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NOVEMBER 13, 2013

Illustration by Jonathon Waters, Graphics Manager

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ISSUE NO. 12 VOL. 50


CAMPUS EVENTS Wednesday, Nov. 13 • Honoring & Remembering Members of the Disability Community: 6-7 p.m. Pathfinder Lounge Thursday, Nov. 14 • Political Breakfast with State Rep. Rick Perales: 9-11 a.m. Millett Atrium Friday, Nov. 15 • Fourth fee payment date for term • Spring 2014 MCAT prep course registration deadline • “The Wild Party”: 8 p.m. Herbst Theatre Saturday, Nov. 16 • Raiderthon: 10 a.m1a.m. Apollo Room Sunday, Nov. 17 • B Term last day to drop in-person with a W grade

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Monday, Nov. 18 • Study Abroad Fair: 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m. Millett Atrium Tuesday, Nov. 19 • “The Meanings of ‘Indian Blood’: Perspectives on Race and Identity” Lecture: 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Millett Atrium • “Reducing the Mystery: A Conversation with Muslim Women”: 2-3 p.m. 135 Allyn Hall Thursday, Nov. 21 • Paul Laurence Dunbar Chorale concert: 8-9:30 p.m. Schuster Hall, Creative Arts Center

PHOTO Editor-in-Chief Phone: 775-5534 Brandon Semler News Editor Leah Kelley

Features Editor Hannah Hendrix Sports Editor Andrew Smith

Photography Editor Michael Tyler Web Editor Aaron Schwieterman News Writers Benjamin Virnston Michele Crew

Features Writer Adam Ramsey Sports Writer Justin Boggs

WRIGHT LIFE

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Photographer Brittany Robinson

Graphics Manager Jonathon Waters

Marketing/Promotion Eli Chizever

Business Manager Jared Holloway

Distribution Manager Joel Gibbs Advertising Representatives Phone: 775-5537 David McNeely Joseph Craven Zach Woodward Fax: 775-5535

The Guardian is printed weekly during the regular school year. It is published by students of Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Editorials without bylines reflect the majority opinion of the editorial board. Views expressed in columns, cartoons and advertisements are those of the writers, artists and advertisers. The Guardian reserves the right to censor or reject advertising copy, in accordance with any present or future advertising acceptance rules established by The Guardian. All contents contained herein are the express property of The Guardian. Copyright privileges revert to the writers, artists and photographers of specific works after publication. Copyright 2013 The Guardian, Wright State University. All rights reserved.

Accountant Kegan Sickels

The front cover was inspired by Nintendo’s Mario, Taito Corp’s Space Invaders and Namco’s Pac Man.

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Library revenue decreases with semester transition A look into student library fines Adia Lane Contributing Writer Lane.53@wright.edu

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right State recently transitioned from quarters to semesters, forcing a change in rental policy which lengthened the rental periods. of library materials. Assistant Vice President for Finance and University Controller Jeffrey Ulliman said that these changes have resulted in a decrease in the library’s rev-

improvement fund which goes towards additional computers and new furniture, as well as remodeling,” said Shellabarger. According to Shellabarger the library sets some of the fines while others are set within a larger group such as The Ohio Library and Information Network. (OhioLINK) The fees set by WSU library are enforced because the library wants to ensure the material is available to all students and not just to those who get there first.

enue stream. “We only expect to get around $30-35,000 in annual revenue, we used to get closer to $5060,000 a year,” said Ulliman. “We got about $39,000 in fiscal ‘13.” The money goes towards items such as the software related to course reserves as well as the maintenance of registers and providing supplies, according to Ulliman. “As we get new books in, there are repository fees we have to pay which are associated with

cycling out the older books,” said Ulliman. “Without fines and fees, that money would have to come from some other source of student fees.” The fees and fines that are collected by the library support the functionality of the library, according to Associate University Librarian for Public Services Sheila Shellabarger. “One of the places the money goes is to the replacement of lost, damaged and unreturned materials. Another is the library

ect, Chair of the Building and Grounds Committee Mat Rizki had not yet received an official proposal and Director of the Office of Engineering and Construction Dan Papay had only heard rumors and could not provide any solid information. Similar plans have been around for even longer, Papay said. However, he was not sure

if these plans were the same as those now being considered “I suspect this has to do with a possible deal with the YMCA,” Papay said. “They have been talking for years about building a facility on WSU land somewhere.” Beyond simply providing a venue for swim meets, Young believes an Olympic-size pool

would benefit the university as a whole. “I believe that the implementation of this style of pool at Wright State University would not only drive admissions for swimming student athletes, but also allow the university

a significant portion of printrelated services in the near future. Executive Director of Business Services Art Neff explained the impetus for this overhaul. “We started 6-7 months ago by forming a committee

of students, faculty, administration and other WSU stakeholders to discuss the direction in which we wanted to take print management,” Neff said. “What prompted it was our Woodhall contract, which covers many of our printing devices, expired.”

Vice President of Business and Fiscal Affairs Mark Polatajko expanded upon the purpose of this committee. “A university-wide committee has been examining whether an enterprise print management system, in the form of a shared-service partnership

“We do track students fines and send out notices but after a certain amount of time we turn things over to the bursar and the fines automatically come off the students account,” said Shellabarger. “We try to be understanding with people and we realize that if the student runs up a large amount in fines they may not always have the money to pay, which is why we work with students to set up payment plans so that it’s not too onerous.”

Plans for a New Pool Make a Splash on Campus Benjamin Virnston News Writer Virnston.2@wright.edu

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proposal to construct the only Olympic-size swimming venue in the greater Dayton area on Wright State’s campus has been under consideration for at least a year, according to Student Government Associate of Athletic Affairs Jordan Young. While no final decisions have yet been made, plans for the second pool on campus seem to be moving forward. “This new pool would essentially put Wright State on the map,” Young said. “[It would] allow... schools (affiliates and non-WSU affiliates) to host meets here due to the lack of available Olympic size venues in Ohio, and ultimately drive profits for the Nutter Center and the University as a whole.” Though the pool has been previously discussed, many of the parties that would seemingly be involved with such a project were unaware of the proposal. Vice President of Business and Fiscal Affairs Mark Polatajko had not heard of the proj-

Student dives in the Student Union Natatorium pool. Photo by

as a whole to grow and become more enticing for all types of students” Young said. “This would also give us a substantial advantage over other schools in the area... as well as exponentially increase Wright State athletics’ presence in Ohio and the nation alike.”

Xerox could take over large potion of campus printing

Benjamin Virnston News Writer Virnston.2@wright.edu

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n overhaul of Wright State’s print management is underway. Xerox will likely be taking over

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with Central State University and Clark State Community College, could result in process efficiencies, provide continued quality and service and enhance sustainability and cost savings,” Polatajko said. Story continued on page 5

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Letter to the Editor: questionable advertising Dear Guardian Editor and Staff,

I am writing in response to the placement of an advertisement in your November 6 issue of The Guardian for people to earn money distributing a tabloid in which the articles prominently espouse racism, xenophobia, anti-Semitism and other forms of hate. I am not writing to question the student paper’s autonomy or authority to decide which proposed advertisements to accept but rather to outline a few issues which I hope will be considered as future decisions are made. I was told that there were deliberations around the placement. So I am sure that the decision was not made lightly. However as someone who worked on the student newspaper as an undergraduate and

now is charged with helping to promote multiculturalism, inclusion and community engagement on campus I would like to share a few issues that I hope will be part of future deliberations of this type. Since this is about advertising, I would begin by considering the purposes of this activity. For the paper I think a central purpose is to raise revenue. For the person or organization buying the advertising it is promotion of something, a furthering of their cause whatever that might be. So I think that any of us responsible for a venue in which advertising is made available have an obligation to consider the consequences of the activities we promote through advertising for individuals and our society. For me I would need to consider three key issues. First, whether

Dear Mandy

Is it okay to pursue a professor romantically? -Enquiring Mind Enquiring mind,

What is romance though? If we’re talking about dinner, chocolate, and an evening walk through Yellow Springs, there is technically no issue with ‘going out’ with your professor. It’s when you’ve booked those tickets to Cancun and things get frisky that you should be worried. According to the WSU Faculty Handbook, all faculties must avoid sexual relations with their students. If they don’t, they must make accommodations through their Department Chair to ‘eliminate any conflict of interest.’ Long story short, it’s frowned upon. So unless you’ve notified the Dean that you’re going to Cancun and you’ll be doing it on the beach, I’m sorry. Also, please call to tell me how that conversation went. Love, Mandy

Send your anonymous questions to Mandy at: Ask.fm/mandyadvice

Disclaimer: Ask Mandy is satirical and intended for humorous purposes. The views and opinions reflected are those of Mandy, not The Guardian as an organization. 4

November 13, 2013

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they promote or in some way inhibit the development of a society that respects the dignity of all. In addition, is it likely to promote harm. Finally does it promote a view that is truthful and accurate given current generally held scientific information. If I had concerns about any of these I would forgo the revenue and not run the advertisement. This decision to promote something is quite different from printing articles representing multiple perspectives or publishing opinion pieces such as columns and letters to the editor. These represent important opportunities to be informed and exercise our right to freedom of speech as engaged citizens of a diverse democracy. Providing a forum for the

open exchange of ideas that are consistent with tenants of freedom of expression does not mean that we are value neutral. In fact, this perspective represents a value. Professionally we also refer to this as a code of ethics. So being explicit about what our values are and applying them to decisions across the board related to where we get our funding, what we give funding to, what we promote and in the case of the student paper, what we print, is critical to being discerning but fair. This should apply whether deciding to do an advertisement for a wings restaurant, alcoholic beverage or hate group as well as when deciding what articles to print. Responsible journalism

is fair, accurate and purposeful. Despite my concerns about this particular advertisement, I have every confidence that you and your staff are and will continue to be responsible journalists as well as engaged university citizens working to promote inclusion and social justice.

Elizabeth Turner Contributing Writer Turner.227@wright.edu

Ohio so their son could wrestle. Would anyone move their family cross country for an excellent math program? Of course not. Friendships, TVs and body parts are broken all the time over NFL games. Just look up “crazy NFL fans” on YouTube. You see the recent developments with the Miami Dolphins, where a player has left the team for alleged being bullied and/or hazed. This man is being seen as weak or “sensitive”, obviously something that is not an attribute when it comes to wearing pads and running into other men over a ball for a living. The health of these athletes is also at stake here. These people, in order to please our primal nation, force their body to do inhuman things and then when their prime is over (age 30-40)

they’re dumped. Destined for a life of becoming an embarrassing sportscaster or owning a bar (Sam Malone style!) if they can adjust at all. Sports can be a place of camaraderie. It has the potential to teach teamwork and leadership. But when the focus on sports become so enveloped in our society that we lose track of arguably more important things, then what are we? A bunch of beer swilling, foam finger-wearing people who life live vicariously through the TV and their children whose best is never good enough. “We won the playoff game!” they shout. No, YOU sat on the couch and spilled salsa all over yourself. You most certainly did not win.

Based upon the novel of the same name by the controversial writer Orson Scott Card, the story is about a young boy named Ender (Asa Butterfield) enrolled in a futuristic military program where children are trained to prepare to battle an alien threat. This was a case where reading the book seems like a better alternative. The characters were simple, unexciting and, frankly, stereotypical. Ender is the hero, Abigail Breslin plays his loving sister, Harrison Ford plays a gruff commander, Viola Davis

is a compassionate officer and Hailee Steinfeld is the love interest. The actors were alright but their parts left the audience wanting more. The special effects, on the other hand, were a sight to see, with the highlights being the military academy and the battle simulation scenes. While the film did have spectacular visuals and special effects, the watered-down plot and one-dimensional characters kept it from being a real hit.

The sports problem S

ports can be great. A soccer game, some hoops, a lazy round of golf. You get some exercise, get to show off some skill or lack thereof and just hang out. It’s a frolicking good time! Said no one living today between the ages of four and ninety-nine. It’s never just for fun. There’s constant competition from the start. As a former little league coach, I saw enough crazed parents to put me off ever letting my future children pick up a glove. I went to a high school where people uprooted their entire family to move to rural

Respectfully, Dr. Kimberly Barrett Vice President for Multicultural Affairs & Community Engagement Wright State University The Guardian will address the advertisement in an editorial in next week’s issue. We invite and encourage any students, staff or faculty that wish to contribute an opinion on the matter to send inquiries to semler.4@ wright.edu.

Review: Endgame for Ender’s Game John Hamilton Contributing Writer Hamilton.107@wright.edu

“Ender’s Game” features more-than-mediocre performances and an impressive display of special effects but fails to try anything outside the usual sci-fi tropes. The most appropriate word to describe “Ender’s Game” is “meh.” This film never sparked any real emotions. The film adaptation is lackluster. It’s obvious that the original source material is better written and more detailed.

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Vending Machines: where is your money going?

Adia Lane Contributing Writer Lane.53@wright.edu

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he revenue brought in by the vending machines each year exceeds the expenses needed for standard vending operations such as labor, food and beverage costs according to WSU Assistant Vice President and University Controller Jeffery Ulliman. So where does the extra money go? “What we do with the excess is, number one, we provide an annual allocation to the Wright1 card office of about $50,000 which helps support the student and faculty carding operation. This offers the ability to use the card for food services and vending as well as laundry and off campus vendors,” said Ulliman. “Outside of some small external revenues from off campus vendors, the Wright1 card office has no other real revenue to support their operations.” University Bursar and Director of Treasury Services Steven Sherbet said the newly installed

vending equipment in Allyn Hall is fully ADA compatible making it easier for students with disabilities to access the machines as well as make selections. “Wright State takes pride in making sure we keep everything accessible for students with disabilities,” said Sherbet. “One of the things we are doing is that as we change out the vending machines across campus we will make sure that at each location has one or two vending machines installed with those updated features.” With the funds made available through the reserve, WSU was able to purchase updated software allowing the drivers to see what machines need serviced while at the warehouse which enabled them to load up and head out with what they need in a single trip. “Vending route drivers had to go around campus, take inventory on each machine, head back to the warehouse to load up the carts, then make a second trip back over to restock the machines,” said Sherbet. “Now all of our machines are on IP ad-

dresses so that the supervisor or the driver can do inventory electronically from the warehouse and only have to make the one trip saving both money and time.” Alongside these improvements is another soon to come, the much-anticipated ability to make vending purchases using a debit or credit card. “As students seem to be migrating more towards the use of credit and debit cards for purchases, we are looking to equip some of the machines at key locations with a credit card reader, so be looking for that to be piloted at certain locations very soon,” said Sherbet. Question: What snacks do you only buy from a vending machine? 1: Pop-Tarts 2: Skittles 3: Funions 4: Sunchips 5: Nature Valley granola bars Vote online at: theguardianonline.com

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Continued from page 3 Xerox’s National Higher Education Team was selected to head the implementation of an enterprise print management system after multiple bids were reviewed by the committee, according to Polatajko. Of the applicants, only Xerox could effectively fill both roles needed for the new print infrastructure: production and multifunctional devices, according to Neff. “We had the bidders come in and of the two best proposals, in terms of cost per copy, only Xerox could fulfill both parts of what we need,” Neff said. “We had 4 or 5 other bidders, but

they could only fill one of the two roles we are looking to fill.” While Xerox has been chosen to move forward in the process, a final agreement has not yet been signed, according to Purchasing Office Strategic Sourcing Analyst Marty Gantz. “Right now, we are still in the evaluation stage of the process,” Gantz said. Once the project moves forward, the major goals will be reducing the number of desktop printers, centralizing print jobs to the more efficient devices found in Print Services and sharing print management with Central State University and Clark State Community College, according to Neff.

Department of Modern Languages, WSU ¡Bienvenidos al Día de Inmersión en Español!

Call 937.224.7546 to schedule an appointment.

Cosmetic Dermatology Clinic wrightstatephysicans.org/derm/cosmetic

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Bethel Local High School Bexley High School Buckeye Central High School Edgewood High School Jonathan-Alder High School Monroe High School RULH High School Rittman High School Tippecanoe High School Waynesville High School West Liberty-Salem High School Worthington Christian High School

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Veterans Day at Wright State Photos by Michael Tyler: Photo Editor

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o cap off Veterans Day Events, local veterans competed with Army ROTC cadets in a Tug-ofWar competition. The veterans pulled off the victory by a score of two games to one.

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Annual Commemoration reveals stories of life and near-death in Nazi Germany

Illustration by Jonathon Waters: Graphics Manager

Dylan Dohner Contributing Writer Dohner.6@wright.edu “Through the years I’ve hesitated to speak on this particular thing, because it’s a little bit emotional and very personal,” said Renate Frydman, founder of the Dayton Holocaust Resource Center (DHRC) and the member of a family shaken during an attack by German Nazis. She spoke of Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, a series of organized attacks that occurred through the streets of many German and Austrian towns on November 9 and 10, 1938. During a commemorative event held in the Creative Arts Center on Nov. 5 marking 75 years since Kristallnacht, Fryd-

man said that her family was very fortunate to escape Nazi Germany. “It was a watershed event,” Frydman said. “However, for me, it was a second birthday.” In 1938, Nazis in Germany torched and destroyed various synagogues, schools, businesses and homes, killing nearly 100 Jews. In its aftermath, around 30,000 Jewish men were arrested and taken to prisons and concentration camps. “We went to Holland and stayed with relatives for a brief time, then went to England, where my father found out his only brother had been arrested,” said Frydman. She explained how her father took the small amount of money he had and ransomed her uncle out of prison. “My uncle lived to be 96 years

old and never knew my father had helped release him.” She said he found out about ten years ago. Frydman noted that during the attacks, none of the German authorities acted; rather, they looked on and even assisted in the rioting at times. Kristallnacht would later be described as the violent ignition to Adolf Hitler’s “Final Solution” and the shift of Nazi policies from nonviolence to something significantly more terrifying. Another speaker during the Kristallnacht 75th Commemoration, author Gina Roitman, described her own experiences. “So much of who I am as a Jew has to do with remembrance,” Roitman said, “but it’s not something I willingly embraced at an early age.” Roitman described how her

mother told her dark stories about the war, including one regarding Gina’s birth and how she had saved her daughter’s life in Germany. Steeped in disbelief, Roitman gathered a camera crew and travelled to Passau, a German town Roitman’s mother associated with a deep paranoia and where a midwife had been rumored to have killed fifty two newborn Jewish babies. One of those babies, Roitman’s mother had told her, would have been Gina herself. In Passau and the surrounding areas, Roitman discovered that her mother had been right. There had indeed been a midwife, a Nazi, who had pushed in soft spots on the heads of more than fifty newborn babies and killed them. Fearing the worst, her mother gave birth in anoth-

er Passau hospital. Roitman’s findings have since been composited into a documentary called, “My Mother, the Nazi Midwife, and Me.” It won a Make a Difference Award at the 8th annual COMMFFEST in Toronto. “People in discussion ask me if I hold any bad feelings for the German people,” said Frydman, “and I say… I can’t have any bad feelings about it.” “If you live with hate in your heart, it affects you,” Frydman said. “The devastation of the Holocaust goes beyond anything that has ever happened in human history, so we commemorate and think about it. We hopefully try to do something in our lives to make a better world.”

rently resting above her goal. Jessica Blair, President of the English Club, said she thinks community is an important aspect of NaNoWriMo, providing support and motivation for writers who might be struggling to hit their daily word quota. Blair said she believes NaNoWriMo is an effective way to improve as a writer, with its ability to produce a daily writing habit and the tendency for writers to sharpen their skills through-

out the experience. WriterCon - Wednesday Nov. 13 from 12:20 p.m. - 1:15p.m. in 286 Millett Hall. WriterCon is question-and-answer session with a panel of three published WSU faculty: Erin Flanagan, Ph.D., Byron Crews, and Brady Allen. Meeting: Friday Nov. 15 from 5 to 7 in one of the TBA conference rooms for anyone that wants to write with a group of people. More information can be found on the English Club’s Facebook page.

NaNoWriMo: a month of writing Adam Ramsey Features Writer ramsey.55@wright.edu

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tudents readied their quills on Nov. 1 to begin National Novel Writing Month (NaNoWriMo), during which writers across the nation make their best attempt at writing a 50,000 word novel in 30 days. NaNoWriMo has a website where users can log on, track their novel writing progress and reach out to other writers

for help or encouragement, according to Hyatt Hammad, sophomore creative writing and French major. There are also a few events put together by the English club in order to foster a similar sense of community in person at Wright State. Hyatt Hammad said NaNoWriMo provides motivation for students that have difficulty finding spare time for writing. “I’m taking a lot of credit hours and I have a part-time job and it feels like I never facebook.com/theguardianonline

have time to write,” said Hammad. “Sometimes the best way to get yourself to write is to tell yourself that you have to write. Otherwise, it simply will not get done.” NaNoWriMo is proving to other students to be an easier beast to tame the second time around. Freshman English major Juliana Crask is writing a young adult fantasy novel. She said she participated in NaNoWriMo last year and had a lot of difficulty but found more success this year, with her word count cur@wsuguardian

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Video game culture in a virtual world

Hannah Hendrix Features Editor Hendrix.16@wright.edu

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rom Pong to Pac-man to Mario to Skyrim, videogames have had a long pop culture history and a cult following. “With the videogame community, there’s no good way to describe the different types of gamers there are,” president of Wright State’s Adventurers’ Guild Robert Leonard, who said gamers tend to group based on their preferred game genre. According to Leonard, one of the most popular types of videogames are multiplayer games like Call of Duty and Battlefield. Another genre that gets a lot of attention is RPGs (role-playing games), like Skyrim and Dragon Age, where the focus is on the story. Nicole Reel, a biological sci-

ences major and self-professed gamer, said the gaming community is subjected to a lot of stereotypes. “I’d say the most used are that we never get outside, waste our life with games, are ugly, never play sports and are complete nerds,” said Reel. “While sometimes that’s true, most of the time it’s the complete opposite.” Reel said the stereotype she hates the most is that girls only game for attention. “Why would I take days of my life away playing a game for attention?” said Reel. “That’s the most ridiculous thing I’ve ever heard.” Another stereotype about gaming is that it leads to violence. Robert Leonard said the problem wasn’t with the games. “What people don’t understand is that a lot of those really violent games like Grand Theft

(From left to right): Lindsey Millsaps, Nick Weaver, Shiro Chung, Philip Kaiser-Parmette

Auto V (five) are supposed to be parodies. It’s game designers trying to show how ridiculous the things people want from their video games are,” said Leonard. “It’s the people, not the game.” Gaming subculture started decades ago in real life but has developed a huge online presence. Reel said her older sister was the person who introduced her to gaming. Now Reel mostly interacts with other gamers online. “I compete on some online games against other people around the world,” said Reel. “I don’t really get out in person except when I have a chance to go to a gaming con.” Reel said that the gaming community is pretty inclusive. She also said it depends on the gamers, but “a lot of them welcome you with open arms.”

Photos by Brittany Robinson: Staff Photographer

“Games are different than books or movies,” said Jake Mullins, an undergraduate religion major. “Every time you play it’s a little different. You get to help make it what it is.” Mullins said the best thing about gaming is that anyone can really do it. “You meet so many different kinds of people, and you all have this one thing in common,” said Mullins. “Also, sometimes it’s hard to find other gamers around.” The WSU Adventurers’ Guild provides one way for gamers to meet and play in Guild was the largest non-Greek person—whether they are into organization at Wright State,” video gaming, card gaming or said Leonard. “See?” said Mullins. “There tabletop RPGs. Robert Leonard are more of us than you think.” said WSU’s Adventurers’ Guild has about 70 members, but it used to be larger. “At one point in time, the

Shiro Chung relaxing in the Gamer’s lounge in the Student Union.

Religion on campus: Chi Alpha

ith its Greek name, some might not realize that Chi Alpha it is actually a Christian organization. “We’re not a fraternity or a sorority, but the name does kind of make it sound like that,” said Andy Erickson, the Campus Pastor for Chi Alpha. According to Daniel Swiggett, Senior Psychology major and a leader in Chi Alpha, the name comes from a scripture found in

II Corinthians, which refers to Christians as “Christ’s ambassadors”, with the Greek letter “chi” representing Jesus Christ and the Greek letter “alpha” representing ambassadors. Chi Alpha is affiliated with the Assemblies of God, which, according to Erickson, is a denomination that is characterized by flexible service structure and expressive, rather than conservative, worship. Another defining characteristic of the Assemblies of God is Pentecostalism, according to senior computer engineering major Nir Wiener, a leader in

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Chi Alpha. Pentecostalism is the belief that the baptism and the gifts of the Holy Spirit are active in present day and include the gift of tongues, healing and prophecy. Erickson and Chi Alpha practice these beliefs due to scriptural evidence found within the Bible that they believe pertains to these practices. “I wasn’t raised [in an Assembies of God church],” said Erickson, “and when I first got involved with [Chi Alpha] it was definitely different for me. It was stretching for me and we realize that that is stretching

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for other people, but those beliefs are founded in specific and clear areas of scripture within the Bible. We don’t do it just because we think it’s a good idea we believe that God is directing us to do that.” Although affiliated with a particular denomination, Chi Alpha welcomes people from all backgrounds, including nonChristian backgrounds. Erickson also said Chi Alpha would offer to pay for a meal for any student willing to speak with him for an hour about God, Christianity or Jesus. Students interested in learnfacebook.com/theguardianonline

ing more can find Chi Alpha at Wright State on Facebook or attend their weekly meeting on Wednesdays at 7 p.m. in the Rathskellar Room. Are you a member of a religious organization you would like to see featured? Contact us at guardian.featuresdept@ gmail.com


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Men’s basketball: Donlon demands a faster tempo on offense cent last season from the field. Donlon said before the season he wanted team to shoot better this year. The Raiders answered his call on Sunday. Led by A.J. Pacher’s 21-point performance, WSU shot 56.6 percent from the field. Pacher was a perfect 9-for-9 in Sunday’s win over MSJ. “My teammates gave me some great opportunities,” Pacher said. “They really did look for me a lot which is incredible and a tribute to them. I am just proud of the way we played tonight.” Donlon credited his team for not getting selfish with the basketball Sunday. “I don’t think we took a lot of bad or selfish shots and that is always the sign of a team that is coming together,” he said. Raider J.T. Yoho got in on the scoring with 17 points, nine of which came from a trio of 3-pointers. “My teammates found me and I think tonight, we went back more to last year not caring who gets the credit,” Yoho said. “As you can see, everyone on the stat sheet scored.”

Findlay on Nov. 1. Dixon suffered from a torn labrum in his shooting shoulder. Donlon said the decision to play Dixon was made last Friday. Dixon scored six points in Sunday’s contest. “I thought he looked good, really good,” Donlon said. “He

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Up Next: Raiders take to the road The Raiders are on the road for their next two contests first visiting Georgetown tonight followed by DePaul on Saturday. Both teams are from the revamped Big East Conference. Georgetown is coming off an 82-75 loss Friday against No. 19-ranked Oregon in a game played for 2,100 United States troops stationed in South Korea. In that contest, Hoyas 6-foot-10, 350-pount center Joshua Smith scored 25 points. Donlon is expecting Smith to pose a challenge for the Raiders big men. Georgetown was a No. 2 seed in last year’s NCAA Tournament and was upset by Florida Gulf Coast in the first round of the big dance. “We can pose some problems for them” Donlon said. “Our guys shouldn’t be big eyed, they have been in games like that before against teams of that caliber. There are nine juniors and seniors that need to play with some confidence against a good team, but we’re a good team when we play well.” Following Wednesday’s game, the Raiders will visit DePaul Saturday to kick off the CBE Hall of Fame Classic. DePaul is off to a 1-0 start after topping Grambling State 96-58 last Saturday.

“We don’t move the ball fast enough,”

Raiders’ coach Billy Donlon

Justin Boggs Sports writer Boggs.59@wright.edu

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ollowing Wright State’s 82-49 win over Mount St. Joseph Sunday night, coach Billy Donlon said he wants his team to move the ball faster

Photo by Michael Tyler: Photo Editor

which will give the Raiders better looks at the basket. “We don’t move the ball fast enough,” Donlon said. “We got to pass, we have to get it from one guy to another faster sooner and quicker against better defenses.” The Raiders shot 43.9 per-

Senior Miles Dixon and junior Kendall Griffin joined the Raiders’ lineup Sunday after missing WSU’s exhibition contest versus

that states the website has one free redesign that allows new features or exterior modifications to be added. Assistant Director of Athletics, Bob Noss thought it was a good time for the redesign to make navigation easier for the fans and recruits. “The drop down boxes, such as under sports, allows fans to quickly choose to go to any sports schedule, roster or news without going to the sports’ page,” Noss said. “I think the new look is brighter and more welcoming.” The home page features the

top five stories trending and also displays an up-to-date sports schedule for current athletics. A more friendly navigation tool that has been implemented is the drop down boxes for each tab, reducing the amount of clicks a user goes through. During the conversion from the old to new appearance, some users were caught in the middle of the websites’ tuning process. “We are still tweaking the website,” Noss said. “During the transition, a few fans needed to hit the refresh button for the new site to appear, but that was

Dixon, Griffin in; Arceneaux out

- Billy Donlon didn’t play timid. It is great to have him out there. He plays so hard, has great athleticism. Nice to see him out there.” Griffin missed the exhibition contest with an unspecified injury in the preseason. He returned Sunday to score six and add five assists in 28 minutes of play. WSU lost the services of guard Reggie Arceneaux last week who suffered a tweaked hamstring. Donlon was hopeful Arceneaux will be able to play tonight against Georgetown. “I think he has a chance to play,” Donlon said.

Athletics website overhauls image, simplifies navigation process

Sam McLain Contributing Writer Mclain.15@Wright.edu

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he Wright State University athletic website- the online center for Raider sports news and updates- came out with a new and improved appearance to garner more traffic. The website engaged in a comprehensive online makeover to make navigation easier and more user-friendly to visitors. As part of their contract with NeuLion, WSUraiders.com was due for a redesign, which is part of the five-year agreement

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due to old ‘cookies’ that were still in their computers. For the most part, we have received positive feedback.” The reception of the redesign has gone over well with students and recruiters. Users are finding it easy to locate specific sports and are more able to save time looking for them. Senior, Dai Jackson thought the website was simple and invited the reader in. “Along with it being easy to navigate, it saves time for someone who knows exactly what they’re looking for,” Jackson www.theguardianonline.com

said. “The photo album is also a great idea for those who aren’t able to makes the games.” Sophomore Jacob Jetter visits the website often and said he thought the changes made were structured to a more userfriendly design. “The upcoming events schedule and headline changes are very well organized,” Jetter said. “I think having the important stories and recent scores at the top capture the reader’s attention.”

November 13, 2013

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These guys have all the fun

WSU pep band features distinctive variety of entertainment Andrew Smith Sports Editor Smith.1026@wright.edu

I

n the far corner of the Nutter Center, during men’s and women’s basketball games, are two groups of cheerleaders: one that tumbles and carries pompoms, and one that marches to a different beat. Under the direction of graduate assistant Aaron Jacobs, the Wright State pep band delights crowds, both big and small, with its musical proficiency, then dazzles them with an assortment of chants, cheers, dances and choreographed silliness. Jacobs isn’t certain when the band added the familiar flair basketball fans have come to

expect from them, but he does know that it is important for his band to entertain in way beyond their music. “As far as I know, it’s more of a recent thing,” said Jacobs, who is in his second and final year of leading the band. “At least the amount of cheering and weird things that we do during the games that kind of amuse us a lot, but I know it’s for the fans too. I think that [the pep band] and the core of student section make it a better game experience for all of our fans.” Jacobs said he tries to remain hands-off in terms of planning and organizing the cheers. He leaves those responsibilities up to his student leadership team. “I definitely encourage, but a lot of it comes from the students

Students holding fists in unison during “Raider Up” when WSU attempts a free throw.

and I prefer it to be that way,” Jacobs said. Pep band music manager Ricky Day said the band appoints a spirit coordinator, who manages the band’s cheers. Day said Jacobs picked the leaders for the band during meetings held earlier in the year. What has resulted from the band’s creations, are modern twists on well-known songs and nursery rhymes. When an opposing player, for example, steps to the free throw line, the band sings, “You’re not going to make it, no, you’re not going to make it. You’re not going to make it anymore,” to the tune of Twisted Sister’s “We’re Not Going to Take It.” When WSU attempts a foul

Photo by Andrew Smith: Sports Editor

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shot, the cry of “Raider up!” echoes throughout the arena. “The favorite [cheer] I have would definitely be the ‘Raider up’ during free throws,” Day said. “There has been a couple of people buckle, especially last year, because it was sort of a last-minute thing.” Jacobs said the band isn’t out to offend anyone, and under his tutelage, the reviews have been overwhelmingly positive. “We keep it family friendly, but we’ve actually had a couple of opposing teams who have said, ‘we really enjoy your band and you really make us laugh’ and we’ve had some [WSU] players say, ‘you guys crack us

Band Director: Aaron Jacobs

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up with all the stuff you do,’ which is always nice to hear.” Jordan Hambright, who over sees recruitment for the band and acts as the alumni coordinator, said the band’s cheers have helped separate them from other groups who support the Raiders in a given night. “I think it kind of distinguishes us a bit from just ordinary student organizations that are just being at the game and cheering along because we participate just like the other spirit squads, but we’re not really part of the spirit squad,” Hambright said.

Photo by Andrew Smith: Sports Editor

Women’s soccer: Season ends in penalty kicks Wilson’s final attempt hits crossbar

Justin Boggs Sports writer Boggs.59@wright.edu

I

t was not the ending Pat Ferguson had in mind. The ninth-year Wright State head coach was not prepared for the way the Raiders’ season came to an end last Friday at the Horizon League Championships in Milwaukee. After 110 minutes of stout defending, the Oakland Grizzlies broke a scoreless tie by winning 4-3 in penalty kicks over Wright State in the semifinal round of

the tournament. The game was decided when defender Samantha Wilson’s last penalty kick hit the crossbar, giving Oakland the win. “That is a real tough way to lose and a fun way I suppose,” Ferguson said “That tiebreaker was not reflective of how the game went.” The Raiders finished the season with a 8-5-5 record. The Raiders did not allow a goal in their final four contests. It was the last match for six seniors, five of which were regularly in Ferguson’s starting lineup.

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Among the seniors, the Raiders lose Horizon League Goalkeeper of the Year Brooke McCurdy, and Second Team AllConference members Liz Soto and Emilie Fillion. Fillion was among the league leaders in goal scoring with eight tallies. “It was a special senior class,” Ferguson said “When I went to coaching school, I missed the day where they talk about what to say to a team after they lose in PKs in the a conference tournament. “I told them what I hope you take away from not this game but from this program is in 10 @wsuguardian

years or 20 years when you have a family or a job, if someone had the power to send you back to your college days and play one more time for your college program, I hope the response is, ‘I’ll go in a second.” Fillion’s offensive effort was not enough this season as Wright State relied heavily on its defense en route to the Horizon League’s second best record. “We didn’t do well on the offensive side of the spectrum this year and I think that was an issue last (Friday),” Ferguson said. “As a coaching staff, all we www.theguardianonline.com

can do is put them in a position to win. From a defensive side we did that and from an offensive side, we didn’t.” Ferguson has 16 players potentially returning next season from this year’s squad including Horizon League Defender of the Year Allie Metzler. Ferguson said he has a good recruiting class set for next season. That class will be finalized in early February for national letter of intent day.

November 13, 2013

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