering Tips: Tips For Better Bass by Jon Schorah - NuGen Audio

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Diversions: My Way or No Way by WilliamK

20 Inspiration: Knocking the Block Off by Adrian Earnshaw

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What's On Your Amp by Zachariah Weckter

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Making Of: Anomaly by Daniel Kemp

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Sound Review: ArtVera New Age Collection by David Keenum

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Manytone Boris Sitar by David Keenum

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Manytone ManyOne by Wouter Dullaert

In My Own Words: Enjoying the Simplicity. Understanding the Complexity. by Blake Attebury

56 The Synth Romance: My First MAC by WilliamK List of Sounds

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Table Contents

Improvised Instruments by DamBros


Improvised Instruments by DamBros

When I was small I loved to experiment with the inventions of others and also to invent new musical instruments or simply interesting sounds (well, at least they were interesting to me). I remember the sound that could be produced through the vibration of the mouth when in contact with a comb covered by cellophane paper.

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Many times my friends and I played, performing well known songs of the day, to school friends during lunch time or to the kids in neighborhood.

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At home, our parents and siblings “loved� our performances to the extent that they hid all the combs and cellophane paper that could be at our reach.

After that came the pumpkin stems. We would spend hours choosing the best stems and cut them right at the soil level, on one end, and on the other just under the leaf so as not to be open on both ends. Finally we would make a precise vertical cut on one end and cut four or five tiny holes along the stem. The instrument was then ready to be played. This was another great sound to be heard, but, preferably, with the hands covering the ears! But we loved it and spent days blowing into them and were always inventing new and horrible melodies. We would go on cutting more and more stems until our parents found out and figured the fruits wouldn’t grow if we kept that up. We were apprehended and punished. The orchestra suddenly stopped and the obsession ceased. The following year a younger brother who had not participated in the fun would start the whole process again.

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Improvised Instruments

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Ficus leaves ranked first place in the hit parade for a good while. It all started when someone performed several songs on a radio program using those leaves. My friends and I found the tree, pulled out several leaves and spent endless days putting leaves into our mouths trying to extract any similar sounds to the ones we heard. After exhausting trials we learned a bit about that art, but just a little, something like the first violin class where the student could only “scratch” the strings and produce whinny high-frequency sounds that would scare cats and dogs. Our parents and relatives almost cried; I even think they became physically ill with an upset stomach and terrible abdominal pains. They asked us where the tree was because they wanted to cut it down, chop it up, and burn it so as to not let one single seed remain. After that came the empty (actual tin) cans of olive oil that played host to a variety of small objects: pebbles, marbles, coins, fine and coarse sand, seeds of various fruits and etc. Each “filling” was immediately taken to spectators that heard it with the enthusiasm and fascination of sophisticated audiences. All was well until someone thought it would be more interesting that besides using the cans we could use other metal containers: basins, buckets, tin cups, and pans. What? Pans? Yes, pans. That’s when we got into trouble. Our mothers started to notice some kitchen utensils were missing and a new battle began. It only came to an end when the last pan and last tin cup was returned. What a shame! Now things were becoming interesting. We then tried boxes of matches and spoons, but soon after this caused us the same kind of problems.

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Improvised Instruments

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The beating or the simple shaking of the match boxes gave the final touch to our “orchestra” as much as the two spoons “clapping” one against the other while held between our fingers. The objects disappearances were quickly noticed by our moms and were eventually confiscated. Consequently, our orchestra was again deactivated due to a lack of instruments. It’s amazing, though, how certain noises caught our attention. The problem was that when the origin of each of them was detected we would reproduce them over and over till exhaustion, and we thought it was strange that the older people didn’t enjoy the “beautiful and divine music” that these exercises produced. It was during one of these experiments that I lost my treasured red metal lunchbox (today they are all made of plastic) which had a lid with golden hinges. When letting the lid fall down to close it, it made a sound very similar to the sound made by the clutch pedal of manual transmission vehicles of the day. Excited about that, I soon built a beautiful car made of chairs - right in the middle of the living room. I tied my mother’s apron to the latch of the lunchbox and extended it until it was really close to my car seat (my pillow). Imagine the wild trips that I imagined, the swerves and difficult routes I drove through, and the long journeys I made with my beautiful car. Evidently, through sheer ignorance as to its intended use, I was abusing the clutch. One day, after playing with the neighbors kids, I went back home to find the chairs back to their places and the lunchbox was never to be seen again. No one could tell me where it had gone. Now I realize that we were probably the pioneers of this electronic music that so many people love.

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Dark Ages - The Album by WilliamK What people said about it: “Melodic, rhythmic and cinematic with world music and electronica influences.“ “Dark, Retro, Filtered, Deep, Epic, Transcendental, Emotive, Happy, Bento, YAY!!!” “I just need one word: Excelent!” “Its a new style: New Age Beat Fusion.”

Visit the New Site: www.william-k.com


Getting Heard Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

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Cutting Through The Clutter by Zachariah Weckter


Cutting Through The Clutter

With so much media available from every direction, sometimes it can be a chore to filter through the advertisements and channels of mainstream mediocrity and tune into what the taste buds in our ears prefer. Fortunately, there are avenues to audio salvation just under our fingertips. If you are anything like me and desire to hear more than what everyone else is buying or selling, there is a world of inspirational and enlightening music at your disposal that can be streamed directly to your consciousness. Here we will review two of the most beneficial sites that are dedicated to bringing new music to your ear drums, and who knows, maybe you can share some of your own ideas and songs to gain valuable feedback and enhance your own musical capacities.

www.myspace.com

www.bandspace.com This site is a bit different than the aforementioned site. You can ditch the friend requests and ad bombing associated with MySpace for a more vague approach. This site enables you to browse thousands of artists directly or actually review different artists in the most uncorrupted manner I have seen. The way it works is you choose a specific genre of music and review two songs one after another. After listening to the tracks there is a brief questionnaire about the track you just listened to. Once you have completed multiple pairs of reviews you are allowed to upload one of your own tracks to have judged in the same manner, and you are entered into the charts to win a grand prize. If this method seems tedious to you, you can also pay to upload your own tracks for the reviewing system. It’s not as easy as the simplicity of browsing through your band favorites, but you will encounter some tunes you may not have found otherwise. There are several sites online that emulate both of the web based communities mentioned here. I personally have tried a handful and found these two to be the most favorable. However, the name of the game is exploration. I urge you to seek out new music and to share your music with the world, because to me music is more than just a hobby, it’s a collective way of life.

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Whether you love or you hate it, there is no denying that MySpace has a collective of billions of bands and fans of music. Almost anything from 50 Cent to Ozric Tentacles can be found looming in the barrage of advertisements and friend requests from scantily clad young women. But there is a definitive reason you should give it a shot. Simply put that reason is ‘word of mouth’. If you search for a band that you really love, the odds are quite decent that

if you scroll down their page to their “top friends” listing you will find alternate bands either closely related or even side projects from the bands actual members. I have found a lot of new music I didn’t even know existed this way. Alternatively, the fans usually have extensive lists of all of their favorite bands listed on their own pages to which you can hyperlink at the click of a mouse.

Getting Heard

In a world where music seamlessly streams from satellites, public frequencies, and land lines, it is easier for us to connect almost instantaneously to any type of music we would like to hear. It is a painless effort to switch on a satellite receiver and stream virtually any style of music we would prefer, and with the advent of home recording new music is sprouting up in every corner of the internet, providing literally years of music for a pair of ears to listen to in any given month.

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Advanced Level

Creating Sounds

Modularity

Part 1

Using the modular-matrix to get complex sounds.

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by WilliamK

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Modularity

Creating Sounds

Wusikstation has a very complex modular-matrix component where you can route sounds and events from one location to another with only a few clicks of the mouse.

Let's start with a very simple self-modulation, using the preset: Lead Mod 1 Note for all examples: on the Config page, set MOD MATRIX FAST to YES. (the included presets were already saved with this option)

Here we loaded a SAW waveform and set voices to 1 on both layers O1 and O2. On the Mod-Matrix, we added the entree: O1 Out - O1 Pitch. That means that the layer O1 output will modulate its own pitch. This will force the same to be off-tune so you need to adjust pitch and tune accordingly.

On Layer O2 we loaded the saw waveform like we did on layer O1, but without the pitch+fine changes.

If you raise the Mod-Matrix entree amount too much, the sound will be totally unusable.

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Now, play some keys and notice how the sound deviates on each key, especially on the high-end of the keyboard - becoming very off-pitch.

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Creating Sounds

Modularity Moving to a more complex preset, load up: Lead Mod 3 Instead of Pitch-Modulation, we will now try a Filter-Modulation which can produce some pretty interesting sounds.

In this case, we are using the Layer O2 output to modulate the Layer O1 Filter-Frequency. Notice how grainy the sound gets when you modulate the Filter-Frequency. Higher amounts will get you a better sound. You can also try messing up with Layer O2 Pitch. This results in pretty strange sounds.

You can also try the following: instead of Layer O2 to O1 Filter-Frequency, use O2 x Env. And change the Layer O2 envelope Sustain to Zero and Decay to Middle.

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Preset "Load Mod 9" shows you the result of this.

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Regardless of which music production suite you use, we've got the killer new sounds you need! Our samples will inject new life into your music. Our newest releases are all downloadable, so you can feed your sampler today!

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Julie Hamelin Julie Vocal FX vol.1, a collection of one-shot female vocal FX and scats. Julie Scats Collection, female jazz scat singing one-shot samples.

Visit our Products Page for details, dowloadable demo soundsets and MP3s. http://www.lesproductionszvon.com

Give your music the edge it deserves! Check out our free demos now! www.Electronisounds.com


Basic Level

Creating Sounds

Bad Organ

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Getting that old retro transistor organ sound

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by WilliamK


Bad Organ Most organs will have from 6 to 8 stops, also known as draw-bars. Since Wusikstation only has 6 layers, we will emulate a retro 6 stop transistor organ.

The whole thing is actually very simple. To start, check out the first included preset: "Bad Transistor Organ 1"

We just loaded a SAW waveform on the first layer O1, and used C and P to copy and paste this to all layers: O2, O3, O4, W1 and W2.

Creating Sounds

In this tutorial, we will show you how to get a very Lo-fi transistor organ sound by using all 6 Wusikstation OSC layers.

On the Master section, you will adjust the pitch of each stop/bar.

Set it like this: O1 - Pitch 0 O2 - Pitch 19 O3 - Pitch 12 O4 - Pitch 24 W1 - Pitch 31 W2 - Pitch 36

At the same location, you can use the mixerlevels as the draw-bars to adjust the volume of each stop/bar. To get a "chorus" effect, adjust the fine-tuning of each layer so they deviate from each other a bit.

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This will get a pretty basic raw sound. You will need to filter it a bit by using a 2 Pole Low Pass Master filter. This will make the sound less aggressive.

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Creating Sounds

Bad Organ Almost done, now you need to adjust the effects 1 send of all layers to MAX, and insert the Dynamics FX. This will normalize the sound volume, just like a transistor organ would.

To get a percussive sound, you can adjust layer W1 or W2 envelopes. Set Sustain to Zero and Decay to lower-middle to make the sound fade out very fast. Now adjust all other layers volume a bit lower, so the percussion sound is louder.

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You can also try other waveforms, like Pulse and Sine, to get other types of organ sounds. You can even mix Saw, Pulse and Sine waveforms together.

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Artvera presents her first commercial sound project for Wusikstation - MISTRAL. This sound library offers Wusikstation users the chance to own a collection of ethnic sounds - string instruments, drums/percussion, woodwinds, vocals and more. With more than 300 presets and 300 megabytes of sample data it's a great inspiration for musicians in any kind of music, especially composers of Film, Ethnic, NewAge or Ambient music. The presets contain not only individual instruments but also longer melodic sequences. Many presets take advantage of all the new features of Wusikstation version 3. In addition, there are very interesting pads with extra sounds which can be used in different music styles. These pads have been created by combining multiple ethnic instruments. The package also contains percussive/drum sequences and even some nature sounds, which have been used to create some special sound effects.

MISTRAL contains also a free bonus - two variants of a new skin for Wusikstation, in both normal and large sequencer formats (see the preview of main page below). The MISTRAL presets have been created by Vera Kinter (Artvera), Daniel Kemp (dnekm) and Stephan M端sch (rsmus7). The price is very friendly - only $30. Release is scheduled for March 2007. www.artvera-music.com/ Wusik Sound Magazine April 2007 #012

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Advanced Level

Creating Sounds

Modularity Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Part 2

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Getting random modular-styled sounds.

by WilliamK


Modularity Continuing from Part 1, here we introduce an even more complex usage for the Mod-Matrix: random sounds.

Here we used only one layer with a Sine waveform. Mod Env 1 is set to a very quick decay, the lowest values possible. And on the ModMatrix, we set Env 1 to O1 Amplitude (volume). This makes the sound "blip" once and stop. But by using a LFO to Env 1 Gate, you get to repeat the envelope, making the sound output again. By using a Random LFO, you get a very interesting sound.

Fig.1

Creating Sounds

Start-up by loading the following preset: Modular FX 5.

Now modulate this with 2 other LFOs, one for the Pitch, and one for the Filter. There you go, a very complex random sound, just like those old Modular systems. On the preset "Modular FX 4", we used 3 Layers and several Mod-Matrix entrees. This results in a very complex sound. [Fig.1]

Again, Env 1 is set to Layer O1 Amplitude (volume) and Env 2 to Layer O2 (Amplitude). Layer O3 volume is set to Zero. We only use this as a modular source for the other Mod-Matrix entrees. The sound gets quantized by a Master Filter, modulated by Layer O3. [Fig.2] Fig.2

This results in a very complex sound that changes on every key.

Don't forget to check the other sounds, including the Bass sets.

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We also used Layers O1 and O2 mixed together, to cross-self-modulate Layer O2 Pitch.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Diversions

Diversions is a light-hearted monthly column designed to provoke thought and trigger your funny bone. It is about the nature of those that give the world the gift of song.

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My Way or No Way by WilliamK


My Way or No Way

You may wonder, so what in the world did we do? Simple - we no longer eat and drink what we used to, but I said that already, didn't I? "Would you elaborate" you say? Yes, I could, but I will leave you to find your own solution, you won't like mine. We had to eliminate all the things people call "goodies". You wouldn’t like it, so forget about it.

Persistent are you? Ok, think about this a bit: no more sugar and sweets; at least not the amount you were used to anyway. No more alcohol. Yes, I said it. But I never drank very much anyway. Forget about red meat, it’s very bad for you. Did you know that it takes over a month to digest it? What do we eat now? Well, food, just not the stuff we were used to eating all our lives. Fast-food is really out of the question. Like us, try eating more vegetables, but only organic stuff. "Yuk" you say? I know, but you will get used to it. Try watching the famous UK program "You Are What You Eat”, which will get you started. Wait until you see how much fat, lard, sugar and unhealthy foods and ingredients that you eat on a daily basis and don't even notice.

Diversions

I guess time does change people. Today I no longer eat and drink what I used to. I’ve lost over 30 pounds so far. No, I didn't take any pills for that. All I did was to change the way I live my life. For my wife it was even more impressive, over 60 pounds. We had to change our entire wardrobe.

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Diversions

My Way or No Way

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Dr. Gillian McKeith really changed my life. After seeing her show a few times, I couldn't believe how I had been living my life. Most of my health problems were all related to what I was eating. Now they are mostly gone, thanks to the new way I see food. Of course, this wouldn't have happened if I didn't put my foot down, and I don't mean in the house. My wife was with me all the time; she wanted to change more than me, actually. But we had to be very clear with friends and relatives that we could no longer eat "regular" food at their houses. It may sound harsh, but it wouldn't work if things didn't go our way.

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The worse part of all was that now we can't just go to any restaurant, it has to be a place that cares about those things, as much as we do. Did you know that Sushi is the healthier food? Yes, it's true. But before you say "yuk" again, let me say what goes into it: Rice, a bit of sugar, vinegar, and a special type of seaweed. See, it’s not so bad; it even has sugar - your favorite thing. "But how about the raw fish?" you say. Yes, some, but not all,

Sushi comes with raw fish. But after you try one, you will see that it’s no big deal. It’s very tasty. And it’s not dangerous to eat, as some may think. Sadly, most people see Japanese food as a status thing. They don't look at it from the health perspective. Anyway, if you hate raw fish, you can always cook your own. Just don't overcook it - that's also not good. It’s not bad, mind you, but you are wasting the nutrients. There are other problems along the road. Somehow people tend to think we are the outsiders, the strangers, crazy people, and all sort of things. You may think the same right now; it’s easy to judge others. But think again, is McDonalds really good for you? "Damn those scientists, they know nothing!" you shout. Yes, we should be careful with what people say, we shouldn't believe everything we read. But how can we know the real truth about things? When a group of scientists say

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My Way or No Way

The main thing that people take into consideration when it comes to food and other things is this: "I'm feeling good with all those things, why should I bother?" Really? Are you sure about that? Don't you have asthma? Problems breathing? Plumbing problems? Skin problems? Perhaps other problems? You won't live longer but you will live better if you commit to the changes you know you need.

Diversions

that something is good for you, check the number of participants in the study group. If they tested 100 people with some sort of product, and revealed that only 1% had problems, it means that from every 100 people, 1 had at least one problem with the product. That's not very good. I’m sure you would prefer to read that of 100,000 people only 10 had any problems. That would be much better. It’s simple like that. Not to mention articles paid by competing companies. For example, do you remember when the Tobacco group said that cigars and cigarettes weren't addictive? They even proved that with some scientific tests? As you know, all of that was proven wrong. Cigars and cigarettes are bad for you, may not kill you in 10 years, but may shorten your life span.

We are not talking about longevity; we are talking about quality of life. That should be what most people want. At least, that's what I want. I couldn't care less about other people. But still, I have the right to talk about this, to show my way of life, and to hope I can help influence someone else toward a better, healthier lifestyle. I guess I do care after all.

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Knocking the Block Off

Knocking the Block Off

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Inspiration

by Adrian Earnshaw

Okay - hands up if you’ve ever sat at the keyboard staring at the computer monitor and no matter how hard you try you cannot seem to get your next great opus started. When I suggested this article to William, I was at this very stage; I could not get any ideas going and composers block had set in. It's always the worst feeling because you think all your ideas have dried up for good. So, in writing this article, I took the approach of someone in this predicament and will share some methods I have tried which helped me to break through the block.

My first suggestion would be to take a break from it all. Go for a walk or visit some friends and switch off that musical brain. On your return to your studio, you may find the break had loosened the block enough for you to get started. When you go for your walk, listen to the sounds you come across and pay attention to the sites that you see. Luckily I live near the seaside and so every time I go for a walk the landscape is never the same; the sea can be calm one day and stormy the next. One exercise would be to use these changes and try to come up with a sympathetic tune which may fit what you see. In these times it may be helpful to take a small recording device with you so you could sing/hum any ideas you may have into the mic so that they are not forgotten. There is nothing worse than having the idea in your head and forgetting it before having the opportunity to get home to put hands to keyboard.

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Knocking the Block Off

Inspiration

You may also want to take the opportunity a break would afford to analyze your studio setup. Is the room too warm or to cold? Basically, try and make your composing area as comfortable as possible without ruining the acoustics of your room. There is no benefit in having your studio in a room that you do not feel comfortable in. I, myself, have moved my music studio into a different room in the house as I was not comfortable in the existing room; the window looked out to a rather lifeless scene of house rooftops. I now look out towards the sea with a nice view of ships sailing past and hills rolling off into the distance.

This nicely leads us to one of the most fundamental parts of a tune - the actual sounds used. It is true you may find some sounds more inspirational than others. I always use a piano sound with the slight sound of strings in the background. Most of my own tunes have started life in this way and only after I am happy with the basics of the tune do I move on to choosing a more appropriate sound. Load your favourite sequencer and drop Wusikstation (or your synth of choice) into the rack and find a sound that inspires you. Note it as a favourite for future use. Always have some stock sounds that are sure to get the juices going.

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If you are adept in music theory, you may want to take a more analytical approach to your composition. Hunt through your CD (or MP3) collection and listen to your favourite tune. Play it through a few times and casually listen to it - then stop the recording and think about things which make this particular tune do it for you. Is it the intro build-up or is it the catchy chorus? Then play the tune again and take a deeper listen. How long does the intro build-up take? How many repeats

of phrases do they use? Basically, you are trying to listen to see if you can catch precisely what makes the tune tick. Once you have done this try to recreate something similar, but not a direct copy – but something that may hint of a slight influence. You never know where this may take you.

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Inspiration

Knocking the Block Off

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On the subject of sound, if you always struggle in programming drums there is nothing wrong in using samples to help get a tune going. Try experimenting by putting the drum beats through a filter like CamelSpace or a freeware filter like filterbank (which can be downloaded at www.service-1.de/music/). All they ask is for you to send a postcard from your home town! These can change the shape and sound dramatically and inspire you to move on to constructing a tune around them. You may also consider reversing your drum loops but this is something that may be discussed in a future article. When starting a tune, if you usually start by laying down the drums - don't. Why not start with the actual tune first and fitting the drums round the tune later? Or, start with a funky bass line and compose the tune first while adding the drums last. Try adding effects as you go along instead of waiting to the end of the tune. Basically, try working out of step with your usual norm as breaking this mould could be all you need to get that creative flow back again.

Even taking a break from actually composing and having a go at sound design can lead to some interesting results and in the process may give you a new sound to your music. It doesn't matter if you have never tried programming your own synth patches before as this allows approaching your synth of choice with an open mind. This may lead to more interesting results than would planning on trying to design a specific sound. Pictures and poems or verses can also offer some inspiration; place favourite pictures and verses into a book. Then, for times when the weather is just not nice enough to go for a walk, you can refer to the book and garner some inspiration from this alternative source. I have made what I term ‘my book of inspiration’, and have placed pictures of landscapes, outer space scenes, and poems that conjure images and sounds in my minds ear. Sometimes I would be lost without this as I have found that it kick-starts my creative juices.

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Knocking the Block Off

Inspiration

Happy composing.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Another way to try and get something going is to envelop your work with strict guidelines and realistic targets. Aim to try and compose a tune within one week, no matter how bad it may sound to you. Remember, we musicians are always our own worst critics. Always aim to finish what you start otherwise you may end up, like many musicians, with lots of beginnings to tunes but no ends and vice versa. If you need an incentive then set a reward for yourself. For example, if I finish this tune in a week I will buy Artvera's Ethnic soundset for Wusik. Now there's a thought!

As you can see from some of the above suggestions, all is not lost when that muse decides to pack its bags and go for a vacation without any prior notice. There is one final and rather strange item I came across some time ago in a magazine which may help someone; most of you may have heard of a composer called Brian Eno who does a lot of New Age stuff and messes around with random music generating software. He has devised a system of cards (along with the painter Peter Schmidt) called Oblique Strategies. Each have a word or phrase on that may help you move on from moments when things just don't seem to be happening, or when you are up against a deadline. There is an online version of that may help and it can be found at www.rtqe.net/ObliqueStrategies/. I personally have never found them useful but you never know - it may work for you and is certainly worth a try.

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What's on

your Amp Zachariah Weckter

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

A majority of what I’ve been listening to this month came from my favorite local record store. I am an avid collector of actual records and have a pretty varied collection of vinyl LPs and 7 inch records. So when I’m home the music’s mostly straight from my turntable, but more and more anything new is becoming increasingly difficult to find in this format. My CD collection, therefore, got a little larger this month.

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Some would say I have an eclectic taste in music, others could say it’s schizophrenic. I actually prefer the latter. A schizophrenic taste in music implies that you could listen to, say Tori Amos, for example, and then slam into Cannibal Corpse, and then wash it all down with Air Supply. I guess I pretty much fit the bill then. However, since this is not the focal point of this column, let’s skip the introductions and get straight to the point.

One album I bought and which I’ve thoroughly been enjoying is Alkaline Trios “Remains” compilation. Granted, it is in essence a “best of” collection of tracks from their previous CDs but if you don’t have all of their albums this is a pretty good collection. The Trio has a tendency to be pretty morbid, but this collection tends to steer away from that, bringing the focus to some of their ingenious wordplay and aggressive melodies. All in all I find myself listening to it too much. Highlights include Track 3 titled “Dead End Road” which, essentially, is a very sad song but you won’t feel particularly sad listening to it. Track 10 is entitled “Warbrain” and has one of those riffs you just can’t get out of your head. Overall it’s a great album. If you’re into the more orthodox rock side of things then this works wonders.

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What's on

your Amp

Moving on to more relative matters, I picked up the new Skinny Puppy album last month labeled “Mythmaker”. If you have paid any attention to this band then you’ll know that limits are always pushed when a new album is released. I’m probably slightly biased when it comes to SP because they were the band that got me started with electronic music in the first place. “Mythmaker” is brilliantly put together and has very peaceful melodic portrayals of indifferences with respect to human relationships – portrayed to great effect in track 8, “Pasturn”, and in the angry antigovernment anthem “Politikil”, slotted as track 6. One of my favorite parts off this album is track 5, “Jaher”, which sounds to me like a beautiful love song written about death. Overall I was surprised at this album when taken as a whole. It brings old styles and unconventional sequencing skills to new light. Another band I’ve really been playing a lot this month is Interlace. I actually stumbled across this industrial band on MySpace and have been hooked ever since, but haven’t had the chance to pick up their album yet. If you have iTunes or a similar check out the dark edge, rhythmically driven track “Master” and the electro-ballad “Crystalline Hush” which I interpret as a song of backwards evolution. Yes, I do love the harder side of electronic music so this probably isn’t for everyone but very good if you like that side of the spectrum.

Lastly, Nine Inch Nails has released “Year Zero” this month. NIN albums tend to grow on me, but I can honestly say I like this album better than the previous effort, “With Teeth”, which really lacked bite, in my opinion. “Year Zero” is much more like “The Fragile” in that it has more innovation and flavor. The new album starts out somewhat mediocre but gradually fades back into the “Downward Spiral” style that made them so notable. Try track 9, “The Warning”. This track has a catchy detuned theme that is very interesting. The percussion is a bit different than their previous efforts and, I think, is a long while overdue. Track 13, labeled “The great Destroyer”, adds new style to anything previously used in NIN albums. This is an unexpected change, brilliantly reducing the track to sonic rubble. Last but not least, track 15, “In this Twilight”, and track 16, “ZeroSum”, portray how NIN has and will continue to evolve, rather than dissolve, in spite of my impressions of the last release.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

In My Own Words

Enjoying the Simplicity.

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Understanding the Complexity. by Blake Attebury

Ok, so here comes another "Nugget of wisdom" from yours truly. Although the content in this article has been covered 500 times at your favourite music message board, I thought I might share my perspective.


Enjoying the Simplicity. Understanding the Complexity.

hen I first started to get into pro

audio, ProTools was the must-have. Sony's Acid was redefining the term "Musician", and Propellerheads’ Reason was changing the face of the soft studio. This was an exciting time in music to say the least - one where technology was actually gelling or merging with music instead of fighting it. Sure there had been many successful computer applications before these, but none that provided the features and ease of use that these products seemed to offer. I remember wondering what the future of music technology would be like, and I have to say that it's not exactly what I had expected.

First, there were a lot of features and needs that were lacking in all of these products. Everyone wanted lower latency, more tracks, more instances, better midi support, better onboard effects, more 3rd party add-ons and accessories, etc. These were all well understood and much needed features. Since the implementation of these features, the wide acceptance of VST as a standard plug-in format, and the plethora of audio interfaces available, we are finally happy - right? (Musicians happy?! HA!)

I decided to record for the first time in a while after getting some new VST’s. Now, not only was I using updated software that I couldn't fully utilize, but I was using new instruments I didn't understand. I was fine with that because I knew I would catch on. It took me a while but I created something I was satisfied with, and went to lay down the guitars. Only one problem - I couldn’t play very well! I was shocked and amazed. I've been playing 13 years. It was my first instrument; what happened? I realized, of course, that I had been looking around and waiting for a plug-in or update to make me sound good. I forgot how to make myself sound good. I had forgotten the power of practice and the feeling of actually playing. I also realized that I depend on AMP simulators to the point that I don't actually own an amp! My acoustic guitars’

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Now we want easier midi editing, better snap functions, real-time time stretching, and of these are reasonable requests. With them, though, comes settings and features that would confuse even the most technologically savvy musician. Have you ever tried to set up and

I have been working on the tech side of audio for years now. Not only an audio tech enthusiast, a computing fanatic, and an overall geek, I feel I know just enough about the subject. I wake up, check all of my favourite music forums, check all the rumour sites, look at all the new release and update information I can and then make myself some breakfast. This is my dedication. I wake up like a kid on Christmas morning every day.

In My Own Words

W

configure ProTools 7.3! Yowza! I've got a message board, a manual, and a 3rd party book, and I still feel like I've been reading about it since my conception. No big deal though, because I am sure I will get it all figured out just in time for a new release that changes everything. Even my favourite apps, the ones I am most versed in and teach in my classroom, have evolved beyond my ability to keep up. Time for some damage control.

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In My Own Words

Enjoying the Simplicity. Understanding the Complexity.

neck is old and warped. My strings on my electric are old and rusty. I have forgotten why I even bother with this crazy thing called music which steals time from my family and costs me so much money. For the next 3 days I jammed. No computers, no plugs, no loops. I just rocked out. I’m still not very good, but it's coming back. This is the first time in a long time I have had to re-evaluate my position and approach to music. Why is it every time I want to write a song I open my favourite sequencer and click away? What happened to instruments; midi controllers even? I’ve decided I'm getting back to my roots.

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There are VST’s I own of which I had grown tired. I turned on the midi controller, auto midi-linked some knobs and sliders, and it sounded like a whole new instrument; same with some of the most basic effects (Rad free ones bundled with my software). I had forgotten how awesome these things can be if I just played with them a while.

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When Tracktion first came out, I laughed. How boring. I tried Tracktion 2. I actually had to use it because it's what some of my clients worked with natively, and I sold it at the music shop I worked at so I kind of had to know a bit about it. I was so bored and unimpressed. One screen. No tools - just shortcuts, left click, and right click. I used it reluctantly, but as soon as I

could I jumped back to my favourite DAW’s and their "pro" features. I was glad that I didn't have to use that thing! This revelation made me realize that all of the "pro" features that I had in the other applications were a bunch of really cool features for which I had absolutely no use. I mean, they're cool, but I never needed or used any of them. I've also noticed that in the world, America especially, we are under the illusion that the more features the better and the more expensive the better. For the first time ever I fully disagree with both of these statements. My favourite DAW’s run under $250.00. My favourite plugs all run the same or less. For the first time in a long

time I am finally able to be more concerned with making music than learning how to utilize application features I won't use. It feels awesome. I have rediscovered what I love, and that it is actually making music. I still have all of the applications and plug-ins and they will all have their time and place. However, when I open my semi-pro studio this winter, Tracktion will be my main tracking application, with FL Studio as my main sequencer. I will stand by and take the jabs and jeers and smack-talk from my associates and peers because at the end of the day my clients and their fan base will never know the difference. They're too busy rocking out to listen for crazy huge sample rates, and so am I.

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Visit www.viraloutbreak.net For tons of demo mp3s and to Purchase!

Viral Outbreak Volume One Is finally here for Wusikstation. Viral Outbreak Volume * Over 2gb (Wusik Format) Sick of searching for One is the first in a series of of multisamples comprised of sounds and plugins that sample libraries based on the 130+ soundsets. are supposed to sound sounds of the Virus TI * virtually all soundsets stereolike a Virus, but don't? hardware synthesizer. Using sampled for the greatest depth. Get the real thing - and the power of extensive 96khz * Sampled at 32-bit 96khz harnass its power in multisampling, manual looping quality! For resource efficiency, then Wusikstation! and professional preset design carefully downsampled to 24-bit Nucleus SoundLab brings the TI sound to your 48khz. sampler! * Nearly 750 Wusikstation v3 presets, many taking advantage of all the new v3 Viral Outbreak Volume One is available now features! (450 presets for Wusik v1) for Wusikstation v1/v2/v3, SFZ, and Kontakt 1/2. * The best preset designers out there: Viral Outbreak Volume One contains all ToTc, Teksonik, Tim Conrardy, Jeremy Janzen, manner of TI-based sounds. Classic wavetables, rsmus7 and more! raw saw and pulse waveforms (sampled at multiple * An amazing, TI-inspired, Wusikstation v1pulsewidths), unison dance leads, breathtaking v3 skin by Vera Kinter. pads and even punchy synth drumkits. Details:

Wusik Sound Magazine April 2007 #012

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Glitchy FX

by WilliamK

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X Effects


LoopGlitchy RecorderFX FX Starting with this issue, and whenever possible, we will present a new effect for Wusikstation. This month it’s a glitch effect called Glitchy. It’s a very simple and useful program which emulates buffer-overruns and glitch sounds.

All new effects released with our magazine will be added to a Wusikstation V4 Update in the future. So you can rest assured that no one will miss this effect if you use in your own presets.

X Effects

The effect consists of a variable buffer size which samples and repeats the sound, thus producing a glitch effect; hence the name.

The effect gets installed once you download and uncompress the Sounds files. It will be shown under Effects\Others\Glitchy.WusikEFX. We also added a few presets to show you how to use it. Those are also included with the Sounds archive, under Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Glitchy\

A bit more about the effect parameters: -

-

-

-

Double: If selected, the audio will be sampled and copied at the end of the buffer, and played once the buffer is at the final position. Inverse: Reverses/Inverts the buffer audio after sampling. StereoF: When selected, it will invert one channel but not the other.

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-

Size: This is the buffer Size that is used to sample and play back the incoming audio. Steps: How many times the buffer will sample and mix the previous sounds before outputting. The larger you set this parameter, the longer the sound will hold and glitch. Smooth: This applies a linear envelope to the output signal. The Envelope fades-in and out.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Quantizer FX

by WilliamK

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X Effects


Quantizer FX

What this does is basically change the sample rate of the input audio, but without consideration to aliasing artifacts. This results in a very strange but harmonic output. Also, by using the Silenced and Envelope options, you can get pretty much any type of effect. And finally, StereoDV (Stereo Deviation) can produce stereo results by adding more Quantization to the Right channel. We have included some simple but effective presets under \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Quantizer

- Quantize: Sets the quantization factor, from 1% to 99% of the original Sample Rate. - Silenced: When set to ON, instead of playing back the past quantization buffer, it will play silence. The result is a sort of high-pass filter effect.

X Effects

The 3rd new effect presented with this issue is a digital quantize effect. It will create a lot of aliasing, but it is totally intentional.

- Envelope: Adds a linear envelope to the quantization transition. - StereoDv: Deviates the Right-Channel quantization, resulting in a stereo effect.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

X Effects

Loop Recorder FX by WilliamK


Loop Recorder FX

X Effects

This is the second extra effect for this issue - a very simple Loop Recorder. This is mostly useful in live situations or to help spur musical ideas while using it real-time. You can use the Wusikstation FX VST as a Master-Insert on your host with this effect. We’ve included a few simple presets, but this is basically an "insert and use" effect. It can also act as a normal Echo or Reverse-Echo; check preset #3 for an example.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

- X/X - Loop Size: 1/4, 2/4, 3/4, 4/4, 8/4, 16/4, 32/4 or 64/4. - Play: When set to ON, the recorded loop will be played. You can leave this OFF and still record. You will only be able to hear the recording if Play is set to ON. - Record: When set to ON, any audio will be recorded as a loop. - Clear: Clears the loop. - ReStart: Starts from position zero of the buffer. This is not in sync; if you want it to be, use this option while playing the start of the next phrase. - Reverse: Reverses loop playback. - Fdbk: Feedback amount. When set to MAX, the loop will keep playing. Lower values will fade out the sound over time.

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Mastering Tips

by Jon Schorah - NuGen Audio

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

tips for

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Better Bass


tips for

Better Bass

Getting the bass sounding right can be one of the more challenging aspects of modern music production, especially for the project studio or enthusiast, where a lack of full range monitoring and full acoustic treatment can make the task of correctly identifying and solving problems all the more difficult. Even whit all the equipment to hand it is important to have an understanding of how bass works in a mix and how the ears and playback system respond. Armed with this information and taking a systematic approach, common pitfalls can be avoided and the route to better sond becomes a matter of habit tather than one of attempting to fix a confused mix. If you audio is not destined for a club sound system, begin rolling off the bass in the 35-40Hz range. Before you start: Before you begin your production it can be useful to think about your plans for the finished mix. Different system have different frequency ranges and it is entirely possible that you cold be focussing attention and building energy in the mix with frequencies that will not be heard by the eventual consumer. A laptop speaker, for instance may only have the capacity to produce frequencies down to

200Hz. The table below gives a rough guide. The bass inmany systems will start to roll off long before these minimum figures.

Speaker Laptop

Guide to minimum frequency 200Hz

Standard TV

90Hz

Average Hi-Fi

50Hz

Good Hi-Fi

35Hz

Club PA

20Hz

Mastering Tips

Armed with this, the route to a better sound becomes a matter of rather than one of attempting to fix a cofused mix.

Generally, if your audio is not destined for a club sound system, it is fairly safe to begin rolling off the bass in the 35-40 Hz range. This has several advantages. Sounds at these frequencies are difficult to hear and are not produced accurately (or at all) on most systems, but they take up headroom in your recording, leaving less room for the rest of the mix. In a worse case scenario, leaveng them in will do nothing other than make your mix sound quieter to the listener. These frequencies also make the speakers work very hard when they try to reproduce them, especially if there is not dedicated sub woofer, reducing efficiency and clarity of reproduction. If you are

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tips for

Mastering Tips

Better Bass

performer hitting the body of the instrument. Some careful eq can free up these frequancies for other sounds. Space. Mixing bass is about space. If you want to avoid a muddy sound, and produce a tight, punchy mix, each componente needs to have it's own space. The table below shows typical frequancy ranges for some commom instruments.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

recording for the club environment and wish to leave your mix 'full range', it would be a good idea to monitor the low frequencies using an audio analyser, as many studio monitors have a hard time accurately reproducing the very low frequencies. A/B tests with well-produced club tracks will also give you vital information about level control and frequency spread.

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Something else worth considering before you begin is where the meaningful frequencies are in the sounds you wish to record. If you are recording a choral arrangement, you can roll off the bass somewhere below 100Hz, as the human voice does not usually extend below this. Recordings can contain noises that are not part of the sound you wish to capture. Low-level rumble traffic noise in microphone recordings for instance. Double bass recordings can have veray loud, low thumps that come from the

As can be seen, synths, bass guitar and kick drums all have the potencial to occupy the same frequancies. This can lead to a cyclic volume war as you adjust each in turn so it can be heard more clearly. Further up the frequency range we can solve some of these issues by panning sounds into different part of the stereo spectrum. Unfortunately, this is not advisable when dealing with bass frequencies for several reasons. As mentioned abouve, bass frequencies are difficult, high- energy sounds for speakers to produce, this energy is best shared between the speakers. When mastering traks for vinyl, stereo sounds in the bass frequencies are best avoided, as this can couse severe problems for the cutting plant and may result in your master being rejected. Another problem is that low frequencies are perceived by the human ear as being omni-directional - we can't tell very well whith direction they are coming from. Panning bass sounds does not clear things up, it just adds to the confusion as the ear tries to work out what is going on. To deal with bass masking we need to utilise techniques.

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tips for

Better Bass

Choosing sounds that do not conflict in the first place is the most straightforward approach. Using a Spectrum Analyser you can look at the spectrum your sounds occupy and make sure that there are no unhelpful clashes between the kick drum and bass line for exemple. If you do have problems, deft use of eq and sound layering can help to reduce clashes. Listen carefully to the kick and work out where the main chararter of the sound is in the frequency spectrum. Other frequencies can be adjusted more brutally, whilst still retaining the original character of the sound. Bass synths often have multilayered sounds covering a very wide frequency range. Using the synths internal filters, this can often be tamed to reside within the space around the kick drum. Most sounds are not pure sine waves, they have a fundamental frequency (perceived as the pitch) and harmonics, which give the timbre to the note. There may well be other resonances and noises going on as well, adding up into a multi-layered frequency spread, covering far more than the fundamental note. Discovering where the most important harmonics are gives you more freedom to deal with the remaining frequencies firmly.

A second way to find space in the mix is to avoid triggering similar sounds at the same time. Trance music is a classic example - it is no accident that the bass line runs on the offbeat to the kick drum. This avoids masking and means that both sounds can be mixed at a higher level. You don't need to be as obvious with the rhythm as this 'taking turns' approach, often a few tweaks here and there can bring the clarity and opening up you need.

Mastering Tips

Discovering where the most important harmonics are gives you more freedom to deal with the remaining frequencies.

Finally, have a think about the key frequencies of other instruments in the recording. Is the overall sound benefiting from the low overtones of the rest of the drum kit for instance, or would they be better rolled off to give the kick and bass more room to breathe? Check other sounds with an audio analyser to make sure there are no unwanted artefacts in there that you don't really notice in the mix, but are taking up headroom and causing confusion in the bottom end. You may be surprised how much low shelf filtering you can do without changing the essential nature of a sound very much at all in the context of the track as a whole.

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tips for

Better Bass

Mastering Tips

A heavy sine wave sub-bass may sound huge in a club, but can all but disappear on a domestic hi-fi.

What if your bass need some life support?

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Character. Taming harmonically rich sounds in one method for getting instruments to sit together in the mix, but what if your bass seems lifeless and flat? Trimming out frequencies may make things worse. If you are dealing with a dull samples bass or an innocuous synth you need to a different approach. This is where effects come in. Adding or enlivening existing frequencies and looking at the dynamics of the sound are the keys to success.

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Firt we will look at effects. If your bass sounds flat, and doesn't cut through the mix, it could be because it has a limited harmonic content. The smoothness of the sound can give the ear little to latch onto. Adding low levels of distorcion or overdrive to your sound can begin to add some presence to the sound in the higher frequencies. Vintage valve simulators act in the similar, yet aften more subtle way. Distorcion can add 'bite' and 'crunch' to the sound, valve effects are more usually associated with 'warmth', 'depth' and 'richness'.

Sounds lacking in any higher frequency content however, will not benefit much form this technique, as there is little there to harmonically enrich. A heavy sine wave sub-bass may sound huge in a club, but can all but disappear on a domestic hi-fi. In this kind of situation, it is often worth layering another sound over the bass line, say an octave higher, running through a high pass filter to avoid adding to the low end. Careful balancing and eqing these sounds against the rest of the track can often make a composit track that sits well into the mix and still cuts through even when mixed at a lower level. Some harmonics enhancers and sub-harmonic generators can be used to create a similar effect, generating additional frequency content from the existing bass itself. It is worth taking cara to check what is happening here with an audio analyser, as can be difficult to hear what is being added in the lower frequency ranges. Some of these effects also realing the phase of certain frequencies - worth testing with a mono button to make sure it's not too extreme. Adding other types of effects to bass sounds is less routine. Chorus, reverb and even delay, whilst seeming to make things sound richer can also have the unwanted side effect of making them seem further away, somehow robbing the bass any impact. Stereo effects also tend to muddy up the stereo image, with all the resulting problems mentoined abouve. This can be avoided by either using nono effects (and loosing the sense of space in higher frequencies) or by using a plugin to reduce the width as you enter the lower frequencies. When engaging with any of these techniques it is important to keep an eye on the bigger picture, to make sure you are aware of any potential masking problems you may be encountering as you tweak your sound.

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tips for

Better Bass

There work on the rate of change in level rather than the level itself, and can be used where traditional compression might fail to respond in quieter sections or begin to interfere with desirable dynamic changes in the performance. LImiting is similar to compression, except that, as the name implies, it limits the overal level sharply, rather than gently squashing (compressing) it. Limiting is generally used in the mastering stages of production to increase the perceived level of the whole mix.

Mastering Tips

Dynamics. The dynamic envelope of a sound can greatly affect how 'loud' it appears to be. A sound with a shrp attack and rapid decay, much like a typical kick drum, will appear to be quieter than a sound that reaches the same level, but sustains for longer. With synths, adjusting the amplitude envelope of a sound can be a good way to start increasing the overall energy, without changing it's timbre. With samples sounds and drum tracks, this is not always possible - this is where dynamics processing comes in. Dynamis processing can be to alter the amplitude dynamic of pre-recorded material, reducing the dynamic range of a sound, and then boosting the volume by that reduction to give an overall increase in energy. The effect can be quite dramatic, and at the same time, if you wish, it can also be strangely subliminal, making things seem louder and more solid and yet otherwise unaffected. Of couse, heavy settings can dramatically change the nature of the sound, something that is often very desirable when you areattempting to rescue weak source material. Compression is routinely used with drum parts and bass lines to increase the impression of solidity and energy. Transient designers can also be used.

References: www.en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Speakers www.soundonsound.com/sos/jun01/articl es/dancemixing.asp

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Making Of

by Daniel Kemp

Anomaly began as an experiment. When I can, I like taking sounds and transforming them.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Not too long after I made a preset called ‘Ambient Percussion’ for SonicScapes, I got the idea to attempt to make real Ambient Percussion sounds - that is, to take drum/percussion sounds and turn them into atmospheres.

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John Gibson of Dangerous Bear Underground kindly gave me his permission to experiment with the sounds in his Dangerous Grooves Volume 1 for this purpose. Dangerous Grooves consists of drum performances by Johan Rucker.

I had originally named the project ‘Ambient Percussion’, changed it to ‘Percussive Atmospheres’, and finally settled on Anomaly. I chose the name based upon its definition: Anomaly: A deviation or departure from the normal or common order, form, or rule. One that is peculiar, irregular, abnormal, or difficult to classify. These sounds were difficult to classify. I also like doing things in my own weird way, so the name fits.


Anomaly

Then I loaded WAV files of various beats, one at a time, into my sequencer and started applying effects to them and recording the resulting output. I started with Ugo's Metallurgy. Liking the results, I branched out into utilizing Camel Audio's CamelSpace and Tone2's FilterBank. Then I started running the WAV files through a succession of the three effects, always recording the output. I took this output and looped certain sections of each file, then discarding the remainder. So I wound up with bits of beats - but warped, mangled and twisted. I also took those files and tried combining them in Wusikstation, Absynth and the STS-24. What I wound up with, in the end, were 54 WAV files which I then categorized according to their sound into 3 categories Organic, Metalistic and Mechanical. Organic was the category for weird, squelchy type sounds - like if a swamp monster were coming up behind you. Metalistic was for harsh, metal type sounds, and Mechanical represented hitting objects with other objects.

Now that I had a bunch of weird sounds, what to do with them? Enter the STS-24.

To get these sounds into the STS-24, I had to make them into soundfonts. I had bought ESC during the special promotion for Wusik customers, so turning the WAVs into individual SF2 files was no problem, but that left me with a whole bunch of individual SF2 files. After a little research online I found Sf2Patcher (www.synthfont.com) that could take individual SF2 files and let you assemble them into one large SF2 file. After various experiments in doing this - I had started by making a different SF2 for each category (Organic, Mechanical and Metalistic) - I wrote to Vera Kinter (who had made so many wonderful presets for the STS-24) about the secret of soundfonts in HG Fortunes synths. Through her help I was able to understand exactly how the STS-24 saved soundfont information in its FXB files. The SF2 file used in the first preset of the FXB bank file is used throughout the rest of the FXB bank file. So I had to combine all three of my SF2 files into one; back to Sf2Patcher‌ The result was one SF2 file with all 54 sounds and I could now save presets into one FXB file.

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The 54 WAV files were the ones that I kept. This project generated 100's of files that were discarded or combined with others to result in a manageable number of files.

This was perfect for what I wanted - taking somewhat (by now) percussive sounds and morphing them into each other. Remember, I was seeking, in the end, sounds that could be used in Wusikstation. What better food for the wavesequencer than sounds that were already morphing on their own accord.

Making Of

At first, I tried experimenting with these sounds in Wusikstation using the wavesequencer and got some interesting results - but not what I had in mind. I did save them, though, and some of them found their way into Anomaly.

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Making Of

Anomaly

I used the demo version of EnergyXT because it can save both FXP and FXB files. I started making presets in STS-24 to be sampled as sounds for use in Wusik. Preset making in the STS-24 went well. It took me a while, as I had never programmed for that synth before but enjoyed tremendously learning about it. After a while I had a decent amount of presets waiting to be sampled. So I took those recorded WAV files and started to make them ready for use in Wusikstation. All of the samples were converted to mono WAV files - with some slight compression added - and then the overall volume was adjusted. I started making loops using ESC, which took a long time. Then I had to convert the WAS files to WusikSND files. Initially I tried using the WAV to Wusik converter. Then I tried ManyTone's Mapper and now use that for making all WusikSND files. ManyTone's Mapper is great and eases mapping the sounds to the keyboard correctly. It is simple and elegant.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Then, I took the WusikSND files and made different presets in both the STS-24 and Wusikstation using the wavesequencer, and sampled some of those. This involved making a separate SF2 file of those WusikSND files. I again made the loops using ESC - and the WusikSND files using ManyTone Mapper.

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In the end, I wound up with 50 unique WusikSND files and so started making presets for these in WusikSation. While doing this, I asked Vera if she would be interested in making presets for this. She agreed to do so. I also met (through KVR Audio) both Jamie Skeen (Jamie worked on dBu's Padded Cell and Prepared Piano Fuel Cells) and Vespers75. Jamie contributed presets for the Wusik version and Vespers75 contributed presets for the Rapture and SampleTank2 versions. John Gibson did the conversion to SampleTank2 format and also contributed presets for the Wusik version. All other conversions (SF2, SFZ, WAV,) were done by myself using ESC. I also used Big Tick's vfsmaker to do the conversion to Rhino format. Anomaly has been released in versions for WusikStation, Rhino, SF2, Dimension Pro, Rapture, SampleTank2 and Absynth. This has been an incredible journey and I received help every step of the way. From beginning to end, this has taken over a year to complete. Thank you to: William, John, Johan, Vera, Jamie and Vespers. Anomaly audio demos: www.westgatenecromantic.net/Anomaly/

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Enigma Engine Mallory's Preset Generator for WusikEngine With this amazing utility program you can create thousands of semi-randomly generated presets for your WusikEngine SoundSets. Presets are based on 8 carefully designed algorithms, each targeting a particular type of sound.

Features include: • Presets can be created for WusikEngine V1 and V2/V3 according to preference. • Many parameters affecting the algorithms can be tweaked according to taste. • Presets can utilize sounds from multiple Sound Sets simultaneously. Supports many popular WusikEngine SoundSets, including: • Famous Keys Wusikstation)

(default

soundset

for

• Famous Keys Plus 1, 2 & 3 • Digi One • TSW, TSW Pro and Vox'd, by BITR • Manystation and Ultimate Bass Kit, by Manytone Music • SoundCell 1-3, Oberheim Resurrection and Viral Outbreak Vol 1 by Nucleus Soundlab

Only $19.99

• Ignition, Fuel and SonicScapes vol 1, by Danger ous Bear • Prepared Rhodes etc, by Zvon • Drone Structures

Now includes a utility that allows users to add support for any other SoundSets not yet directly supported internally (perhaps commercial sets converted from another format). Sound Designers can also use this to provide support for new SoundSets without requiring my input.

System Requirements: CPU: Pentium 4 or better O/S: Windows 98SE/ME/2000/XP RAM: At least 512MB HD: At least 100MB free space Microsoft's .NET framework V1.1 The Enigma Engine software is built upon Microsoft's .NET Framework v1.1 In order to run the Enigma Engine software, you must have the .NET Framework v1.1 installed on your system. V1.1 can happily co-exist alongside the later V2.0 of the framework but you do not need to download that. Also there is no need to uninstall V2.0

For more screenshots, a freely downloadable demo or to purchase the program, visit:

www.wusik.com/w/enigma.html


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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Sound Review

ArtVera New Age Collection by David Keenum


ArtVera New Age Collection Sound Review

Musical Genre definitions are sometimes confusing (“Is that Trance song glitch influenced or is it pure IDM?”). To me, New Age has to be one of the broadest and most fuzzy genre categories. Who would link Yanni, John Tesh, Vangelis and Tangerine Dream to the same type of music? You may even like all of them, but they are not the same.

The ArtVera (aka Vera Kinter - www.artvera-music.com ) New Age Collection consists of 310+ presets. It is a 320 MB download that costs $49.95 on the Wusik website. But all of the sounds are also included in Wusik Sound Magazine Volumes 4 – 8. Some of us who joined the last group buy received 3 of the 5 volumes, so maybe this review will help us take another look at the collection. It is worth the look.

The downloadable version of the collection is divided into 12 categories. I like this division because it highlights the strengths of the collection. If you received the collection through the magazine, your patches are organized differently, but you still have all of the patches.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Well, the ArtVera New Age Collection is a little like that. I have a hard time thinking of it as new age. Its sounds are not, for the most part, sweet, relaxing, and serene. Some of them are even somewhat aggressive. This is definitely not your typical ‘Kitaro’ New Age! Now don’t get me wrong - these are quality sounds. There are some (even many) smooth sounds, but the emphasis is on complex, evolving sounds that take up sonic space. In my opinion, this material leans more toward ambient than New Age. But I guess we’re back in the genre classification dilemma. I can see somebody like Amethystium using these sounds in a New Age context. So maybe there is a bias on my part.

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Sound Review

ArtVera New Age Collection

The first category is Atmosphere with 23 patches of ambient or space sounds. These, along with the FX category, would also work for suspense or mysterious sense in video or movie work. Since these were the first sounds I encountered, this is probably where I began to question the “New Age” title.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Next up is Bass with 4 OK patches and Choir with 8 non-natural but nice vocal patches. My favorite of these is CHOR-Wind Voice Solo. Next are the FX patches with 22 sounds that are similar in style to the Atmosphere category. FX-Lonely Wind was a standout sound for me.

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The Keys category consists of 20 patches that are more like what I would describe as New Age. There are no “natural” sounds – everything is processed, but you will find both melodic and rhythmic sounds here. The Orchestral sounds are generally processed sounds. The 7 patches do not contain any orchestral instruments, but ORCH-Fine Horn Orchester would make a nice Vangelis type horn - not a French horn exactly, but a nice mellow sound.

To me, the heart of this collection is in the Pad category. It contains 131 patches, and many of them have a lovely mysterious quality. These sounds, generally, are slowly evolving with elements coming in over time. Because many of the patches contain other intervals, mainly the 5th, you could label these sounds as “one finger” patches. This is not a problem to me, because you can always layer something else with it to customize your own sound. Here are my favorites: PAD-Avalon - A beautiful pad with shifting overtones. PAD-ChoirPad - To me it has a Vangelis quality. PAD-Christmas Landscape – This is another smooth evolving pad. PAD-Dreamily – A one note wonder! PAD-Helixr TC – Another ONW! PAD-Spec-Sea Oasis – This is my favorite of the "press a note and see what happens" type presets. It is also in Wusik Sound Magazine, volume 02.

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ArtVera New Age Collection Sound Review

The Pad category also contains patches by Tim Conrardy and Westgate's Daniel Kemp. They are all quality.

SEQ-Bellsomnia SEQ-BellsPad SEQ-Dragon SEQ-Fluting SEQ-Lunar Sequence SEQ-MeloDica SEQ-Percepta

When I saw the name New Age I had an idea of what I would see. When I examined the collection I knew this was something very different than I had expected. But, after I spent a number of hours working through all the patches, I have found a number of useful sounds for my music. And if you lean toward ambient, soundtrack, or even… yes, even new age music, this collection will have something to interest you.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Next is Percussion with 5 sequences/wave sequences and Split with 3 patches. The Split patches work well with a pad-like sound in the left hand and a mellow lead-type sound in the right. Next are the String category with 1 (!) patch that has a thick “string machine” quality to it, and the Synth category with 21 patches. My favorite here is SYNFlute and SYN-Lambent which does have more of a new age sound to it. The SynthVocal category has 5 Patches, and the Texture category 13 patches. The Texture sounds hearken back to the Atmosphere and FX categories.

The last category is WSequence, and it contains 88 patches, many of them useful and interesting for rhythmic texture. Here are my favorites:

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Sound Review

Manytone Boris Sitar by David Keenum

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

“I once had a girl, or should I say, she once had me….” I remember “that” sound when I first heard the Beatles perform Norwegian Wood. It was like nothing I had ever heard before! After that I heard Ravi Shankar, and even though his music didn’t resonate with me, the sound of the sitar did. And I guess I wasn’t alone, because everybody from The Box Tops' "Cry Like A Baby” to The Lemon Pipers' "Green Tambourine" used the sitar or its electric version. To me, it is one of the sounds of the late ‘60s and early ‘70s.

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Sitar samples are easy to come by. There are soundfonts, and any “ethnic” collection has sitar. But what about Wusikstation? Well, Manytone has that covered. In fact, Manytone has the Boris Sitar available for Wusikstation/Manystation (it plays in any instrument that will play the WusikSND format), Vsampler, and in soundfont format. It costs $9.95 for a single format or

$12.95 for multiple formats. It’s even available for free if you purchase a VST from them. The Manytone Boris Sitar consists of multi-samples of a handmade Sitar, a few drones, and an upstroke across all strings (high to low). Every note has been sampled, with full decay, in 24 bit. There are both stereo and mono multi-samples with 18 presets plus 2 presets for only work in Manystation. There is no installer; I’m guessing because it is designed to play in various WusikSND format instruments. Because of that, it took a little while to figure out where to put the WusikSND and preset files. A little look around the wusik.com folder got me up and playing. How does it sound? In two words - really nice! Unlike some other sitar sounds, it is easy to play. The sounds respond well to this

>


Manytone Boris Sitar

Long Just Hold pitch

Drone PBend Notes what the name says. the drone and you can bend the right hand.

Namaste - a smooth patch with a slightly filtered sound. Stereo Filtered MW – when you move the modulation wheel the tone brightens. Sitar Pad - This patch reminds me of a volume swell on a guitar. It's not a pad as such, but a nice sound never the less. Washy Sitar - It has an autowah effect. Interesting lead. But my favorite pure sitar patch is Sitar Melody STEREO. It has a "hammer-on" type effect where legato notes do not have the attack. With some editing of the MIDI notes it could provide a very realistic sitar solo part.

I do have a few "quips,� and they all center on the drones. Mainly, they are all in C. I would have preferred it to at least be stretched to an octave, but maybe there were "considerations" that dictated why Manytone did this. And, while I'm on the subject, I

But the drones are just drones, and you can find other sitar drones. The heart of this set is its multi-samples, and I really like the way it plays. While trying out the sounds, I kept coming back to the stereo versions, so I could just play! There is a depth to the sound, and the velocity programming adds to the playability and naturalness. Needless to say, I had fun with these sounds! I'm not sure the sound is ethnically accurate, but I can tell you that it is playable. Let me explain. Sitars have, generally speaking, 18 to 20 strings with 6 or 7 strings being playable. The rest of the strings are drone or sympathetic strings. This creates a very complex sound. People like Ravi Shankar spend a lifetime mastering the instrument. We westerners have developed our own versions of sitar, with the Coral Sitar probably being the most famous. It plays more like a guitar but sounds similar to a sitar. Even though this is a "real" sitar, the samples sound, at least to me, like an electric sitar. I actually think of this as a plus. It makes it easy to play for my western mind and fingers. I've always wanted to cover B.J. Thomas' Hooked on a Feeling! And all that for a Hamilton ($9.95 US).

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

It was also fun and easy to edit some of the patches to fit my music better. For example Sfx-Distorted Slow has, obviously, distortion as an effect. By changing the distortion to combo, it became something more to my liking. Easy enough.

would have preferred the drones to be looped. They die out after about 7 seconds. All of that said, I do like the sound of the drones, and the high to low upstroke is very useable.

Sound Review

keyboardist’s touch. Here are some of my favorite patches:

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Sound Review

Manytone ManyOne by Wouter Dullaert

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

$45.95/currently $37.95

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Manytone ManyOne

ManyOne is the follow up to the now discontinued EveOne, which also formed the basis of ManyTone’s ManyGuitar. It’s a sample player for wusikSND-files that is very light on CPU resources. It can load one soundset at a time which you can then run through the built in effects, of which there are 10: Tremolo, Overdrive, Mono Phaser, Stereo Phaser, Dual Chorus, Quad Chorus, Mono Flanger, Stereo Flanger, Echo and Output Limiter.

The samplesets include a lot of synth waves, like squares and saws from the ms-20. They’re very functional but probably won’t be particularly special if you already own Wusikstation. It can also only load WusikSND and DashSND files - not WAV files, which I really find a pity. I have a lot of WAV files which I’d very much like to run through ManyOne. It also doesn’t stream from disk - not that I expect it from this kind of synth, but this does rule out some of the large HQ soundsets included with Wusikstation. >

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

You only need one look at the GUI to notice that ManyOne is all about ease of use. There is only one page, every control has its dedicated control, and they’re all very logically grouped. On the left you’ll find a tree view of all the soundsets you have: the central part controls the amplifier and the filter and the right part controls the effects. Because ManyTone feels that everything helps you to get inspired, they have also included 3 different skins (with more to be released soon).

Sound Review

In our ongoing quest to help you get the most out of your Wusikstation and, in this case, your Wusikstation sample library, we bring you a feature about sampling geniuses ManyTone’s ManyOne.

This isn’t everything though. The best part of this synth is hidden in two small buttons on the GUI. On the top left there are two small buttons labeled “s” and “e”. These include the “sample-wizard” and the “effect-wizard”. These contain presets for the amplifier and filter on the one hand, and presets for the effect section on the other. These presets have very informative names and make creating new patches a breeze. Even if you have never turned a knob on a synth before, you can re-create the sound in your head within a few seconds: choose a sampleset, choose a “sample-preset”, choose an “effectpreset”, tweak a bit and you’re done. Now that is ease of use. It is a pity that you cannot save new wizards though.

57


Sound Review

Manytone ManyOne

This leaves the presets: ManyOne has a healthy dose of them, including a lot of nice e-piano’s, leads, basses; the usual. They sound good, and do a good job at showing what this is synth is capable of.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

The big question is, would you actually need this synth if you already own Wusikstation (which if you’re reading this magazine, probably do)? Wusikstation and ManyOne relate in a similar way as do a room filling modular synth vs. a simple monosynth. The modular can do anything the monosynth can, and a gazillion of other things, but you probably wouldn’t patch them up. Each inspires in a different way. ManyOne’s ease of use will allow you to dial up patches in no time, without all the fuss and complexity of having to deal with a multi-page synth. It’s a lot faster and more direct.

58

In my case, if I want a certain sound to round out a song, I’ll use ManyOne because I’ll get what I want quickly. If I use Wusikstation, I end up in “Sound Designer” modus and the result is a sound which is great, but probably too complex for the track I’m working on.

If you’re a die-hard sound designer, ManyOne may not appeal to you as much, but otherwise it will revolutionize the way you work with your Wusik samples and sit very comfortably next to your Wusikstation.

Pro: Very easy to use: sample and effect wizard! Nice Skins Very light on CPU Very inspiring Con: Does not load WAV files Does not save wizard presets

More info and sound demos and functional demo at: www.manytone.com

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The Synth Romance Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

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Last week I got my first

MAC computer. by WilliamK

I’ve been a Windows user all my life so this was a big change for me. Yes, I still do most of the work on the PC, but with time I have to get used to the MAC so that we can port our Wusikstation code to it.


My First MAC

The small unit came with a remote, and it’s amazing. When you power-up the computer, OS X boots up and initializes, in the background, a total media solution. Just press Menu from the remote and it slides the whole desktop up and opens up a small list of functions. There you can play a DVD, Videos, listen to music or browse the iTunes store for movie previews. In Vista, you need special hardware and appropriate OS version to handle that. The Basic version won't cut it. One thing that annoys programmers a bit is how Windows and OS X handles paths and text-files. For instance, in Windows, a file can be stored like this: c:\directory\file.txt while on the MAC it would look like this: /home/directory/file.txt. There's a lot of history information about this on the Internet, so I won't bother explaining it here. But keep in mind that before Windows it was DOS, and before OS X it was Unix.

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Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Did you know that the name ‘MAC’ comes from Macintosh? The Macintosh was the first popular computer from Apple to come with a full graphics interface. They had ‘Lisa’ before that, but it was a total disaster due to its high price-tag. ($9,995 US)

Since Windows Vista was officially released with its Aero interface and 3D effects, I wonder: Why do I need a powerful computer to performs all those graphical feats when my lowly Mini-Mac can do the same with less CPU usage? I'm still a big Windows fan, but seeing how OS X handles things in such a simple machine really amazes me.

The Synth Romance

It was a total surprise to me to see how different things are on MAC OS X. The whole interface is clean and easy to use, but it can also be a total pain for a PC user to get used to the MAC way of working. For instance, double-clicking on a window title bar will minimize the program. On Windows, that maximizes it to full screen. For some reason, clicking on the "X" icon to close it only hides the program. If you really want to close it you need to quit the application instead. So why did they add that "X" on the first place if it does pretty much the same thing as the minimize function? Also, the top-menu bar is fixed and changes according to the program you load. The mouse also seems to move in a different way. Maybe it’s because on my Windows machine I have the option "Enhance pointer precision" selected. I couldn't find an equivalent on the MAC side. Anyway, I don't want to complain about things. It’s like learning to drive on the left when you’ve driven all of your life on the right. Everything works as it’s supposed to - you just need to learn and get used to the small changes along the way.

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The Synth Romance

My First MAC

For those users who are used to DOS, or had used it in the past, did you know that DIR in Unix is LS? And that PWD shows you the current path location? Also, Command-Prompt is called Terminal and there's no Registry Database in OS X. Most programs I installed on the MAC were just a matter of extracting a file to a folder. Even that was a bit strange at first. You download a DMG file that is actually a Disk-Image. Once Safari (the Web browser) finished downloading a file, a new disk was mounted. Opening this disk shows a folder inside, and an instruction telling me to just move the folder to my Macintosh HD. So I did it, and the program was installed. Not a big deal, just confusing at first.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

What's really amazing is that, after a lot of searching and asking around, I learned that there are no viruses for the latest MAC OS X. Impressive, just like the PCs (sarcasm alert). The previous OS 9 had a few, 64 if I recall, but none for OS X so far. That doesn't mean that you shouldn't worry about it, but it’s not likely, especially if you only have MAC OS X installed. People advised me to be careful only if I had a Windows partition installed.

62

But again, I remember what someone told me years ago: Windows is the most secure system ever since it’s been optimized. Can you guess who said that? Yes, you guessed right, Bill Gates. A lot of people made fun of that remark, mostly MAC users. But he is not totally wrong. Some new security companies alerted people that if we ever had a MAC attack, it would be devastating to the Apple userbase - since MACs are full of security problems. I’m not sure about that. Maybe for the latest OS X they fixed them. But again, problems always occur when people get too used to a security level they really don't have. For now I will keep my Firewall up and running and avoid installing programs on the MAC unless I really need to. Right now it’s powered-off and has the network cable disconnected; can't be careful enough. Maybe with time I will switch to the MAC to check emails and do basic support. But for now that's a big change for me. So I'm sticking with my old car for now. It’s like having a Ferrari in your drive-way, but you can't get used to the gear-stick.

.


JERASH LABS leads the conceptio, the manufacturing, and the aftersales service of MAWZERŠ, to optimise his costumer service.

www.mawzer.com


List of Sounds

Anniversary Edition

MS 2000 Sounds by Zachariah Weckter Location: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\MS 2000

This is the Seventh volume of our special High Quality (HQ) Synth Sounds. (check issue #007 for detailed information)

53 Presets - 24 SoundSets 49 Meg

Reason Lahalla Set

Orchestral Lite 3

Location: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Reason Lahalla

by WilliamK Location: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Orchestral Lite 3 25 Presets - 28 SoundSets 192 Meg This is the 3rd edition of our Orchestral Lite Sets. For this volume, we included more Strings and added Piano + Choir SoundSets.

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

HQ Synthetica Volume 7

64

by Kevin Breidenbach - aka synthgeek www.skincontact.com/synt hgeek Location: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\HQ Synthetica\Volume 07 33 Presets - 6 SoundSets 68 Meg

73 Presets - 50 SoundSets 72 Meg Reason Lahalla TeamDNR Music Management FatKidz Sound www.rlahalla.net

Zvon Mix Set by LesProductionsZvon Location: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Zvon Mix 47 Presets - 20 SoundSets 123 Meg There are 47 presets and 20 soundsets. All the samples are taken from various demos of our sample sets, note that some of these do not currently have a WS version. The presets are all new and many combine waveforms from different sets.

- Growly, Mellow long, Renaissance and Staccato 03 are from the Marching Band Horn (WS). - Drums_demo from the Electronic drums/percussions kits (WS). - IYTTIW_1930s synth, and IYTTIW_baroque 01 from the IYTTIW modified trumpet set (WS). - JR_Aah short, JR_Boop, JR_La.bank and JR_Ow 2 from Julie Resynth (WS). - PR01 demo from the Prepared Rhodes (WS). - sidekick_demo from the Sidekick electronic percussions set. - HornM42_Melancholic from the Horn for M42 soundfont. - Const_Clarinet and Const_Organic from the Constellation soundfonts. - JM42_Earth Mantra, JM42_Mellotronic bending, JM42_Tones 02 and JM42_Warping 01 from the Julie M42 soundfont. You can use the soundsets and presets included in this file royalty-free in any piece of music. The only restriction is that you are not allowed to sell or distribute in any way the samples, soundsets and presets themselves, even in modified form, without our authorization.


Anniversary Edition

tower to announce the time and various warnings, but also as a fortified watchtower and town treasury.

email: info@lesproductionszvon.c om Forum: www.kvraudio.com/forum/vi ewforum.php?f=58 Web site: www.lesproductionszvon.c om

Construction of the tower began in 1313 to the design of master mason Jan van Haelst, whose plans are still preserved in a museum. After continuing intermittently through wars, plagues and political turmoil, the work reached completion in 1380. It was near the end of this period that the gilded dragon assumed its place atop the tower. The uppermost parts of the building have been rebuilt several times, in part to accommodate the growing number of bells.

Š 2004, 2005, 2006, 2007 Les Productions Zvon, all rights reserved

Belfort Bells Set by Laika Audio Productions Location: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\LaikaAudio-Belfort 1 Preset - 1 SoundSets - 56 Meg

Each of the 54 bells have been sampled and put in the public domain by the city of Ghent. The original samples wheren't of exceptional quality, but we at Laika Audio Productions have cleaned them up, resampled and packed in a highly usable wusikstation soundset.

\Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\LoFi Organ (9) \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Modularity (17)

New Effects Presets: \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Glitchy (8) \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Loop Recorder (3) \Presets\Wusik Sound Magazine\Issue 0013\Quantizer (4)

Wusik Sound Magazine May 2007 #013

Belfort is a full Belfry bell set. The orginal samples comes from the Belfry of Ghent in Belgium The 91meter-high belfry of Ghent is one of three medieval towers that overlook the old city center of Ghent, Belgium, the other two belonging to Saint Bavo Cathedral and Saint Nicholas' Church. Through the centuries, it has served not only as a bell

The belfry of Ghent, together with its attached buildings, belongs to the set of belfries of Belgium and France inscribed on UNESCO's World Heritage List.

Extra Presets for Articles:

List of Sounds

Comments and questions are welcome! Zvon Visit our website for more sample sets.

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Wsm - May 2007 - Issue 013  

Wsm - May 2007 - Issue 013

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