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OCTOBER 23, 2013

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ISSUE NO. 9 VOL. 50

pg. 3

Guardian critic reviews “Captain Phillips” Page 4 Theater department presents “Oklahoma!” Page 8 Club football wins third straight Page 11

Illustration by Jonathon Waters: Graphics Manager


CAMPUS EVENTS Wednesday, Oct. 23 • B Term last day to drop with 70% refund • Advising Days: 9 a.m. to 12 p.m. University College • Horror Fiction reading: 4-5:30 p.m. Pathfinder Lounge, Student Union • Disney on Ice 100 Years of Magic: 7 p.m. Ervin J. Nutter Center Thursday, Oct. 24 • Oklahoma!”: 7p.m. Festival Playhouse • The X-Men: Responding to Adversity: 7-8:30 p.m. 163 Student Union Friday, Oct. 25 • Last day to drop in-person with a W grade • UCIE Coffee Hour

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– Pumpkin Carving: 3-4 p.m. Rathskellar Room, Student Union • “Oklahoma!”: 8 p.m. Festival Playhouse Sunday, Oct. 27 • Last day to drop online with a W grade for students without holds Monday, Oct. 28 • Ice Hockey v. UC: 10 p.m. Kettering Rec Center Tuesday, Oct. 29 • Raider 4 Life Grad Fair: 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Student Union Bookstore • Music & Medicine Symposium Concert: 7-9 p.m. Schuster Hall Thursday, Oct. 31 Halloween • Nightmare on Springwood Lane: 8 p.m. Woods clearing

PHOTO Editor-in-Chief Phone: 775-5534 Brandon Semler News Editor Leah Kelley

Features Editor Hannah Hendrix Sports Editor Andrew Smith

Photography Editor Michael Tyler Web Editor Aaron Schwieterman News Writer Benjamin Virnston Features Writer Adam Ramsey Sports Writer Justin Boggs

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Photographer Brittany Robinson

Graphics Manager Jonathon Waters

Marketing/Promotion Eli Chizever

Business Manager Jared Holloway

Distribution Manager Joel Gibbs Advertising Representatives Phone: 775-5537 David McNeely Joseph Craven Zach Woodward Fax: 775-5535

Nov. 4: Spring Early Registration begins

Dec. 1: Open registration for Spring begins – no backout if initual registration is on/after this date Dec. 15: Fees due for Spring early registration

Jan 6: Last day to apply for admission as a degree-seeking undergraduate student Jan. 10: Last day to be admitted as a degree-seeking undergraduate student Jan. 13: First day of Spring Semester classes

Jan. 24: Undergraduate and graduate deadline to apply for Spring graduation

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The Guardian reserves the right to censor or reject advertising copy, in accordance with any present or future advertising acceptance rules established by The Guardian. All contents contained herein are the express property of The Guardian. Copyright privileges revert to the writers, artists and photographers of specific works after publication. Copyright 2013 The Guardian, Wright State University. All rights reserved.

Can’t get enough of ghouls and ghosts? Keep an eye out for The Guardian’s Halloween issue--coming to you on Oct. 30.

Oct. 21: Release Spring Schedule on web

October 23, 2013

The Guardian is printed weekly during the regular school year. It is published by students of Wright State University in Dayton, Ohio. Editorials without bylines reflect the majority opinion of the editorial board. Views expressed in columns, cartoons and advertisements are those of the writers, artists and advertisers.

Accountant Kegan Sickels

Spring Semester Dates to Remember

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New student organizations plans to fight human trafficking

Michele Crew Staff Writer crew.3@wright.edu

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group of students at Wright State University are coming together to fight human trafficking. Generation Freedom Makers is a new student organization whose purpose is to educate and spread awareness of human trafficking. Human trafficking is commonly referred to as modern day slavery, in which people are transported, traded and put into forced labor or prostitution. “This generation is going to have to be the ones to take action,” said Catalleya Byrd, president and founder of Generation Freedom Makers and fourth-year political science major at WSU. “I’m excited to actually make a difference and see the difference.” To spread awareness, the organization plans to hold movie nights, talks and a bake

sale with information about slave labor. In the future, the group would like to hold an event where speakers and human trafficking organizations could attend to raise money for an area organization that is actively involved in educating the public and working with survivors of human trafficking. Generation Freedom Makers also hopes to get the university involved by starting a class that trains university faculty and staff to recognize and report human trafficking, according to Byrd. “There is no set guideline to what a trafficker looks like,” said Byrd. “There is no set guideline to what a victim looks like.” By joining Generation Freedom Makers, students have the opportunity to be involved in active legislation. The organization is planning to collaborate with the University of Dayton to rally in Columbus to pass legislation that would change how trafficking is handled in Ohio.

“I’m really encouraged that so many college students are embracing this issue,” said Donna Schlagheck, chair and professor of the political science department at Wright State. “This is what democracy is all about.” Each year, about 600,000 to 800,000 victims are transported across international borders. In the United States, about 50,000 victims are trafficked each year, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. About half of the victims are under the age of 18 who are runaways or are kidnapped. Currently, Generation Freedom Makers meets every other Thursday at 5 p.m. and has about 8-10 members. They are always welcoming new members. Those interested in joining can contact Professor Schlagheck at d.schlagheck@ wright.edu or go to the office of Student Activities .

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Fair Trade on Campus Thomas Koronowski Contributing Writer Koronowski.2@Wright.edu

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right State University is home to over 200 student organizations, now including the Fair Trade Student Association. Charmaine Griffith is one of the founders of the Fair Trade Student Association. “Our goal is to make Wright State a Fair Trade University,” Griffith said in a press release. “Fair Trade at its core is about thinking globally and acting locally.” This organization aims to bring back the idea of protecting neighborhoods,

economic sustainability and retention of relationships. Fair trade between consumer and producers is the goal. “The certification we are trying to earn allows for a new conversation about WSU’s diversity, the need for growth and innovation, and believe it or not human trafficking,” Griffith said. This organization strives to grant WSU national attention and be actively involved in talks about economic peace, social justice, and human trafficking. “Fair Trade can make a difference on WSU’s campus,” Griffith said, “and around the world.”

Staying safe on Wright State campus A look into the security of your car, your belongings and yourself

Benjamin Virnston News Writer Virnston.2@wright.edu

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string of car burglaries, attempted thefts and an assault in a campus parking lot have shaken the sense of security felt by many Wright State students. Wright State Police Crime Prevention Manager Sergeant Patrick Ammon speculated that the thefts were committed by those not affiliated with the university. “People from the surrounding areas will come on campus and look for unsecured possessions,” Ammon said. “The stolen items were probably in plain sight within locked cars.” Biomedical Engineering student Kay Harper strongly suggested that drivers lock their cars when they are parked in the campus lots. “I never leave my car unlocked,” Harper said. “There

are a lot of thieves around campus.” In addition to these car break-ins, an assault occurred mid-afternoon on 22 Oct, according to an official WSUPD email alert. “An unknown male assaulted a female student near Parking Lots 12 and 13,” the email said. “Reportedly, the suspect grabbed the victim’s arm and kissed her on the neck before being pepper sprayed by the victim.” There has been at least one instance recently in which non-students have been caught attempting to steal from people in the Dunbar Library. Student Evans Amo Ameyaw described his encounter in the library. “I left my bag unattended briefly and it was gone when I returned,” Amo Ameyaw said. “I looked around and saw some people that didn’t look like students with my bag.” “I called the campus police, and

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after returning my bag, they were asked to leave and never return.”

“People from the surrounding areas will come on campus and look for unsecured possessions,” – WSUPD Patrick Ammon Ammon offered the following safety advice. “Pay close attention to one’s surroundings, report suspicious activity, have the campus police number on speed dial, travel with trusted friends or stick to well-lit and occupied areas and use alcohol responsibly,” Ammon said. “Defensive weapons, such as knives and pepper spray, are allowed on campus, but be trained in the use of whatever you carry.” English student, Juli @wsuguardian

Poling, offered similar advice and agreed that defensive weapons are definitely worth consideration as a safety precaution. Despite these warnings, she considers the WSU campus to be relatively safe compared to other campuses she has visited, such as the University of Cincinnati. “With the exception of one creepy stranger following me around and asking me to join him in running through the fountains, I have never felt threatened on campus,” Poling said. Ammon explained his view of campus security. “The campus is like a small city and with that you will always have some problems,” Ammon said. “The goal is when the problems happen that we keep the campus aware of the facts so they can take the needed safety precautions.” Further crime-prevention tips can be found on the WSPD website. www.theguardianonline.com

Have you experienced theft or vandalism on campus? Tell us your story at: guardianeditorial. com

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Government shutdown demonstrates need for American solidarity

Brandon North Contributing Writer North.23@wright.edu

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he recent government shutdown has shown me at least one thing: the United States is becoming more like an oligarchy than a democracy. For those who haven’t encountered the word (and of course, politicians don’t throw it around much), oligarchy is a general term for any political system in which a small, elite group of people hold power. I won’t go as far as saying

that the U.S. seems like a plutocracy (in which money is the way a small group holds their power), but with a U.S. credit default narrowly missed, things don’t exactly appear overly democratic either. CNN reported in an online article that according to one estimate, the shutdown cost the economy $24 billion dollars— all because members of an elite group are trying to appease the other members of their faction within that group. This kind of political irresponsibility makes me wonder if a democratic republic

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Absolutely, yes! Leggings are a gift to women everywhere. Let us take a moment and thank the person who made leggings possible. Now if we’re talking about those skin-tight, see-through tights that many women call ‘leggings,’ absolutely not. If I can see the butterfly print on your underwear, it is safe to say that those are not acceptable, and you should probably be embarrassed of yourself. Truth is, leggings have been around for centuries and were often used to keep people warm. Men used to wear leggings paired with a tunic, and now women are doing the same. Anyone who argues that leggings are not appropriate to wear in public have obviously never worn the soft, stretchy waist bands or experienced the freedom of feeling like you’re not wearing any pants at all. Don’t be a hater; be a lover of the legging.

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is possible any longer. Isn’t it, too, simply an impossible ideal that a small group uses to gain power over a larger one? I’m not being facetious here. It’d be nice to think that everyone in the US has an equal opportunity to shape the progress of the nation, but this is an illusion that was cemented with the Constitution itself. As great as it is, it was founded upon inequality: the colonies wanted independence from England, and this implied they thought of themselves as different, perhaps even ‘better’ than the English because they

wanted more ‘freedom.’ And we all know what happened to the Native Americans because of that different kind of freedom. Difference doesn’t have to mean oppression. No two people will ever be completely equal; genetics determines that with genders. But valuing difference, and not homogeny, is how a political system moves toward offering both universal and particular freedoms. It’s difficult to not let an elite group control our political system when identity politics are fragmenting people into

small groups. I think we need a sense of American solidarity or we risk losing personal freedoms when faced with the economic survival of the nation.

John Hamilton Contributing Writer Hamilton.107@wright.edu

aware that the members of the Alabama have stated that they thought the portrayal of Phillips was inaccurate, and I would like to say that I disagree. Mainly because Phillips does not come off as extremely heroic. He doesn’t give himself as a hostage when they enter the lifeboat he is forced to be in there. He also comes off as very arrogant. Also, no one in the film is praising him, so in my eyes I see it more as a movie about a particular incident and not a film about the heroics of one man. As for the rest of the film: the performances are spectacular. Tom Hanks is, as always, fantastic. I want to give attention to the actors who portrayed the four pirates in the film as well. Barkhad Ali as the lead pirate Muse is especially fantastic. He gives a chilling and confident performance in this film and I

hope to see more from him in the future. Hopefully in more than villain roles. Another positive is that the film shows what each leader goes through during the situation. We see Phillips trying to maintain control on his ship, we see Muse wanting prove himself and help out the people in his village, and we see the naval leaders doing what needs to be done to control the situation. I especially like how the film gives attention to the pirates and allow you to empathize with them. The only problem I had with “Captain Phillips” is the use of a shaky camera for effect, which became kind of annoying. It’s not that terrible, though, and it didn’t take me out of the moment. Again, this movie is totally worth the price of admission. A can’t-miss.

Movie Review: ‘Captain Phillips’ T

he latest film from Oscarnominated director Paul Greengrass (“United 93”, “Bourne” films) is a truly suspenseful and finely-acted film that is worthy of its two hour and 14 minute run time. The movie is based on the true story of the hijacking of the cargo ship Maersk Alabama in April, 2009. The hijacking led to a hostage situation involving the Alabama’s captain Richard Phillips, played by Tom Hanks. Obviously, if you are aware of the historical event, you know how it turns out. But nonetheless, this film is still worth the trip to the theater. I would like to get one thing out of the way: I am fully aware of the controversy that surrounds this film. I am

What are we really afraid of?

Elizabeth Turner Contributing Writer Turner.227@wright.edu

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ear is a fascinating idea. I wonder what we really fear anymore. Horror movies have to get more creative (or their marketing does, anyway) to get true fear from anyone. Things that go “boo!” and grotesque monsters no longer cut it. Nowadays it takes a 4

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government shutdown or a missed call from a loan agency or tragedies to inspire fear (and two of the three of those would make terrible movies). Here are the things that get my adrenaline up and my inner scaredy cat out. The first is geese. Due to multiple geese-related incidents when I was younger I am genuinely equal parts scared and disgusted by them. I would’ve paid for those fake www.theguardianonline.com

Interested in writing opinion pieces for The Guardian? Contact Brandon Semler at semler.4@wright.edu for more information.

crocs outside the hanger if they asked me to. The second is death by electrocution in a bathtub. It was on an episode of CSI I watched when I was about nine. For the next month I told my mom I was going to take a shower and instead would go outside and use the hose. Country living, everybody. So while none of you probably share my first two fears (even though you really

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should) I am willing to bet the 76 cents in my left pocket that most of you share my last fear: Unpredictability. It’s a woozy because it encompasses every aspect of a person’s life. What if they’re out of brown rice by the time I get to Chipotle? Will I get to work on time without hitting someone’s fender/chicken/mailbox? Will I ever find love? Can I get into graduate school? What if this cat scratch gets infected and they have to amputate my hand? What if I’m not good

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enough? We fear surprises, the future, the what-ifs and the maybes. And that’s natural. I know you don’t want to hear this. I know you thought the end of this amateur opinion column was going to be some insightful epiphany that will cease all your worries, anxieties and fears forever. Well, you’re going to have to consult with your amygdala about that. Do you “CheckNGo To Hell” would be a good movie title?


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Former Wright State professor pleads guilty

depicted erotic scenes involving adults and children. Investigation began just before Uphoff’s retirement, after suspect material was ormer Wright State found by employees on University professor a printer and copier on James Uphoff, 76, pleaded campus, according to a press guilty to possessing child release from The United pornography in U.S. District States Attorney’s Office Court on Sept. 24. Southern District of Ohio. The conditional plea Uphoff is expected to be agreement involves a sentence sentenced on Jan. 21. ranging from 6 to 24 months. Dayton Daily News stated that Uphoff possessed “550 For breaking news updates go pornographic images and two to theguardianonline.com videos on three of Uphoff’s computer devices,” which Adam Ramsey Staff Writer Ramsey.55@wright.edu

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Female student assaulted on campus Brandon Semler Editor-in-chief Semler.4@wright.edu

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n “unknown male” grabbed a female student’s arm and kissed her neck before being pepper sprayed by the victim and fleeing on a black motorcycle with another male, according to a Wright State alert email sent to campus Tuesday afternoon. The incident occurred at 2:30 p.m. near Lots 12 and 13, according to the email. The email said: “The victim reported that one of

the suspects wore a mask, a black T-shirt, black pants, and a black jacket. She said the other male was wearing jeans, a white T-shirt, and a brown jacket. The victim described the suspects as being African-American. Anyone with information about the incident can contact WSU police at 937775-2111. The Guardian will update as more information is gathered.

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Week in review: what you might have missed Love Your Body Day Sponsored by the Women’s Center, this all-day event used positive encouragement to men and women on the emphasis on true body beauty.

Photos by Brittany Robinson: Staff Photographer

Draw on the Walls occurred in between art galleries exhibits in the Creative Arts Center . Students, staff and faculty were permitted to draw on the gallery walls to express themselves.

Photos by Brittany Robinson: Staff Photographer

Talent Show, hosted by The Black Student Union, was one event that took place during their Jamboree Week, which took place October 14 - 20.

Photo by Jordan Danko: Contributing Photographer

Photos by Michael Tyler: Photo Editor

Football FrenXI, a flag football tournament, was part of Alpha Xi Delta Sorority’s Philantrophy program in which they sponsor an event where proceeds go to a charity of their choosing. This year’s charity was Autism Speaks. This was the first year for the event.

Photos by Michael Tyler: Photo Editor

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Latin Night a fitting finale to Hispanic heritage month Dylan Dohner Contributing Writer Dohner.6@wright.edu

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atin Night kicked up its heels Tuesday, Oct. 15 in the Student Union’s Apollo Room. Students were struck with a bit of culture, and the fast and fluid styles of Merengue and the Cha Cha as demonstrated by helpful, energetic instructors. An authentic Mariachi troupe accompanied a few of the dances with their own beats, and took requests of such classic Mexican songs as “Guantanamera” and “Cielito Lindo” when the dancing settled down. The coordinator and director of the Asian/Hispanic/Native America center, Mai Nguyen, said that Latin Night is the finale of Hispanic Heritage Month.

Photos by Megan Waddel :Contributing Photographer

“We do this every year,” Nguyen said. “Music is universal, and it’s nice to be exposed to different forms of music. The more you know, the better you are. We take this opportunity to introduce it to everyone.” A student and attendee, sophomore Adrienne Lohr, came with a friend for extra credit. She had taken Latin dance classes before, and “they were all partner-based, to teach you about dancing in a social environment. It’s just good culture.” Sarah Olsen, a sophmore and the friend who accompanied Lohr, said “Yeah, it was for extra credit, but I also went because I thought it would be a lot of fun.” “The Mariachi band is definitely my favorite part. I love the Hispanic culture, and the band brought that culture to me,” said Olsen.

Melding Music and Medicine: Wright State’s 5th annual symposium

Dylan Dohner Contributing Writer Dohner.6@wright.edu

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right State University will host the 5th annual WSU Music and Medicine Symposium in the Creative Arts Center this month. The event is intended to foster a relevant and meaningful connection between the art of music and the science of medicine with a collection of professors, performers and doctors in attendance to speak on behalf of their fields.

This year’s guest speakers include Linda Brovsky, a nationally-recognized opera singer and musical theater connoisseur, Cynthia Solomon, president of SHEPPARDSOLOMON Biomedical Consulting, Randall Paul, chair of the Wright State University Department of Music, and Jerald Kay, chair of the Department of Psychiatry at the WSU Boonshoft School of Medicine. Kay will discuss how to help physicians make their patients secure enough that they can reflect what is really going on about their symptoms and

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emotions, “and what sorts of things that interfere in the doctor-patient relationship that make it very challenging for physicians to understand their patients,” Kay said. Tuesday will see a Guest Artist Recital beginning at 7 p.m. in Shuster Hall in the Creative Arts Center. The Symposium will be held Wednesday, Oct. 30 beginning at 8:45 a.m. with Kay’s speech, “Having the Difficult Conversation — Sex, Drugs, Life and Death” at 1:30 p.m. Steven Aldredge, an instructor in the Music Department, said that he will

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accompany renowned vocalists Roderick Dixon and Alfreda Burke during the second half of Tuesday night’s Guest Artist Recital at 7:00 p.m., where they will follow performances by doctors from the Boonshoft School of Medicine. Aldredge has been “assisting and playing [piano] since the Symposium began.” “I think the bond between the disciplines of music and medicine . . . are inextricably linked,” Aldredge said. “The art of medicine [influences] how an artist shapes his interpretation of a work or even how he physically approaches his

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instrument.” Aldredge also pointed out “the positive effect of music on the mind and body has been proven.” Admission is free for WSU students, faculty and staff and the surrounding areas, though spaces are limited. For more information, including other guest speakers and their times, visit http://www. wright.edu/music/musicmed/index.html.

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UAB to host Fright Night at the Nutter Center Adam Ramsey Features Writer Ramsey.55@wright.edu

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repare for a scare: University Activities Board (UAB) will soon host their first Fright Night, a complete haunted house. The event will be held in Nutter Center’s McLin Gym No. 4 on Tuesday, Oct. 29 from 8- 11 p.m. Shuttle service will be provided from campus residences to the Student Union, and from the Student Union to the Nutter Center. The spooky set up will feature complete lighting and sound provided by Simplified Entertainment Inc., a company that specializes in hosting many different types of events and has 10 years of experience in haunted house hosting specifically. UAB Programmer Ala’ Saleh said that the event is free for

all Wright State University affiliates. The haunted house is set to have multiple rooms and hallways with each individual room built around a specific theme. “There are winding and twisting hallways thoughout the unit that open up into a room with a specific theme,” said Melissa Ovitt, Simplified Entertainment Vice President of Sales. “There’s one room that we call ‘Dr. Evil,’ which has changed this year to an autopsy room. There are black light hallways, a falling ceiling hallway, a claustrophobia hallway, and a skeleton hallway.” “We get a great response,” said Ovitt. “Many people book us year after year and bring us back.”

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tudents and alumni alike came to the Multicultural Halloween celebration for a taste of the exotic on Monday evening in the Apollo Room. “It started about 14 years ago,” said Mai Nguyen, director of the Asian/Hispanic/Native American center (AHNA). “Actually, a group of Asian students started [the event] as the Ethnic Halloween celebration.” AHNA started the event to celebrate the autumn festivals of other cultures in conjunction with Halloween. “Halloween is only celebrated in the United States and Canada, but in Asia, in Latin America and in Europe [they] don’t have Halloween,” said Nguyen. “They have other celebrations that happen at the same time, like the Mid-autumn Festival, Chuseok, the Japanese festival is called the Obon, the 8

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Nigerians have the Festival of Yams and the Mexicans have the Day of the Dead.” The event featured food from around the world and a variety of entertainment inspired by different cultures. “We had Asian food, American food, soul food, Mexican food and kosher food,” said Nguyen. “All those were free to Wright State University students, faculty or staff.” “The food was really awesome,” said freshman biomedical engineering major Jonetta Parker. “They had all kinds of different things to choose from.” “We had entertainment from different cultures: the French can-can, a dance from Latin America, Irish dancers, a Lebanese dance and then the Millennium Robots. We also had a martial arts demonstration,” said Nguyen. The Millennium Robots were a dance crew of four decked out in silver paint. “I thought the Millennium Robots were the best part,” www.theguardianonline.com

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Students “Cain’t Say No” to Wright State’s “Oklahoma!”

though everyone may know it, they’ve never seen it like this before.” Despite knowing the show, Gregory Andrus, Liberal Studies and French Major, is uninterested in seeing “Oklahoma!” again. “I think it’s one of those shows that it’s more fun to be in than it is to watch,” said Andrus. “I don’t think it was written to be poignant. It wasn’t written to be complicated or dramatic.” “I think it’s a good play. I like the characters, the design of the set, the costumes as well, just about everything about it. Yes, [I would go see it.] I think it would be fun,” said Beth Dorsey, Freshman Biology major. Tickets can be purchased at the theater box office for the price of $18 for students and $22 for adults. According to Richard, students that are interested in seeing the show can sign up at the theater box office as an usher to hand out programs and see the show for free.

Jon Hacker and Caroline Gruber work on the opening scene

Adam Ramsey Features Writer Ramsey.55@wright.edu

“Oklahoma!,” a musical love story by Rodgers and Hammerstein set in the old west, will debut at the Festival Playhouse on Thursday, Oct. 24 and will run until Nov. 10. “It’s essentially a love story between a young woman and a cowboy and the complications they have in living the unsettled west. There’s a love triangle,” said Director Greg Hellems on the plot of classic show. “It’s basically relationship drama in

AHNA celebrates autumn festivals with Multicultural Halloween Hannah Hendrix Features Editor Hendrix.16@wright.edu

SPORTS

said freshman biology major Shantel Carson. The Multicultural Halloween celebration also included costume contests for both children and adults, as well as a culture quiz contest in which attendees could win gift cards by answering questions about a variety of cultures.

the old west.” Hellems said that this show was challenging due to people’s perceptions of the play. “[People] think it’s a very happy musical about farmers and cowboys but there’s a lot of complication.” Jason Richard, stage manager for “Oklahoma!” believes that this showing differs from what is conventionally expected from it. “I think for this show, they’ve gone and pulled out a lot of the interesting moments and brought a new twist to it,” said Richard. “It’s a show that, even

Emerald Jazz, WSU dance troupe.

The Hip-Hop dance group Millennium Robots performing on stage.

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Photo by Brittany Robinson: Staff Photographer

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Quality opponents hard to attract for WSU Justin Boggs Sports Writer Boggs.59@wright.edu

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or yet another season, Wright State was unable to attract a marquee men’s basketball program to the Nutter Center, a fact that does not surprise WSU Athletics Director Bob Grant. It has been 14 years since a Top 25 nonconference opponent has visited the Nutter Center in men’s basketball. According to Grant, it would take extra special circumstances to convince a big-name team to visit WSU. “The problem is the money has gotten so big for college coaches, as far as salaries, and their best chances of winning is to stay at home,” Grant said, “so none of the big boys will leave

their building. It is rare that they do.” One of the ‘big boys’ WSU will face this year is Georgetown on Nov. 13. WSU is being paid $85,000 by Georgetown for a contest the Hoyas expect to easily win. Georgetown did not play a true road nonconference game last year and only plays on the road once this season out of conference. Unfortunately for WSU fans, the Hoyas will not make a return trip to Ohio. “They buy us and they are trying to buy a win but you know what, the fun thing is be careful, you might not be buying a win. You might be buying a loss at home,” Grant said. The Raiders’ 2013-14 nonconference schedule includes a pair of Division III squads- the NCAA’s lowest level. WSU head coach Billy Donlon said he tried to schedule

big name opponents but was unwilling to play the vast majority of nonconference matchups away from WSU’s campus. “We couldn’t get anybody to play us at home,” Donlon said. “I called everybody. I could give you the schools. They were more than willing for us to come to their place but we were already locked into so many road games.” Despite the lack of bigname institutions on the nonconference schedule, Grant said season ticket sales for this season surpassed last year’s totals more than six weeks before the start of the season. But Donlon recognizes seeing the likes of Manchester and Mount St. Joseph in the Nutter Center will not satisfy everyone. “Some of our fans are probably not happy and to that,

I say it wasn’t done maliciously,” Donlon said. “It wasn’t done with intent. We gave it our best possible effort to come here and play. What I hope is we have five really good seniors and they get the support that I believe they deserve.” The last time WSU hosted a ranked nonconference opponent was on Dec. 30, 1999 when the Raiders welcomed No. 6-ranked Michigan State. WSU entered the contest with a 3-8 record and pulled off one of the greatest college upsets against the eventual National Champions by winning the game 53-49. Grant, who worked in a support role for the Athletics Department at the time, said WSU landed the contest because MSU head coach Tom Izzo promised Dayton-area recruit Andre Hutson a game in

his hometown if he signed with the Spartans. “We worked out a deal where we went to Michigan State twice, they came here which would have never happened if it weren’t for Andre Hudson,” Grant said. “It was crazy, it was your classic David versus Goliath. That was the year they won the National Championship so that was no small feat.” Michigan State easily won its two home contests against WSU. Since the contest versus MSU, the Raiders have gone 12 years without hosting a BCS conference team. In 2010, WSU and Cincinnati worked out a deal where the Raiders would host the Bearcats once while the Raiders would travel to the Queen City twice. WSU lost all three matchups.

Justin Boggs Sports Writer Boggs.59@wright.edu

because that was a tough loss,” Soto said. “We just came out here and if we would come out with a win, we would be in good standing.” Last Saturday’s win practically assures WSU a spot in the Horizon League Tournament and keeps the Raiders’ hopes alive to receive a first-round bye and earn homefield advantage by winning the league’s regular season title. “Our first objective is to get in the conference tournament,” Ferguson said. “Now we have some business to take care of but this was a huge step towards that.” Soto’s goal came in the 80th minute after Mackenzie Hamilton drew a UWM foul. On the ensuing free kick, Emilie Fillion served a well place ball that bounced off a pair of Raiders before Soto kicked the ball past Milwaukee goalkeeper Paige Lincicum. “We were just pushing forward so hard and everybody wanted it and attacked, it was meant to happen,” Fillion said. For Soto, it was her second tally of the season. “Coach always says to (get the ball) on frame and something good will happen and that is what I did and it went in,” Soto said. The Raiders hemmed the

Panthers into their defensive half in the second half. WSU outshot Milwaukee 9-6 in the second half. Milwaukee had its only shot on target in the 68th minute from Amy Kauffung. It was the only save WSU goalkeeper Brooke McCurdy had to make. In the first half, UWM had a chance to take an early 1-0 lead as Kelly Lewers’ strike just sailed to the right of the net. Later in the second half, Fillion had a wide-open net but her chip shot over Lincicum just missed wide left. As the first half came to a close, freshman forward Paige Aguilera nearly scored as she was one-on-one with Lincicum and her shot went off the outside post. “We were kind of on our heels,” Soto said about the first half. “Our mentality (in the second half) was to keep pressuring so that we could get a free kick and get their backs to the goal.” WSU has its final road game this Saturday at Green Bay before wrapping up the regular season at home versus Cleveland State on Nov. 1.

Raiders top defending HL champs on Soto goal I

Jump for Joy: Liz Soto celebrates the game-winning goal against Milwaukee Saturday.

Photo by Justin Boggs: Sports Writer

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t has been almost a full year since UW-Milwaukee took the 2012 Horizon League Championship by defeating Wright State with a doubleovertime goal in Milwaukee. The Raiders exacted their revenge last Saturday when Liz Soto booted the game’s lone goal in the second half and WSU topped UWM 1-0 at Alumni Field. “I thought in the second half we played very well,” WSU head coach Patrick Ferguson said. “We scored one but we probably had five great opportunities to score and the fact we went after them and attacking players took them on, I was very pleased with it.” The Raiders’ victory ended the Panthers’ six-game conference winning streak dating back to last year and more importantly, put WSU on top of the Horizon League standings with 10 points. The Raiders came into Saturday’s match winless in their previous two matches after starting the conference slate 2-0. “(The win) means a lot for us coming off a loss at Detroit @wsuguardian

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Making a Splash: Wright State outlasts Michigan-Flint for third-straight win John Hamilton Contributing Writer Hamilton.107@wright.edu

In the never-ending football rivalry of Ohio versus Michigan, chalk another one up for the Buckeye State. Two-way players Nick Blower and Brian Sledge each scored rushing touchdowns, wide receiver/tight end Zach Barlage added another through the air and No. 5 Wright State knocked off conference rival No. 23 Michigan-Flint 18-6 Saturday afternoon in Fairborn. The win earned the Raiders their third Great Lakes

Conference Founder’s Classic trophy in the four years of the rivalry game and helped WSU avenge a 57-14 loss to UM-Flint last year. To take back the trophy from the Kodiaks, the Raiders endured cold temperatures and a driving rain storm that made ball security a dilemma for both teams for the majority of the game. WSU leaned on its reliable ground game early, and then broke the scoring open through the air. Barlage out-battled Kodiaks WR/DB Jordan Garcia in midair on a pass from QB Nate Bollheimer, eluded additional

defenders and raced into the end zone for game’s first touchdown. “We just continued to pound the ball and it opened up the door for a couple of the big passes,” coach Anthony Van Horn said. With just over eight minutes before halftime, and the Raiders clinging to a 6-0 lead, Blower broke free from beyond midfield on a long touchdown run to give WSU a 12-0 halftime lead. In a game where points where as hard to come by as it was to find shelter from the elements, WSU’s ability to break big plays on the ground proved to be vital. The slick field, and seemingly slicker ball, stymied both teams early and often, but offensive tackle Devonte Jordan said the rain that drenched Mulhollan Field Saturday didn’t faze the Raiders. “We saw the weather when we first came out, but it didn’t matter to us because we knew our offensive line and running backs could force the ball up the middle and outside, and we knew we could gain yards,” Jordan said.

Running Away With It: WR Zach Barlage (above) and RB Nick Blower (below) pace the WSU offense with a pair of first half touchdowns.

To read the complete version of the story, log onto theguardianonline.com.

Keeping the Hardware In-house: Brandon Smith (55), Robert Maxi (9), Shawn Focht (63), Michael Skipper (2), Brian McElroy (26), Ben Rinehart (8) and Jimmy Neyhouse (90) pose with the Great Lakes Founder’s Classic trophy after Saturday’s game at Mulhollan Field.

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The Guardian 10-23-13