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Ur Co-Founder & Managing Director Antony Hamon Ur Editor In Chief Pierre Rabotin Ur Editor Eve Watling Ur Designer Vandy Ros Ur Designer assistant Sok Sochetra Ur Sales Manager Sarah Belli 0888 197 202 sarah@wuppmag.com Ur Photographers Sam Jam/samjamphoto.com Sentosa Mam Ur Journalists Nathan Thompson C.M. Griffin Ur Project Managers Jéremie Courtot Lorenz Gaimard Clémence Trémol Anaïs Lamory Louise Couchaux Ur Distribution Manager Sorn Vanny Special Thanks Phnom Penh Designers Week team and all the designers Linnette Chhun Charm Trude Jacobsen

Dear readers Happy New Year! We wish you the best for 2014: success, happiness, love and whatever else you might need. And if you’re Cambodian and don’t celebrate it - well, Happy New Month then. We work hard to bring you more and more interesting, fun and original content. In case you hadn’t noticed, the mag’s changed a lot from what you might remember at the beginning. Despite entertaining you guys, we aim to build a bridge between people, bringing them closer together to create a cultural and creative platform. We have a billion ideas, many projects and the will to rock the casbah! This issue is especially dedicated to all the fashonistas of Cambodia, who should enjoy our 9 page extravaganza of a fashion shoot by photographer Sam Jam, giving you a preview of what to expect when Phnom Penh designers week hits town this month. To contrast with this future fashion forecast, we also travelled to the provinces to hear some of Cambodia’s oldest, rarest music – and to watch one of it’s oldest, most chilling bloodsports. In addition, we caught up with the youngest generation of Khmer women, to find out about their dreams and expectations as they make their way into the adult world. Best wishes, The WUPP team

Cover Portrait of Linnette Chhun Charm by Sam Jam samjamphoto.com facebook.com/samjamphoto ..... WHAT’S UP MAGAZINE contact@wuppmag.com facebook/wupp.magazine www.wuppmag.com 097 958 7338

Editorial pictures: Sam Jam


La Croisette italian & international cuiSine Since 1997 on the riverSide, Phnom Penh

Great cocktails and wines ItalIan and InternatIonal cuIsIne

Large

outdoor terrace 241 Sisowath Quay Phnom Penh +855 (0) 23 220 554 info@lacroisette.asia


Nº 17-J anuary 2014 08 UR PICTURE OF THE MONTH

P28

10 UR NEW DISCOVERIES

Ur Cover: Phnom Penh Designers Week 2014

12

UR CULTURE: CLA 15TH ANNIVERSARY

16

UR FEATURE: YOUNG, FEMALE AND KHMER

24 UR REPORTAGE: COCKFIGHT 28 UR FASHION: PHNOM PENH DESIGNERS WEEK 38 UR MUST HAVE: PHNOM PENH ACCESSORIES 40 UR HYPEMAKER 42 UR WINE: MATCH OF THE MONTH 44 UR ARTIST PROJECT: IN RESIDENCE 46 UR WEEKEND: ON THE ROAD 50 UR 5 RESOLUTIONS 52 UR HOW TO… RECYCLED ART

P12

56 UR PLAYLIST: DJ SEQUENCE

UR CLA 15 th an culture: nivers ary

57 UR COCKTAIL OF THE MONTH 58 UR DAY IN THE LIFE 59 UR STREET STYLE

P24 Cockfighting

60 UR KHMER GAMES 63 UR AGENDA

P16 Young, Female

66 UR SOS PAGE

and Khmer

P59

Stre et

P56

ce

equen

: DJ S

ylist UR Pla

Styl e


photo of the month

‘NUCLEUS’ BY JONAS DE SCHRIJVER A young activist monk arrives in Phnom Penh after a 10 day walk from the provinces on International Human Rights Day in December. Want to be the next Photo of the Month? Send your best shot that was taken in Cambodia in the last month to contact@wuppmag.com


UR discoveries

new discoveries OUR LATEST FAVOURITE THINGS JEWEL IN THE LOTUS

English comic book artist Nicolas C. Grey co-owns this beautifully colourful curio shop in Battambang, which opened in October. Stocked full of weird and wonderful objects from Indian chewing tobacco to animal teeth to rare 1960s Khmer pop tapes, Jewel in the Lotus is a welcome break from generic tourist gift shops. It is also one of the few places to find a good, cheap selection of graphic novels – including Grey’s own work. Also check out the affiliated Lotus bar a little further up the road, which is bringing together the local creative scene together for the best nights out in Battambang.

SOMBAI Fermented rice wine is a staple in Cambodia, but the Siem Reap-based Sombai are adding a fruity twist to the age old recipe. Using infusion techniques inspired by her native country Mauritius, head brewer Joelle adds a combination of fresh local fruit and a sugar cane stick to each bottle, giving the drink a rich taste which matures over time. Beautifully presented and topped with a mini Krama, the drink is available throughout Siem Reap and selected places in Phnom Penh. sombai.com

TONLE

No. 76, St 2.5, Battambang

BROOKLYN PIZZA & BISTRO Bringing East Coast cuisine to Phnom Penh, Brooklyn serves up pizza, ribs, pasta and cheesecakes that will have you spontaneously firing your shotgun into the air while singing the ‘Star Spangled Banner’. facebook.com/brooklynbistro No. 20, St. 123, Phnom Penh - 089 925 926

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Long standing ethical design store KeoK’jay is sadly closing up shop – but the phoenix rises again with owner Rachel Faller’s new label, Tonle. Using the same ethical principles and recycled materials that made KeoK’jay such a treat, Tonle will be more fashion-forward and cohesive that its predecessor. Faller has promised us a fun wearable, stylish collection – we can’t wait to see it!


MEMORY FROM DARKNESS

© KAMPUCHEA PARTY REPUBLIC Cambodian composer and Khmer Rouge survivor Him Sophy has released a new recording combining Western and Khmer music to address the trauma of Cambodia’s recent past. Composed in 1990, the 25 minute work is a haunting mix of cello, violin and piano, freshly recorded with the internationally renowned New York Music Ensemble and produced by Cambodian Living Arts. The music recalls the prisoners, workers and farmers that Sophy encountered during the war, and cathartically expresses the dark nightmarishness of his experience. You can find the CD at Cambodia Living Arts or Monument Books.

DISPLAY

No. 128-G9 Sothearos Blvd, Phnom Penh 023 986 032

MADAME VINTAGE The newest entry in Phnom Penh’s burgeoning vintage shop selection comes with plenty of Parisian sass. The shop is spacious and filled with reasonable priced goodies – we love the selection of crisp linen shirts and printed blouses. The excellent selection of French language second hand books makes us wish to Dieu that we paid more attention in French class. No. 169, St. 136, Phnom Penh.

Open since November 24th, Display is the new go-to shop for innovative design, selling on-trend decorations, photography and art. “I want to give to Phnom Penh a shop of a new genre with a more playful approach.” says French owner Alain, “A place that could compete in Hong-Kong or London.” Display sells global design alongside local produce, always united by a contemporary approach. facebook.com/displaylifestore No. 178, St. 63, Phnom Penh - 095 810 250

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UR Culture

2 0 1 4 : ca m b od i a n li v i n g a rt s 15t h a n ni versa ry

So k D u c h ,

2014 marks the 15th anniversary of Cambodian Living Arts, an NGO dedicated to keeping endangered

Khmer

art

forms alive. To celebrate, the organisation

will

throw

a variety of dance events, as well as a cyclo tour of Phnom Penh, where traditional will

musicians

make

perfor-

mance pitstops at the cities. Also expect a look on the contemporary Cambodian arts scene, with

flashmobs

of

traditional dancers taking on modern dance. CLA promise they have plenty of secret surprises up

their

sleeves...

we cant wait to see them!

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TEXT BY EVE WATLING | PHOTO BY SENTOSA MAM

O CELEBRATE CAMBODIAN LIVING ART’S 15TH ANNIVERSARY, WE TRAVELLED TO TAKEO PROVINCE TO MEET SOK DUCH, THE LAST LIVING MASTER OF CLASSICAL WEDDING MUSIC. Before the Khmer Rouge, Cambodia had a thriving culture of unique indigenous art forms, including dancing, music, and theatre. Cambodian Living Arts is trying to record and revive these art forms, tracking down surviving masters – most of them died during the Khmer Rouge regime - to make recordings, and facilitate the passing on ancient knowledge to a new generation.


the last master PRESERVING THE ANCIENT SONGS OF CAMBODIA

Designated a Living Human Treasure by UNESCO, Duch lives in a beautiful stilted house painted in faded blues, and strewn with colourful patterned rugs and low slung hammocks. In a shed next door, ancient musical instruments hang on the walls and lay on tables. Amongst them is the Kse Diev, Duch’s speciality, an instrument so old that it is depicted in Angkor bas reliefs. It resembles a violin bow with a gourd attached, played by plucking the single string with a silver thim-

ble over the ring finger. The gourd is placed over the heart, with the play­er moving it to vary the tone. Duch isn’t just an expert at playing the instrument, but at making it as well. At 87 years old, Duch speaks slowly and softly, his cigarette smoke wind­ ing lazily through the low shafts of light that slant between the stilts underneath his house. His students wander in and begin to practice, making low bows to their elderly teacher, be-

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UR Culture fore picking up instruments and releasing streams of piquant, bubbling music. Duch was born nearby, and has been living here since the end of the Khmer Rouge regime. At 10 years old he began to learn traditional wedding instruments and songs, and by 13 was playing at local weddings. A prodigious talent, Duch already had a name for himself before the Khmer Rouge arrived, recording and performing in Phnom Penh. Contrary to many artists’ experience, his musical and crafting skills played a crucial part in his survival when the Khmer Rouge flooded into Phnom Penh. “I was valued as I was so good at working with my hands. They knew I played instruments and they asked me to play for them. They liked listening to me. I didn’t face any specific persecution, but like everyone else I was deprived of food.” When the occupation ended, Duch resumed making the instruments and teaching his craft. In 2002, he was

The

discovered by a monk from Wat Bo, who needed somebody with expertise with the Kse Diev to make his traditional music craft complete. CLA sponsored his teaching there. “If it wasn’t for me all traditional music would be gone” he says, “this music is unique to Cambodia – we didn’t take anything from any other country. And now everyone who knows these instruments knows them from me.” Seeing Duch’s student play the Kse Diev is a revelation – any wonder about why a single-stringed instrument is so hard to play vanishes instantly. The instrument has no markers, and the student must learn almost intuitively where to press the string, and how close the gourd must be to the chest, to produce one of the hundreds of sweetly mournful traditional songs Duch has up in his head. Picking up another wedding instrument and plucking a tune, he looks every inch like a Cambodian Johnny Cash. As he plays, his shaky hands become certain, and the sounds of ancient Cambodia fill the air.

Art o f S m o t emonies, and on Buddha day. A rare skill to have, today many Cambodians are actually frightened by the sound of the ancient songs.

After visiting Duch, we travelled to a nearby cement schoolhouse, where 62 year old Koeut Ran was teaching her students traditional smot chanting. A part of the Cambodian Buddhist tradition, smot is often sung to help people recollect the nature of life and death. Always a part of Khmer funerals, it’s also sung during Pchum Ben, flower cer-

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The oldest student, a 33 year old woman dubbed ‘Golden Voice’, sings a solo for us. Her voice is clear and elastic: Pali words wrapped around a long thread of a note. With so much variation in each note, I’m amazed she can remember exactly what quavers to hit in this beautiful, haunting song. “It feels really good to sing smot, because we’re singing together and learning Buddhist words”, one of Ran’s students, a young boy, tells me. “I want to preserve the art of smot and teach it myself one day.”


Le Royal’s Afternoon Tea Deeply rooted in Le Royal’s tradition we have heralded an afternoon tea celebration since the hotel was established in 1929. Rediscover the past of one of the Asia’s greatest heritage hotels through its traditional high tea with madeleine, palmier, financier pastries and scones or experience our new executive chef’s creation of macaron afternoon tea tiers made of unforgettable blue cheese, goose liver, cream cheese and smoked salmon macarons. Conservatory Monday to Sunday 2.30PM to 5.30PM Price from US$ 14.50 - Afternoon Tea Price from US$ 26.50 - with a glass of Champagne

www.raffles.com/phnompenh

Prices are subject to service charge and applicable government taxes. For reservations please call: 023 981 888 or email dining.leroyal@raffles.com


UR feature

Young, Female

and Khmer CODES OF CONDUCT AND FAMILY TIES

© ‘LITTLE STORIES OF PHNOM PENH’ BY MARYLISE VIGNEAU

BY EVE WATLING QUIET AND VIRGINAL? A TIGER IN THE BUSINESS WORLD? THE HARD-GRAFTING BACKBONE OF FAMILY LIFE? AN EXOTIC AND SUBMISSIVE PLAYTHING? DOWNTRODDEN AND IN NEED OF SAVING? STEREOTYPES OF CAMBODIAN WOMEN CAN BE CONTRADICTORY, OBSCURE, AND FRANKLY PLAIN OFFENSIVE. BUT HOW DO YOUNG CAMBODIAN WOMEN SEE THEMSELVES AND THEIR OWN PLACE IN SOCIETY? IS THERE A CHANGE IN THE ROLES THAT THEY TAKE ON, AND THE BEHAVIOUR THAT IS EXPECTED OF THEM?

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omen’s roles have varied throughout Cambodia’s history, the publishing of the Cbpab Srei (see box p.20) articulated a defined set of conservative rules that Cambodian women were expected to abide by, and is still widely known and influential today. Kem Kim Am is a CNRP politician from Battambang, confident and politically open-minded, but even so, she praises the Cbpab Srei. “There are lots of good aspects to it. In our village, we believe that girls shouldn’t leave to work far away by themselves, or have sex before they are married”. She does make an exception however: “If it was absolutely necessary for a girl to go off and work alone to support her family, it would be OK. But if it was just for her own enjoyment, it is not.” This submission of personal fulfilment to the greater good of the family is a central part of the expectation of Khmer women. Trude Jacobsen, expert on the history of women in Cambodia, explains. “Generally speaking, there is an expectation for women to maintain the family unit - through efficient handling of the household resources, through cleaning, cooking, and rearing children, and through contributing to the family enterprise, be it harvesting rice, running a guesthouse or going to university to get a law degree that will enhance the family’s prestige. Whatever she does in the furtherance of this objective is acceptable.” “What is not acceptable is to do anything for herself that does not somehow contribute to the family. Men, on the other hand, are allowed to do things that further a personal or individual goal.” Women are by no means passive members of Khmer society, but their sense of individualism is slight compared to their brothers.

REINTERPRETING TRADITION With the arrival of the internet, the in-

creasing influx of individualistic Western culture, and the host of NGOs setting out to ‘empower’ the Khmer woman, have attitudes changed

© ‘LITTLE STORIES OF PHNOM PENH’ BY MARYLISE VIGNEAU

amongst the younger generation? Voeun Leakhena, a 24 year old who coowns a nail bar in Phnom Penh’s Kandal market, has no desire for change. Although she admits that the Cbpab Srei is almost impossible to follow in the modern day due to the precise rules regarding speaking, walking, and never socialising with men outside the family, she believes the code serves to protect her. “Western women act like boys”, she says, “they drink and smoke and go clubbing – I don’t like it. It’s not right for a Khmer woman to do that. It’s better to do what your family wants rather than what you want, although it’s not the same for boys. But that is because this society takes care of women more than men”. Working full time and shouldering the household chores, Voeun takes on the typical dichotomy of the Khmer woman, being both the breadwinner and housewife, the businesswoman and the preciously guarded daughter. Although she is often tired out, she finds reward for her efforts in the closeness >>of the family that she holds together.

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UR feature

women in Cambodia: the timeline

Lower Mekong River society called Funan is mentioned in Chinese records. The original ruler of the kingdom is a queen called Lieu-Ye.

ca. 1–500s CE

1736

1500s

1835

Queen Sijhata broke away from the Cambodian court at Longvek and established her own court at Samrong Saen for 11 years.

Me Penh discovers four statues of the Buddha and one of Vishnu and establishes Wat Phnom.

Queen Ang Mei, ascends the throne of Cambodia. Soon after, Prince Ang Duong, Ang Mei’s uncle and another claimant for the throne, composes the Cbpab Srei which specifies that women should obey men. Ang Duong and Ang Mei are both crowned as sovereigns. Mei vanishes from the historical record until the 1870s, when she is discovered by a French visitor wandering around Udong, insane.

184

Cambodia becomes French protectorate.

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1863–1940 present The most recent Gender Equality Index ranked Cambodia 96th out of 148 countres. Just 11.6% of women over 25 have a primary education. Women make up 18.1% of parliament, and 79.2% of the workplace.

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1994

1975–1979

Khmer Rouge establish Democratic Kampuchea. Pol Pot declares that “men and women are equal in every respect.”, although few women could be found in the top sections of the hierarchy except the wives of leaders. Female soldiers are common.

Khmer Rouge establish Democratic Kampuchea. Pol Pot declares that “men and women are equal in every respect.”, although few women could be found in the top sections of the hierarchy except the wives of leaders. Female soldiers are common.

1955

1953 Independence from France

Women included in voting rights for all Cambodian citizens. Jean Thierry writes that the prominent position accorded women in ancient Khmer society has no equivalent in modern Cambodia.


Three successive queens rule the polity of ambhupura in eastern Cambodia.

780s–802 CE Under influence from kingdoms to the west, Theravada Buddhism wins royal and popular allegiance.

1200s – 1300s

Indradevi, a queen of Jayavarman VII, is appointed head of three centres of Buddhist learning. The French assume that the elite literature of the Cambodian court, including the Cbpab Srei, reflects Cambodian society and enshrine this as “traditional Cambodia” in schools and in the cultural consciousness.

A Khmer female journalist writes “women cannot develop their potential. If educated women were strongly supported by men, the customs and traditions of housewives would be totally eliminated.” Male journalists respond one piece with the title: “Women’s Work is in the Kitchen”

1946

1948

The first Khmer Women’s Association was established in 1948 by members of the royal family and urban intellectuals.

[Cont.] However, some women feel that this traditional family structure, so reliant on the fidelity of the young woman, can have its drawbacks. Srey Lin, 17, is the daughter of a Phnom Penh businesswoman, and was educated at an English speaking international school. “I don’t want to live under the shadow of my parents. I want to make an impact and push myself”, she says. “At the moment I’m interning to get experience I need for a career in the arts. But my mother is hurt and disappointed I’m not spending my time helping out at her business. She and my grandma tell me that it would be OK if I was a boy, but as a girl I shouldn’t be so independent.” Although she has reached a tentative compromise with her parents about her lifestyle, she still worries that her own behaviour is seen as reflecting poorly upon her parents. “People don’t judge young women as individuals, but as an extension of the family. I don’t smoke in public because I don’t want to embarrass my parents.” It’s not just alienation from the family group that occurs when women transgress social norms. In such a patriotic nation, the Khmer woman is seen as central in the fight to protect the race from its bigger, more powerful neighbours. In an article about female politicians in Cambodia, academic Kate Frieson points out that the “importance in the socialization of the family, and by extension the nation, has been used as a political tool by various regimes since independence. Women not only literally carry the seed of future generations, they are viewed as being responsible for the cultural regeneration of the na>> tion through their role of raising and educating children.” In turn, Jacobson points out that “Cambodia nearly lost its cultural identity un>>

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UR feature

der the Khmer Rouge, so -there is a tendency on the part of some Cambodians to cling to those things that are believed to be “truly Cambodian” - including the Cbpab Srei.” Srey Lin’s behaviour and dress draw stares, with people often believing she is foreign. Like Voeun, she feels as though she is taking core Khmer values and re-enterprising them for the modern world. But pushing her freedom this far causes some cultural alienation. “Sometimes I feel neither Khmer nor Western”, she says. This combination of the family group’s desire to protect their daughter, as well as the lack of government support for the elderly or vulnerable means that young women often shoulder the heft of familial responsibilities. The government plans to introduce a comprehensive pension scheme in the coming years, a move which will relieve some of the desperate financial imperatives for Khmer women to earn money. But if Khmer women want as much personal autonomy as their male counterparts, the tight knit family group have to learn to trust their daughter’s own decisions in the outside world, and find a way to function without her total devotion.

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The Cbpab Srei – What is it? The influential Code of Conduct for Women is believed to be written by Ang Duong in 1837. Although Duong was a man, the narrative takes the form of a Queen giving her daughter advice as she prepares to leave the family home. Expert on the history of women’s roles in Cambodia, Trude Jacobson sums it up: “The key thrust of the text is that it is the responsibility of wives to ensure the good reputation of the family by maintaining a harmonious image of the home, regardless of what occurred behind closed doors. This was best achieved, according to the Cbpab Srei, by total obedience to one’s husband.” Most Khmers are still aware of the text today, and consider its basic values to be relevant for respectable young women. However, Jacobson points out that the text has a little known male equivalent: “There is a Cbpab Pros, for men, but nobody ever expects them to follow it! (They are told not to gamble, visit sex workers, or associate with Chinese.)”


We asked some young women in Phnom Penh

“Whats your dream for the future?” PHOTOS BY SENTOSA MAM

Sopheakneath, 19 I want to work in a bank, and I feel like I have a good chance of succeeding. I want to earn a lot of money for the family

Nou Srey Roth, 23

Sita, 21

I want to own a grocery store. My family’s setting up the business so I don’t have much choice! It’s a steady income

I already own a clothing store with my older sister, so I want to continue expanding that. I love fashion so I really enjoy it – it’s not just for the money!

Aka, 24 I want to be an actress, but I’m not sure it’s possible seeing as I work in a hostess bar. Also there’s no money in it, and that’s the most important thing for me. I need to help my family

Somalin, 16 I want to be a doctor. I want to do it for myself – I’m interested in it. I want to study cancer and help the world

Roth, 25 I want to be a flight attendant. I’m still studying, but I’m worried I don’t know enough languages to make it. I want to see lots of different countries, but the main reason is to earn money for my family

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“A great sunset bar & restaurant”

A fishermans house on the beach serving Asian and international lunches and dinners.

Open: 7 days/week 10am-10pm Happy Hour: Mon-Thu 5pm-7pm Wednesdays: Live music 5pm-9pm Fridays: Happy hour all night long Saturdays: Beach BBQ 6pm-9pm Sundays: Brunch 11am-2pm

ACTIVITIES • Swimming • Volleyball • Pingpong • Petanque • Pool

RENTALS • Sailing • Bicycles • Motorbikes

TIP: Book your lunch or dinner well in advance to secure your best waterfront table. Reservations: +855(0)78 333 686, fbm@knaibangchatt.com www.knaibang chatt.com

Kep’s signature restaurant

Chef Janine, our South-African 5-star Executive Chef, and her Cambodian team fuse international and local flavors to lift your senses and invoke a sense of adventure. Open 7 days, Noon-10pm. The Strand, at Knai Bang Chatt resort (next to Sailing Club, 300 meters from the crab market). Dress code: smart casual. Reservations: +855 (0)78 333 686, fbm@knaibangchatt.com


ADS ST

1 st FLOOR

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PU ST

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gem of a lounge

Street 11, n째13A (1st floor), Siem Reap, Cambodia

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UR Reportage

cockfight: Blood BY NATHAN THOMPSON

Nath an Th omp -Viet son t nam rave ese ls to abou b o a Ca rder t the mbo town thriv fight dian to fin ing u ing c d n d u o ergr lture ut and ound , wh the f ere s c ights ocktake are b s are ruta high l.

It was 10am on Tuesday and the blood was already flowing. It was vomited from the mouth of a cock who had staggered into the encircling wall gasping for breath in between brutal hemorrhages. Through dying eyes it saw the ring floor; covered with gory polka dots. Its opponent, the victor, was held aloft by his owner and a cheer gushed from the crowd. At the hem of the ring sat the richest gamblers resting their guts and mopping their brows. Around them were bleachers holding a crowd of 100 men on their feet, craning for a better view, smoking and drinking energy drinks. Around the bleachers, on the hangar floor, dozens of fighting birds crowed in wire cages. The noise was like the rush of white water rapids, it caught and propelled you, addicted, looking for the next fight. The cockfight was located in a casino somewhere on the Vietnamese border. The crowd was 95% Vietnamese, who had popped over the border to Cambodia because casinos are illegal in Vietnam. Cockfights are also illegal in Cambodia but the law is regularly flouted with impunity.

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on the Border

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HIGH STAKES The venue was in a hangar at the back of the main casino. It was high stakes stuff. Minimum bets of $100 were taken by casino employees who crowded the ring in between fights wearing blue Chelsea football shirts. They swelled and shrank like a shoal of fish jabbering intensely at the crowd, exchanging hand signals and handing out betting slips of blue or red depending on which bird you tipped to win. A bird was prepared for the next fight. A 5cm metal spur was taped to its foot. The birds knew exactly where to stick their opponent – below the wing and straight into the lungs. Once a bird had its opponent impaled it used its other talon to grab onto the neck and keep its victim from getting away. Some say the weaponised fights are more humane because natural fights can go round after round and result in no clear winner. Weaponised fights end when one bird dies or cannot get up again to fight. If both birds are down the referee takes a decision. Match fixing is common and some birds enter the fight secretly injured by their owners.

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BETS OF M U IM IN M BY E TAKEN R E W 0 $10 ES EMPLOYE O IN S A C

The crowd gently simmered as two new birds entered the ring carried by their owners. Anticipation is a key part of the addictive thrill of the sport. The owners filled their mouths with water and expelled a fine mist over their birds stroking them until their feathers glistened. They walked them around the ring so the crowd could get a good look. “This is my last time”, said Kien Giang a rice farmer. “I want to quit gambling”. But he had already spent the money he was saving to build a new house for his family - was he even capable of stopping? The casino employees in their Chelsea shirts vacated the ring with fistfuls of blue and red betting slips. Now it was just the


birds, held by their owners and the referee, the whole event choreographed to perfection. Hardly surprising when you consider the sport has been ongoing in South East Asia for centuries: there is even a relief carving of a cockfight on the walls of Bayon Temple in Angkor Wat. Despite official bans it still happens all over the region. Every Cambodian I have talked to knows someone involved in the sport.

BY THE THIRD ROUND THE RED BIRD BORED ITS METAL SPUR INTO ITS OPPONENT’S BREAST AND HELD ON AS THE LIFE DRAINED OUT OF IT. THE RING FLOOR WAS ROSY WITH BLOOD

TO THE DEATH All attention was now on the ring as the cocks got ready to begin. The crowd had worked itself into a frenzy of craving. By comparison, the cocks were perfectly at ease – they seemed neither frightened nor stressed. They were released and approached each other fanning their neck feathers giving the junglefowl equivalent of “what you lookin’ at?” The fight went for three rounds of four minutes each. The birds fanned their wings lifting their feet in the air lashing out with their spurs. It was a marriage of claws and vicious beaks. After the first round the handlers picked them up, kissed their wounds and sprayed water over their torn feathers. By the third round the red bird bored its metal spur into its opponent’s breast and held on as the life drained out of it. The ring floor was rosy with blood. The loser was removed from the ring. If a bird’s wounds aren’t too bad it is stitched up and returned home to recover. This one looked too torn up to have much hope. The victor was taken away by its owner who was now $200 richer. The crowd settled down into a post orgasmic fug, and around the ring 70 cocks crowed.

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“Reinvention of Tradition” phnom penh designers week 2014

Cambodia’s biggest fashion celebration is back between the 24th-26th January with 3 days of runways and parties honouring the country’s fashion scene. From origami dresses to embracing the elements, WUPP has chosen a select preview of the most exciting pieces due to grace the runway this year.

“ Armada ” by Reynier Necesario Abello “The concept of my col­lection is mainly based on the Spanish Armada. I was inspired by a painting of a Spanish captain, and my love for theater and drama: I see this concept to be an av­enue for me to show and express my passion on that area and translate it into clothes.”

Bracelet: THE SHOWROOM Bag: PAPERDOLLS


“ reincarnation ” by sophie & sophea for two wonders “We will be showcasing a limited edition collection inspired by change and evolution. The ‘idea’ of reincarnation is featured in our collection with pure flowing angelic pieces. Open jackets are featured along with soft flowing dresses and layered pieces, showing the beautifully constructed garments that define change.”

Bracelet: THE SHOWROOM Photographs by SAM JAM Artistic Director: SENTOSA MAM Model: LINNETTE CHHUN CHARM


Necklace: PAPERDOLLS Bracelet: MODEL’S OWN

“ ERIC RAISINA “ by ERIC RAISINA This collection is inspired by new cultures and diverse techniques in Africa as well as in Asia. We started a new workshop, training weavers, seamstresses and embroiderers. Research began on new textures, colors, unique weave patterns, most notably Silk Fur (patented by us) and Naturak Raffia lace, leading to a commission to create unique textures for Yves Saint-Laurent and Christian Lacroix.


“ Monks In Riot ” by Don Protasio “My spring/summer 2014 collection is called ‘Monks In Riot’, inspired by a photograph I saw. It’s an exercise in layering tailored and draped clothing, sometimes independent of each other, and in some pieces fused together into one, often using cold dyeing treatments. I have always been fascinated with clothing styles that evoke a darker sensibility.”

Necklace+Chain: THE SHOWROOM Left Hand Bracelet: THE SHOWROOM Right Hand Bracelet: A.N.D. Rings+Earrings: PAPERDOLLS


“ origami ” BY KIMS “For my collection, I used the process of origami, cut­ting and folding one piece of fabric at a time and stitching them on top of the dress. For the theme of “Reinven­tion of Tradition”, I decided to design the evening and cas­ ual dresses with Khmer silk as the main fabric, and also work cream and black satin and chiffon into my collection.”

Shoes: MODEL’ S OWN Bracelet: THE SHOWROOM


Bag + Ring: PAPERDOLLS Necklace+Shoes: MODEL’ S OWN

“ Playtime ” BY Mitsou Creation “Our collection “Playtime” contrasts the joy of childhood to the roughness of the adult world. This season we play with plain, retro and bright colours mixed with geometrical print­ s. The structured lines, re­ fined and sharp cuts fall with­in an approach of geometrical modernity.”


Skull: THE SHOWROOM Right Bracelet: THE SHOWROOM Left Bracelet: A.N.D. Earring: PAPERDOLLS Shoes: MODEL’ S OWN Bra: MODEL’ S OWN

“ Earth, Wind & Fire ” by Julie Schrag for La’Or “The earth, the wind and the fire inspires the collection’s colour pallet, dye pattern & fabric appli­ cation used in the garments. Em­ bers of gold and orange develop into deep crimson red flames. Soft and floating fabric move like rippling flames carried by the wind. The La’Or woman in 2014 is a well grounded free spirit who is strong, passionate and full of energy.”


“ MOVIEMANIA ” BY TRY SUPHEARAC & ALAN JAMES FLUX FOR A.N.D “This collection features our signature hand-woven cotton ikats, and is inspired by Hollywood movies celebrating America throughout the last century. You will find a colourful and eclectic mix of workwear from The Grapes of Wrath, gangster flash from Public Enemy Number One, a froth of Ginger Rogers gowns, and the sheriff’s posse riding into High Noon...”

Bracelet: MODEL’ S OWN


“ Poppy ” by Christine Gauthier for waterlily “Waterlily is the perfect excuse to express my creativity through my love for flowers, Cambodian nature and colour using recycled materials. The latest collection uses recycled rice bags and second-hand waterproof fabric to create chic raincoats.”


UR shopping

must haves... Phnom Penh’s Accessories

Check out the fabulous accessories from our Phnom Penh Designers Week fashion shoot. From Waterlily’s glowing buttons to A.N.D’s natural, chunky jewellery, it’s not just great clothes that local designers have to offer...

Necklace @The showroom 52z, street 240, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

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brown bag

leopard ring wooden earring

diamond ring

All accessories @Paper Dolls street 240 and a half, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

blue ring

pattern earrings

skull ring

mandala ring

owl braclet

flower ring

butterfly ring

wooden rings @A.N.D. street 240, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

button necklace @Waterlily street 240, Phnom Penh, Cambodia

39


UR events

HYPEMAKER WHAT WE’RE EXCITED ABOUT THIS JANUARY Phnom Penh: Rescue Archeology Sa Sa Bassac, the gallery and resource centre for contemporary art, are holding an exhibition and book launch as a part of Our City festival. The launch will feature a talk and a screening of performance pieces from nine Phnom Penh artists. Rescue Archaeology will be the first comprehensive publication on contemporary art in Cambodia, featuring contributions from historians, curators and architects – including acclaimed Cambodian architect Vann Molyvann. Collecting interviews, essays and writings on events, this is an exciting step in the study of Cambodian arts.

Cambodia Living Arts Anniversary The NGO dedicated to keeping endangered Khmer art forms alive is turning 15 this year. To celebrate, the organisation will throw a variety of dance events, as well as a cyclo tour of Phnom Penh, where traditional musicians will make performance pit stops throughout the city. Also expect a look on the contemporary Cambodian arts scene, with flashmobs of traditional dancers taking on modern dance. CLA promise they have plenty more secret surprises up their sleeves... we cant wait to see them! Flashmob and cyclo tour – Jan 9th Other events @ Various locations through out January - cambodianlivingarts.org

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Wed, Jan 22nd

Equinox’s 8 Year Anniversary Happy birthday Equinox Bar! The French owned institution will celebrate its 8th anniversary this month with two big nights of partying, live bands and secret surprises. Diego Demarques Trio and Marsyas will rock the place out, so make sure you don’t miss it! Latin mood on Jan 19th with Diego Demarques Trio, Funky gimmicks on Jan 20th with Marsyas, at Equinox Bar.


DJ Cut Killer @ Pontoon sponsored by WUPP Mag French / international DJ Cut Killer returns to the Penh for an epic night at Pontoon sponsored by WUPP Mag. The DJ became the French Hip Hop master 15 years ago, before entering the Big Dawg Pitbull collective and touring Europe and the US with P. Diddy, and is now back for the third time in the city. You can catch our exclusive interview with the DJ last time in came to Cambodia in WUPP Mag #6. DJ Cut Killer @ Pontoon sponsored by WUPP Mag – Jan 17

Our City Festival The marvellous Our City Festival returns to Cambodia this January. Started in 2008, the festival explores urbanism, contemporary arts, and the relationship between the two. Expect exhibitions on art and architecture, screenings, performances and workshops as Cambodia’s big three cities enjoy a week of creative coming together. 16th-23rd January, various locations in Phnom Penh, Battambang and Siem Reap. ourcityfestival.org

t in our even y e e s o t akers? You want ry Hypem a u r b e F the ures s and pict k n li , fo in g.com Send all wuppma @ e r r ie p to

41


UR wine

Wine & Food “Match of the Month”

DISCOVER OUR MONTHLY FEATURE ON HOW TO PAIR WINE AND FOOD. TWO WINES AND TWO RECIPES BY ONE CHEF FROM AN EXCITING RESTAURANT TO MAKE SURE YOU BECOME THE BEST HOST IN THE CITY.

Risotto shrimp, melon and gorgonzola Ingredients 60g onion, 40 ml olive oil, 60g butter, 400g Carnaroli rice , 60 ml white wine, 100g rock melon ( 1/2 blended, 1/2 in small cubes), 80g gorgonzola cheese, 12 g shrimp U10, 40g parmesan cheese, 250 ml vegetable stock

Preparation 1). In a cooking pot, fry the onion with the olive oil and the butter until it turns blond, but not brown. 2). Add the rice and stir until it gets warm, then add the white wine and let evaporate slowly. Add the vegetable stock, continuing to stir. 3). When the rice is cooked at around 12 min, add the shrimp and the blended rock melon. 4). When you have been cooking for 18 to 20 min, season with salt and pepper then take off the heat. Add the gorgonzola, the melon cubes, the butter and parmesan and stir. Serve hot.

Trimbach Riesling h perfectly

Why they matc

is h is pe r­ cre a m y d Th e rich , th e cris p, ra ste d b y fe ctly co nt e wine, th of dity citrus a ci nes s of ti ui sl ight fr wh ils t th e ce n s th e also b ala th e wine o nzola . rg o G e s of th salty note

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Gran Devocion, by Vina Maipo Why they match perfectly

Australian Lamb Rack with potato cake and Red Wine Sauce Ingredients 1.5kg Lamb rack French cut, 5g salt, 2g ground black pepper, 2g fresh thyme, 50 ml red wine, 50g grated parmesan, 1 kg potato, 50g butter unsalted, 200 ml milk, 50g butter, 50 ml Olive oil

Preparation 1. Cut the lamb in 4 portions of 3 ribs each. Marinate with chopped thyme, pepper and salt. 2. Boil the milk with the butter and a pinch of salt, and then leave to cool. 3. Peel the potato and slice thinly with a mandolin and arrange in a greased deep baking tray. Cover with the milk and butter and sprinkle with parmesan, cover with aluminium and bake in oven at 170C for 1 hour.

A full bodied red meat dish in a rich sauce needs a power­ ful yet elegant wine, and the Gran Devocion achieves this perfectly. Enough weight and depth of fruit to compete with the strong flavours of the dish, it still remains elegant and with enough finesse to compliment the lamb.

Do Forni Restaurant@ Sofitel Nestled at the heart of the luxurious Sofitel Hotel, Do Forni restaurant is a classic, romantic haven in Phnom Penh’s dining scene. With a fire oven and open kitchen, diners can enjoy an aperitif on the balcony overlooking the shimmering swimming pool.

Chef Andrea Molinari The award winning Italian chef Andrea Molinari worked in hotels in Abu-Dhabi and Kuala Lumpur before bringing his culinary passion to Phnom Penh. Winner of a ‘Junior Chef of the Year’ for fish and meat, he is also noted for his artistic displays, his innovation and his deserts.

4. In a hot frying pan sear the lamb both sides for 3 minutes and bake in oven at 180C for 5 min. Glaze the pan with the red wine and nob of butter. 5. Cut the hot potato cake with a round cutter and arrange on the plate. 6. Cut the racks in 3 pieces and arrange standing above the potato cake. Sprinkle the sauce on top. Serve hot.

Do Forni

@ Sofitel Phnom Penh Phokeethra No. 26, Sothearos Blvd, Phnom Penh, www.sofitel.com

These wines are exclusively distributed by celliers d’Asie and available everywhere in Cambodia Siem Reap Sihanouk, Kep & Kampot Phnom Penh Battambang (855) 63 964 409 (855) 34 934 155 (855) 23 986 350 (855) 53 953 855


UR artist

In Residence CHANRADO SOK AND BLU SIMON WASEM

The Pisaot Project, facilitated by the gallery and resource centre for contemporary art Sa Sa Bassac, was back last month with a double-wammy of resident artists. Blu and Chanrado spent December living in Phnom Penh’s White Building, creating open ended art projects inspired by, or in concordance, with the residents living there.

BY EVE WATLING

Chanrado Sok For Cambodian artist Chanrado Sok, living in the White Building is no unusual experience. Born in a similar building round the corner, he moved to the White Building when he was a child, and his parents still live down the corridor. His project is leaning against a wall of his new residency room: ostensibly a bicycle, but modified into a strange and wonderful contraption, with a huge megaphone on the front and a giant wire sculpture on the back. ‘It’s a radar’,

he says of the sculpture, ‘and this sign on the side says ‘Wave Sound’ in Khmer – this bike is a public radio”. Chanrado rides the Wave Sound bike around Phnom Penh, asking the people he passes by for information which he records on his tape recorder and then plays back over the bike’s megaphone as he rides around the city. ‘I don’t care if it’s a political statement or if it’s about traffic jams – everything they tell me I record and play around Phnom Penh. I think in Cambodia we don’t have freedom of information on TV or radio - people don’t know everything that happens here. But they need to know about things like human rights and illegal logging – it’s important to make people think about our country.” “This is my first performance art piece, and at first I was really shy. Most people on the street encourage me, although someone told me that it’s good to care about my country but better to look out for myself. I’m afraid I will be arrested as we don’t have much freedom of speech here. The police always ask about my bike – the speaker is really loud!” As well as the radio bike, Chanrado is making a film about the people in the white building. “It’s a short documentary which I will play on a TV rather than a projector, to re-enforce the commentary on the lack of free speech on TV”, he says.

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White Building, landmark or lost cause? Blu Simon Wasem Blu Simon Wasem takes a more spontaneous approach to his residency than his upstairs neighbour Chanrado. The 26 year old Brazilian artist originally trained in gastronomy, and the warm home cookingstyle intuitive mishmash of ideas and disciplines is the core of his residency. “I’m not sure what my project really is until I finish. For me, this residency is more of an exchange platform about the process rather than the final piece. There’s no end and no beginning. ”, he explains. One wall of his airy residency space is already covered in maps, tickets and notes, mementos documenting his four year journey across Asia. During his final residency exhibition, two walls are occupied by traditional gallery hangings and a video installation, and Blu himself adds yet another dimension to the mix, with a performance piece and live music. “I let myself be influenced by the community. I just hung out with the people living here, and found local art scenes and collaborated with them. This is already artwork: there is no difference between art and life. The exhibition will be sharing this private experience with the audience.”

An icon of modernist Cambodian architecture, the White Building was originally intended to provide low-cost housing to civil servants. The building’s facade has been neglected, and although it has historically facilitated much of the cities art scene, the controversial building is now criticised by some for being a hotbed of prostitution and gang activity. But is demolishing the White Building the answer? “People from the outside say it’s bad, but they don’t know about the art gallery and the support they have”, reflects Chorada.

Blu also hopes to involve a more unusual White Building community in his artwork. “I feel spirits here at night, so I have started to leave food and light incense for them. In the final performance I will make an altar and ask people coming to see the exhibition if they want to bring an offering – the spirits are also guests in the exhibition!” Although he feels some residents see him as a strange foreign guy in a sarong, Blu feels a certain connection between Cambodian and Brazilian culture. “Cambodian artists have something to say. It’s a growing scene. The social economic situation means that the artists make art from no money – they make something out of nothing. It’s like brazil in the 1960s.”

45


UR weekend

On the Road BIKING TO NEAK LOEUNG

BY C.M. GRIFFIN Cycle enthusiast C.M Griffin sets off with down Highway 1 on a journey to the Phnom Penh countryside, winding his way past temples, suburbs and coconut stands to drink a glass of cool beer at an endangered ferry port. Here’s what you’ll find on ‘The Best Road Leaving Phnom Penh’... It was warm and sunny day with a good chance of dust - like most days now when two of my friends and I set off in search of Neak Loeung on bikes of varying credibility. Soon after setting off, our push-pedal chariots clambered up and coasted down the closest thing to a hill we would see on our two-day adventure: the Monivong Bridge. This is the northern terminus of Highway 1, which could aptly be called “The Best Road Leaving Phnom Penh” because, unlike its siblings, it is not pocked, scarred, and pitted. This singular characteristic makes it perfect for a bicycle trip.

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On the other side of the bridge, the NH1 passes through what might loosely be called a burgeoning suburb. In reality, this stretch is little more than a smattering of Western-style complexes that quickly give way to rural river landscapes and ramshackle settlements. The road winds its way in a southeastward arc along the Mekong for 60 kilometers before coming to an abrupt halt at our final destination: the Neak Loeung ferry dock. First, we reach a small spit of town some 42 kilometers before the dock. At its center is the Kokir Market where, amidst vegetable and meat purveyors, a few coconut vendors line the road, peeking out from forlorn, color-washed umbrellas. These sirens of Highway 1 tempt with gracious hospitality and nondescript plastic chairs. And as their sweet coconut elixirs replenish veins and capillaries, the wide bottoms and broad backs of the chairs seem to drain the willpower to move on. But rest lightly. The road calls. There is little time to reflect


on the brief kilometers that have passed because Prasat Vimean Koh Pos temple lies just down the road. An audacious monument in an otherwise subtle landscape, Prasat Vimean boasts a giant, nine-headed rearing concrete serpent. The temple itself incorporates the four-faced Bodhisattvas of Bayon, that inner sanctum of Ankor Thom. At Bayon the compassionate heads now look down through their silent centuries to find photosnapping tourists, here at Prasat Vimean, those same gentle faces look out over those faithful who find in this temple a lush, shady refuge on an otherwise long and sunny road.

final respite for the road-weary. These are the places to tuck in before making a final push into the small town that the ferry industry has sprouted on this side of the Mekong. The town, listed as “Neak Loeung Ferry” on the map, will one day have to find a new identity when the Neak Loeung Bridge, begun in late 2011 and funded by the Japanese government, comes to fruition. Most estimates put completion in 2015, which equates to a precious few years that travelers have to experience this unique little ferry trip. The impending date also leaves little time for Neak Loeung and “Neak Loeung Ferry” to adapt and reinvent themselves. For the time being, though, “Neak Loeung

Prasat Vimean and the smattering of local eateries just down the road from it offer a

47


Ferry� hosts a vibrant assortment of small shops and restaurants, street vendors, and brazen street children who seem almost uninterested in actually selling any of their wares. In addition to these stalwarts, this port town also welcomes an unending convergence of travelers: Vietnam-bound Cambodians and tourists alike, bus drivers, and the occasional bicyclists. These passersby vie for pole position when the arriving ferry docks, and the frenetic activity caused by this mingling of drivers, passengers, sellers, and children only abates once through the ferry terminal gates and safely onto the ferry.

The ferry itself is a flat, barge-like affair that seems intended less for people and more for trans-Cambodian trucks, busses, and vans. Behind these, at the back, is the holding area for everything else. Women weave through this maze of machinery selling sodas and snacks as the river breeze sweeps away the sweaty, weary kilometers and promises, as all river crossing do, renewal. And there, out in the distance over the starboard side, is a lone second-story balcony adorned with bamboo stalks hanging in beer-bottle vases. That is the goal. From that vantage, the sun sets into a hazy landscape just on the far side of the Mekong, and the cold beer glasses empty themselves into thirsty travelers – a perfect celebration of our trip before we do it all over again, in reverse, on our journey back home the next day.

If you are looking for a good place to rent a bicycle go to FLYING BIKES Address: No. 8, St. 114 - 023 210 765

or 2cycle Cambodia 2cyclecambodia.com

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5 New Year’s By EVE WATLING

#1 Quit drinking “*Megaphone crackles* STEP AWAY FROM STREET 51!”. In a city with more than its fair share of hedonists, sometimes it can seem that your night out has to involve at least five beers and a trip to Katy Perri’s. Actually though, there are many more creative options that won’t leave you with drymouth and a lingering sense of regret the next morning... Some things to do in Phnom Penh (that dont involve drinking): Nerd Night– –‘Plae Pakaa’ traditional performances at the National Museum - Sunset cruise on the Tonle Sap – Meditation (@ Wat Lanka, Feel Good Cafe, Beth’s Goldring’s sangha) – Choir @ Raggamuffin Boathouse – Reiki sessions with Jane Morrisey–– Chess Club @ Open Wine – Cineclub @ Bophana – Lazer Tag and ice skating @ Kids City - The Comedy Club Cambodia – Phnom Tamao wildlife sanctuary

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#2

Learn something new / Get creative

Let the New Year mean a new start – whether its arts or crafts or languages, it’s always good to keep the brain flexible and to push out of your comfort zone in order to try something new. Expand your mind: Various Classes @ Phnom Penh Community College - Franglish club Ukulele circle @ Baitong - Art Therapy @ Ragamuffin Boathouse – Learn how to code @ http://code.org and become the new Zuckerberg


Resolutions for Phnom Penhers #3 Get fit

#4 Get organised

Phnom Penh may suck when it comes to green spaces and clean air, but luckily there are plenty of sports clubs and gyms to help de-smog the lungs and compensate for the fact that you never walk anywhere.

WUPP staffers swear by the Pomodoro time management technique that involves timing yourself in 25 minute segments in order to get a task done without distractions.

Workout inspriration: Combat fitness, Bellydancing and Yoga @ Feel Good Cafe – Countryside jogging @ Hash House Harriers – Gym @ the Place Tiny Toones hip hop dance @ Krama Yoga- Capoeira Kampuchea – Hockey Night Cambodia - Touch Rugby @ Northbridge school - Ultimate Frisbee @ Phnom Penh Ultimate – Yoga @ Various locations – K1 Fitness & Fight factory

pomodorotechnique.com

#5 Explore the city more Living in one place long term means that it’s easy to fall into the ‘work-bar round the corner-home-and repeat’ rut. Occasionally you have to remind yourself that you are living in a city of 4 million people – it’s likely that you’ve never even laid eyes on 90% of the city. Clear a day for walking or cycling round the city, keeping an eye out for potential adventures. WUPP scavenger hunt: how many can you find? The secret rooftop on the city’s most famously dilapidated building? The arcade with the amazingly retro 1990’s video games? The park in the rich Cambodian’s playground that becomes creepily deserted at night?

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How to... Make a Recycled Tin Flower BY EVE WATLING

WUPP TEAMED UP WITH LOCAL CRAFTER ZOE BOYD, WHO SHOWED US HOW TO TURN OUR OLD EMPTY BEER CANS INTO BEAUTIFUL FLOWERS.

• an empty can • pliers • thick gloves (it’s sharp!) • spray paint • wire • a button

1) Drink contents

of can. Rinse, then

cut off the top.

2) Cut out 4 or 5 even petal shapes from the body of the can

3) Pull out the petals so that the can

F inal Resu

lt

becomes flower-shaped

4)

Shape the petals if necessary. You can also turn the excess can from between the petals into stamen by cutting them into thin strips

5)

Time to add some colour! Put the can over some newspaper and spray with spray paint. Use more than one colour if desired.

6)

To make the stem, pierce two small holes next to each other in the centre of the flower. Poke the wire through one of the holes, slide on the button, and then poke the wire back down through the second button hole and through the second can hole. Twist into a knot on the other side to keep secure.

2

1 3

4

5 53


True taste of Italy, unique to Cambodia ! Natural flavours and textures. Terrazza is the combination of this culinary holy trinity of dining exellence. Our Chef will prepare Italian culinary masterpieces that will take you on a dream journey across Italy. We also deliver !

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High quality Italian products for your business ! We are importing highest quality products from Italy that can nicely complement your offer at your restaurant, shop… True “dolce vita” style! Please check www.terrazza.asia.

Fresh and authentic Italian products ! Our Deli shop is a home to the authentic Italian products of highest quality. Stop by whenever you feel like preparing an awesome Italian meal at home should that be a romantic dinner, family lunch or a little bite.

Opening time: 9am - 10pm daily 1c, Street 282, BKK1 Phnom Penh, Cambodia +855 (0) 23 214 660 reservations@terrazza.asia


T OF S I L Y PLA MONTH THE

DJ Sequence

More info & music at : phnom-penh-underground.com facebook.com/phnompenhunderground facebook.com/sequencednb

Listen to DJ Sequence ‘s exclusive set only on: wuppmag.com

4 tunes that never leave my record box 1. Makoto – Voyager “It always makes me laugh when people call this style ambient! Listen to this and get transported far away from the everyday world.” DJ SEQUENCE ARRIVED

2. DJ Marky - LK (Marcus Intalex & ST Files Remix)

IN PHNOM PENH IN 2011

“As soon as people hear the flamenco guitars on this they start to smile – and when they smile, they start to dance.”

AND SINCE THEN HAS BEEN SPINNING AT PAR-

3. Michael Jackson - Human Nature (Makoto & Specialist 2007 Remix)

TIES LIKE BASS:SESSION,

“You might be surprised to hear me playing Michael Jackson but this beautiful bootleg by Japanese maestro Makoto ticks all the right boxes.”

TECH-PENH, BERLIN TROPICAL,

HIGH

RISE

AND

BOMB THE BASS. IN 2013 HE SET UP THE PHNOM PENH

UNDERGROUND

WEBSITE, TO

WHICH

BRING

AIMS

TOGETHER

4. Top Cat & Rebel MC - Police In Helicopter - Serial Killaz VIP Mix “Old Skool Ragga Jungle updated for now. As soon people hear the “Police in Helicopter / Searchin’ Marijuana” sample, they go crazy.”

4 t un e s t h a t I’ m f e e li n g r i ght n ow

ALL THE DIFFERENT UN-

1. Dr Meaker – Fighter

DERGROUND CREWS IN

“Starts off soulfully and beautifully, so when the dirty, filthy bass drops, it’s like getting a punch in the face from someone wearing a velvet glove.”

PHNOM PENH AND PROVIDE TO

AN THE

ALTERNATIVE COMMER­ CIAL

CLUBS IN THE CITY. HIS STYLE IS 100% DRUM AND BASS – PLAYING THE FULL SPECTRUM FROM SILKY SMOOTH LIQUID FUNK TO THE TUFFEST NU-JUNGLE.

2. Makoto ft. Christian Urich - Girl I’m Running Back 2 U (Random Movement Remix) “Disco DnB? Funk DnB? Who knows and who cares – forget about the labels and lose yourself in the slinky, twisting bassline.”

3. David Boomah & Juxci Dnero – Soundboy Robber “Produced by my pal Serum, this is a tour de force of the NuJungle style. If you can’t feel this, you need to check your head.”

4. Dom & Roland – Unofficial Jah “Just out, this an amazing tune that sounds like it has just arrived from 500 years in the future. Like Bladerunner on a dancefloor.” Photo: Jeremie Montessuis for Film Noir Studio

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COCKTAIL OF THE MONTH

Dragon Mojito As Cambodia’s thirst for cocktails grows, bars are popping up everywhere selling everything from buckets of e-numbers to crisply mouth-watering elixirs. WUPP lends a hand to help you serve up a slice of the latter, for a fun cocktail-slurping night that tastes great, but doesn’t break the bank.

Dragon Mojito Dragon Mojito is a refreshing alcoholic cocktail with fresh Dragonfruit and mint. It’s an easy going, refreshing drink which goes well with the sunset at Knai Bang Chatt’s Sailing Club restaurant.

Ingredients : 45ml Tequila, 3pcs fresh lime, 4pcs fresh dragon fruit, 15pcs fresh mint leaf 15ml sugar syrup Top up with soda water

Method: Pour all ingredients into the highball glass, gently smash them all equally & finally top up with soda, Garnish, Dragon fruit wedge and mint leaf

Info: www.knaibangchatt.com PhumThmey, Sangkat Prey Thom, Kep Cambodia

+ 855 (0)78 333 686

57


UR society

A Day in the Life of...

A Gardener

WUPP GETS THE LOWDOWN ON THE DAILY LIFE OF PEOPLE IN PHNOM PENH. THIS MONTH, WE TALK TO A RIVERSIDE GARDENER, 35. AS TOLD TO SENTOSA MAM AND EVE WATLING, ILLUSTRATION BY EVE WATLING

I wake up at 5am, go jogging, and then start work at 6am. Every day, we work on a different plot of land along the riverside, under the palm trees. At first we weed, and then we rake the earth flat and start planting. At 12pm we take an hour lunch break, go eat in the market, and then carry on working. Between the three of us working together, it takes a whole day to finish this 6m2 circle of land. We go home when we finish the plot of land – there’s no time limit, but it’s usually around 5pm. After I go shower, and then start my second job as a motodop driver, usually finishing at 12am. It’s tiring,

58

but I’m used to it, and I get Saturdays off. After work I go home, watch sports and sleep. I have a family but we are separated, so sometimes I have fun with girls... I’ve been doing this job for 6 years. I like it because it’s easy and I can rest when I’m tired. I prefer gardening to moto driving because it’s doing something good for society, making something that people enjoy. I like working on our land. Before this, I spent two years as a soldier, fighting on the Thai border. I loved to serve the country. That was really my dream job.


t e e r t S tyle s

PHOTO: SENTOSA MAM

Sheena IS A TEACHER FROM MELBOURNE my clothes I get most of in Melbourne. s op sh e ag from vint tterns pa ix m to I like

Ratarotana IS A BANKING STUDENT FROM PHNOM PENH. I like big t-shirts and short shorts. I love short hair.

Molyka

IS A GOVERNMENT WORKER FROM PHNOM PENH. I like simple styles. I love JLo’s style!

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KHMER GAMES TA TA SOM PLEUNG (GRANDFATHER, I HAVE SOME FIRE?) BY EVE WATLINGCAN AND OUM CHANVATEY

PLAYERS: At least 6

ILLUSTRATION BY EVE WATLING

Play paper rock scissors. The loser becomes the Grandpa, who sits on the floor with a pile of rocks in front of him – this is the ‘fire’. The other players form a single-file line in front of him. The person on the front is the mother and the rest of the players are her children. The mother asks “Grandpa, can I have some fire?’ and the grandpa will answer ‘What will you do with it?’. The mother says: ‘We want to cook snails with it’. Then Grandpa asks ‘Give me some snails!’ The mother says: ‘No!’. Everyone in the line spreads apart their legs. The grandpa is angry – he throws the ‘fire’ rocks through their legs. The family tries to avoid the rocks hitting their legs. If someone gets hit by the rock, they will be eliminated.

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If there are still kids left, the grandfather asks to have the child directly behind the mother – the ‘front’ child. The mother says ‘no’ and so the grandpa says ‘Can I have the back child?’. The mother says ‘take them if you can catch them’. The mother spreads her arms, trying to protect her children, while the grandpa tries to reach around her and catch them. The children hold onto the mother and each other, keeping in a line, dodging the grandpa. If they break the line, the kids behind the break have to go to the grandpa. There’s not really a winner – it’s about the joy of running around and catching the kids, one by one. The game ends when Grandpa gets all the kids.


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•agenda•

NOT TO MISS>>>>>>>>>>>>>> The Piano Trilogy @ Doors, Jan 8th, 7:30PM/8:20PM/9:10PM >>Barry Speirs, Gabi Fa ja and Philippe Javelle perform 3 solo sets at Doors, one of Phnom Penh’s premier Jazz Spots. Jahzad @ Equinox, Jan 17th, 09:00 PM >> Ska Jazz Fusion

DJ Cut Killer @ Pontoon sposored by WUPP Mag, Jan 17th

REGULARS>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>> Monday Happy Mondays @ Showbox, 6PM Meditation @ Feel Good Studio, 6PM - 7PM Franglish Club @ The Plantation Hotel 06:30 PM Tuesday Combat Fitness @ Feel Good Studio, 6PM - 7PM Black & White Silent and not so Silent Movie Nights @ Le Jardin, 6PM - 8PM Swing Dancing @ DOORS, 7PM Joey Paz @ The Village, 8PM Salsa Parties @ The Groove, 8PM Wednesday Tiny Toones in the Garden @ Le Jardin, 5PM – 6PM Belly Dancing @ Feel Good Studio, 7PM - 8PM Ladies Night @ The Village, 7PM Lipstick @ St-Tropez Phnom Penh, 9PM till late Thursday Yoga @ Feel Good Studio, 6PM - 7:30PM High Heels @ Raffles Hotel, 8PM X-PAT-SOUND system DJ party @ Meta House, 8:30PM La Deca’DANCE @ St-Tropez Phnom Penh, 9PM till late Vanity, Ladies Night @ NOVA, 9PM till late Friday Hip-Hop @ Feel Good Studio, 6PM - 7PM Seafood Friday @ Raffles, 6PM Sunset Sandpit Sessions @ Le Jardin, 6PM - 9PM Saturday Raffles’s Personality Brunch @ Raffles Hotel, 12PM Brunch Saturdays @ Raffles, 12PM Rhythm Sessions @ DOORS, 9:30PM Sunset Sandpit Sessions @ Le Jardin, 6PM Sunday The Brunch @ DOORS, 11:30PM Family Sunday @ Raffles Hotel, 12PM Jazz & BBQ @ Le Jardin, 5PM - 8PM Sunday Funday Brunch Buffet @ Nagaworld, 12PM

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Dear WUPP, I’ve been mea go gluten-fre ning to while, but I have for a where I can g e no idea free food here et glutenin PP. Can you help? Julia, Phnom Pe nh Dear Julia,

Digby’s h as a goo of gluten-free d range produce for your sens itive digestive system. You’ll find it at No. 34 A, St. 306, Phnom Penh , at www.digby or online sbutchery. com.

Erratum We mad e issue sa a crazy mista ke in ou ying tha r la tA and pro ducer J ustralian filmm st a away la a st year. mes Gerrand ker past Penh an He is no d w Thank y is far from be in Phnom ou Mr G ing a g e h of humo r r. We’re rand for your s ost. ense truly sor ry.

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Love, WUPP

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h arm We w er by t ere to he h tall y last ilari ch a o t Rea ime we us Sokh rmed p spea – he’s visited a the k boo s flawl reliabl Siem t. e a e n of a If you’r ss Eng lish d goo e ev d dr t e Rea o r in iv p on 0 area, g er in the need 929 244 ive him Siem 06. a ca ll Got a funny WUPP story, a question, a problem, or a dire emergency that for some reason can wait until the next issue comes out? Email eve@wuppmag.com and we’ll sort you right out!


WUPP Mag #17 January  

WUPP Mag #17 January 2014

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