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Vol. VI No. XLV

Westchester’s Most Influential Weekly

E N E R G Y

M AT T E R S

Sandy vs Nuclear Plants

Thursday, November 8, 2012 $1.00

JOHN F. McMULLEN Let’s Start Over Page 4 SHERIF AWAD Lili Sand Artist Page 5 PEGGY GODFREY Maple Terrace Funding Page 6 LARRY M. ELKIN Super Storms Page 10 ROBERT SCOTT Star-Cossed Lovers Page 11

By ROGER WITHERSPOON, Page 7

Post-Sandy Halloween By SHANNON AYALA, Page 9 By SHANNON AYALA, Page 9

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CARLOS GONZALEZ NYS to Waive Class Requirements Page 16 Dr. NASEER ALOMARI Syria & Multi-Power World Order Page 16 RICH MONETTI Bill Clinton Rallies Support in Somers Page 18


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Of Significance Of Of Significance Significance

Community Section ...............................................................................4

Community Section ...............................................................................4 Community Section......................................................................................3 Business ................................................................................................4 Business ................................................................................................4 Calendar......................................................................................................3 Calendar ...............................................................................................4 Calendar ...............................................................................................4 Charity ..................................................................................................5 Charity.........................................................................................................4 Creative Disruption ............................................................................5 Charity ..................................................................................................5 Contest Disruption. ..................................................................................................6 Creative ..................................................................................4 Cultural Perspective ...........................................................................7 Contest ..................................................................................................6 CreativePerspectives................................................................................5 Disruption ............................................................................6 Cultural Energy Issues .......................................................................................8 Creative Disruption ............................................................................6 EducationDevelopment..........................................................................6 .............................................................................................7 Economic In Memoriam ....................................................................................10 Education .............................................................................................7 Fashion ..................................................................................................8 Energy Matters. ..........................................................................................7 Medicine .............................................................................................10 Fashion ..................................................................................................8 Fitness....................................................................................................9 Community................................................................................................9 Najah’s Corner ...................................................................................11 Fitness....................................................................................................9 Health ..................................................................................................10 Movie Review ....................................................................................12 Current ............................................................................10 Health ..................................................................................................10 HistoryCommentary. ................................................................................................10 Music ...................................................................................................12 History.......................................................................................................12 History ................................................................................................10 Ed Koch Movie Review ...................................................................12 Community ........................................................................................13 Ed Koch Movie Review ...................................................................12 Movie Review. ..........................................................................................13 Spoof ....................................................................................................13 Writers Collection.............................................................................14 Spoof ....................................................................................................13 Music. Sports.........................................................................................................13 Scene .......................................................................................13 Books Sports Scene .......................................................................................13 Najah’s...................................................................................................16 Corner ...................................................................................13 Transport Update....................................................................................14 People ..................................................................................................18 Najah’s Corner ...................................................................................13 Writers .Collection.............................................................................14 Reading. ....................................................................................................15 Eye On...................................................................................................16 Theatre ..................................................................................18 Writers Collection.............................................................................14 Books Government Section...................................................................................16 Leaving on a Jet Plane ......................................................................19 Books ...................................................................................................16 Transportation ...................................................................................17 The Albany Section Correspondent. ..................................................................16 Government Transportation ...................................................................................17 Government Section ............................................................................20 ............................................................................17 Government.............................................................................................16 Campaign Trail ..................................................................................20 Government Section ............................................................................17 Albany Correspondent ....................................................................17 Fault Lines. .Development ...............................................................................................17 Economic ..................................................................20 Albany Correspondent ....................................................................17 Mayor Marvin’s Column .................................................................18 Education ...........................................................................................21 Campaign Trail........................................................................................18 Mayor Marvin’s Column .................................................................18 Government.......................................................................................19 TheSection. Hezitorial ....................................................................................21 Government .......................................................................................19 OpEd OpEd Section...............................................................................................18 .........................................................................................23 LegalSection ....................................................................................................23 OpEd .........................................................................................23 Sam Zherks...............................................................................................18 Ed Koch Commentary.....................................................................23 People ..................................................................................................24 Ed Koch Commentary.....................................................................23 Ed Koch Letters toCommentary...........................................................................18 the Editor ..........................................................................24 Strategyto...............................................................................................24 Letters Editor............................................................................25 ..........................................................................24 Help Wanted.................................................................................................18 Weir Onlythe Human OpEd Section .........................................................................................25 Weir Only Human ............................................................................25 LegalAds. Notices ..........................................................................................26 Legal .......................................................................................................18 ..........................................................................................27 Legal Notices ..........................................................................................26

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Westchester On the Level is heard from Monday to Friday, from 10 a.m. to 12 Noon http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/Westchester kersthe Philharmonic Orchestra Sadewhite is our scheduled Westchester On the Level is Conductor heard fromJames Monday to Friday, from 10 a.m.guest to 12Friday, Noon on Internet: http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/WestchesterOntheLevel. Join March 30. Jointoll-free the conversation by calling OntheLevel. on Internet: by http://www.BlogTalkRadio.com/WestchesterOntheLevel. the the conversation calling to 1-877-674-2436. Please stay on topic. Join It is howeverby anticipatedtoll-free that thetojury will conclude its Please deliberation ontopic. either Monthe conversation 1-877-674-2436. stay on Please stay onbetopic. Richard Narog March andcalling Hezi Aris your co-hosts. thewe week day 1-347-205-9201. or Tuesday, 26 or 27.are Should that theIncase, willbeginning resume ourFebruary regular 20th and ending on Richard Narog andhave Hezi are entourage your InYonkers the week beginning February 24th,schedule we an Aris exciting of the guests. programming and announce thatco-hosts. fact on Tribune website.February 20th and ending on February 24th, we exciting entourage ofshow. guests. Richard Narog and HezianAris are co-hosts of the Every Monday is have special. On Monday, February 20th, Krystal Wade, a celebrated participant in http:// Every Monday is special. On Monday, 20th, Krystal a celebrated participant in http:// www.TheWritersCollection.com is ourFebruary guest. Krystal Wade isWade, a mother of three who works fifty miles www.TheWritersCollection.com our guest. Krystal is a novel mother threeaccepted who works fifty miles from home and writes in her “spare istime.” “Wilde’ s Fire,”Wade her debut hasofbeen for publication from home and writes ininher “spare “Wilde’iss her Fire,” her debut has sbeen accepted and should be available 2012. Nottime.” far behind second novel,novel “Wilde’ Army.” How for doespublication she do it? and available Tuneshould in andbefind out. in 2012. Not far behind is her second novel, “Wilde’s Army.” How does she do it? Tune in and find out. Co-hosts Richard Narog and Hezi Aris will relish the dissection of all things politics on Tuesday, February Co-hosts Richard andPresident Hezi ArisChuck will relish the dissection of his all things politicsfrom on Tuesday, February 21st. Yonkers CityNarog Council Lesnick will share perspective the august inner 21st. Yonkers Lesnick will share 22nd. his perspective from theEsq., august sanctum of theCity CityCouncil CouncilPresident ChambersChuck on Wednesday, February Stephen Cerrato, will inner share sanctum of the CityonCouncil Chambers Wednesday, February24th 22nd. Esq.,bewill share his political insight Thursday, Februaryon 23rd. Friday, February hasStephen yet to beCerrato, filled. It may a propihis political Thursday, February 23rd. Friday, February 24th has yet to be filled. It mayofbeThat a propitious day toinsight sum uponwhat transpired throughout the week. A sort of BlogTalk Radio version Was tious day to sum up what transpired throughout the week. A sort of BlogTalk Radio version of That Was The Week That Was (TWTWTW). The Week That Was (TWTWTW). For those who cannot join us live, consider listening to the show by way of an MP3 download, or on For thoseWithin who cannot join us consider listening the the show by wayinof MP3 that download, orlink on demand. 15 minutes of live, a show’ s ending, you cantofind segment ouranarchive you may demand. Within 15 minutes of a show’ s ending, you can find the segment in our archive that you may link to using the hyperlink provided in the opening paragraph. to using the hyperlink provided in the opening paragraph. The entire archive is available and maintained for your perusal. The easiest way to find a particular interview The is available and maintained forfor yourtheperusal. easiest to findofa the particular interview is toentire searcharchive Google, or any other search engine, subjectThe matter or way the name interviewee. For isexample, to search Google, or any other search engine, for the subject matter or the name of the interviewee. search Google, Yahoo, AOL Search for Westchester On the Level, Blog Talk Radio, or use For the example, hyperlinksearch above.Google, Yahoo, AOL Search for Westchester On the Level, Blog Talk Radio, or use the hyperlink above.

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The Westchester Guardian is a weekly newspaper devoted to the unbiased reporting of events The Westchester Guardian is a weekly newspaper devoted to the living unbiased reporting of events and developments that are newsworthy and significant to readers in, and/or employed in, and developments that are newsworthy and significant to readers living in, and/or employed in, Westchester County. The Guardian will strive to report fairly, and objectively, reliable informaWestchester County.tion Thewithout Guardian willor strive to report fairly, andduty objectively, reliable informafavor compromise. Our first will be to the PEOPLE’S tion without favor or compromise. Our first duty will be to the PEOPLE’S RIGHT TO KNOW, by the exposure of truth, without fear or hesitation, RIGHT KNOW, by themay exposure ofthe truth, without fearoforFREEDOM hesitation, no matterTO where the pursuit lead, in finest tradition no matter where the pursuit may lead, in the finest tradition of FREEDOM OF THE PRESS. OF THE PRESS. The Guardian will cover news and events relevant to residents and The Guardian will cover news and eventsAs relevant to residents and businesses all over Westchester County. a weekly, rather than businesses all over Westchester County. As a weekly, rather than focusing on the immediacy of delivery more associated with daily focusingwe onwill the instead immediacy more associated daily journals, seek of to delivery provide the broader, morewith comprejournals, we will instead seek to provide the broader, more comprehensive, chronological step-by-step accounting of events, enlightened hensive, chronological step-by-step accounting of events, enlightened with analysis, where appropriate. Professional Dominican with analysis, where appropriate. Hairstylists & Nail Technicians Professional Dominican Hair Cuts • Styling •Nail Wash Technicians & Set •journalism’ Perming From amongst s classic key-words: who, what, when, Hairstylists & Pedicure • Acrylic Nails • Fill Ins • Silk Wraps • Nail Art Designs From amongst journalism’ s classic key-words: who, what, when, Highights • Coloring Hair • Extensions • Manicure • Eyebrow Waxing Cuts • Styling • Wash & Set •how, Permingthe why and how will drive our pursuit. We where, why, and Pedicure • Acrylic Nails • Fill Ins • Silkwhy, Wraps •and Nail Art Designs where, how, the why andand how drive our will use our •more time, ourwill resources, to pursuit. get past We the Highights • Coloring • Extensions • Manicure Eyebrowabundant Waxing Yudi’s Salon 610 Main St, New Rochelle, NY 10801 914.633.7600 will use our more abundant time, and our resources, to get past the initial ‘spin’ and ‘damage control’ often characteristic of immediate initial and damage often characteristic immediate Yudi’s Salon 610 Main St, New Rochelle, NY ‘spin’ 10801 914.633.7600 news releases, to ‘reach thecontrol’ very heart of the matter: the of truth. We will news releases, to reach the very heart of the matter: the truth. will take our readers to a point of understanding and insight whichWe cannot take our readers to a point of understanding and insight which cannot be obtained elsewhere. be obtained elsewhere. To succeed, we must recognize from the outset that bigger is not necesTo succeed, must recognize from theacknowledge outset that bigger is not necessarily better.we And, furthermore, we will that we cannot be sarily better. And, furthermore, we will acknowledge that we cannot all things to all readers. We must carefully balance the presentationbe of all things to all readers. We must carefully balance the presentation of relevant, hard-hitting, Westchester news and commentary, with features relevant, hard-hitting, Westchester news and commentary, with features and columns useful in daily living and employment in, and around, the and columns useful in daily living and employment in, and around, the county. We must stay trim and flexible if we are to succeed. county. We must stay trim and flexible if we are to succeed.

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News & Notes from Northern Westchester By MARK JEFFERS Our thoughts and prayers go out to all of those hurt by Hurricane Sandy. We hope for a speedy recovery to all of the area families and extended families devastated by this destructive storm if we can bring a smile to your face we will try with this edition of “News and Notes.” Congratulations to the organizers of the 8th annual Lindsey Walk/Run 5K recently held at Purchase College. The event is sponsored by PEACE Outside CAMPUS Foundation and honors Lindsey Bonistall who was raped and murdered in May 2005. The event raises awareness for safety as well as being a fundraiser; our hats are off to this group for a job well done. Wow, now that’s a whole lot of teaching…as the West Center Congregational Church Sunday School in Bronxville celebrates its 100th anniversary, I feel a bit smarter just writing about this… Nine-time Emmy winning medical journalist Dr. Max Gomez and Dr. Albert Sheehy are being honored at the Phelps Memorial Hospital Center’s 25th Anniversary Champagne Ball on Saturday, November 10th at Trump National Golf Club in Briarcliff. The Westchester Community College Fine Arts Gallery in Valhalla is showcasing “Residuum,” a photo series by Ann Lovett and Mary Hafeli through November 18th. Our northern Westchester neighbor, acclaimed jazz guitarist who spent sometime chasing fly balls in centerfield for the NY Yankees, Bernie Williams cut the ribbon recently opening the Harvey School’s new athletic center in Katonah. Blue Sky Studios, the creators of the blockbuster movies “Ice Age” and “Rio” among others will take a look at the world of digital animation as the Katonah Museum of Art presents “Ice Age to the Digital Age: The 3D Animation of Blue Sky Studios,” through January 20th. More Katonah news, the Katonah Village Library will hold its ongoing Poetry Series on November 12th with a reading by Dennis Nurske. Purchase College School of Arts will be presenting the opera “Hansel & Gretel” November 16 – 18 at their Performing Arts Center.

Our cats Phoebe and ‘Cuse sent in this item…the 37th Annual Westchester Cat Show is set for November 17 and 18 at the Westchester County Center in White Plains, no they are not entered, but did say it would be a “purrfectly” great time for all. An exhibit documenting the life of Padre Pio through photographs by Elia Stelluto “ll Cammino di Padre Pio” can be seen at the Westchester Italian Cultural Center in Tuckahoe through November 15th. The St. Thomas Orchestra Fall Concert featuring pianist William Wolfram is set for November 17th at the White Plains High School. Congratulations go out to Yorktown Heights residents Lauren Gorstein and Jeffrey Naft and Jamie Costello of Verplanck for being selected as recipients of the Westchester County Youth Board’s 2012 Milly Kibrick Youth Service Awards. The awards are given in memory of Milly Kibrick, a prominent county social worker and youth activist who dedicated her life to helping underprivileged children. This exhibit looks like fun, “Celebrities: We Remember Them Well,” rare and vintage portraits curated by Milton J. Ellenbogen runs through November 10th at the Arts Westchester in White Plains. The Pound Ridge Library’s “Saturday Review of Literature” will feature “State of Wonder” by Ann Patchett on November 10th. I can’t believe it’s this time all ready, but Mamaroneck Artists Guild’s Annual Holiday Show and Boutique kicks off November 15th through January 3rd, admission is free and the gallery is located at 126 Larchmont Avenue in Larchmont. This week’s column is dedicated to all the hard working fire and police departments here in Westchester County, as always they worked above and beyond the call of duty to help those devastated by Hurricane Sandy. Also, to all the local store owners and neighbors for reaching out a friendly hand in a time of need, we are all very fortunate to have folks like this as our neighbors…see you next week. Mark Jeffers resides in Bedford Hills, New York, with his wife Sarah, and three daughters, Kate, Amanda, and Claire.

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

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THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

CHARITY

Yonkers Firefighters Hold Clothing and Care Package Drive For Victims of Hurricane Sandy Hardest Hit in Breezy Point, Queens YONKERS, NY -- The Yonkers Firefighters of the International Association of Fire Firefighters Local 628 (IAFF Local 628) are holding a clothing and care package drive for Hurricane Sandy victims located in some of the hardest hit parts of Queens - Breezy Point, Broad Channel and the Rockaways. Donations of personal care products and clothing are being accepted immediately at any Yonkers firehouse.

Many residents in Breezy Point, Queens have been left homeless after a fire incinerated 110 homes at the height of the storm. Frustration has grown among residents of the hurricane devastated communities of Broad Channel and the Rockaways as they continue to wait for basic aid and supplies. Most residents in these neighborhoods lack access to fresh food, clean water and power. “It is time to come together and

do what we can to help those in dire need,” said Barry McGoey, president of the Yonkers Firefighters IAFF Local 628. “There are thousands of people who have lost everything. It is our hope to offer them what little aid and comfort we can in these desperate times.” The Yonkers Firefighters are asking for donations of personal care items for men, women and children including soap, shampoo,

towels, toothpaste, feminine products, deodorant, etc. Additionally, donations of new or slightly used clothing for men, women and children are needed, including jackets, shoes, boots, gloves, hats, shirts, pants, undergarments, pajamas, etc. Business and corporate donations are also welcome. All items for donation will be accepted immediately at any Yonkers Firehouse. Monetary donations can be made by check, payable to “Local 628 Charities Fund” and mailed to P.O. Box 1071 Yonkers, NY 10703 or dropped off at any Yonkers firehouse.

CREATIVE DISRUPTION

Sandy Tells Us, “Let’s Start Over” By JOHN F. McMULLEN I’m sitting in a Barnes and Noble in Mohegan Lake, NY -- and it is like a refugee camp because no homes in the surrounding upper Westchester / Putman counties in NY have power due to Hurricane Sandy and, thus, Internet connection is non-existent in the homes, so people flock to public Wi-Fi sites. Unfortunately, this Barnes and Noble has very few public access electric outlets and seven to fifteen people are gathered around the ones that are available with multiple electric strips “daisy-chained” for laptop and tablet connection. Because of the multi-hundred people here (with at least half trying to connect), at least as many as the bookstore gets in a week,Internet connection is “iffy” and, even once connected, it is commonplace to be dropped and have to roll the dice all over again to try to connect. The Barnes and Noble free connection is based on an AT&T service and is usually fairly reliable but is obviously overwhelmed today. If one is a CableVision customer and is lucky enough to find one of the few seats near the window in the coffee area, the Optimum Wi-Fi service is reachable but those seats are few. As recently as five years ago, hurricanes would have kept us in our house -- but times have changed. It’s not even enough now to have just the phone capability and e-mail access that most smartphones provides provide. Now the bookstore is filled

with students doing papers and assignments; business people entering orders and checking systems; and other maniacal eccentrics, such as this writer, demanding access as a constitutional God-given right. There are at least 50 people on the line to get coffee and cakes, 10 times the normal line and the jockeying for outlets is getting worse and worse -- how did we reach this stage where we are both so dependent and so vulnerable? --- and what does this mean when we are in an age when we are concerned about “cyberwarfare,” which we are told may take out our electrical grid? Obviously, better computer security cannot help deal with havoc caused by hurricanes nor with electrical outages because of downed trees and wires but, when we see through this disaster, just how much more dependent we are now on electric power than ever before, we can only imagine what it would be like if someone were able to knock out the entire grid. The present outage is limited to a small, albeit highly populated, section of the east coast of the United States -- and, driving 5 miles over here to our local “refugee center,” I saw the large majority of businesses closed, traffic lights out of operation, and gas stations unable to pump gas. In New York City, the entire area south of 34th Street is without electricity with thousands of businesses and hundreds of thousands of individuals without power. One can only imagine what would be the impact of a nationwide electrical shutdown -- and, of course, the grid is

controlled by computer systems. No matter what our technologists do, hackers, crackers, virus writers, etc. all seem to be able to get around the safeguards which they install. For years, the “Computer Emergency Response Team” (“CERT” -- www. cert.org) has been warning users about security problems in Microsoft products, particularly “Internet Explorer” and “Outlook.” One is sure that Microsoft has been addressing these problems as it finds out about them. Yet on October 25, 2012, it issued a new report, “Vulnerability Note VU#948750 -- Microsoft Outlook Web,” explaining a system hole under which an attacker could “execute arbitrary scripting code.” Microsoft is certainly not the only culprit in the security area. We have all heard of infiltration of bank, credit card, on-line services (Yahoo, etc.), and even Federal Government systems -- infiltration that leads to identity theft, financial loss, password compromises, and vandalism -- and what we have heard is only the tip of the iceberg. “2600: The Hacker Quarterly” magazine regularly publishes vulnerabilities of systems which, hopefully, are soon repaired by at-risk firms (A weekly radio show, “Off The Hook”, hosted by the editor of 2600, Emmanuel Goldstein, is heard on WBAI, 99.5 FM and is streamed at www.2600.com). It is obvious that what our virus programs, security systems, and systems administrators have been doing isn’t working -- at least not 100% of the time, and that is what

is really required to protect our cyber infrastructure. So, what to do? Dr. Peter G. Neumann, who has been monitoring computer security for SRI International for forty years and has edited the “Risks Digest” (http:// en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RISKS_ Digest) since 1985, analyzing the constantly changing technology world -- from the mainframe to the iPad -- and the security challenges that the constant innovation brings (for a full profile on Dr. Neumann, see the recent New York Times article -- http://www.nytimes. com/2012/10/30/science/rethinkingthe-computer-at-80.html) is ready for a different approach. As the Times article relates, “It is remarkable, then, that years after most of his contemporaries have retired, Dr. Neumann is still at it and has seized the opportunity to start over and redesign computers and software from a ‘clean slate.’ He is leading a team of researchers in an effort to completely rethink how to make computers and networks secure, in a five-year project financed by the Pentagon’s Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, or Darpa, with Robert N. Watson, a computer security researcher at Cambridge University’s Computer Laboratory. ‘I’ve been tilting at the same windmills for basically 40 years,’ said Dr. Neumann recently during a lunchtime interview at a Chinese restaurant near his art-filled home in Palo Alto, Calif. ‘And I get the impression that most of the folks who are responsible don’t want to hear about complexity. They are interested in quick and dirty solutions.’” I’ve only known Peter for twentyone of those forty years (He and I were part of the founding group of the first

“Computers and Privacy Conference,” chaired by microcomputer pioneer Jim Warren in 1991, and I have read Risks off and on since its founding on-line (the Google connection to the Digests may be found at https://groups.google.com/forum/ m/?fromgroups#!forum/comp.risks) and in the monthly “Communications of the ACM”) but know him well enough to know that he is not a wide-eyed “visionary” but rather a very practical, well-grounded and very intelligent security professional. It is well to remember that when reading the Times article, because some of his comments sound somewhat scary -- “Dr. Neumann reasons that the only workable and complete solution to the computer security crisis is to study the past half century’s research, cherry-pick the best ideas and then build something new from the bottom up.”-- when one realizes the massive effort that would be required. In spite of the effort required, Richard A. Clarke, the nation’s former counterterrorism czar and an author of “Cyber War: The Next Threat to National Security and What to Do About It” (http://www.nytimes. com/2010/04/27/books/27book. html), agrees with Neumann and is quoted in the same Times piece as saying that Neumann’s “’Clean Slate’ effort, as it is called, is essential. Fundamentally all of the stuff we’re doing to secure networks today is putting bandages on and putting our fingers in the dike, and the dike springs a leak somewhere else. We have not fundamentally redesigned our networks for 45 years,” he said. “Sure, it would cost an enormous amount to rearchitect, but let’s start it and see if it works better and let the marketplace decide.” Continued on page 5


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

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Clarke’s own book, written in 2010, stresses that the next war will be based on bytes rather than bombs and, if so (and this writer believes that it is), we are ill-prepared. If Neumann’s approach is the best possible, then no matter how expensive and time consuming, so be it! Creative Disruption is a continuing series examining the impact of constantly accelerating technology on the world around us. These changes normally happen under our personal radar until we find that the world as we knew it is no more.

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CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

DISRUPTION

“Let’s Start Over”

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

Lili, the Sand Artist By SHERIF AWAD Liliya “Lili” Chistina is a twenty-something Russian artist whose creative practice is a cross between painting, animation and performance, in which she uses one of the oldest materials known to mankind; sand. Despite her young

age, Lili made regular appearances at opening events in Russia and also across Europe, representing her Russian homeland. At the October 2012 Orenburg Film Festival she created a visual representation of the talent participating at the opening ceremony incorporating wide angle plasma screens to depict the various filmmakers,

Lili in the middle of a performance.

John F. McMullen has been involved in technology for over 40 years and has written about it for major publications. He may be found on Facebook and his current non-technical writing, a novel, “The Inwood Book” and “New & Collected Poems by johnmac the bard” are available on Amazon. He is a professor at Purchase College and has previously taught at Monroe College, Marist College, and the New School for Social Research.

awards, and musical numbers. Her improvisational imagery was striking for its use of vivid colors flowing among interweaving icons that brought one’s senses to the edge of wonderment. Her artistry drove me to meet her in Moscow right after the festival to learn more about the secrets of her craft. In her performances, Lili uses her fingers to reshape sands of different colors on a plane of glass

Live performance with three screens.

lit from the top by an overhead projector. In a darkened space, video-photography memorializes the creative process of her work and is projected onto one or more large screens depicting the process from beginning to its resultant animated cartoon form in real time. Lili started to draw when she was a young girl attending kindergarten. Because her skills surpassed Continued on page 7

where are the thinkers who will foresee the forces of nature?

OPEN HOUSE Saturday November 10 and 17 10:00 a.m.

Changing the world requires revolutionary thinking that goes above and beyond, and at Vaughn College that’s the type of thinking we instill in you. Our students come with vision and expectations and leave ready to challenge the ordinary in the fields of engineering, technology, management and aviation. Vaughn offers an array of master’s, bachelor’s and associate’s degree programs — including one of the only degree programs in mechatronic engineering in the New York metropolitan area — and a faculty that is grounded in real-life experience. It’s no wonder that 95 percent of our graduates are employed or continue their education within one year of graduation. Set your sights on Vaughn College and start thinking above and beyond.

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CULTURAL PERSPECTIVES

Lili, the Sand Artist Continued from page 5

other children of her age, teachers suggested she must attend a special art school for talented youngsters. She would come to study and grow at the Russian Art Academy, She was trained and supervised by many Russian tutors and painters who taught her classic and modern art disciplines, like painting, drawing, and iconography until one day, she discovered the arts of using sands in visual expressions.” My first influence came from Ilana Yahav, the Israeli artist who mastered sand animation in animated works like Sand Fantasy”, says Lili who also described Ilana’s work as romantic and enjoyable, raising the eternal themes of love and beauty by depicting the world in sand waves. Other influences came from Hungarian artist Ferenc Cako, French animator David Myriam and Su Dabao, the Chinese performance artist. Sand has in fact held great symbolism years before artists adopted its qualities in their contemporary performances that

Lili at the Teatro Circo, in Spain.

sometimes feature music, lights and special effects. It is said that, in dreams, sand reflects purity; in psychology, it is a common symbol of time. Maybe that’s why mankind created hourglasses with sand and made souvenirs of bottles filled with colored sands. Lili remembers that her first “sand sample” came from the backyard of her house. She used a spoon to pick it up then fried it to give it special color. “To get sands for my work, it is not a mystery or a secret. Some like to use samples found near volcanoes. But I like to get

Real-time animation created by Lili’s dexterous fingertips.

sand from different Russians villages or from other countries, like Tunisia and Egypt. Even if I don’t travel there, I tell my friend to bring me a bottle, maybe one kilogram. In order to colorize sand, I must fry it after mixing it with printing inks in an oven. But it is a very messy and difficult process”, she says. 2012 was a good year for Lili. She created a three-minute video animation that is broadcast daily on a big screen at Moscow’s Central Telegraph Office in celebration

Snapshot of Lili’s sand animation videos.

of its 160 anniversary. In Spain, she performed in Circo Teatro, a circus show hosting troupes from all over the world. Lili presented motifs of clowns and animals which drove the organizers to give her an honorary award, although she was not competing. One of Lili’s dreams is to perform with fellow Russian sand artists in live group shows across the country using techno music, laser lights and visual effect. Born in Cairo, Egypt, Sherif Awad

is a film / video critic and curator. He is the film editor of Egypt Today Magazine (www.EgyptToday. com), and the artistic director for both the Alexandria Film Festival, in Egypt, and the Arab Rotterdam Festival, in The Netherlands. He also contributes to Variety, in the United States, and is the film critic of Variety Arabia (http://varietyarabia. com/), in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), the Al-Masry Al-Youm Website (http://www.almasryalyoum.com/en/node/198132) and The Westchester Guardian (www. WestchesterGuardian.com).

ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT

Is New Rochelle IDA Authorization of Maple Terrace Funding Proper? By PEGGY GODFREY Plans for purchasing and renovating the 55 Maple Terrace Senior citizen building were again on the New Rochelle Industrial Development Agency (IDA) agenda on October 25, 2012. It was no surprise that the tax-exempt bonds sought have resurfaced. John Madeo, the project’s manager, stated he had made a presentation several months ago for this l00-unit senior citizen building. Residents there receive HUD subsidized rents through the New Rochelle Community Management Corporation. Since the building has been owned by a nonprofit, the new arrangement would result in taxes for the City of New Rochelle. A P.I.L.O.T. (payment in lieu of taxes) was included in the newly proposed agreement. Madeo

suggested the company is anticipating it will be “one of the winners in the state” by mid-November. Alan D. Fox, Esq., the lawyer representing NRIDA advised that the state funding process “takes a long time to close.” Furthermore, he emphasized, Councilman Lou Trangucci was involved. At that point NRIDA Chair Marianne Sussman referred to Section 1A, advising there was a “lack of sufficient affordable senior housing in New Rochelle”. Madeo disagreed, saying New Rochelle has “done more for seniors than most communities.” NRIDA member Gordon Bell claimed that Westchester housing was under scrutiny and supervision is needed “to get it right for affordable housing”. The motion to authorize seeking tax-exempt bonding from the state for the project was approved unanimously by the four NRIDA

members present. Madeo reinforced that the tax-free bonds are not the obligation of the City or the NRIDA, only Citibank. Financial assistance will include exempting mortgagerecording taxes, sales taxes, and use taxes, in addition to the reduced real estate taxes through a P.I.L.O.T. (payment in lieu of taxes). There was no discussion on how this tax-free bonding would be created and there was no public comment on the agenda allowed by City Manager Chuck Strome, a member of the NRIDA who was absent that evening. When City Manager Strome was later contacted by The Westchester Guardian, he explained the Empire State Development Corporation (ESDC) is authorized to float bonds of this type albeit there are ESDC conditions attached. The state cap is the “greater of $262 Million or 85 times the state population.... The New

Rochelle IDA received an allocation of $1,219,891 which it may use at its discretion without further action by the state.” Strome added, “The project applied to the Empire State Development Corp. for the $9.5 Million Industrial Development Bond Cap for statewide private activity bond allocation authority under federal guidelines is dedicated to facilitate tax-exempt financing for qualified projects originating through Regional Economic Development Councils.” This was because the funds required are more than the City’s IDA allotment, so an additional “volume cap” was requested from the statewide reserve. This statewide reserve consists of funds not used by other issuers. For the Maple Terrace project, Citibank has offered to lend the money with the provision they will be able to issue New York State tax free bonds.

According to NRIDA counsel Alan Fox, Esq., the thrust of these tax-free bonds is to reduce the cost of renovating or refurbishing the facility explaining, “jobs are not the main thrust.” His statement is anathema to recent media reports that Westchester’s IDA placed New Rochelle at the top of the heap with the second highest cost per job in the state. The jobs created for Maple Terrace are temporary construction jobs and do not comply with IDA directives for creating permanent jobs in a community. The New Rochelle IDA regulation states that projects must be judged by “The extent to which they create or retain, permanent private sector jobs.” The next meeting of the IDA was set for November 29, 2012. Peggy Godfrey is a freelance writer, a community activist, and former educator.


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

ENERGY MATTERS

Riding out the Storm: Sandy vs. the Nuclear Plants By ROGER WITHERSPOON The roaring winds, at times approaching 100 miles per hour, were relentless as Hurricane Sandy pushed the Atlantic Ocean towards the eastern

seaboard. The sheer breadth of the Superstorm, with hurricane-force winds radiating some 250 miles from Sandy’s eye, meant 34 nuclear power plants from North Carolina to Vermont would experience extreme weather. While the winds themselves posed little danger to the primary physical structures at nuclear installations, the storm was bound to send trees crashing into utility lines and transformers, causing station blackouts which, along the coasts, could well

along the Hudson River, but Indian Point 3 and Nine Mile Point 2, upstate near Syracuse, were shut down by malfunctions caused by hurricane force winds. In the view of the NRC, the plants all functioned as designed, even if the weather was unpredictable and some problems were not expected. Eleven northeastern nuclear plants in the direct path of Sandy – including all four in New Jersey – were placed on a special alert status several days before the storm struck that featured additional federal monitors and plans to shut down if the winds or waves exceeded pre-determined storm limits. That special watch list included Calvert Cliffs in Lusby, Md.; Peach Bottom, in Delta, Pa.; Three Mile Island 1, in Middletown, Pa.;

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With over 50 years experience, Lexington Capital provides loans from $1,000,000 to $150,000,000 -at some of the lowest interest rates available in the marketplace. Nine Mile Point in Scriba, NY be accompanied by flood waters. In the latter cases, Sandy would provide a test of some of the safety improvements ordered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in the wake of the triple meltdown at Fukushima Daiichi in 2011. At particular risk were nuclear plants along the coastlines of New Jersey and New York, directly in the path of the strongest part of the hurricane. Massive amounts of ocean water were pounded into storm surges sweeping up the Delaware River and other coastal tributaries along the Jersey Shore; or rammed through Long Island Sound and squeezed up the Hudson River. The combination of storm surge and wind would trigger the declaration of an “alert” at the Oyster Creek on Barnegat Bay, and a forced atmospheric steam vent at the nearby Salem 1nuclear plant along the Delaware River in New Jersey. In New York, the twin Indian Point plants rode out floods

Susquehanna, in Salem Township, Pa.; and Millstone, in Waterford, Conn. None of these were as hard hit as the plants in New Jersey and New York. Millstone 3 and Susquehanna 2 reduced power to 75 percent to accommodate strained regional power grids. But the others operated throughout the storm at 100 percent power. New Jersey was a different case. As the Superstorm approached, plant officials tested their backup generators and topped off their diesel generator tanks in case they were cut off from the grid and had to rely on their own power to keep reactors and spent fuel pools cooled. At high tide the Delaware River running past Artificial Island, home to PSE&G’s Salem 1&2, and Hope Creek nuclear power plants, has a normal depth of 89 feet. Salem 1 and Hope Creek were running at full power, Continued on page 7

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Page 8

THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

ENERGY MATTERS

Riding out the Storm: Sandy vs. the Nuclear Plants Continued from page 7

while Salem 2 and Oyster Creek were shut for refueling and maintenance. Joe Delmar, spokesman for PSEG Nuclear, said refueling operations were suspended Sunday at 6 PM and unnecessary workers had been sent home. Under NRC guidelines, Salem

a three-part, “once-through” cooling system. The first, or primary loop, is the water superheated to 549 degrees within the reactor and piped through thousands of small tubes within the steam generators. The reactor system is pressurized to 2,235 pounds per square inch to keep the water liquid. The second loop is relatively

Hope Creek-Salem Nuclear. and Hope Creek had to shut down if there were sustained winds of 74 miles per hour or the river reached 99 feet in depth. The plants’ “design basis” states the sea wall would repel water up to 120 feet, a level only anticipated with a Category 4 hurricane. But Delmar said the storm pushed water levels in the Delaware River Monday night to 98 feet, and “the winds created additional waves approximately 12 feet high.” That was problematic. Hope Creek has a massive cooling tower to cool the hot water and steam generated by its reactor. Salem, on the other hand, uses the Delaware River to form a critical third loop in

clean water which flows over the tubes in the steam generator, is heated to steam, and then blows over the fans on the 40-ton electric generating turbine. The steam then flows

over a heat exchanger featuring the third loop, containing cold Delaware River water. The steam is cooled, condenses back to a liquid, and is piped back to the steam generator to complete the power cycle. The warm water in the third loop is returned to the Delaware River. But just after 4 AM Tuesday morning, while Sandy’s eye was barreling down on the Jersey Shore, the high waves in the river swamped four of the six massive pumps in a building along the river’s edge which pull in the water through a 40-foot wide conduit jutting into the river. The loss of these pumps caused a chain reaction of events: The loss of river water meant the steam in the secondary loop was no longer being condensed, sending hot steam back into the carefully calibrated system. The added work load, coupled with accumulating junk clogging Salem’s underwater intake pipe, caused the two remaining pumps to fail. With its cooling system compromised, operators stopped the fission process by slamming the boron control rods into the reactor. Now, however, operators faced the problem of what to do with the heat in the reactor. The automated system opened a relief valve and

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thousands of gallons of superheated water from the steam generator were released in an “atmospheric steam dump.” “It sounds like a train whistle from a steam locomotive,” explained David Lochbaum, nuclear safety expert with the Union of Concerned Scientists and a former consultant to the NRC and Oyster Creek. “People who live near the plant can hear it,

which owns the plant, declared an “Unusual Event,” the lowest of four levels of nuclear alert, due to high water in the intake building controlling the plant’s cooling system. At the same time, the regional grid shut down and the plant had to rely on its diesel generators to keep its safety systems operating. Oyster Creek is a boiling water reactor, the same type as those at

Oyster Creek and it looks like a steam blast. You can see it from quite a distance away.” The steam may contain some radioactive particles which were in the reactor’s water and escaped into the secondary loop through minute cracks in the steam generator’s tubes. But the amount is small and, according to the NRC barely detectable. “The irony is that the plant routinely vents radioactive gas into the atmosphere,” said Lochbaum, “and if Salem had stayed up and running the amount of radiation released through those pathways is almost always higher – and less dramatic – than anything in the steam vents.” Oyster Creek faced a different problem. The wind and water knocked out 36 of the 43 Emergency Planning Zone sirens needed to warn the more than 100,000 residents within 10 miles of the site of any major emergency. Then just before 7 PM Monday, officials at Exelon,

the ill-fated Fukushima Daiichi in Japan. Its spent fuel pool is on top of the reactor and both are in the same containment building. Exelon elevated the plant’s status to the second level “Alert” status as its generators took over efforts to keep the spent fuel pool cooled. “It was a very quick switchover,” explained NRC spokesman Neil Sheehan. “The system sensed there was a problem with the loss of outside power lines, and switched over to the diesel generators. At the same time, it isolated the containment building and shut off venting valves. “The problem with the rising water was that if the water got high enough the motors for the large pumps would be knocked out of service. If that occurred, they would have to go to other options, including the use of portable pumps, or connecting to the main fire suppression system using city water Continued on page 9

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THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

Page 9

ENERGY MATTERS

Riding out the Storm: Sandy vs. the Nuclear Plants

New Medicare plans for 2013!

Continued from page 8

to keep the spent fuel pool cool.” About 150 miles north, the Hudson River was rising rapidly. There was virtually no rain in the region, an unusual occurrence with a hurricane. The storm had been expected to dump a foot or more of rain on the region between Manhattan and West Point, and some 400 miles of streams feeding into the Hudson would have added to the storm surge rushing to Indian Point. As it was, a pair of Cougar Military Transport trucks headed for nearby Camp Smith stalled in four feet of river water two miles from the nuclear plants. Yet the plant’s intake pipes remained clear and dry. But Sandy’s winds hurled debris into the transformer yard at Indian Point 3, causing one of its main breakers to fail and cut the plant off from the grid. This triggered an immediate shutdown though its sister plant, Indian Point 2, was unaffected and the rising river rolled on by. --Roger Witherspoon writes Energy Matters at www.RogerWitherspoon. com

COMMUNITY

A Dark, PostSandy Halloween

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By SHANNON AYALA Fences and lawns were wrapped in tape with the term “caution” designated with spooky, jagged letters about Mount Vernon on Halloween. But most of yellow and black caution tape about town was wrapped about fallen trees trunks and dangling power lines. They bore the “creds” of officialdom. Likewise, false spiders and bats hung from the ceiling of a bar with lights dimmed to save money on power, the owner said. Meanwhile at Continued on page 10

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Page 10

THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

COMMUNITY

A Dark, Post-Sandy Halloween Continued from page 9

a bar on the other side of town only candles were lit. this bar was situated in that part of town without power. The mood was set. Thirty percent of Con Edison’s customers –in New York City and Westchester- were without power after Hurricane Sandy came up the East Coast on Monday, the Reuters news service divulged. “It sucks pretty much,” said Paul Smith of the candlelit Locust Street Grille, which opened in Fleetwood, Mount Vernon, in May. The storm’s wrath caused him to lose thousands of dollars in inventory, damage to the building’s façade, and accrued a $200 per day tab on for candlelight. Two blocks away, at the Metro Fresh Supermarket on Broad Street, which also opened this year, customers were guided through aisles with flashlights, and vegetables were sold outside at discounted prices. “Everything must go!” shouted Jeanette Quiñones. Almost every produce item, broccoli, cartons of tomatoes, were a dollar. “This is called a Sandy Special,” Quiñones quipped. “It’s been devastating but we’re trying to help our community,” said owner, Bea Fraschilla. She said they hadn’t yet heard from Con Edison. “But we’re hanging in there,” she said.

On the commercial strip that runs through town, business was slower than usual but alive, even where there was no light. Gas powered ovens allowed for pizza to be served in the dark at Joe’s Italian Restaurant and Pizzeria on Gramatan Avenue. With flashlights on their heads, employees moved to and from the dark kitchen. “We’re taking it hour by hour,” said Neil Ruggiero, noting that the sun hadn’t fully set yet. The tough part was not so much the light, he said, but buying the right amount of perishable food. Kay Douglass, 34, of Prospect Avenue, threw away chicken, beef, and oxtales: “a lot of good stuff,” she said. Her refrigerator lost power, as did the entire eastern section of Mount Vernon where she resides. “I’m from the islands so we’re used to sometimes not having light,” she said, referring to Jamaica. Her niece “is going crazy because there’s no TV,” said Ms Douglass, as in Nickelodeon and Disney. Cars driven about town were crisscrossing through intersections devoid of functioning traffic lights. Gas station attendants guarded their stations and gave out candy to children, but no gasoline to drivers. Many residents were completely in the dark, taking cold showers, and had no way

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Candy but no gasoline to get to work; Metro North and the subway had not yet been returned to service. At a Dunkin Donuts, people who couldn’t go to work shared one extension cable hanging from a ceiling outlet to power their laptops and

Mount Vernon Hospital said there were no known Hurricane Sandy-related injuries and people interviewed for this story were generally unshaken. “I think there are people out there with a lot worse problems than I have,” said Paul Smith of the Locust Bar and Grille. “It could have been worse,” said Bob Coppola, a customer at Locust Bar and Grille, from the power-less North Terrace Avenue. He alluded to the four Hurricane Sandyrelated deaths that were reported in Westchester, including two children who were killed by a tree that fell through their home in North Salem and the man whose car hit a fallen tree on the Sprain Brook Parkway in Greenburgh.

Joe’s Pizza in Fleetwood served slices by flashlight. phones. At bus stops, people sighed when they realized that although busses were free for the day in New York City, the Bee-Line Buses were still charging regular fare. “I’m just really pissed because Con Ed won’t tell me when they’re coming,” said William Hatchett, of William Street in Fleetwood. He was also waiting for a roofer to fix the hole that the storm gouged out of his roof, allowing rain to give the clothes in his closet an unanticipated second rinse. Hatchett advised he had lost power last Halloween, too. “If you remember last Halloween, it was freezing.” Con Ed said they might come in ten days then.

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“A lot of people will never forget this,” he said, “…what happened on Monday and Tuesday.” Shannon Ayala is a Class of 2013 student at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism. He also writes New York environmental news for www. Examiner.com. His work can be found at www.SEArchives.wordpress.com.

Locust St. Bar & Grille by candle light

CURRENT COMMENTARY

Super Storms By LARRY M. ELKIN The name Hurricane Sandy did not do justice to the overachieving, late-season cyclone that spread death and destruction from Jamaica to New England. The media has taken to calling it “Superstorm Sandy” in order to describe a once-in-a-lifetime meteorological event. Once in a lifetime will be more than enough for anyone who dealt with the storm’s vicious winds, heavy rains, absurd October snow drifts (yes, snow from a system that was born in the tropics), towering ocean waves and record storm surges. The grim figures are not in, but it seems likely that Sandy claimed close to 100 lives, perhaps more. Having seen

the video of the storm’s aftermath, I suspect property damage will rival or surpass Hurricane Katrina’s destruction of New Orleans and the Gulf Coast. If nothing else, Sandy probably ensured, at least for a while, that people will pay more heed to mere Category 1 hurricanes, whose winds of 74 to 95 mph often do not command the respect paid to more impressive “major” hurricanes in Categories 3, 4 and 5. When a storm strikes a densely populated area, or one with a lot of trees or buildings that cannot withstand high winds and high water, there is no such thing as a “minor” hurricane. I did not personally experience Sandy’s full force. I was in Florida when it brushed us on its way northward through the Bahamas. We had a blustery, rainy evening in Fort Lauderdale, and that was about it. I Continued on page 11


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

Page 11

CURRENT COMMENTARY

Super Storms Continued from page 10 lived through the rest of the storm vicariously, checking in frequently with two daughters who live in Manhattan (the upper part of the borough, where the streets stayed dry and the lights stayed on), our firm’s New York staff and our office in Scarsdale, which lost power briefly and internet access for a day, but which we kept closed for three days for safety reasons. My New York home went dark and is likely to stay that way for some time to come. Regular readers know that I take a strong interest in the science, history, economics and politics of weather. It has been part of my makeup as long as I can remember. As a little boy one summer in New York’s Catskills, I noticed, during a heavy rain, that the field outside our bungalow was so foggy that I could not see the trees on the far side. I slipped out of the house and walked across the field to see what it was like to be in the fog. I remember being surprised when I looked back and saw that, from my new vantage point, our bungalow had now vanished in the mist. I also remember that my mother was not amused when I returned, utterly drenched, from being AWOL. When I was a teenager, Hurricane Agnes swept up the East Coast. The winds gusted into the Bronx off Long Island Sound, and I had a lot of fun marching around in the rain. (Apparently, I was a slow learner.) But Agnes was not fun for people in the Appalachian hills of New York state and Pennsylvania, where the storm stalled and dumped feet of rain that caused devastating floods in places like Elmira and Corning, N.Y. My family happened to drive through those towns weeks later, during a summer vacation trip to Canada, and I saw house after house where people’s lives had been emptied into the street, in the form of ruined belongings piled on the curb. That was when I realized that bad weather is not always fun. Agnes was just a tropical storm by the time it reached the Northeast, but it was still the costliest U.S. storm in history to that date. I can personally remember at least a dozen “once in a lifetime”

weather events, though I did not experience all of them firsthand. Hurricane Camille, a Category 5 storm that presaged Katrina’s later assault on New Orleans, was just a news story to me, though a college friend later described cowering all night in his family’s car inside their Louisiana garage. Camille struck in 1969, a few months after the “Lindsay blizzard” crippled both Queens and the political hopes of New York City’s mayor, John V. Lindsay. That was the last big snowstorm of my childhood. April 3-4, 1974, brought a massive outbreak of tornadoes in the midsection of the country. I remember that event simply by the name “Xenia, Ohio,” which was a small city that was nearly leveled by one of the twisters. I thought I might never see another such outbreak, but in April 2011, my staff and I were in Atlanta when an even worse cluster of twisters roared across the Deep South and Midwest. Some of us were stranded for a couple of days, but we escaped injury or damage, though many others were less fortunate. We had “super storms” in the 1970s, too. In January 1978, a monstrously powerful low pressure system marched up the western flank of the Appalachians to the Great Lakes with blinding snow and 100-mph winds. I was living in Montana and was used to blizzards by then, but I was duly impressed. Less than two weeks later, a comparable storm struck New York City and New England. Though this was a powerful extra-tropical cyclone, meteorologists noted that its intensity gave it an eye-like structure reminiscent of a hurricane. People died in their cars along Interstate 95 when snow blocked the exhaust pipes as the occupants kept their engines running for warmth. The 1980s were a fairly quiet time, if you discount the freak East Coast blizzard of April 7, 1982, which put down a foot of snow in New York City and nearly two feet in Albany, N.Y., where I was then working. The decade ended with Hurricane Hugo smashing into Charleston, S.C., and with a Christmas Eve snow and ice storm that stretched from Jacksonville, Fla., to the North Carolina coast. My family and I managed to get stuck in that storm when our car broke down in Jacksonville just as everything

started to freeze. It was the first white Christmas on that stretch of coastline in a century. Storms don’t only happen in the eastern United States, of course. Others of equal severity happen all over the world with regularity. They may be “once in a lifetime” events, but they don’t happen to be part of my personal lifetime. One that comes to mind is the Columbus Day storm that struck the Oregon coast with wind gusts up to 138 mph in 1962. Another is Hurricane Gilbert, a beautifully formed (meteorologically speaking) Category 5. It was a terrible disaster in the Caribbean and Mexico, killing more than 400 people in 1988. The early 1990s brought a plethora of remarkable weather: the “Perfect Storm” of 1991, Hurricane Andrew in 1992, the “Storm of the Century” in 1993. The Perfect Storm had much in common, meteorologically, with Superstorm Sandy, as it was a merger of a tropical system with a strong extra-tropical cyclone. But the Storm of the Century was more like Sandy in the way it was predicted days in advance; disasters

were declared and the Emergency Broadcast System was activated in many areas long before the first snowflake fell. Many other storms have come and gone since then. Some have names we will long remember, like Katrina and Wilma and, now, Sandy; some have pedestrian monikers that fade into the history pages, like the Blizzard of 1996. We’re getting better at naming our weather systems. Who is going to forget Snowmageddon? Each of these weather phenomena was unique, so I suppose each could be called a “once in a lifetime” event. It is highly unlikely, though not impossible, that I will live to see another storm tide in New York Harbor like the one Sandy produced; it took just the right combination of wind speed, direction and duration, timing at high tide and phase of the moon to send water cascading through the Financial District’s streets and into the Brooklyn-Battery Tunnel. But extreme weather events are not rare and are hardly once in a lifetime experiences. People older

than me have other memories, like the Labor Day hurricane that hit the Florida Keys in 1935, or the Long Island Express hurricane that sent a wall of water up Narragansett Bay and inundated downtown Providence, R.I., in 1938. Nature regularly reminds us that she has the power to reshape our lives and our memories, no matter how we name the reminders.

Larry M. Elkin, CPA, CFP®, has provided personal financial and tax counseling to a sophisticated client base since 1986. After six years with Arthur Andersen, where he was a senior manager for personal financial planning and family wealth planning, he founded his own firm in Hastings on Hudson, N.Y., in 1992. That firm grew steadily and became the Palisades Hudson organization, which moved to Scarsdale, N.Y., in 2002. The firm expanded to Fort Lauderdale, Fla., in 2005 and to Atlanta in 2008.

SOUTH STREET SEAPORT EXHIBITION CENTRE

WestchesterGuardian-5.5x4.875.indd 1

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THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

CHRONICLES OF CROTON’S BOHEMIA

Jack Reed and Louise Bryant: Star-Crossed Lovers, 2 By ROBERT SCOTT

New York City was experiencing a heat wave in August of 1917 as Jack and Louise rushed to get ready to travel to Russia to cover the impending revolution. Shopping for clothes that would carry them through a Russian winter was especially difficult. Louise managed to wangle new credentials from the Bell Syndicate for her to cover the revolution “from a woman’s point of view.” A clerk at the passport office confiscated their passports. A socialist peace conference was scheduled in Stockholm and the U.S. State Department wanted to keep American radicals from attending. The downcast duo returned to the Hotel Brevoort. The next morning Louise went early to the passport office and vamped the clerk into returning the passports.

Off to Russia

They sailed on the Danish steamer New York for Christiana (Oslo). At Halifax, Nova Scotia, the ship was delayed for a week by British counterespionage officials who removed many Russian exiles eager to return to the mother country. Jack was carrying a number of documents sure to cause trouble-letters from American socialists to Russian counterparts plus an invitation to the upcoming peace conference in Stockholm. He hid these papers under the rug in the cabin and diverted the searches of the officers by sharing a bottle of Scotch with them. Arrival in Norway was followed by an arduous 18-hour train trip to Stockholm, where they learned that the peace conference had been postponed. “After we left Stockholm my own curiosity grew every hour,” Louise would later write. “As our train rushed on through the vast, untouched forests of northern Sweden I could scarcely contain myself. Soon I should see how this greatest and youngest of all democracies was learning to walk— to stretch itself— to field its strength— unshackled!” They crossed into Finland near the Arctic Circle after a week’s delay

afternoon. The cafés had nothing to serve but weak tea and sandwiches but they were always full. “Men and women wear what they please. At one table would be sitting a soldier with his fur hat pulled over his ear, across from him a Red Guard in rag-tags, next a Cossack in a gold and black uniform, earrings in his ears, silver chains around his neck, or a man from the Wild Division, recruited from one of the most savage tribes in the Caucasus, wearing his sombre, flowing cape.” Louise’s Christmas present to Reed was a poem expressing her joy at being with him. It read, in part:

waiting for visas. Another slow train ride south through Finland was marked by frequent stops by soldiers.

In Petrograd

Bryant found the capital, Petrograd (formerly St. Petersburg), the magnificent city designed by French and Italian architects and built by Peter the Great, “impressive, vast and solid.” Compared to its buildings, New York had “a sort of tall flimsiness.” She wrote, “The rugged strength of Peter the Great is in all the broad streets, the mighty open spaces, the great canals curving through the city, the rows and rows of palaces and the immense façades of government buildings.” Jack had seen the capital two years before when he covered in the Eastern front with artist and Croton neighbor Boardman Robinson and wrote excitedly to him: “The old town has changed! Joy where there was gloom, and gloom where there was joy. We’re in the middle of things, and believe me it is thrilling. There is so much dramatic to write about that I don’t know where to begin.” Reed’s timing of their arrival in the late summer of 1917 could not have been better. The war had been a series of disasters for the Russians. In the first year of the war Russia lost a million men. Poorly equipped and incompetently led, outmatched Russian troops were defeated in battle after battle. By the end of 1916, czarist rule had become decidedly unpopular. Mutinies broke out at the front and in barracks back home. Strikes and mass demonstrations were widespread. Shortages, particularly of food, were common, and prices soared with the inevitable inflation. Workers formed committees, called soviets (a Russian word meaning “council”), in factories and urban neighborhoods. Discontent was widespread. The czar abdicated on March 15, 1917, and a provisional government under Aleksandr Kerensky was formed. The new provisional government, unable to reach a decision about

The Women’s Battalion guarding the Winter Palace in Petrograd during the 1917 October Revolution. continuing the war, faced enormous many of the leading participants obstacles. A radical putsch by conser- including Kerensky, Lenin and Trotsky. vatives was quickly defeated July, Louise made sure they interviewed spurring those on the left seek more Nadezhda Krupskaya, Nicolai Lenin’s wife, Alexandra Kollontay, the novelist radical solutions. and educator, Marie Spirodonova, the Revolution! diminutive revolutionary heroine, and Jack and Louise were present Catherine Breshkovsky, known as the when Vladimir Lenin, who had been “Grandmother of the Revolution.” hiding in Finland, secretly re-entered Reed gathered up every docuthe capital on October 23, disguised ment, leaflet and newspaper article for in a wig and false beard. The October reproduction in the book he would title Revolution was triggered by the Ten Days That Shook the World. He also Kerensky government’s shutdown translated and wrote down the words of Bolshevik newspapers. It was over of every printed speech he acquired. quickly in Petrograd with surprisingly The result was a tremendously little bloodshed. valuable combination of reportage Only two days, October 24 and and documentation. He intended the 25, were needed to achieve the easily material to be the basis of the first accomplished victory. Resistance volume in a massive series on Russian by government troops was virtually history. nonexistent. A total of six men were On the other hand, Louisa’s killed in Petrograd--all insurgents. approach was more journalistic and On October 25, Trotsky’s Military totally professional. She not only Revolutionary Committee proclaimed recorded events but interpreted and the overthrow of Kerensky’s provi- commented on them. Her dispatches sional government. In contrast to painted a compelling word picture of Petrograd, in Moscow there was heavy everyday life at the eye of the revoluresistance. The pro-Soviet forces were tionary storm. victors, but at an enormous cost. Of Describing a city in which the the total of 800 dead, 500 were Red streetcars no longer ran, Louise wrote, Guards and soldiers. “People walked great stretches without Jack and Louise were part of a a murmur and the life of the city large army of correspondents from went on as usual. It would have upset all parts of the globe eagerly seeking New York completely, especially if it information about the changes taking happened as in Petrograd that while place in the vast Russian Empire. the streetcars were stopped, lights and News-gathering was no easy task. water also were turned off and it was Fearing inevitable counterrevolu- almost impossible to get fuel to keep tionary activity, passes were issued and warm.” repeatedly checked by the many proviNevertheless, the Russians exhibsional government departments and ited a remarkable calm, even keeping committees, creating a bureaucratic the theatres open. “The Nevsky nightmare. after midnight was as amusing and Reed and Bryant interviewed interesting as Fifth Avenue in the

It is fine to be here in the North With you on Christmas In a land where they really believe In peace on earth And miracles.

Her poem concluded with: What I want most to tell you Is that I love you And I want more than anything To have you stay strong and clear-visioned In all this world madness . . . You are the finest person I know On both sides of the world And it is a nice privilege to be your comrade.

Home Again

Jack and Louise returned to Greenwich Village three months apart and set to work assembling their notes and dispatches into books. His book was an account of Russian history in the making. Her book, Six Red Months in Russia, remains to this day an insightful picture of everyday life at every level during the early days of the revolution. Louise’s book, based on her dispatches from Russia, appeared first. Published by George H. Doran in 1919, it was well-received by reviewers. Jack’s voluminous work would not be published by Boni & Liveright until 1920 but would become a classic. Still in print, scholars still find it invaluable for its reportage and ample documentation. Despite their joint successes at home, both Jack and Louise itched to return to a Russia where so much was still happening. They would journey there separately in 1920 on a final fatal adventure. Robert Scott is a semi-retired book publisher and local historian. He lives in Croton-on-Hudson, N.Y.


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

MOVIE REVIEW

Ed Koch Movie Reviews By Edward I. Koch

Movie Review: “The Flat” (-) This film was widely seen and applauded in Israel winning the country’s top documentary award. I did not think it was a first-rate movie.

“Cloud Atlas” (-) Two movies were supposed to dominate the scene this week with their intellectual displays: “The Master” and “Cloud Atlas.” Some critics loved both films and wrote extended

The premise is that Gerda Tuchler, grandmother of the picture’s director Arnon Goldfinger, left Germany with her husband in the mid-30’s to live in Tel Aviv. While cleaning out her apartment after her death, Goldfinger discovers that his grandparents had a relationship

with a high Nazi official, Leopold von Mildenstein, who was Adolf Eichmann’s predecessor. A copy of “Der Angriff,” or “The Attack,” a Nazi paper of which Joseph Goebbels was the editor, was found in the apartment. An article in that paper reports that von Mildenstein and his

wife traveled to Palestine with Gerda Tuchler and her husband. No one is able to unlock the mystery of that relationship. I found the film to be more of a home movie rather than a documentary and one that I would not recall as memorable but rather mediocre.

reviews explaining their meanings. In my opinion, both pictures failed. The major stars in “Cloud Atlas,” a film based on a novel by David Mitchell, are Tom Hanks and Halle Berry. They portray various

characters in six different stories split among three directors. The plots of each are interesting, but they don’t add up to an engaging movie.

mayorkoch.com/. The Honorable Edward Irving Koch served as a member of Congress from New York State from 1969 through 1977, and New York City as its 105th Mayor from 1978 to 1989.

Visit the Mayor at the Movies to learn more: http://www.

MUSIC

THE SOUNDS OFBLUE By Bob Putignano

Kenny Wayne Shepherd & Robert Cray Live at the (Reopened) Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY Before I write about the KWS show, I just wanted to take a brief moment to report that the Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY has reopened; it’s gloriously restored, and it’s a magnificent

venue that also offers great sound. Designed by architect Thomas Lamb this splendid venue opened over eighty years ago in 1926 as a playhouse with Continued on page 14

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THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

MUSIC

THE SOUNDS OF BLUE Continued from page 13 great decorative beauty and luxurious comfort. I’d been there in the early seventies as they were a reliable alternative for Bill Graham’s legendary Fillmore East as they often booked similar artists passing through the NY area. They briefly reopened their doors in the mid eighties (saw Pat Metheny,) and again in the nineties. By ’97 the venue was transformed into a catering hall. Oh my God! So it’s nice to see this historic site back in business and supporting classic rock and blues just

like they did back in the seventies. My only disappointment was that they ripped out the original seats (not sure when that happened) and installed makeshift seating that was uncomfortable. But long story short: it’s cool to have them back, and in the capable hands of the Bowery Presents. You can keep in touch with upcoming concerts at: www.thecapitoltheatre.com On the night of September 22, 2012, there was a double bill presented, fortunately KWS opened for Robert Cray (a brief note about Cray’s

performance later.) The current KWS band includes bassist Tony Franklin who has appeared on over one hundred and fifty albums mostly from the rock world. On B3 and pianos veteran Riley Osbourn has appeared on over one hundred recordings most notably with Lyle Lovett and Willie Nelson. Chris Layton needs no introductions having toured and recorded with SRV and has been a regular touring drummer with KWS since ’06. Noah Hunt has been with Shepherd for nearly fifteen years and is not only an integral piece of the KWS band, but he’s also one of today’s most invigorating vocalist and performer, he’s also a theatrical

2012 KWS Capitol Ceiling.

2012 KWS Capitol Kenny Wayne Shepherd - Noah Hunt. wild-man on stage. Kenny Wayne also band is how Shepherd and Hunt also needs no preamble, and is considered keep things flowing with excitement by many to be one of the best younger by constantly marching around the Blues rock guitarists, though Blues stage, and often joining together for fans don’t often give him the Blues some rather entertaining segments. credit he deserves. That being said Shepherd is just thirty-four and about Shepherd, I am happy to report Hunt is just thirty-two, but many a (I’ve seen this band three times in the Blues band could learn a few tricks last three years) that Kenny showed about how to make their sets more more restraint and offered more space enthralling with similar set enhancing with his guitar playing, and also offered antics. Long story short, I loved their set, and would definitely see them the more creativeness with his solos. The band came out ripping, next time they came through town. As for Robert Cray’s set, the only tearing through some of their road tested classics like “Deja Voodoo”, thing I am happy to report is that he “Blue On Black”, Kings Highway”, came on after KWS, so after just four“Somehow, Somewhere, Some five songs I was out the door. Cray’s set Way”, “Everything is Broken”, and was a boring snore. For me it’s been like others. Their hair-standing encore this for Mr. Cray for several decades lasted nearly thirty minutes as they now, and I also have similar feelings bombed away with “I’m a King Bee”, about his studio work, including his Fleetwood Mac’s intense “Oh Well”, most recent “Nothin But Love”. Sorry. and as expected Hendrix’ “Voodoo Bob Putignano www.SoundsofBlue. Child (Slight Return)”. It was a killer com set. What’s also enjoyable about this

TRANSPORT UPDATE

Governor Cuomo Announces Major Subway Service Resumptions 80 Percent of New York Subway System Restored; MTA Working With Con Edison to Stabilize Power Load Staten Island Railway Prepared For Limited Service Governor Andrew M. Cuomo on Saturday, November 3, 2012, announced the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) has restored 80 percent of the New York subway system including subway service between Brooklyn and Manhattan, restoring a vital transit link that was severed by Hurricane Sandy. The 4, 5, 6 and 7 trains are fully restored. The Staten Island Railway will resume service hourly today, move

to half hourly service later today, and will be fully restored in time for the Monday morning rush. The F, J, D and M will be fully functional by later this morning. “This is a major step forward in the resumption of regular subway service in New York City,” Governor Cuomo said. “Once again, subway customers have a direct link between Brooklyn and Manhattan, giving them a fast and reliable way to get to their

jobs, their schools and their homes.” The resumption of service is made possible by Con Edison’s continued work to restore power to darkened sections of lower Manhattan. Engineers from the MTA and Con Edison worked together to plan an orderly restoration of power so the subway system would have an adequate supply of electricity without destabilizing the network. “We have worked closely with

Con Edison to bring back the subways as soon as possible without jeopardizing the progress they have made in restoring Manhattan’s electric grid,” said MTA Chairman and CEO Joseph J. Lhota. “Our dedicated workers are continuing to pump water, test signals and bring back more of the subway network that 5.5 million customers depend on each day.” Governor Cuomo also announced that the MTA will be able to restore

limited service on the Staten Island Railway as soon as Con Edison is able to supply power. The railway will initially run trains hourly. Governor Cuomo earlier announced the MTA Metro-North Railroad would resume full train service Saturday morning on the Hudson Line from Poughkeepsie to Grand Central Terminal, completing the restoration of all main lines east of the Hudson River.


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

Page 15

READING

No Guarantees: One Man’s Road Through the Darkness of Depression Chapter Fifty-Four – Life Happens By BOB MARRONE The first phase of hockey practice was winding down. The players, young adults, were completing in a series of wind sprints, a drill that requires players to skate from one end of the rink to the other and back at full speed. Most of the players, having completed their drills, stood leaning on their sticks, or kneeling on one knee, exhausted. Three players remained who had not taken their last sprint. As coach, I blew the whistle to send them on their way. I watched as they skated at full speed toward me at the end of the rink from where I was conducting the drill. Their strides were full with no evidence of fatigue as they turned to head back to the starting point. I watched a bit longer and, then, just before they came to the goal line, I turned towards the bench to get my clipboard to start the next phase of practice. From the corner of my eye I spied two skaters pull up as is standard; the third just kept going, a trivial observation I did not give much thought to at that moment. Boom! The loud, though not unfamiliar, sound of a player slamming into the boards echoed throughout the outdoor rink. This is a noise players and coaches hear all game long, and often enough in practice. It is not heard during skating drills, except on rare occasions when players lazily use the boards to complete a stop, using the boards like bumpers at the end of train tracks.That particular sound has a controlled, muffled thump. The sound of a player being hit into the boards during a game is firm, as if a single heavy surface makes contact with a wall. This sound was different, though. It was louder and more disjointed, like the sound a sack of potatoes might make if you threw it against a flat sheet of plywood. I turned to see the player, rebounding off the boards, falling backward like a rag doll, his head striking the surface with a sickening thus. The sound reminded me of the noise a brick makes when dropped onto concrete. It was, 1982, a lot of players did not wear helmets then, especially during practice. Twenty seven year old Chris lay

unconscious on that mild October night. As the coach, I followed the ambulance to the hospital, called Chris’s mom… he was not married… and spoke with the doctors; first the emergency room physician, then the neurosurgeon. In about an hour, with me suspecting a concussion and maybe a non-serious fractured scull, the neurosurgeon called me into a room off to the side. Shaking his head, he said “it doesn’t look good.” My body reacted with an almost electric shock, an acrid taste filled my mouth, and anxiety, intense, but normal, filled my soul. The doctor went on to explain that Chris had something called an arterial venous malformation in his brain that hemorrhaged. We would never know, he speculated, if the vessels gave way before Chris flew into the boards, after he hit them or upon the second impact to his skull. The surgeon said he had to operate right away if there was any hope of saving him. I had played and coached hockey almost all of my life. People don’t die playing hockey. Twenty-seven-year old friends don’t die only a few minutes after saying their last words, “Thanks for the pads coach,” after you hand them a piece of equipment, as I did to Chris that night. Moreover, people don’t die performing a skating drill. Further, still, how could someone die during a drill that I called for and supervised? It would not and could not happen, could it? After the surgery, Chris was put into a sedative induced coma to relieve swelling and fluid induced pressure on the brain. Sadly, he lapsed into a vegetative state and died three weeks later. It was one of the most heart breaking things I have ever been through. It was also rich in the kinds of things that will challenge any psyche, more so one suffering from depression. The tragedy here is the loss of a young life not lived to the full. It is, as such, about the life of a sometimes troubled, funny, smart friend cut short and the heartache of his family. I must stress, therefore, this is about Chris and I am loathe to make his death about me. But, as with all things in life, we deal with events as they affect us. The relationship of this story to my life illustrates the meaning of John

Casarino’s words to me several years earlier, and their role in getting over anxiety depression. You will recall that Dr. Casarino said getting well, would, among other things, require us to deal with life’s events and learn how to manage our feelings. There would be deaths in the family, problems with work, issues over relationships, and tragedies, as yet unknown. Yes, it would be necessary to learn new skills and deal with symptoms and old demons; I would also have to take responsibility for choices and actions, and face life’s problems directly. But, even with all this, much of the most salient growth and confidence takes place, not in the classroom that is the doctor’s office, but on the battlefield of real life. Like anyone, I experienced all of the events supposed by my doctor. I was fortunate in that I grew along the way and got much better. But of all of life’s twist and turns, the death of my friend Chris was and remains the most instructive as an example of an unforeseen tragedy to be faced, and grown through. It possessed all of the elements that someone with depression must learn to contend. First, and foremost, I felt horrible about the death of my friend. I was his closest friend on the team, and he had come to my new club with me from the squad I first joined in the beginning of my recovery. You will recall I turned to coaching when I could not skate due to the range of vertigo related symptoms. My soul ached over his death and the life he would never have. The night before the accident, we spent two hours on the phone talking about some issues he had, and that I felt he was practicing too hard. We agreed his overall life was more important than hockey and that he should focus more on that, and be more careful in drills. I also felt guilty about his death. He came to this new team with me. Also, he was performing a drill I called for to fit a style of play I was teaching. Over and over, I tended to review the incident in my head, trying to think if there was a better way we might have done it. I rued not insisting that he wear his helmet, which he wore during games and scrimmages. I never insisted with Chris as even practice drills for him were optional due to a history of seizures… likely related to

the AVM we were to learn… and he had trouble with warm weather. Add to that, some of my players did not like drills and I found myself questioning my own competence. Some even questioned the wisdom of the drill on that night. At home, my wife was incensed that I could put the family in jeopardy by coaching a dangerous sport like hockey. I was also angry, in a selfish way, that I hated about myself. For awhile, I did make it about me. How could this happen to me? Why didn’t he take better care himself? Why didn’t he wear his helmet? That anger exacerbated my guilt and anxiety. For the three weeks that Chris lay in the hospital, first in a coma, then on life support, the monotonous ringing of the phone was its own little torture. Anyone who has lost a love one will tell you this. Yet life had to go on. I had just

received a big, challenging promotion at work. Life had to go on. My family had to be taken care of. I had to deal with all of these things. And, thus, we turn to the skills and mantras learned in the previous five years. We will discuss them in the next chapter. I would like to end this chapter, as such: While I am not overly religious, every year around Christmas time, I find a church and light a candle for my friend. Somehow it keeps him alive in my heart. It has been thirty years, yet it feels like only yesterday. In an odd way, it also pleases me, if just a bit, that his passing taught me a bit more about courage… something he had in great quantities. God bless him. Bob Marrone is the host of a Monday to Friday local morning talk show heard on WVOX-1460 AM radio.


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THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

GOVERNMENTSection THE ALBANY CORRESPONDENT

State to Waive Class Requirements By CARLOS GONZALEZ ALBANY, NY — Efforts to alleviate a schools’ requirement to have classes for 180 days is being considered due to Hurricane Sandy. The heads of the State Legislature’s Education Committees said today that they expect to consider the matter quickly. Lawmakers said they would look to modify the law to hold school districts downstate harmless because of the extended school closures. School districts would face a loss

of state aid if they were to have fewer than 180 days of classes. “I believe that there will be a tremendous spirit of cooperation because of the magnitude and severity of these issues,” said Senate Education Chairman John Flanagan, R-Suffolk County. Last year, Irene and Lee devastated upstate counties and a similar bill was passed. The law gave the state’s education commissioner the authority to hold districts financially harmless if they lost up to 10 days “due to a duly

declared state of emergency following a federally and state recognized natural disaster.” Assembly Education Chairwoman Cathy Nolan, D-Queens, said she would expect the Legislature to approve the waiver for New York City and its surrounding areas. “We have done it in the past, and it’s certainly not something that’s done lightly, but clearly this rises to the level of the ice storm in the North Country or Hurricane Irene in upstate,” Nolan said. Lawmakers are expected to hold

a special session after next week to discuss Sandy and other state matters, some even speculate voting on a legislative pay raise. David Albert, a spokesman for the state School Boards Association, said schools would support the change, but stated the schools should be entitled to full state aid regardless of the disaster.

CUOMO CATERS

Not only is our governor leading an effective crisis response to Sandy’s aftermath, but he’s serving it up too. Gov. Cuomo directed the state to bring a million meals to seniors and others in hard-hit areas of the the city. He said the National Guard, with the Federal Emergency Management

Agency (FEMA), will deliver the meals and bottled water door-to-door to parts of Lower Manhattan, the Rockaways and other affected areas in Brooklyn and Queens. “After days without power, the most immediate need for many New Yorkers is food and water and the state is working aggressively to address this need.” Cuomo said. “The first plane into JFK this morning was from FEMA, carrying supplies and personnel we requested.” Carlos Gonzalez pens The Albany Correspondent column. Direct comments and inquiry to carlgonz1@gmail.com.

GOVERNMENT

White Plains Contends With the Aftermath of Superstorm Sandy By NANCY KING WHITE PLAINS, NY -- Nearly a week after superstorm Sandy blew into town, White Plains is still dealing with her aftermath. As of Friday November 2nd, there were still 70 streets in White Plains that were closed due to downed trees and power lines. Many of those closures were in the Highlands section of the city; known for its beautiful tree lined streets. Sadly many of those 50-yearold trees were no match for wind gusts of 70 miles per hour, and down they came taking utility wires with them. It is in this area of town that residents remain in the cold and dark waiting for Con Edison to cut the power to any live wires still on the ground. At a November 1st press briefing, Mayor

Tom Roach stated that DPW crews were ready and waiting to begin tree removal and clean up the city but were being prevented from doing so since utility crews were delayed in cutting the power to those downed lines. Protocol now requires tree removal crews to have a utility crew accompany them to a job site to certify that lines are dead before they may commence tree removal. Mayor Roach announced that 8,708 residents are still without power in White Plains as of Friday night. The Community Center on Mitchell Place has been made available to serve those who do not have power available. It will remain open until all power has been restored to the city. A property located at the Post Road School is no longer being used, instead, it is being prepared for

students returning to the school. The mayor also announced that the White Plains Library would be open until 9 P.M. every night for those residents who may want to use it as a warming center or just to have a place to charge electronic equipment. Downtown White Plains fared far better than its outlying neighborhoods. Since the power cables in the downtown area are underground, few businesses lost power and most were open for business immediately following the storm. Several businesses sustained wind damage in the form of having large windows blown out during the storm. The RitzCarlton hotel also suffered similar damage in its upper floors with glass from the upper panels taking flight and landing in the areas around Hamilton Avenue, Rennaissance

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Square and Main Street. Construction materials that had been stored on the roofs of towers also broke loose and necessitated those streets to be closed through Tuesday afternoon. While this may seem unusual, several construction tradesmen informed me that it is a common practice to store construction materials on the roofs of tall buildings. Engineers and project managers may want to re-think that one! By Thursday afternoon, those materials had been secured and appeared to be shrink wrapped on top of the towers and all three thoroughfares were open to traffic and pedestrians alike. The White Plains Police and White Plains Fire Departments have also seen an uptick in calls. While the Comstat statistics for crime in White Plains will not be available until next week, most of the Department of Public Safety calls have been storm related. Those calls range from providing assistance to those with live wires strewn about their homes to generator related calls. Those residents who are fortunate enough to have secured a generator often place them too close to their residence thus creating emergency calls for possible carbon monoxide poisoning. As of late in the week, police were being dispatched to local service stations that not only had long lines, but patrons who were short on patience.

Storm clean up in the region will be a long, ongoing process, however, the City of White Plains has done a good job of keeping their residents and businesses informed during this storm and its aftermath. The mayor’s office has kept residents and the media informed by holding daily press conferences and updating the city’s website on a daily basis. Essential services have been delivered and the Department of Sanitation has continued trash pickup in neighborhoods that are accessible. And, as a resident, it was surprisingly refreshing to see the Commissioner of DPW driving about town and assessing damage without an entourage; he was driving on his own, snapping pictures and speaking to residents. White Plains, like the rest of the county will have to grapple with clean up for a long time. After that, White Plains, like so many other communities will have to start to examine its aging infrastructure. These “100 year storms” are coming all too frequently and are whittling away our 19th and 20th century infrastructures and our local governments are going to have to take a long hard look at what can be done to bring our cities into the 21st century. Nancy King is a freelance investigative reporter; a resident of White Plains, New York.


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012 Page 26

The WesTchesTer Guardian

Page 17 Thurs

CLASSIFIED ADS

FAULT LINES

Syria and the Multi-Power World Order By Dr. NASEER ALOMARI When the conflict broke out, many Syrians were hopeful the Arab Spring had finally arrived and the anti-Assad regime forces would see an opportunity to get rid of the oppressive, authoritarian government under which they lived. As the international community watched in horror at the killing of innocent people; 37,000 dead, and countless more maimed and wounded, they all hoped that the price for freedom was not going to get much higher. Well, it did. The conflict is now beyond control as more factions and countries have gotten involved. So far, diplomacy has failed, eclipsed instead by an onslaught of additional, ineffective diplomatic maneuvers and half-hearted or cautious efforts to arm the opposition to help them defeat the Assad

regime. It is now obvious that the hope for the Assad regime to collapse from within is dissipating as the Assad regime seems to have enough manpower and supplies to fight on regardless of human cost. The world watches, steeped in contemplation of the various possibilities apart from imposing a no-fly zone or the perilous need for ground troops in a volatile country and region. Creating a no-fly zone and establishing safe zones would bring the confrontation with the Assad regime to a dangerous phase where regional and international powers would have to either clash over or agree to conclude an end to the Assad regime. The possibility of regional and global powers clashing over Syria, or in Syria, has to be factored into the solution for Syria. Russia and China have made it

clear that they are not willing to let go of their support for the Assad regime for reasons that range from pure opportunistic and short-term economic gains to more complicated ideological and strategic goals aimed at competing with or even replacing America’s domination over the Middle East. Since all politics is essentially pragmatic, China and Russia should clarify their intentions regarding the conflict in Syria. After the American presidential election, the international community should have a clearer picture of what the two major powers would like to achieve from supporting a dying regime. If their goal is to secure their interests in the region then something will be worked out to safeguard Russian and Chinese interests. If on the other hand, China and Russia have deeper strategic

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Page 18

THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

CAMPAIGN TRAIL

Bill Clinton Rallies Support for Sean Maloney at Somers Middle School Rich Monetti Holds his Water By RICH MONETTI Last Friday night, I received yet another email from the Democratic Party in regards to you know what. President Clinton in the subject, I decided to take a look. He would actually be stopping at the junior high school I attended over 30 years ago in Somers to rally support for Sean Maloney in the upcoming House race

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against Nan Hayworth. I sent an email hoping to attend as press, and almost before I slogged through all my meaningless Facebook posts, I realized I was going to see the president. Yes, I was excited. Of course, I told my mom, and she was obviously thinking I’d be having a sit down with the 42nd president, so she instructed me to dress nice. The obedient son, I put on a jacket and tie. In accordance to some protocol, about 10 press members were led in first. Seated at the center of the gym

and roped off in full view, I felt kind of important. You have no idea; but I will get back to that later. My first impression of this opportunity was to take a much longer historical perspective. Throughout history, there have been leaders – for better and / or worse – who possess the skill to move the masses to their charismatic words, charm, mannerism and downright Mojo. No matter your political perspective, Bill Clinton pure charisma; he is one of those people. We’ve all seen him on TV but I

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Xquisite Coffee Plantation LLC, Arts. of Org. filed with SSNY on 6/11/2012. Off. Loc.:Westchester Cnty. SSNY designated as agent of LLC whom process may be served SSNY shall mail process to: c/o The LLC, 12 Steven Dr., Unit 10, Ossining, NY 10562.Purpose: all lawful activities. Lastest date LLC to dissolve: No specific date. FAMILY COURT OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK COUNTY OF WESTCHESTER In the Matter of

SUMMONS AND INQUEST NOTICE

BABY BOY DOE A/K/A BABY BOY PETRUCELLI A Child under the Age of Eighteen Years, Docket No: NN-09496-12 Alleged to be Neglected by F.U. No.: 130,489 JANE DOE A/K/A KRISTA PETRUCELLI, Respondent. IN THE NAME OF THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF NEW YORK TO: JANE DOE A/K/A KRISTA PETRUCELLI A Petition having been filed in this Court alleging that the above-named child in the care of the Westchester County Department of Social Services is a neglected child. YOU ARE HEREBY SUMMONED to appear before this Court at 111 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd., 3rd Floor Annex, White Plains, New York, on the 4th day of DECEMBER, 2012 at 2:30 p.m. in the afternoon of said day, to answer to the neglect Petition. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE, that you have the right to be represented by a lawyer, and if the Court finds you are unable to pay for a lawyer, you have the right to have a lawyer assigned by the Court. PLEASE TAKE FURTHER NOTICE, that if you fail to appear at the time and place noted above, the Court will hear and determine the petition as provided by law and may, after hearing, find that you neglected you child. BY ORDER OF THE COURT Dated: October 15, 2012

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Bill Clinton and Sean Maloney at Somers Middle School. was going to witness this live and would schedule, his appearance was quite brief get a small sense of how a Roosevelt, and not necessarily revealing enough for Churchill, or yes, a Lenin type, mobi- my grand historical expectations. That doesn’t mean the sitting lized their followers into a solid wall of House member escaped unscathed allegiance. On the other hand, like the – she would garner the best zinger Chappaqua master himself, I do like to arriving at the expense of her opposition work the room in my own right. And I to President Obama’s healthcare initiative.“Nan Hayworth wants to repeal the ain’t bad at it. Following my instincts, I began Affordable Care Act,” he said. “I know to make my way out of the roping to doctors in her own group plan who treat engage the attendees. I was greeted by me and they disagree with her.” President Clinton then went on a menacing look, turned back to my enclosure and told my natural mingling to outline the easy choice represented between Sean Maloney and a Nan sensibilities were a secret service issue. I didn’t feel so important anymore. Hayworth bound to the unyielding I soon jumped to the conclusion that whims of the Tea Party. “Congress since I was in the press, they didn’t want is a job. It means methodology over us getting close enough to question the ideology and arithmetic over illusion. featured guests. What other explana- It’s not complicated, so go out and win tion could there be - given all the other it for Sean Maloney.” The dude can orate, and the fact attendees who had also simply sent an that a campaign fears the possibility of email. What I found was that the people someone like me interrupting a stream present were all part of larger invited of consciousness such as his means groups like union members or other only one thing. Our election process supporters whose origins and back- has become nothing more than an grounds could be traced back to a infomercial where the leaders have the source. Off that, I decided there was questions and refuse to utter anything that deviates into the uncomfortable credibility to the security claim. But upon further reflection, I felt truths that we already know. That keeps us from getting to what this was too convenient an excuse and the campaigns simply use such tactics we really need to address and confront and rationale to further the fiction that as a nation. Hey, that’s not bad, but I’m just has become our political system. I’m also relatively certain the Secret Service glad I didn’t have to pee. is familiar with a little known security Rich Monetti lives in Somers. He’s been procedure called “frisking”. a freelance writer covering Westchester Deferring my disappointment in County since 2003. Peruse his work at the sorry state of our republic, I was http://rmonetti.blogspot.com/ still excited to see President Clinton. Unfortunately, rushed by the urgency and time constraints of the election


THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

Page 19

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Page 20

THE WESTCHESTER GUARDIAN

THURSDAY, november 8, 2012

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