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W I N S T O N - S A L E M

S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y FOR ALUMNI AND FRIENDS FA L L 2 0 1 0 VOLUME 12 NO. 3

M A G A Z I N E

A Ramatizing Experience


time capsule

W I N S T O N - S A L E M

S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y

M A G A Z I N E

Class officers from the

Class of 1960

FA L L 2 0 1 0

In this issue

As alumni gather on campus October 17-24 for Homecoming 2010, the class of 1960 will be celebrating its 50th anniversary. Senior class officers (from left) were Ms. Vertis M. Armstrong, president; Mrs. Mildred Tillman Bryant, vice president; Dr. Sophia Blanks Pierce, secretary; Ms. Annie Hunter, chaplain; Ms. Barbara Hardison, assistant secretary and acting treasurer; and Ms. Amy Moore, parliamentarian.

3

Homecoming 2010: A “Ramatizing” Experience Students, faculty, staff and alumni share what it means to them to be “Ramatized”­—plus a schedule of special events planned for Homecoming 2010.

5

Origin of the WSSU mascot How did the Ram come to be our mascot­—and how was the name Amon chosen? Here’s the official version—plus some colorful memories.

8

Things that make me proud to be a Ram A growing leadership role … innovative research … outreach that is touching lives. Next time you have an opportunity to recruit a future Ram or inspire a WSSU donor, here are some examples you can share for the reasons behind your pride.

page 3

Departments 2 12 16 17 18 20

Chancellor Reflects On the Yard Time Out Student Spotlight Class Notes Alumni News

page 5 page 8

www.ramhomecoming.com ARCHWAY is published by the Office of Marketing and Communications within Winston-Salem State University’s Division of University Advancement 310 Blair Hall, Winston-Salem, NC 27110 336-750-2150; fax 336-750-3150 We welcome story ideas and class notes. Send them to archway@wssu.edu Chancellor: Donald J. Reaves, Ph.D. Vice Chancellor of University Advancement: Michelle Cook Chief Marketing Officer: Sigrid Hall-Pittsley Editorial Team: Jo Hunter, Concentrics Communications; Rudy Anderson, Nancy Young, Aaron Singleton Photographer: Garrett Garms ’07 Design: Cam Choiniere Designs 17,500 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $0.68 per copy.


time capsule

W I N S T O N - S A L E M

S T A T E

U N I V E R S I T Y

M A G A Z I N E

Class officers from the

Class of 1960

FA L L 2 0 1 0

In this issue

As alumni gather on campus October 17-24 for Homecoming 2010, the class of 1960 will be celebrating its 50th anniversary. Senior class officers (from left) were Ms. Vertis M. Armstrong, president; Mrs. Mildred Tillman Bryant, vice president; Dr. Sophia Blanks Pierce, secretary; Ms. Annie Hunter, chaplain; Ms. Barbara Hardison, assistant secretary and acting treasurer; and Ms. Amy Moore, parliamentarian.

3

Homecoming 2010: A “Ramatizing” Experience Students, faculty, staff and alumni share what it means to them to be “Ramatized”­—plus a schedule of special events planned for Homecoming 2010.

5

Origin of the WSSU mascot How did the Ram come to be our mascot­—and how was the name Amon chosen? Here’s the official version—plus some colorful memories.

8

Things that make me proud to be a Ram A growing leadership role … innovative research … outreach that is touching lives. Next time you have an opportunity to recruit a future Ram or inspire a WSSU donor, here are some examples you can share for the reasons behind your pride.

page 3

Departments 2 12 16 17 18 20

Chancellor Reflects On the Yard Time Out Student Spotlight Class Notes Alumni News

page 5 page 8

www.ramhomecoming.com ARCHWAY is published by the Office of Marketing and Communications within Winston-Salem State University’s Division of University Advancement 310 Blair Hall, Winston-Salem, NC 27110 336-750-2150; fax 336-750-3150 We welcome story ideas and class notes. Send them to archway@wssu.edu Chancellor: Donald J. Reaves, Ph.D. Vice Chancellor of University Advancement: Michelle Cook Chief Marketing Officer: Sigrid Hall-Pittsley Editorial Team: Jo Hunter, Concentrics Communications; Rudy Anderson, Nancy Young, Aaron Singleton Photographer: Garrett Garms ’07 Design: Cam Choiniere Designs 17,500 copies of this public document were printed at a cost of $0.68 per copy.


chancellor reflects Board of Trustees 2010–2011 Mr. F. Scott Bauer, Chair Dr. Karen McNeil-Miller, Vice Chair Mr. Martin B. Davis ’85, Secretary Dr. Vivian Burke Dr. James C. Hash, Sr. Mrs. Sue Henderson Mr. Victor Johnson, Jr. ’61 Mr. Thomas W. Lambeth Mrs. Debra B. Miller ’78 Mr. James R. Nanton Mr. Keith W. Vaughan Mr. Charles “Chuck” Wallington Mr. Jonathan M. Jackson ’11 Winston-Salem State University Foundation, Board of Directors 2010–2011 Mr. James E. Martin, Chair Mr. Roger Vaughn, Vice Chair Mr. Timothy A. Grant ’80, Secretary Ms. Martha Logemann, Treasurer Dr. Lenora R. Campbell Ms. Peggy Carter Ms. Michelle M. Cook Mr. W. Randy Eaddy Mr. Tony Ebron Mr. Kelvin Farmer ’86 Ms. Jacque Gattis Ms. Catherine Pettie Hart ’74 Mr. Fred Harwell Mr. Harold Kennedy III Mr. Elliott Lemon ’83 Dr. Charles Love ’66 Mr. Arthur E. McClearin Mr. J. Walter McDowell Ms. Patricia D. Norris ’93 Mr. Ray Owen Ms. Stephanie L. Porter ’81 Dr. Donald J. Reaves Mr. Curtis Richardson ’76 Ms. Shirley Danner Shouse Mr. Clifton H. Sparrow ’80 Ms. Claudette Weston

this year’s freshman class marched through the archways on W hen campus as part of our second annual Ramdition orientation program,

they officially became part of the Ram Family. They are now Rams and should be proud to be part of a university with such a strong heritage and such a bright future. In addition to all the program does to help freshmen transition smoothly into university life, Ramdition also does an outstanding job of connecting them with the legacy of Winston-Salem State University. As we approach Homecoming 2010, I hope that all of our alumni will reconnect with the Ram pride. When Athletic Director Bill Hayes came back to campus in January, he brought with him the energy and ideas that were needed to rejuvenate that WSSU pride, particularly in athletics. His concept is very simple. He wants to “ramatize” every student, faculty and staff member, alum and the community. To Bill, that means people are excited about the University, its students and the athletic program to the point that they become consistent supporters. Thus far, Bill has held his first Ram Red Booster Bash aimed at engaging more of the community and it was a very successful event that was held in the community. The Bash certainly managed to generate excitement with the football players, cheerleaders and the Red Sea of Sound. Then, there are the Academic Cookouts on campus that bring together athletes, coaches and faculty to add a “ramatizing” touch to the academic side of the term student athlete. While this issue of Archway includes information on this year’s Homecoming, it also has highlights from Bill’s “ramatize” theme. You will hear how alumni, students, faculty and staff define what it means to be “ramatized.” It seems the one common theme that runs through the comments is about being part of the Ram Family and the pride that comes with the connection to Winston-Salem State University. During the past year, we spent a great deal of time developing the University’s Strategic Plan. While a great deal of the Plan focuses on academics, goal five is all about University culture and pride. The strategies listed under this goal cover what must be done to provide students with experiences and opportunities that will transform their lives. It also includes strategies to support athletics and to increase the engagement of students, alumni, faculty and staff in the life of the University. We know our alumni are extremely important to Winston-Salem State. Successful and engaged alumni represent the success of the University, and are the best equipped to be ambassadors for the school. Of course we need your financial support for scholarships, facilities, athletics, programs and other university efforts that benefit our students and our campus. But, we also need you as role models for our students. You have the benefit of having been where they are now combined with the experience and knowledge you have gained since you left the University. Additionally, we need your support for the vision that we have for Winston-Salem State University that can take it to the next level of achievement. This University has a strong and proud alumni network. Never is that more evident than during Homecoming Week. That time is truly unique in that it does bring together our past and our future through the alumni and our current students. Maintaining some of that enthusiasm and involvement throughout the other fifty-one weeks of the year can make a difference in the lives of our students and the future of this University. As alumni who are part of the wonderful legacy of Winston-Salem State University and of the HBCU family, I hope that you will use Homecoming as an opportunity to renew your commitment and to be “ramatized” all over again.

Ex Officio Directors Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr.

F. Scott Bauer Gerald Hunter Gordon Everett Gordon Slade ’93 Jonathan M. Jackson ’11

Donald J. Reaves, PhD

Homecoming. Home coming. Coming home. Remembering what it meant to be a WSSU Ram. Knowing you will, in fact, be a Ram ’til you die. Feeling truly and deeply “Ramatized.” Ready to spread the word. Once a year, in late October when the air is crisp and the campus is carpeted with reds and golds, WSSU grads, friends and fans gather like a family coming home … drawn by rich memories of what this school has been and a deep sense of pride in what it is becoming.

Wanting to be part of it again—for a weekend of celebration, of remembering and reconnecting. Most important, wanting to remain part of it on a deeper level—by spreading the word, finding ways to help other young people know what it means to be “Ramatized” … to come here, live here, experience challenges, struggles and successes … feel supported and encouraged … and leave ready to serve and succeed.

Prepare for Homecoming 2010 … a truly “Ramatizing” experience!

Emeritus Directors Ms. Florence P. Corpening Mr. Victor Johnson, Jr. ’61 Dr. Steve Martin

2

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3


chancellor reflects Board of Trustees 2010–2011 Mr. F. Scott Bauer, Chair Dr. Karen McNeil-Miller, Vice Chair Mr. Martin B. Davis ’85, Secretary Dr. Vivian Burke Dr. James C. Hash, Sr. Mrs. Sue Henderson Mr. Victor Johnson, Jr. ’61 Mr. Thomas W. Lambeth Mrs. Debra B. Miller ’78 Mr. James R. Nanton Mr. Keith W. Vaughan Mr. Charles “Chuck” Wallington Mr. Jonathan M. Jackson ’11 Winston-Salem State University Foundation, Board of Directors 2010–2011 Mr. James E. Martin, Chair Mr. Roger Vaughn, Vice Chair Mr. Timothy A. Grant ’80, Secretary Ms. Martha Logemann, Treasurer Dr. Lenora R. Campbell Ms. Peggy Carter Ms. Michelle M. Cook Mr. W. Randy Eaddy Mr. Tony Ebron Mr. Kelvin Farmer ’86 Ms. Jacque Gattis Ms. Catherine Pettie Hart ’74 Mr. Fred Harwell Mr. Harold Kennedy III Mr. Elliott Lemon ’83 Dr. Charles Love ’66 Mr. Arthur E. McClearin Mr. J. Walter McDowell Ms. Patricia D. Norris ’93 Mr. Ray Owen Ms. Stephanie L. Porter ’81 Dr. Donald J. Reaves Mr. Curtis Richardson ’76 Ms. Shirley Danner Shouse Mr. Clifton H. Sparrow ’80 Ms. Claudette Weston

this year’s freshman class marched through the archways on W hen campus as part of our second annual Ramdition orientation program,

they officially became part of the Ram Family. They are now Rams and should be proud to be part of a university with such a strong heritage and such a bright future. In addition to all the program does to help freshmen transition smoothly into university life, Ramdition also does an outstanding job of connecting them with the legacy of Winston-Salem State University. As we approach Homecoming 2010, I hope that all of our alumni will reconnect with the Ram pride. When Athletic Director Bill Hayes came back to campus in January, he brought with him the energy and ideas that were needed to rejuvenate that WSSU pride, particularly in athletics. His concept is very simple. He wants to “ramatize” every student, faculty and staff member, alum and the community. To Bill, that means people are excited about the University, its students and the athletic program to the point that they become consistent supporters. Thus far, Bill has held his first Ram Red Booster Bash aimed at engaging more of the community and it was a very successful event that was held in the community. The Bash certainly managed to generate excitement with the football players, cheerleaders and the Red Sea of Sound. Then, there are the Academic Cookouts on campus that bring together athletes, coaches and faculty to add a “ramatizing” touch to the academic side of the term student athlete. While this issue of Archway includes information on this year’s Homecoming, it also has highlights from Bill’s “ramatize” theme. You will hear how alumni, students, faculty and staff define what it means to be “ramatized.” It seems the one common theme that runs through the comments is about being part of the Ram Family and the pride that comes with the connection to Winston-Salem State University. During the past year, we spent a great deal of time developing the University’s Strategic Plan. While a great deal of the Plan focuses on academics, goal five is all about University culture and pride. The strategies listed under this goal cover what must be done to provide students with experiences and opportunities that will transform their lives. It also includes strategies to support athletics and to increase the engagement of students, alumni, faculty and staff in the life of the University. We know our alumni are extremely important to Winston-Salem State. Successful and engaged alumni represent the success of the University, and are the best equipped to be ambassadors for the school. Of course we need your financial support for scholarships, facilities, athletics, programs and other university efforts that benefit our students and our campus. But, we also need you as role models for our students. You have the benefit of having been where they are now combined with the experience and knowledge you have gained since you left the University. Additionally, we need your support for the vision that we have for Winston-Salem State University that can take it to the next level of achievement. This University has a strong and proud alumni network. Never is that more evident than during Homecoming Week. That time is truly unique in that it does bring together our past and our future through the alumni and our current students. Maintaining some of that enthusiasm and involvement throughout the other fifty-one weeks of the year can make a difference in the lives of our students and the future of this University. As alumni who are part of the wonderful legacy of Winston-Salem State University and of the HBCU family, I hope that you will use Homecoming as an opportunity to renew your commitment and to be “ramatized” all over again.

Ex Officio Directors Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr. Mr.

F. Scott Bauer Gerald Hunter Gordon Everett Gordon Slade ’93 Jonathan M. Jackson ’11

Donald J. Reaves, PhD

Homecoming. Home coming. Coming home. Remembering what it meant to be a WSSU Ram. Knowing you will, in fact, be a Ram ’til you die. Feeling truly and deeply “Ramatized.” Ready to spread the word. Once a year, in late October when the air is crisp and the campus is carpeted with reds and golds, WSSU grads, friends and fans gather like a family coming home … drawn by rich memories of what this school has been and a deep sense of pride in what it is becoming.

Wanting to be part of it again—for a weekend of celebration, of remembering and reconnecting. Most important, wanting to remain part of it on a deeper level—by spreading the word, finding ways to help other young people know what it means to be “Ramatized” … to come here, live here, experience challenges, struggles and successes … feel supported and encouraged … and leave ready to serve and succeed.

Prepare for Homecoming 2010 ��� a truly “Ramatizing” experience!

Emeritus Directors Ms. Florence P. Corpening Mr. Victor Johnson, Jr. ’61 Dr. Steve Martin

2

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3


To me, being Ramatized means feeling, igniting or re-igniting the spirit and pride of WSSU. It means being reminded that you are a part of a special group of people— The WSSU Rams Nation! It’s a WSSU State of Mind; a Rams State of Being. When you are Ramatized, you are true to our school’s motto: Enter to Learn … Depart to Serve.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN

to be

“Ramatized” Students, faculty, staff and alumni search for a way to describe the feeling.

When someone has been Ramatized, they have WSSU school spirit, pride and loyalty; they support WSSU financially and by attendance at events, athletics, and special occasions. While not hiding the negative, they find and share the positive about WSSU; they reach out to colleagues, alumni and friends to invite/encourage involvement with and support of WSSU.

Any time you see someone starting the moves to our FIGHT SONG “GET UP SU GET UP” you definitely know that they’ve been Ramatized! Being Ramatized is when someone asks you if you attended WSSU and you sing your response … “And I’ll be a Ram till I die! Oh ohhh ohhhhh oh oh ohhhh … So hard to be a Ram!” It’s contagious! It’s contagious!

It’s hearing the WSSU band, hearing the talent of the illustrious University Choir, and gaining a personal sense of pride for being a part of the WSSU family in your own way—it can be through academics, joining an organization, or just being a student that loves the RamShack.

You are part of the rich ancestry and the fabric of this great institution. You have embraced the Ram Motto and accepted the charge to sustain and promote the university and make it better for generations to come.

of Winston-Salem State University A1892-1995,” Winston-Salem Teachers

ccording to the book, “The History

The origin of the

WSSU Mascot

College (WSTC) initiated its physical training program during the 1922-1923 academic year, under the direction of Clarence W. Davis. A. Bernice Miller of Hampton Institute was hired to become the first full-time director of the women’s health and physical education program at WSTC in 1929. The men’s program was slow to develop because the enrollment of men was “too small to field many activities.” In 1932, three freshmen, William Roscoe Anderson, Jr., (a member of the very first basketball team 1933-1934) and a couple of his classmates asked if they could have a men’s program. (This information comes from his memory, photos and articles still in his possession from those days.) Rupert Bell (deceased) and Jesse B. Eggleton, Jr. (deceased) approached President Dr. Simon Green Atkins about establishing an athletics program at the college. According to Anderson, Dr. Atkins, being a devoutly religious man, was at first not inclined to give his approval. Anderson says their persistence paid off, and Dr. Atkins did give his approval. Anderson, Bell, and Eggleton were joined by Walter Gray, James T. Diggs, Jr., Robert Schooler, Robert Scales, Belvedere Cook, Theodore Hayes, Theodore Staplefoote, and James Boyd, to make up WSTC’s very first basketball team or any other sports team.

How the Ram came to be our mascot According to a photo circa early 1930s in Anderson’s possession, an inscription on the back reads in part: “Theodore Hayes named the team ‘The Rams.’” That’s where the mascot came from. So when WSTC affiliated with its first athletic conference, the Eastern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (EIAC), we were “The Rams.” Football was added to the

and how it got its name By Rudy Anderson

athletics program in 1942. WSTC applied for admission to the CIAA the same year and was admitted to the CIAA in 1946. How did the name “Amon” come to be? Here’s the short version: In 1978, Paul Kuhl, then the Sports Information Officer for Winston-Salem State University and currently a history professor, ran a mascot naming contest on campus and throughout the community. Names were collected in a shoe box circulated on campus and at games.

The name selected by Kuhl and coach Tiny Wallace was “Amon.” The name was inspired by the West African deity Amon, which was always represented as a ram. The ancient Egyptians included the deity Amon in their pantheon of gods and greeted conquering Pharoahs as “Sons of Amon.”

The story behind the contest … Well as the story goes, Cleo Hyman (a black man from Pfafftown, N.C.) was a huge fan of the Rams back in the late 1970s when Coach Bill Hayes was head football coach. His wife, Shirley Hyman, worked in the Financial Aid Office. He apparently said to Coach Hayes one day that “The Rams” needed a real mascot. Hayes told him that he didn’t know where to get one. Hyman, who had a little farm in Pfafftown, told Hayes that he had one. Coach and Athletics Director Clarence “Big House” Gaines, who wanted nothing to do with the naming process, had Coach Hayes to have Paul Kuhl, the Sports Information Officer for WSSU, and Coach Cleo “Tiny” Wallace to come up with a plan to name the ram. They did—a campus-wide and community-wide naming contest. The day they were to select the name, they discovered they had a real problem— many of the names thrown into the shoe box they were passing around on campus and at games turned out to be pretty bad. Kuhl, who was also a professor of history, had just finished doing research on African history and had come across the name Amon. He shared the name and its history with Coach Gaines and Coach Wallace. Kuhl says Coach Gaines just looked at him, reminded him that this naming business was going to a problem, and walked away. Kuhl says after Coach Gaines left, Coach Wallace stuck his hand back into the box and, guess what? Out came the name Amon. And the rest as they say is, well, history.

ARCHWAY

5


To me, being Ramatized means feeling, igniting or re-igniting the spirit and pride of WSSU. It means being reminded that you are a part of a special group of people— The WSSU Rams Nation! It’s a WSSU State of Mind; a Rams State of Being. When you are Ramatized, you are true to our school’s motto: Enter to Learn … Depart to Serve.

WHAT DOES IT MEAN

to be

“Ramatized” Students, faculty, staff and alumni search for a way to describe the feeling.

When someone has been Ramatized, they have WSSU school spirit, pride and loyalty; they support WSSU financially and by attendance at events, athletics, and special occasions. While not hiding the negative, they find and share the positive about WSSU; they reach out to colleagues, alumni and friends to invite/encourage involvement with and support of WSSU.

Any time you see someone starting the moves to our FIGHT SONG “GET UP SU GET UP” you definitely know that they’ve been Ramatized! Being Ramatized is when someone asks you if you attended WSSU and you sing your response … “And I’ll be a Ram till I die! Oh ohhh ohhhhh oh oh ohhhh … So hard to be a Ram!” It’s contagious! It’s contagious!

It’s hearing the WSSU band, hearing the talent of the illustrious University Choir, and gaining a personal sense of pride for being a part of the WSSU family in your own way—it can be through academics, joining an organization, or just being a student that loves the RamShack.

You are part of the rich ancestry and the fabric of this great institution. You have embraced the Ram Motto and accepted the charge to sustain and promote the university and make it better for generations to come.

of Winston-Salem State University A1892-1995,” Winston-Salem Teachers

ccording to the book, “The History

The origin of the

WSSU Mascot

College (WSTC) initiated its physical training program during the 1922-1923 academic year, under the direction of Clarence W. Davis. A. Bernice Miller of Hampton Institute was hired to become the first full-time director of the women’s health and physical education program at WSTC in 1929. The men’s program was slow to develop because the enrollment of men was “too small to field many activities.” In 1932, three freshmen, William Roscoe Anderson, Jr., (a member of the very first basketball team 1933-1934) and a couple of his classmates asked if they could have a men’s program. (This information comes from his memory, photos and articles still in his possession from those days.) Rupert Bell (deceased) and Jesse B. Eggleton, Jr. (deceased) approached President Dr. Simon Green Atkins about establishing an athletics program at the college. According to Anderson, Dr. Atkins, being a devoutly religious man, was at first not inclined to give his approval. Anderson says their persistence paid off, and Dr. Atkins did give his approval. Anderson, Bell, and Eggleton were joined by Walter Gray, James T. Diggs, Jr., Robert Schooler, Robert Scales, Belvedere Cook, Theodore Hayes, Theodore Staplefoote, and James Boyd, to make up WSTC’s very first basketball team or any other sports team.

How the Ram came to be our mascot According to a photo circa early 1930s in Anderson’s possession, an inscription on the back reads in part: “Theodore Hayes named the team ‘The Rams.’” That’s where the mascot came from. So when WSTC affiliated with its first athletic conference, the Eastern Intercollegiate Athletic Conference (EIAC), we were “The Rams.” Football was added to the

and how it got its name By Rudy Anderson

athletics program in 1942. WSTC applied for admission to the CIAA the same year and was admitted to the CIAA in 1946. How did the name “Amon” come to be? Here’s the short version: In 1978, Paul Kuhl, then the Sports Information Officer for Winston-Salem State University and currently a history professor, ran a mascot naming contest on campus and throughout the community. Names were collected in a shoe box circulated on campus and at games.

The name selected by Kuhl and coach Tiny Wallace was “Amon.” The name was inspired by the West African deity Amon, which was always represented as a ram. The ancient Egyptians included the deity Amon in their pantheon of gods and greeted conquering Pharoahs as “Sons of Amon.”

The story behind the contest … Well as the story goes, Cleo Hyman (a black man from Pfafftown, N.C.) was a huge fan of the Rams back in the late 1970s when Coach Bill Hayes was head football coach. His wife, Shirley Hyman, worked in the Financial Aid Office. He apparently said to Coach Hayes one day that “The Rams” needed a real mascot. Hayes told him that he didn’t know where to get one. Hyman, who had a little farm in Pfafftown, told Hayes that he had one. Coach and Athletics Director Clarence “Big House” Gaines, who wanted nothing to do with the naming process, had Coach Hayes to have Paul Kuhl, the Sports Information Officer for WSSU, and Coach Cleo “Tiny” Wallace to come up with a plan to name the ram. They did—a campus-wide and community-wide naming contest. The day they were to select the name, they discovered they had a real problem— many of the names thrown into the shoe box they were passing around on campus and at games turned out to be pretty bad. Kuhl, who was also a professor of history, had just finished doing research on African history and had come across the name Amon. He shared the name and its history with Coach Gaines and Coach Wallace. Kuhl says Coach Gaines just looked at him, reminded him that this naming business was going to a problem, and walked away. Kuhl says after Coach Gaines left, Coach Wallace stuck his hand back into the box and, guess what? Out came the name Amon. And the rest as they say is, well, history.

ARCHWAY

5


2010 HOMECOMING EVENTS SCHEDULE OCTOBER 17-24 Sunday, October 17

Thursday, October 21

Friday, October 22

12:00 a.m. – 4:00 a.m. Student Kick-off Party Hosted by Kid n Play and featuring House Party Movies Whitaker Gym

8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Alumni Return to Serve Day Thompson Center, Room 207

8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Homecoming Golf Tournament Winston Lake Golf Course

10:00 a.m. Class of 1990 Wineries and Vineyards

8:45 a.m. Wreath Laying Ceremony S.G. Atkins Statue

6:30 p.m. Sunday Night At the Movies Feature: “Blindside” Thompson Center, Room 207ABC 9:00 p.m. Lighting of the Sign Thompson Center Rotunda

Monday, October 18 7:00 p.m. Coronation K.R. Williams Auditorium Coronation Reception (Immediately following Coronation) Anderson Center, McNeil Ballroom

Tuesday, October 19 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Quinton Aaron (“The Blindside” film star) Autograph Session Thompson Center Breezeway/ Kennedy Dining 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Q/A Discussion and Lecture Session with Quinton Aaron Dillard Auditorium 7:00 p.m. Hypno Bro Dillard Auditorium

Wednesday, October 20 7:00 p.m. Homecoming Comedy Show Featuring Gary Owens & Tony Roberts K.R. Williams Auditorium

(independent venture)

Westbend Vineyards, Lewisville, N.C. RayLen Vineyards and Winery, Mocksville, N.C. Childress Vineyards, Lexington, N.C. 12:00 p.m. Alumni Return to Serve Luncheon Thompson Center, Room 207

Rain site will be K.R. Williams Auditorium

9:45 a.m. Founder’s Day Convocation Dr. Simon Green Atkins Distinguished Alumni Award Presentation K.R. Williams Auditorium

Invitation Only

(Immediately following Founder’s Day Convocation) School of Education & Human Performance Gallery Walk Anderson Center, Foyer/Hallway of 1st Floor

6:00 p.m. Alumni Nurses Banquet Reception Anderson Center, McNeil Ballroom

10:00 a.m. Class of 1990 Wineries and Vineyards

3:30 p.m. Queen’s Tea Reception Clarion Sundance Hotel and Spa

7:00 p.m. Class of 1960 50th Reunion Banquet Hawthorne Inn Downtown Winston-Salem 9:00 p.m. Class of 1960 Hospitality Hour Hawthorne Inn 9:00 p.m. Homecoming Show Red & Black Affair/Party – Wale & Monica Millennium Center

(independent venture)

Westbend Vineyards, Lewisville, N.C. RayLen Vineyards and Winery, Mocksville, N.C. Childress Vineyards, Lexington, N.C. 11:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Alumni Registration Thompson Center, Room 207 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Freshman Class of 1986 – Graduating Class of 1990 Alumni and Friends “Art and Soul” Gallery Tour Diggs Gallery 12:00 p.m. Founder’s Day Luncheon Anderson Center, McNeil Ballroom

B e s u re t o c h ec k w ww. ram h o m e c om i n g. c om f or e v e n t u p d a te s . 6

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2:00 p.m. Mass Communications Alumni Reception Anderson Center, Main Dining Room 2:00 p.m. Computer Sciences Alumni Reception TBD 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. RAM Rave mini-parade/pep rally/day party/vendor fair Fine Arts Bldg./Clock Tower/ Pitt area 3:00 p.m. Class of 1990 Reunion Hospitality Suites – Open Holiday Inn University Parkway 3:00 p.m. Department of Chemistry Alumni Reception W.B. Atkinson, Room 435 3:00 p.m. Colloquium: The Impact of RAMS Healthcare on Wheels on residents of East Winston-Salem F.L. Atkins Bldg., Room 102 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Young Alumni Day Party 6th & Vine Restaurant & Wine Bar 6:00 p.m. Freshman Class of 1986 – Graduating Class of 1990 Meet & Greet Mixer Diggs Gallery 7:00 p.m. Alumni Hall of Distinction Induction and Reception Millennium Center 8:00 p.m. – 2:00 a.m. Alumni Crowning and Scholarship Gala Millennium Center Time TBA Class of 1975, 1985 Gathering The Hawthorne Inn

Saturday, October 23 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Class of 1990 Reunion Hospitality Suites – Open Holiday Inn University Parkway 9:00 a.m. School of Health Sciences Alumni Breakfast F.L. Atkins Building, Room 201 10:00 a.m. Homecoming Parade Downtown Winston-Salem (4th and Poplar) 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Class of 1990 Wineries and Vineyards (independent venture)

RayLen Vineyards and Winery, Mocksville, N.C. Childress Vineyards, Lexington, N.C. 12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Tavis Foushee & Freshman Class of 1986 – Class of 1990 Tailgate Bowman Gray Stadium 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Chancellor’s Hospitality Tent Bowman Gray Stadium 1:30 p.m. WSSU vs. UNC Pembroke Football Bowman Gray Stadium 7:00 p.m. Homecoming Step Show K.R. Williams Auditorium

Westbend Vineyards, Lewisville, N.C.

9:00 p.m. Bossman Entertainment Presents SU Jam 5, Class of 1990 Holiday Inn University Parkway Salem/Forsyth Ballrooms 9:00 p.m. Alumni Extravaganza Millennium Center

Time TBA Class of 1975 Alumni Worship Service Location TBA Time TBA Class of 1985 Worship Service Location TBA

Sunday, October 24 9:00 a.m. 1950 Class Reunion Breakfast Location TBA Time TBA Class of 1960 Worship Service United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church (450 Metropolitan Drive)

Miss WSSU and Mr. WSSU 2010 Cornell Jones

Regan-Janell Hales

Senior, Mass Communications Major Manassas, Va.

Senior, Psychology Major Raleigh, N.C.

Activities: • Dean’s list for 6 consecutive semesters • Member of the Honors Program • Captain of the Track and Field team • Member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., where he serves as Associate Editor to the Sphinx Magazine • President of the Mass Communications Club

Activities: • Collegiate Achievers • Latin Club • SAAC • Veteran Leaders through Athletics • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. • WSSU Red Team Cheerleaders—honored with MVP, rookie of the year, and athlete of the week awards, as well as second place winner in the All-Star competition in the MEAC; was previously Miss University Cheerleader.

Outreach Emphasis: Cornell believes in the power of leadership and strives to be a positive role model. He stands on the basis that “The perception of the Black Male must change” and has many programs slated during the academic school year to help promote this important platform. His stance on representing WSSU this year: “I’m eagerly looking forward to serving my fellow Rams this year, and I am also ecstatic to have been elected to the position of Mr. Winston-Salem State University, an honor I do not take lightly.”

Outreach Emphasis: Regan has also been involved in hosting cheerleading camps for young girls in the community, helping with Habitat for Humanity, reading at elementary schools, and participating in events for young children hosted by the YMCA. Her stance on representing WSSU this year: “The school year will be busy and productive, but I have dedicated my time and efforts to making this Homecoming and academic year the best possible.” ARCHWAY

7


2010 HOMECOMING EVENTS SCHEDULE OCTOBER 17-24 Sunday, October 17

Thursday, October 21

Friday, October 22

12:00 a.m. – 4:00 a.m. Student Kick-off Party Hosted by Kid n Play and featuring House Party Movies Whitaker Gym

8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Alumni Return to Serve Day Thompson Center, Room 207

8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m. Homecoming Golf Tournament Winston Lake Golf Course

10:00 a.m. Class of 1990 Wineries and Vineyards

8:45 a.m. Wreath Laying Ceremony S.G. Atkins Statue

6:30 p.m. Sunday Night At the Movies Feature: “Blindside” Thompson Center, Room 207ABC 9:00 p.m. Lighting of the Sign Thompson Center Rotunda

Monday, October 18 7:00 p.m. Coronation K.R. Williams Auditorium Coronation Reception (Immediately following Coronation) Anderson Center, McNeil Ballroom

Tuesday, October 19 12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. Quinton Aaron (“The Blindside” film star) Autograph Session Thompson Center Breezeway/ Kennedy Dining 3:30 p.m. – 5:30 p.m. Q/A Discussion and Lecture Session with Quinton Aaron Dillard Auditorium 7:00 p.m. Hypno Bro Dillard Auditorium

Wednesday, October 20 7:00 p.m. Homecoming Comedy Show Featuring Gary Owens & Tony Roberts K.R. Williams Auditorium

(independent venture)

Westbend Vineyards, Lewisville, N.C. RayLen Vineyards and Winery, Mocksville, N.C. Childress Vineyards, Lexington, N.C. 12:00 p.m. Alumni Return to Serve Luncheon Thompson Center, Room 207

Rain site will be K.R. Williams Auditorium

9:45 a.m. Founder’s Day Convocation Dr. Simon Green Atkins Distinguished Alumni Award Presentation K.R. Williams Auditorium

Invitation Only

(Immediately following Founder’s Day Convocation) School of Education & Human Performance Gallery Walk Anderson Center, Foyer/Hallway of 1st Floor

6:00 p.m. Alumni Nurses Banquet Reception Anderson Center, McNeil Ballroom

10:00 a.m. Class of 1990 Wineries and Vineyards

3:30 p.m. Queen’s Tea Reception Clarion Sundance Hotel and Spa

7:00 p.m. Class of 1960 50th Reunion Banquet Hawthorne Inn Downtown Winston-Salem 9:00 p.m. Class of 1960 Hospitality Hour Hawthorne Inn 9:00 p.m. Homecoming Show Red & Black Affair/Party – Wale & Monica Millennium Center

(independent venture)

Westbend Vineyards, Lewisville, N.C. RayLen Vineyards and Winery, Mocksville, N.C. Childress Vineyards, Lexington, N.C. 11:30 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Alumni Registration Thompson Center, Room 207 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Freshman Class of 1986 – Graduating Class of 1990 Alumni and Friends “Art and Soul” Gallery Tour Diggs Gallery 12:00 p.m. Founder’s Day Luncheon Anderson Center, McNeil Ballroom

B e s u re t o c h ec k w ww. ram h o m e c om i n g. c om f or e v e n t u p d a te s . 6

FA L L 2 0 1 0

2:00 p.m. Mass Communications Alumni Reception Anderson Center, Main Dining Room 2:00 p.m. Computer Sciences Alumni Reception TBD 2:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. RAM Rave mini-parade/pep rally/day party/vendor fair Fine Arts Bldg./Clock Tower/ Pitt area 3:00 p.m. Class of 1990 Reunion Hospitality Suites – Open Holiday Inn University Parkway 3:00 p.m. Department of Chemistry Alumni Reception W.B. Atkinson, Room 435 3:00 p.m. Colloquium: The Impact of RAMS Healthcare on Wheels on residents of East Winston-Salem F.L. Atkins Bldg., Room 102 3:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Young Alumni Day Party 6th & Vine Restaurant & Wine Bar 6:00 p.m. Freshman Class of 1986 – Graduating Class of 1990 Meet & Greet Mixer Diggs Gallery 7:00 p.m. Alumni Hall of Distinction Induction and Reception Millennium Center 8:00 p.m. – 2:00 a.m. Alumni Crowning and Scholarship Gala Millennium Center Time TBA Class of 1975, 1985 Gathering The Hawthorne Inn

Saturday, October 23 8:00 a.m. – 10:00 a.m. Class of 1990 Reunion Hospitality Suites – Open Holiday Inn University Parkway 9:00 a.m. School of Health Sciences Alumni Breakfast F.L. Atkins Building, Room 201 10:00 a.m. Homecoming Parade Downtown Winston-Salem (4th and Poplar) 10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Class of 1990 Wineries and Vineyards (independent venture)

RayLen Vineyards and Winery, Mocksville, N.C. Childress Vineyards, Lexington, N.C. 12:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Tavis Foushee & Freshman Class of 1986 – Class of 1990 Tailgate Bowman Gray Stadium 11:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Chancellor’s Hospitality Tent Bowman Gray Stadium 1:30 p.m. WSSU vs. UNC Pembroke Football Bowman Gray Stadium 7:00 p.m. Homecoming Step Show K.R. Williams Auditorium

Westbend Vineyards, Lewisville, N.C.

9:00 p.m. Bossman Entertainment Presents SU Jam 5, Class of 1990 Holiday Inn University Parkway Salem/Forsyth Ballrooms 9:00 p.m. Alumni Extravaganza Millennium Center

Time TBA Class of 1975 Alumni Worship Service Location TBA Time TBA Class of 1985 Worship Service Location TBA

Sunday, October 24 9:00 a.m. 1950 Class Reunion Breakfast Location TBA Time TBA Class of 1960 Worship Service United Metropolitan Missionary Baptist Church (450 Metropolitan Drive)

Miss WSSU and Mr. WSSU 2010 Cornell Jones

Regan-Janell Hales

Senior, Mass Communications Major Manassas, Va.

Senior, Psychology Major Raleigh, N.C.

Activities: • Dean’s list for 6 consecutive semesters • Member of the Honors Program • Captain of the Track and Field team • Member of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, Inc., where he serves as Associate Editor to the Sphinx Magazine • President of the Mass Communications Club

Activities: • Collegiate Achievers • Latin Club • SAAC • Veteran Leaders through Athletics • Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority Inc. • WSSU Red Team Cheerleaders—honored with MVP, rookie of the year, and athlete of the week awards, as well as second place winner in the All-Star competition in the MEAC; was previously Miss University Cheerleader.

Outreach Emphasis: Cornell believes in the power of leadership and strives to be a positive role model. He stands on the basis that “The perception of the Black Male must change” and has many programs slated during the academic school year to help promote this important platform. His stance on representing WSSU this year: “I’m eagerly looking forward to serving my fellow Rams this year, and I am also ecstatic to have been elected to the position of Mr. Winston-Salem State University, an honor I do not take lightly.”

Outreach Emphasis: Regan has also been involved in hosting cheerleading camps for young girls in the community, helping with Habitat for Humanity, reading at elementary schools, and participating in events for young children hosted by the YMCA. Her stance on representing WSSU this year: “The school year will be busy and productive, but I have dedicated my time and efforts to making this Homecoming and academic year the best possible.” ARCHWAY

7


Things that make me

proud to be a Ram

N

o question about it: Most of us would travel many miles to experience the fun side of WSSU Homecoming … the chance to gather with classmates and friends, clapping and cheering, yelling and screaming support for the team, lovin’ the music and savoring the memories. But deep inside, most would admit there is more … much more … that draws us here. As we walk the campus and remember how things were … as we watch today’s students and hear about the emphasis on raising graduation rates and preparing for the jobs of tomorrow … as we learn about the many ways WSSU is establishing itself as a leader in the community … how students are touching lives and giving back … and how WSSU faculty members are spearheading innovative and impactful research initiatives … It’s hard to avoid, and few would want to: the lump in the throat, the deep sense of pride that makes us stand a little taller, smile a little broader and say with conviction and justification: I’m truly proud to be a Ram. Next time you have an opportunity to recruit a future Ram or inspire a WSSU donor, here are just a few examples you can share for the reasons behind your pride.

WSSU class helps create a big day for visually impaired, adopted child who has cerebral palsy Tuesday, June 29, was probably one of the best days in the life of adopted, three-year-old, JaRavion Clemmons, who is visually impaired and was born with schizencephaly (an abnormal brain function) and spastic cerebral palsy— thanks to a group of Winston-Salem State University students and corporate and nonprofit support. That was the day WSSU’s Master’s of Occupational Therapy students unveiled a

12' by 8' playhouse they built and designed to address JaRavion’s therapeutic needs. It was decorated and furnished not only to allow him to play but also rehabilitate his physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs. The disabledaccessible facility was constructed in the backyard of the Clemmons’ home in WinstonSalem. The students unveiled the playhouse with a special play activity. The work was part of an assignment in a Rehabilitation Technology class, taught by Dr. Anne Jenkins, WSSU assistant professor of Occupational Therapy, and Brenda Kennell, WSSU clinical assistant professor of Occupational Therapy, which required students to apply lectures to life by way of a volunteer community service project. “When you have a disability such as JaRavion’s, play and leisure activity is a challenge,” says Jenkins. “Children learn through using their eyes and hands … observing, feeling and manipulating objects to get a sense of texture, shape and size. However, JaRavion is blind and lacks the ability to voluntarily reach and touch.”

The WSSU class explored a number of ways to help enable JaRavion to play and improve his condition. The 29 first-year master’s degree students were split into teams, each named for its area of focus to address JaRavion’s disabilities. The teams were auditory, fine motor, gross motor, furniture, tactile and visual. The teams worked to ensure that nearly every aspect of the playhouse was designed with a purpose to help JaRavion improve developmentally.

Minority middle school students participate in WSSU summer health sciences program Sixteen middle school students from the Piedmont Triad participated in a free School of Health Sciences summer program that aims to boost the number of males and people of color entering health science careers. WSSU’s Youth Exploring Health Sciences (Camp YEHS!) Summer Camp is a two-week enrichment program for rising ninth-grade students from underrepresented populations. It is designed to educate, prepare and enhance their academic qualifications for careers in nursing and the health science professions. The program included a two-week residency on campus at WSSU and an opportunity to shadow a health care professional in the community. The program also included guided career facilitation sessions and a post-men-

torship experience. The free program was sponsored by a North Carolina Glaxo Smith Kline Foundation grant. “This program is specifically for those underrepresented students who would not otherwise have an opportunity for direct exposure to health care careers and ways to pursue the profession,” said Marina A. Skinner, director

Students toured a medical air transport helicopter at N.C. Baptist Hospital’s AirCare. of the program. “We selected 16 outstanding students for this second year of the program at WSSU.” Their ethnic backgrounds ranged from African American to Vietnamese to multiracial (African American, Native American, and Japanese), and Indonesian.

WSSU teaches financial literacy to low-income high school students Low-income high school students got to open a bank account and learn ways to manage money, thanks to a special workshop series offered by WSSU’s Upward Bound Program in conjunction with the Center for Financial Education Consumer Credit Counseling Services of Forsyth Co., Inc. The “Money Skills for Life” initiative was made possible by a grant from the Black Philanthropy Initiative of the Winston-Salem Foundation. The program provided students with “real life” practice at managing a checking account, online banking, long-term savings methods, personal budgeting, and sustainable financial planning. Each participant received $100 to deposit into a savings or checking account specifically for the student. “This was a unique opportunity for young people to be exposed to an area that is seldom taught anywhere,” said Clarence McKee, WSSU Upward Bound Program director. “This can help these young people develop life-long skills and habits and can truly make a difference in their futures.”

Black Men for Change receive ECHO Award Black Men for Change, a university student organization, was selected to receive a 2010 Everyone Can Help Out (ECHO) Award. The organization was recognized for its efforts to build social capital through their volunteer efforts as young community leaders. This student organization was founded six years ago to help empower young predominately African American males to rise above negative stereotypes and become productive assets to our community. Accepting the award on behalf of the organization was BMC’s president Justin Redd and vice president Maximilian Glodde. ARCHWAY

9


Things that make me

proud to be a Ram

N

o question about it: Most of us would travel many miles to experience the fun side of WSSU Homecoming … the chance to gather with classmates and friends, clapping and cheering, yelling and screaming support for the team, lovin’ the music and savoring the memories. But deep inside, most would admit there is more … much more … that draws us here. As we walk the campus and remember how things were … as we watch today’s students and hear about the emphasis on raising graduation rates and preparing for the jobs of tomorrow … as we learn about the many ways WSSU is establishing itself as a leader in the community … how students are touching lives and giving back … and how WSSU faculty members are spearheading innovative and impactful research initiatives … It’s hard to avoid, and few would want to: the lump in the throat, the deep sense of pride that makes us stand a little taller, smile a little broader and say with conviction and justification: I’m truly proud to be a Ram. Next time you have an opportunity to recruit a future Ram or inspire a WSSU donor, here are just a few examples you can share for the reasons behind your pride.

WSSU class helps create a big day for visually impaired, adopted child who has cerebral palsy Tuesday, June 29, was probably one of the best days in the life of adopted, three-year-old, JaRavion Clemmons, who is visually impaired and was born with schizencephaly (an abnormal brain function) and spastic cerebral palsy— thanks to a group of Winston-Salem State University students and corporate and nonprofit support. That was the day WSSU’s Master’s of Occupational Therapy students unveiled a

12' by 8' playhouse they built and designed to address JaRavion’s therapeutic needs. It was decorated and furnished not only to allow him to play but also rehabilitate his physical, psychosocial and spiritual needs. The disabledaccessible facility was constructed in the backyard of the Clemmons’ home in WinstonSalem. The students unveiled the playhouse with a special play activity. The work was part of an assignment in a Rehabilitation Technology class, taught by Dr. Anne Jenkins, WSSU assistant professor of Occupational Therapy, and Brenda Kennell, WSSU clinical assistant professor of Occupational Therapy, which required students to apply lectures to life by way of a volunteer community service project. “When you have a disability such as JaRavion’s, play and leisure activity is a challenge,” says Jenkins. “Children learn through using their eyes and hands … observing, feeling and manipulating objects to get a sense of texture, shape and size. However, JaRavion is blind and lacks the ability to voluntarily reach and touch.”

The WSSU class explored a number of ways to help enable JaRavion to play and improve his condition. The 29 first-year master’s degree students were split into teams, each named for its area of focus to address JaRavion’s disabilities. The teams were auditory, fine motor, gross motor, furniture, tactile and visual. The teams worked to ensure that nearly every aspect of the playhouse was designed with a purpose to help JaRavion improve developmentally.

Minority middle school students participate in WSSU summer health sciences program Sixteen middle school students from the Piedmont Triad participated in a free School of Health Sciences summer program that aims to boost the number of males and people of color entering health science careers. WSSU’s Youth Exploring Health Sciences (Camp YEHS!) Summer Camp is a two-week enrichment program for rising ninth-grade students from underrepresented populations. It is designed to educate, prepare and enhance their academic qualifications for careers in nursing and the health science professions. The program included a two-week residency on campus at WSSU and an opportunity to shadow a health care professional in the community. The program also included guided career facilitation sessions and a post-men-

torship experience. The free program was sponsored by a North Carolina Glaxo Smith Kline Foundation grant. “This program is specifically for those underrepresented students who would not otherwise have an opportunity for direct exposure to health care careers and ways to pursue the profession,” said Marina A. Skinner, director

Students toured a medical air transport helicopter at N.C. Baptist Hospital’s AirCare. of the program. “We selected 16 outstanding students for this second year of the program at WSSU.” Their ethnic backgrounds ranged from African American to Vietnamese to multiracial (African American, Native American, and Japanese), and Indonesian.

WSSU teaches financial literacy to low-income high school students Low-income high school students got to open a bank account and learn ways to manage money, thanks to a special workshop series offered by WSSU’s Upward Bound Program in conjunction with the Center for Financial Education Consumer Credit Counseling Services of Forsyth Co., Inc. The “Money Skills for Life” initiative was made possible by a grant from the Black Philanthropy Initiative of the Winston-Salem Foundation. The program provided students with “real life” practice at managing a checking account, online banking, long-term savings methods, personal budgeting, and sustainable financial planning. Each participant received $100 to deposit into a savings or checking account specifically for the student. “This was a unique opportunity for young people to be exposed to an area that is seldom taught anywhere,” said Clarence McKee, WSSU Upward Bound Program director. “This can help these young people develop life-long skills and habits and can truly make a difference in their futures.”

Black Men for Change receive ECHO Award Black Men for Change, a university student organization, was selected to receive a 2010 Everyone Can Help Out (ECHO) Award. The organization was recognized for its efforts to build social capital through their volunteer efforts as young community leaders. This student organization was founded six years ago to help empower young predominately African American males to rise above negative stereotypes and become productive assets to our community. Accepting the award on behalf of the organization was BMC’s president Justin Redd and vice president Maximilian Glodde. ARCHWAY

9


A WSSU research team working to fine tune ultrasound to destroy infectious bacteria A Winston-Salem State University researcher is working to fine tune ultrasound waves to destroy dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria that causes open wound infections that claim lives annually. Bacteria in open wounds are often treated with antibiotics, according to Dr. Teresa ConnerKerr, WSSU Department of Physical Therapy chair in the School of Health Sciences. But antibiotic-resistant forms of bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are emerging as problems in daycares, sports facilities and homes. They are no longer just a problem in hospitals. Conner-Kerr and her research team found that very low frequency ultrasound at 35 khz kills bacteria—including MRSA—by puncturing and fracturing the bacterial cell walls and altering the cells’ tendencies to grow in colonies. This study measured the effects of ultrasound

on bacterial viability, cell wall structure, colony characteristics and antibiotic sensitivity. The study was conducted on in vitro bacteria samples. The study documented that when exposed to 30 seconds of treatment, antibioticresistant forms of bacteria dropped from 106 per milliliter to six per milliliter, an approximate 99 percent drop. “We are happy to report, based on our study, 35 khz very low frequency ultrasound is more effective at reducing total bacteria cells in vitro than other frequencies of ultrasound. This is encouraging and timely news because standard therapies are failing, and finding alternative approaches to managing these pathogens is becoming increasingly important,” said Conner-Kerr, “but further study is recommended on this potentially effective therapy.”

SURE program prepares next generation of researchers Twenty-three undergraduate students from Winston-Salem State and Forsyth Technical Community College were recently awarded for their research efforts as participants in a summer program designed to give them research experience over a five-week period. The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) program is one of the project activities associated with a five-year $1.75 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to fund the HBCU-UP Programat Winston-Salem State University. The grant runs from September 2009 to August 2014. The WSSU HBCU-UP Program is designed to: • Increase the number of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors graduating from WSSU • Strengthen undergraduate research education and capacity at WSSU • Increase the number of STEM graduates who matriculate into graduate programs This NSF HBCU-UP grant seeks to investigate how a research-intensive program can enhance STEM education at WSSU. A major theme of the grant is the engagement of STEM students at WSSU in “active learning” and “learning through research” in order to better prepare them for gaining successful admission into research-intensive Ph.D. programs. 10

FA L L 2 0 1 0

WSSU researchers study effects of Nintendo Wii Bowling on senior citizens Winston-Salem State University researchers visited a Clemmons, N.C., retirement community in October 2009 to study the effects of the Nintendo Wii Bowling game on the quality of life of the 60-and-older population living in retirement facilities. Study results were planned for release in January 2010. Dr. Cynthia Bell, WSSU assistant professor of occupational therapy in the School of Health Sciences, Elizabeth Fain, WSSU occupational therapy instructor, and six students conducted the study. They used Nintendo’s Wii Bowling game to assess quality of life, confidence in preventing falls, and social skills—three major areas in the lives of seniors. “There have been a number of cases at senior communities in which people are led to believe that residents who play Nintendo Wii Bowling tend to experience greater quality of life. But that is based mostly on unofficial observation,” said Fain. “This study is designed to scientifically confirm the true effects.”

fine motor skills to enhance overall quality of life through physical and mental well-being. The Nintendo Wii system is a recent technological advancement in the area of virtual reality video games and provides an interactive experience that blends physical activity and interface through simulation of real world environments. Participants can engage with the games one-on-one or in a group setting.

WSSU, WFU kick off new undergraduate neuroscience training cooperative Winston-Salem State University and Wake Forest University officially kicked off a new undergraduate neuroscience training cooperative prior to a regional student neuroscience conference last spring. The collaboration on the new training cooperative is designed to increase minority participation in neuroscience, education and

As part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE), Amanda Lee and Dr. Nickolay Hristo proudly display research on the motion and habitats of bats.

Fear of falling has a major impact on mobility and consequently the social and other activities of residents of senior residential facilities, according to the researchers. “Those issues impact quality of life,” Bell said. “Social relationships have a tendency to decrease with age when fewer social opportunities are available. Establishing supportive social relationships is central to the older person’s self-efficacy, well-being and continued success in socializing,” she added. The study involves examining three groups. The participants in group A were exposed to virtual rehabilitation through the Nintendo Wii Bowling only. The participants in group B were exposed to both the Nintendo Wii Bowling and fall prevention education (checklists, tips and low-impact exercises). The participants in group C were not exposed to the Nintendo Wii or the fall prevention education. Virtual rehabilitation is an interactive video game experience that utilizes gross and

research. It will provide a neuroscience minor degree program for five students at WSSU, who will complete additional courses at WSSU and WFU over a two-year period. At least one semester of research is also required. “The Department of Life Sciences is excited to offer this neuroscience degree minor,” said Dr. Donna Durham-Pierre, department

chair. “This will serve as a stepping stone for students who are interested in graduate programs in neuroscience.” Dr. Azeez Aileru, professor of neurobiology at WSSU and director of the university Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center (BRIC), was instrumental in developing the collaborative agreement between the two universities. “BRIC and the Department of Life Sciences at WSSU have a critical mass of neuroscientists, and we need to build upon these strengths,” Aileru said. “Our goal is to create a neuroscience training ground for our students in which this program will firmly stand.” Aileru also emphasized that underrepresentation of minorities in the biomedical sciences is well documented, especially in neuroscience. In 2006, approximately 60 of the 483 neuroscience degrees were awarded to underrepresented minorities, with only 3 percent going to African Americans. “Consequently, the neuroscience program at WSSU will continue to support the goal of increasing minority participation. This will help increase the involvement of minorities in important research areas such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.” ARCHWAY

11


A WSSU research team working to fine tune ultrasound to destroy infectious bacteria A Winston-Salem State University researcher is working to fine tune ultrasound waves to destroy dangerous antibiotic-resistant bacteria that causes open wound infections that claim lives annually. Bacteria in open wounds are often treated with antibiotics, according to Dr. Teresa ConnerKerr, WSSU Department of Physical Therapy chair in the School of Health Sciences. But antibiotic-resistant forms of bacteria, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), are emerging as problems in daycares, sports facilities and homes. They are no longer just a problem in hospitals. Conner-Kerr and her research team found that very low frequency ultrasound at 35 khz kills bacteria—including MRSA—by puncturing and fracturing the bacterial cell walls and altering the cells’ tendencies to grow in colonies. This study measured the effects of ultrasound

on bacterial viability, cell wall structure, colony characteristics and antibiotic sensitivity. The study was conducted on in vitro bacteria samples. The study documented that when exposed to 30 seconds of treatment, antibioticresistant forms of bacteria dropped from 106 per milliliter to six per milliliter, an approximate 99 percent drop. “We are happy to report, based on our study, 35 khz very low frequency ultrasound is more effective at reducing total bacteria cells in vitro than other frequencies of ultrasound. This is encouraging and timely news because standard therapies are failing, and finding alternative approaches to managing these pathogens is becoming increasingly important,” said Conner-Kerr, “but further study is recommended on this potentially effective therapy.”

SURE program prepares next generation of researchers Twenty-three undergraduate students from Winston-Salem State and Forsyth Technical Community College were recently awarded for their research efforts as participants in a summer program designed to give them research experience over a five-week period. The Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) program is one of the project activities associated with a five-year $1.75 million National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to fund the HBCU-UP Programat Winston-Salem State University. The grant runs from September 2009 to August 2014. The WSSU HBCU-UP Program is designed to: • Increase the number of Science, Technology, Engineering and Math (STEM) majors graduating from WSSU • Strengthen undergraduate research education and capacity at WSSU • Increase the number of STEM graduates who matriculate into graduate programs This NSF HBCU-UP grant seeks to investigate how a research-intensive program can enhance STEM education at WSSU. A major theme of the grant is the engagement of STEM students at WSSU in “active learning” and “learning through research” in order to better prepare them for gaining successful admission into research-intensive Ph.D. programs. 10

FA L L 2 0 1 0

WSSU researchers study effects of Nintendo Wii Bowling on senior citizens Winston-Salem State University researchers visited a Clemmons, N.C., retirement community in October 2009 to study the effects of the Nintendo Wii Bowling game on the quality of life of the 60-and-older population living in retirement facilities. Study results were planned for release in January 2010. Dr. Cynthia Bell, WSSU assistant professor of occupational therapy in the School of Health Sciences, Elizabeth Fain, WSSU occupational therapy instructor, and six students conducted the study. They used Nintendo’s Wii Bowling game to assess quality of life, confidence in preventing falls, and social skills—three major areas in the lives of seniors. “There have been a number of cases at senior communities in which people are led to believe that residents who play Nintendo Wii Bowling tend to experience greater quality of life. But that is based mostly on unofficial observation,” said Fain. “This study is designed to scientifically confirm the true effects.”

fine motor skills to enhance overall quality of life through physical and mental well-being. The Nintendo Wii system is a recent technological advancement in the area of virtual reality video games and provides an interactive experience that blends physical activity and interface through simulation of real world environments. Participants can engage with the games one-on-one or in a group setting.

WSSU, WFU kick off new undergraduate neuroscience training cooperative Winston-Salem State University and Wake Forest University officially kicked off a new undergraduate neuroscience training cooperative prior to a regional student neuroscience conference last spring. The collaboration on the new training cooperative is designed to increase minority participation in neuroscience, education and

As part of the Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE), Amanda Lee and Dr. Nickolay Hristo proudly display research on the motion and habitats of bats.

Fear of falling has a major impact on mobility and consequently the social and other activities of residents of senior residential facilities, according to the researchers. “Those issues impact quality of life,” Bell said. “Social relationships have a tendency to decrease with age when fewer social opportunities are available. Establishing supportive social relationships is central to the older person’s self-efficacy, well-being and continued success in socializing,” she added. The study involves examining three groups. The participants in group A were exposed to virtual rehabilitation through the Nintendo Wii Bowling only. The participants in group B were exposed to both the Nintendo Wii Bowling and fall prevention education (checklists, tips and low-impact exercises). The participants in group C were not exposed to the Nintendo Wii or the fall prevention education. Virtual rehabilitation is an interactive video game experience that utilizes gross and

research. It will provide a neuroscience minor degree program for five students at WSSU, who will complete additional courses at WSSU and WFU over a two-year period. At least one semester of research is also required. “The Department of Life Sciences is excited to offer this neuroscience degree minor,” said Dr. Donna Durham-Pierre, department

chair. “This will serve as a stepping stone for students who are interested in graduate programs in neuroscience.” Dr. Azeez Aileru, professor of neurobiology at WSSU and director of the university Biomedical Research Infrastructure Center (BRIC), was instrumental in developing the collaborative agreement between the two universities. “BRIC and the Department of Life Sciences at WSSU have a critical mass of neuroscientists, and we need to build upon these strengths,” Aileru said. “Our goal is to create a neuroscience training ground for our students in which this program will firmly stand.” Aileru also emphasized that underrepresentation of minorities in the biomedical sciences is well documented, especially in neuroscience. In 2006, approximately 60 of the 483 neuroscience degrees were awarded to underrepresented minorities, with only 3 percent going to African Americans. “Consequently, the neuroscience program at WSSU will continue to support the goal of increasing minority participation. This will help increase the involvement of minorities in important research areas such as Parkinson’s disease, stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.” ARCHWAY

11


on the yard

campus news & events

Dr. Jones among 50 most important African Americans in technology D

r. Elva J. Jones, chair of the Department of Computer Science at WSSU, was named to the 10th Annual 50 Most Important African Americans in Technology for her work in education, research and outreach. The selection was made by eAccess Corp., a San Francisco-based publisher. The purpose of the list is to raise the profile of African Americans in technology and to inspire new generations. Jones is professor and department chair in WSSU’s College of Arts and Sciences. Her entire career has centered on exposing underrepresented minorities to computing and preparing them for computing careers. “It is a tremendous honor for me to be included on the 50 Most Important African Americans in Technology list,” said Jones. “Computing has been such a captivating field for me that I never tire of the work and the

discovery each day brings. I want as many students as possible to experience the joy of idea discovery, creative design, and technology integration.” Jones has focused her recent teaching, research and outreach in two areas: analysis and visualization of NASA data and robotics as tools to attract African American students to the field of computer science. She is the founding chair of the Department of Computer Science. She has led the natural progression from teaching the first courses in computing, developing the first concentration in computer science, leading the development of the major program in computer science, leading the development of the master of science program in computer science and information technology and the BS in information technology, to most recently leading the development of an option in information security.

WSSU Friends of the Library Did you know? WSSU has the longest operating Friends of the Library organization among the nation’s HBCUs – and the only one that has created a substantial library endowment. Come celebrate this great organization’s 25th anniversary:

Friday, November 5, 2010 6:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Village Inn Conference Center, “Jones is an example of the critically important role of African American innovators, educators, policymakers and executives who shape the future of the global economy,” says John William Templeton, president/executive editor of San Francisco-based eAccess Corp., which has produced the list since 1999. “During a transformational national administration, they represent the role models to propel new generations into the careers of the future.”

Construction begins on WSSU-sponsored business incubator As enthusiastic supporters watched, shiny new sledge hammers were placed in the hands of dignitaries who, one by one, proceeded to knock holes in a wall set up just for the occasion. With that ceremonial “wall-breaking” on August 26, construction officially began on transforming the former Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club into The Enterprise Center, a business incubator designed to support entrepreneurs, encourage “green” practices and strengthen economic development along

Participants in the “wall-breaking” that marked the start of renovations to create The Enterprise Center included (left to right) Rep. Larry Womble; City Council Member James Taylor; Mayor Pro Tem Vivian Burke; Carol Davis, executive director of the S.G. Atkins CDC; WSSU Provost Brenda Allen; City Council Member Derwin Montgomery; and Notis Pagiavlas, WSSU associate professor and chair of the S.G. Atkins CDC Board. 12

FA L L 2 0 1 0

the southern portion of Winston-Salem’s Martin Luther King, Jr., corridor. A project of WSSU’s S.G.Atkins Community Development Corporation, The Enterprise Center will also benefit the surrounding neighborhood and broader community long term

through health and wellness programs and other quality-of-life initiatives, while offering experiential learning opportunities for WSSU students. Office space is already being leased, with an anticipated move-in date of early 2011.

Clemmons, N.C. Tickets are $50 each ($25 for students). For details, go to http://fol.wssuomc1. com. Or contact Dr. Mae Rodney at 336-750-2446 or rodneyml@wssu.edu, or Rachel Simon at 336-750-2442 or simonra@wssu.edu.

Bailey selected president-elect of the HBCU Business Deans’ Roundtable Economics at WSSU, was selected to serve as presidentD elect of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities r. Jessica M. Bailey, dean of the School of Business and

(HBCU) Business Deans’ Roundtable at the group’s eighth annual national summit held recently in Houston, Tex. As president-elect, Bailey will be responsible for the planning and preparation for the annual meeting to be held in June 2011 in Orlando, Fla., prior to assuming the presidency of the organization. Her goal during the coming year is to expand the group’s membership by reaching out to foreign countries with institutions similar to HBCUs that would benefit from affiliation with the Roundtable. The HBCU Business Deans’ Roundtable provides networking opportunities for HBCUs in the United States and the U.S. Virgin Islands to share knowledge, effectively recruit faculty, leverage resources and foster beneficial growth and changes for its members. Organized 10 years ago, the Roundtable is the only organization that focuses on the needs of and opportunities for business schools at HBCUs.

Powell named director of adult student services

Diggs Gallery to celebrate its 20th Anniversary October 15

Dr. Esther S. Powell has been named director of adult student services and evaluation as part of the university’s restructuring of its Lifelong Learning program areas. “With an increasing number of students falling into that adult category, which is defined as 25 years old or older, we must be prepared to meet a differing set of needs than those of students who come directly from high school to live on our campus,” said Dr. Brenda Allen, provost. “As part of our effort to provide the best service possible for our older students, we have restructured Lifelong Learning to ensure that we are providing the programs and the coordinated efforts needed by adult learners.”

Since opening in 1990, Diggs Gallery has established itself as the major cultural center at WSSU, while also serving as a teaching facility, community center and highly acclaimed art gallery. It is home to one of the South’s leading showcases dedicated to African and African American art. In 2007 the Gallery was identified as one of the top 10 African American galleries in the nation. It also was identified by the Smithsonian as one of the nation’s best regional facilities for exploring contemporary African art. Diggs Gallery relies on donations from a variety of sources to support operations, exhibitions, programs and enhancement of its facilities. Donations of gifts, cash, and artwork are important in allowing the Gallery to maintain its prominence in the arts community. For more information, contact the Gallery at diggsinfo@wssu.edu or by phone at 336-750-2458. For

information about planned giving opportunities that may offer tax benefits, contact the Advancement Division at 336-750-3089.

ARCHWAY

13


on the yard

campus news & events

Dr. Jones among 50 most important African Americans in technology D

r. Elva J. Jones, chair of the Department of Computer Science at WSSU, was named to the 10th Annual 50 Most Important African Americans in Technology for her work in education, research and outreach. The selection was made by eAccess Corp., a San Francisco-based publisher. The purpose of the list is to raise the profile of African Americans in technology and to inspire new generations. Jones is professor and department chair in WSSU’s College of Arts and Sciences. Her entire career has centered on exposing underrepresented minorities to computing and preparing them for computing careers. “It is a tremendous honor for me to be included on the 50 Most Important African Americans in Technology list,” said Jones. “Computing has been such a captivating field for me that I never tire of the work and the

discovery each day brings. I want as many students as possible to experience the joy of idea discovery, creative design, and technology integration.” Jones has focused her recent teaching, research and outreach in two areas: analysis and visualization of NASA data and robotics as tools to attract African American students to the field of computer science. She is the founding chair of the Department of Computer Science. She has led the natural progression from teaching the first courses in computing, developing the first concentration in computer science, leading the development of the major program in computer science, leading the development of the master of science program in computer science and information technology and the BS in information technology, to most recently leading the development of an option in information security.

WSSU Friends of the Library Did you know? WSSU has the longest operating Friends of the Library organization among the nation’s HBCUs – and the only one that has created a substantial library endowment. Come celebrate this great organization’s 25th anniversary:

Friday, November 5, 2010 6:30 p.m. – 10:30 p.m. Village Inn Conference Center, “Jones is an example of the critically important role of African American innovators, educators, policymakers and executives who shape the future of the global economy,” says John William Templeton, president/executive editor of San Francisco-based eAccess Corp., which has produced the list since 1999. “During a transformational national administration, they represent the role models to propel new generations into the careers of the future.”

Construction begins on WSSU-sponsored business incubator As enthusiastic supporters watched, shiny new sledge hammers were placed in the hands of dignitaries who, one by one, proceeded to knock holes in a wall set up just for the occasion. With that ceremonial “wall-breaking” on August 26, construction officially began on transforming the former Salvation Army Boys and Girls Club into The Enterprise Center, a business incubator designed to support entrepreneurs, encourage “green” practices and strengthen economic development along

Participants in the “wall-breaking” that marked the start of renovations to create The Enterprise Center included (left to right) Rep. Larry Womble; City Council Member James Taylor; Mayor Pro Tem Vivian Burke; Carol Davis, executive director of the S.G. Atkins CDC; WSSU Provost Brenda Allen; City Council Member Derwin Montgomery; and Notis Pagiavlas, WSSU associate professor and chair of the S.G. Atkins CDC Board. 12

FA L L 2 0 1 0

the southern portion of Winston-Salem’s Martin Luther King, Jr., corridor. A project of WSSU’s S.G.Atkins Community Development Corporation, The Enterprise Center will also benefit the surrounding neighborhood and broader community long term

through health and wellness programs and other quality-of-life initiatives, while offering experiential learning opportunities for WSSU students. Office space is already being leased, with an anticipated move-in date of early 2011.

Clemmons, N.C. Tickets are $50 each ($25 for students). For details, go to http://fol.wssuomc1. com. Or contact Dr. Mae Rodney at 336-750-2446 or rodneyml@wssu.edu, or Rachel Simon at 336-750-2442 or simonra@wssu.edu.

Bailey selected president-elect of the HBCU Business Deans’ Roundtable Economics at WSSU, was selected to serve as presidentD elect of the Historically Black Colleges and Universities r. Jessica M. Bailey, dean of the School of Business and

(HBCU) Business Deans’ Roundtable at the group’s eighth annual national summit held recently in Houston, Tex. As president-elect, Bailey will be responsible for the planning and preparation for the annual meeting to be held in June 2011 in Orlando, Fla., prior to assuming the presidency of the organization. Her goal during the coming year is to expand the group’s membership by reaching out to foreign countries with institutions similar to HBCUs that would benefit from affiliation with the Roundtable. The HBCU Business Deans’ Roundtable provides networking opportunities for HBCUs in the United States and the U.S. Virgin Islands to share knowledge, effectively recruit faculty, leverage resources and foster beneficial growth and changes for its members. Organized 10 years ago, the Roundtable is the only organization that focuses on the needs of and opportunities for business schools at HBCUs.

Powell named director of adult student services

Diggs Gallery to celebrate its 20th Anniversary October 15

Dr. Esther S. Powell has been named director of adult student services and evaluation as part of the university’s restructuring of its Lifelong Learning program areas. “With an increasing number of students falling into that adult category, which is defined as 25 years old or older, we must be prepared to meet a differing set of needs than those of students who come directly from high school to live on our campus,” said Dr. Brenda Allen, provost. “As part of our effort to provide the best service possible for our older students, we have restructured Lifelong Learning to ensure that we are providing the programs and the coordinated efforts needed by adult learners.”

Since opening in 1990, Diggs Gallery has established itself as the major cultural center at WSSU, while also serving as a teaching facility, community center and highly acclaimed art gallery. It is home to one of the South’s leading showcases dedicated to African and African American art. In 2007 the Gallery was identified as one of the top 10 African American galleries in the nation. It also was identified by the Smithsonian as one of the nation’s best regional facilities for exploring contemporary African art. Diggs Gallery relies on donations from a variety of sources to support operations, exhibitions, programs and enhancement of its facilities. Donations of gifts, cash, and artwork are important in allowing the Gallery to maintain its prominence in the arts community. For more information, contact the Gallery at diggsinfo@wssu.edu or by phone at 336-750-2458. For

information about planned giving opportunities that may offer tax benefits, contact the Advancement Division at 336-750-3089.

ARCHWAY

13


on the yard

WSSU announces

campus news & events

reorganization of select functions to better support implementation of its

WSSU introduces new dual admissions program in partnership with Forsyth Tech

W

inston-Salem State University and Forsyth Technical Community College have entered into an agreement that will allow students to be simultaneously granted admission to both institutions. The new Dual Admissions Program (DAP) partnership will provide support and resources to students who may not be ready to succeed in a bachelor’s degree program. The initiative, which began Fall 2010, is designed to provide a seamless and successful transition from community college to a university. “We have students who come to WinstonSalem State without the depth of preparation needed to be successful at our university,” said Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. “This partnership with Forsyth Tech will provide those students with such important supports as smaller classes and lower tuition. By using dual admission, we also will be taking the steps necessary to help students feel a part of our campus so that the transition to a four-year institution will be easier.”

14

Under the DAP agreement, students will have an application process that includes admission to both institutions. The two schools will share responsibility for student advising, access to resources at both campuses, and opportunities to participate in university activities. Supporting access to higher education “Part of the mission of WSSU, and of all Historically Black Colleges and Universities, is to provide access to higher education,” added Reaves. “As we increase our admission standards, this program ensures that students will continue to have the opportunity to earn a four-year college degree.” Students who apply and do not meet the admission standards at WSSU will receive information on the Dual Admissions Program. Students who sign the contract to join the program and are accepted will receive a letter of deferment for admission to WSSU. Once they complete their requirements at Forsyth

Tech, the students are guaranteed admission into a related baccalaureate degree program at WSSU. Students who graduate with associate degrees in arts or science from Forsyth Tech are already able to transfer their credits to University of North Carolina schools. This new partnership provides additional advantages. “Students will have the same benefits as in our regular program, but will have the additional benefits of an established relationship with Winston-Salem State,” said Forsyth Tech President Gary M. Green (shown above with Chancellor Reaves). “They will have access to academic advisers, student activities and facilities at both schools. “We are excited to be able to offer our students another option for continuing their education,” Green added. “Our partnership with Winston-Salem State enhances our ability to provide quality, affordable, accessible educational opportunities.”

WSSU receives $100,000 Walmart grant

Endowed chair in nursing will honor chancellor emeritus Cleon F. Thompson

Winston-Salem State University has been selected by the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) to receive a $100,000 Walmart Minority Student Success Award grant to support the university’s continuing efforts to provide additional academic assistance for first-generation college students. WSSU was one of only 14 minorityserving institutions in the nation selected by IHEP to receive a grant and the only institution selected in North Carolina. The award, made possible by a $4.2 million grant to IHEP from the Walmart Foundation, is aimed at increasing and enhancing efforts to enroll, retain and graduate first-generation college students.

Chancellor Donald J. Reaves has announced the establishment of the Cleon F. Thompson, Jr. Distinguished Professorship in Nursing. The endowed chair was made possible by a gift of $250,000 from the C. D. Spangler Foundation and a matching grant from the State. “Our program continues to be a major provider of nurses, particularly in the State of North Carolina,” said Reaves. “An endowed professorship is crucial to our ability to recruit distinguished professors who will promote excellence in teaching, research and service. With the impact of the healthcare field on our area and the state’s economic development efforts, the emphasis on quality nursing education becomes even more important.” The chair is named in honor of Dr. Thompson, who served as Chancellor at WSSU from 1985 until 1995. During Thompson’s tenure, the goals of the university included recruitment of quality faculty and surpassing accreditation standards. The Student Services Center on the campus is named for Thompson. After leaving WSSU, he continued work within

FAL L 2 0 1 0

the University of North Carolina system and at Shaw University. Thompson is also a director emeritus for the North Carolina Institute of Minority Economic Development.

$100,000 received for nursing scholarships The School of Health Sciences at Winston-Salem State will receive $100,000 for scholarships from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). Grants provided through this competitive program will be given to students traditionally underrepresented in the field of nursing and strives to prepare culturally competent leaders in WSSU’s accelerated bachelor’s degree in nursing program. NCIN was launched in 2008 to address the national nursing shortage and fuel the pipeline of diverse nurse faculty.

strategic plan

Wrestructuring that is designed to provide more implementation support for its strategic inston-Salem State has announced a

plan that focuses on improving student retention, graduation rates and post-graduation outcomes. The changes were effective July 1. “Our strategic plan has identified the programs and initiatives that will provide our students with the support that they need to be successful while at Winston-Salem State and after graduation,” said Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. “We define success as graduates who are well prepared for advanced study or work in their chosen profession and who also are willing and capable of providing leadership and service to the community. There is, however, a set of management challenges that must be addressed if we are to implement successfully the strategies that are contained in the plan.” Realigning responsibilities To provide the implementation support necessary to monitor and measure the work outlined in the strategic plan, the role of the executive vice chancellor for management and strategic initiatives will be realigned. “We must have someone working continuously on the various aspects of the plan,” Reaves explained. “Dr. Dorcas Colvin will be the day-to-day driver of our implementation efforts. Reporting directly to me, and working collaboratively with the other senior officers who have responsibility for various aspects of the plan, she will lead the ongoing implementation effort and will ensure that we are

measuring our progress in a meaningful manner. “We will be reassigning the enrollment service and human resources function to allow the executive vice chancellor to provide leadership for new initiatives such as staff development, service excellence and

“We define success as graduates who are well prepared for advanced study or work in their chosen profession and who also are willing and capable of providing leadership and service to the community.” process improvements,” Reaves added. “Dr. Colvin also has been designated as WSSU’s project manager for the UNC-FIT, or Finance Improvement and Transformation initiative, which is designed to align people, processes and technology throughout the multi-campus University system.” In August 2008 the responsibility for enrollment management was assigned temporarily to Colvin while the university searched for a new provost. With Provost Brenda Allen in place for a year, enrollment management has been reassigned to academic affairs. Additionally,

the office of human resources has been reassigned to the finance and administration area where it is better aligned with other business operations. Improving teacher training As part of its larger restructuring effort, the university created a Secondary Education Department within the School of Education and Human Performance to better serve students who are preparing to teach high school English, mathematics and science. “We have been providing a high level of education in these specific subject areas that have been housed in our College of Arts and Sciences,” said Reaves. “By consolidating our secondary education program in the School of Education and Human Performance, we can focus more attention on teacher training. The world of teaching has changed significantly over the years and we need to be sure that the teachers that we produce are equipped to be successful in the classroom.” Other changes include moving the physical education major from the Department of Human Performance and Sports Sciences to the new Department of Secondary Education and moving the English as a Second Language program from the College of Arts and Sciences to the new Education Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Professional Studies. The new departments became effective July 1. Strengthening graduate programs The university is also reorganizing the administration of its graduate programs by eliminating the School of Graduate Studies and Research and consolidating the responsibilities for graduate school programs administration, institutional research, sponsored projects and special projects under one associate provost. Effective July 1, Dr. Carolynn Berry, formerly assistant provost for planning, assessment and research, was named an associate provost with responsibility for the activities outlined above. She also will retain responsibility for institutional research.

ARCHWAY

15


on the yard

WSSU announces

campus news & events

reorganization of select functions to better support implementation of its

WSSU introduces new dual admissions program in partnership with Forsyth Tech

W

inston-Salem State University and Forsyth Technical Community College have entered into an agreement that will allow students to be simultaneously granted admission to both institutions. The new Dual Admissions Program (DAP) partnership will provide support and resources to students who may not be ready to succeed in a bachelor’s degree program. The initiative, which began Fall 2010, is designed to provide a seamless and successful transition from community college to a university. “We have students who come to WinstonSalem State without the depth of preparation needed to be successful at our university,” said Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. “This partnership with Forsyth Tech will provide those students with such important supports as smaller classes and lower tuition. By using dual admission, we also will be taking the steps necessary to help students feel a part of our campus so that the transition to a four-year institution will be easier.”

14

Under the DAP agreement, students will have an application process that includes admission to both institutions. The two schools will share responsibility for student advising, access to resources at both campuses, and opportunities to participate in university activities. Supporting access to higher education “Part of the mission of WSSU, and of all Historically Black Colleges and Universities, is to provide access to higher education,” added Reaves. “As we increase our admission standards, this program ensures that students will continue to have the opportunity to earn a four-year college degree.” Students who apply and do not meet the admission standards at WSSU will receive information on the Dual Admissions Program. Students who sign the contract to join the program and are accepted will receive a letter of deferment for admission to WSSU. Once they complete their requirements at Forsyth

Tech, the students are guaranteed admission into a related baccalaureate degree program at WSSU. Students who graduate with associate degrees in arts or science from Forsyth Tech are already able to transfer their credits to University of North Carolina schools. This new partnership provides additional advantages. “Students will have the same benefits as in our regular program, but will have the additional benefits of an established relationship with Winston-Salem State,” said Forsyth Tech President Gary M. Green (shown above with Chancellor Reaves). “They will have access to academic advisers, student activities and facilities at both schools. “We are excited to be able to offer our students another option for continuing their education,” Green added. “Our partnership with Winston-Salem State enhances our ability to provide quality, affordable, accessible educational opportunities.”

WSSU receives $100,000 Walmart grant

Endowed chair in nursing will honor chancellor emeritus Cleon F. Thompson

Winston-Salem State University has been selected by the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP) to receive a $100,000 Walmart Minority Student Success Award grant to support the university’s continuing efforts to provide additional academic assistance for first-generation college students. WSSU was one of only 14 minorityserving institutions in the nation selected by IHEP to receive a grant and the only institution selected in North Carolina. The award, made possible by a $4.2 million grant to IHEP from the Walmart Foundation, is aimed at increasing and enhancing efforts to enroll, retain and graduate first-generation college students.

Chancellor Donald J. Reaves has announced the establishment of the Cleon F. Thompson, Jr. Distinguished Professorship in Nursing. The endowed chair was made possible by a gift of $250,000 from the C. D. Spangler Foundation and a matching grant from the State. “Our program continues to be a major provider of nurses, particularly in the State of North Carolina,” said Reaves. “An endowed professorship is crucial to our ability to recruit distinguished professors who will promote excellence in teaching, research and service. With the impact of the healthcare field on our area and the state’s economic development efforts, the emphasis on quality nursing education becomes even more important.” The chair is named in honor of Dr. Thompson, who served as Chancellor at WSSU from 1985 until 1995. During Thompson’s tenure, the goals of the university included recruitment of quality faculty and surpassing accreditation standards. The Student Services Center on the campus is named for Thompson. After leaving WSSU, he continued work within

FAL L 2 0 1 0

the University of North Carolina system and at Shaw University. Thompson is also a director emeritus for the North Carolina Institute of Minority Economic Development.

$100,000 received for nursing scholarships The School of Health Sciences at Winston-Salem State will receive $100,000 for scholarships from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) and the American Association of Colleges of Nursing through the RWJF New Careers in Nursing Scholarship Program (NCIN). Grants provided through this competitive program will be given to students traditionally underrepresented in the field of nursing and strives to prepare culturally competent leaders in WSSU’s accelerated bachelor’s degree in nursing program. NCIN was launched in 2008 to address the national nursing shortage and fuel the pipeline of diverse nurse faculty.

strategic plan

Wrestructuring that is designed to provide more implementation support for its strategic inston-Salem State has announced a

plan that focuses on improving student retention, graduation rates and post-graduation outcomes. The changes were effective July 1. “Our strategic plan has identified the programs and initiatives that will provide our students with the support that they need to be successful while at Winston-Salem State and after graduation,” said Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. “We define success as graduates who are well prepared for advanced study or work in their chosen profession and who also are willing and capable of providing leadership and service to the community. There is, however, a set of management challenges that must be addressed if we are to implement successfully the strategies that are contained in the plan.” Realigning responsibilities To provide the implementation support necessary to monitor and measure the work outlined in the strategic plan, the role of the executive vice chancellor for management and strategic initiatives will be realigned. “We must have someone working continuously on the various aspects of the plan,” Reaves explained. “Dr. Dorcas Colvin will be the day-to-day driver of our implementation efforts. Reporting directly to me, and working collaboratively with the other senior officers who have responsibility for various aspects of the plan, she will lead the ongoing implementation effort and will ensure that we are

measuring our progress in a meaningful manner. “We will be reassigning the enrollment service and human resources function to allow the executive vice chancellor to provide leadership for new initiatives such as staff development, service excellence and

“We define success as graduates who are well prepared for advanced study or work in their chosen profession and who also are willing and capable of providing leadership and service to the community.” process improvements,” Reaves added. “Dr. Colvin also has been designated as WSSU’s project manager for the UNC-FIT, or Finance Improvement and Transformation initiative, which is designed to align people, processes and technology throughout the multi-campus University system.” In August 2008 the responsibility for enrollment management was assigned temporarily to Colvin while the university searched for a new provost. With Provost Brenda Allen in place for a year, enrollment management has been reassigned to academic affairs. Additionally,

the office of human resources has been reassigned to the finance and administration area where it is better aligned with other business operations. Improving teacher training As part of its larger restructuring effort, the university created a Secondary Education Department within the School of Education and Human Performance to better serve students who are preparing to teach high school English, mathematics and science. “We have been providing a high level of education in these specific subject areas that have been housed in our College of Arts and Sciences,” said Reaves. “By consolidating our secondary education program in the School of Education and Human Performance, we can focus more attention on teacher training. The world of teaching has changed significantly over the years and we need to be sure that the teachers that we produce are equipped to be successful in the classroom.” Other changes include moving the physical education major from the Department of Human Performance and Sports Sciences to the new Department of Secondary Education and moving the English as a Second Language program from the College of Arts and Sciences to the new Education Department of Educational Leadership, Counseling, and Professional Studies. The new departments became effective July 1. Strengthening graduate programs The university is also reorganizing the administration of its graduate programs by eliminating the School of Graduate Studies and Research and consolidating the responsibilities for graduate school programs administration, institutional research, sponsored projects and special projects under one associate provost. Effective July 1, Dr. Carolynn Berry, formerly assistant provost for planning, assessment and research, was named an associate provost with responsibility for the activities outlined above. She also will retain responsibility for institutional research.

ARCHWAY

15


student spotlight

time out ram sports

Spend a few minutes with Morgan Hinton and you find yourself thinking, “One of these days I’ll pick up the paper and see that she has been appointed as a U.S. diplomat or ambassador to a foreign country.”

New baseball program: new coach for the first time since 1973. W “Having a baseball team was a require-

SSU will field a baseball team next spring

ment to join the CIAA, but beyond that, it is a great sport to add to the athletic roster,” said Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. “I believe a Rams baseball team will be good for the university’s athletic program and for the image of the university as an athletic competitor. As an avid baseball fan, I am certainly excited.” “I understand why the CIAA wanted to expand the conference’s baseball presence,” said Bill Hayes, WSSU’s athletic director. “Developing an eight-team league will definitely create more competitive play within the conference. As for WSSU, I think the local community is much more excited about baseball

in general as shown by the attendance at DASH games in Winston-Salem and Grasshopper games in Greensboro. I am hopeful that the growing interest in baseball will create support for our team as well.” WSSU has hired Kevin Ritsche as interim, part-time head coach in an effort to move the baseball program forward. Ritsche has been an assistant professor in exercise science at the university since 2006. He was team captain and later a graduate assistant for the varsity baseball team at The College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, Minn., where he earned his graduate and undergraduate degrees in exercise physiology. He was also a two-time Academic All-American and selected for the Midwest

Baseball All-Region First Team in 2004. The CIAA now requires that schools entering the conference have a baseball program. With the addition of Chowan University, Lincoln University and now WSSU, eight of the 13 CIAA schools will have baseball teams next spring.

Thanks to an exceptional combination of enthusiasm and initiative, plus solid support from WSSU, her training is well underway.

Her world knows

Homecoming Football • October 23 at 1:30 p.m. • WSSU vs. UNC Pembroke

W

2010 WSSU Return to Glory Homecoming Golf Tournament October 22, 9:00 a.m. • Winston Lake Golf Course Come enjoy the chance to win great prizes with the Captain’s Choice “3 Flight Format”! Please call Robert Bethea at 336-750-8745 or the WSSU Department of Athletics if there are questions or if special arrangements are needed: 336-750-2141 For hotel information, log onto the WSSU Athletics Department Travel Center at wssurams.com. For information on sponsorship opportunities, call WSSU Department of Athletics at 336-750-2141.

Note: WSSU has determined that $25 of your entry fee is tax deductible. Consult with your tax advisor.

16

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hile some students took a needed break during the summer, Morgan Hinton traveled halfway around the world and back on a mission trip ... spent time in Washington, D.C. as part of an internationally focused fellowship … then prepared to head overseas again for the fall semester. She loved every minute of it. “I’ve always loved the idea of being able to travel,” says Hinton, a junior Political Science major from Raleigh, N.C. “When I came to WSSU as a freshman, the very first day or two a friend told me I should go by the Office of International Programs. I followed her advice and spent time talking with Ms. Deana Brim, and that quickly became one of my favorite spots on campus.” With encouragement from Brim and others, Hinton joined the Ralph Bunche Society and found herself increasingly focused on the prospect of international travel. She also found herself surrounded by support as she began seeking out opportunities to go abroad. “It’s easy to think, why even dream about something like international travel when you know you can’t afford it,” she points out. “But there are so many sources of funding through grants, scholarships and fellowships. We’re fortunate at WSSU to have caring faculty and staff, who will help you find those sources and apply for them. Yes, applications take

no boundaries

work—and nobody loves all that paperwork— but the results can be amazing.” Hinton, a Chancellor’s Scholar with a 3.9 GPA, speaks from experience. Along with fellow WSSU student Yolanda Paylor, she began her summer in South Africa for the Mission of Good Hope through Wake Forest University. “It was a great time to be there, right before the World Cup, when there was such a spirit of national pride. We worked at an elementary school in a small town about an hour and a half from Durban. The children were so polite and bright and appreciative. I loved working with them, and we also painted the school while we were there.” Once she returned to the U.S., Hinton headed to Washington, D.C. to participate in the United Negro College Fund Institute for International Public Policy (IIPP) as part of a six-year fellowship she was awarded with a recommendation from Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. The IIPP fellowship is designed to groom minority students for international careers. Graduate school is a requirement, with funding assistance provided; one summer will be spent at Middlebury Language Institute in Vermont. In September Hinton left for a semester of study in Istanbul, Turkey. “Typically students

choose a location in Western Europe or Africa. I wanted to do something different. Dr. Joti Sekhon, director of WSSU’s Office of International Programs, has been working to establish a relationship with a university in Turkey, and that appealed to me. Again, I was able to get the funding I needed, including a $4,500 federal Gilman Scholarship. “Part of the requirements of the scholarship is a follow-on project—I had to promise to come back and encourage other students to travel, and make them aware of the Gilman Scholarship. That part will be easy—I’ve been able to do what I’m doing because of great support from WSSU, my family and others, and I love being a source of support and encouragement to others.” Phelps Stokes Ralph Bunche Societies are extracurricular undergraduate student-led associations dedicated to developing global citizens, regardless of their field of study, through an emphasis on scholarly excellence, language proficiency and cultural awareness, community service and activism, leadership and professional development, and the life work, legacy, and values of Dr. Ralph J. Bunche.

ARCHWAY

17


student spotlight

time out ram sports

Spend a few minutes with Morgan Hinton and you find yourself thinking, “One of these days I’ll pick up the paper and see that she has been appointed as a U.S. diplomat or ambassador to a foreign country.”

New baseball program: new coach for the first time since 1973. W “Having a baseball team was a require-

SSU will field a baseball team next spring

ment to join the CIAA, but beyond that, it is a great sport to add to the athletic roster,” said Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. “I believe a Rams baseball team will be good for the university’s athletic program and for the image of the university as an athletic competitor. As an avid baseball fan, I am certainly excited.” “I understand why the CIAA wanted to expand the conference’s baseball presence,” said Bill Hayes, WSSU’s athletic director. “Developing an eight-team league will definitely create more competitive play within the conference. As for WSSU, I think the local community is much more excited about baseball

in general as shown by the attendance at DASH games in Winston-Salem and Grasshopper games in Greensboro. I am hopeful that the growing interest in baseball will create support for our team as well.” WSSU has hired Kevin Ritsche as interim, part-time head coach in an effort to move the baseball program forward. Ritsche has been an assistant professor in exercise science at the university since 2006. He was team captain and later a graduate assistant for the varsity baseball team at The College of St. Scholastica in Duluth, Minn., where he earned his graduate and undergraduate degrees in exercise physiology. He was also a two-time Academic All-American and selected for the Midwest

Baseball All-Region First Team in 2004. The CIAA now requires that schools entering the conference have a baseball program. With the addition of Chowan University, Lincoln University and now WSSU, eight of the 13 CIAA schools will have baseball teams next spring.

Thanks to an exceptional combination of enthusiasm and initiative, plus solid support from WSSU, her training is well underway.

Her world knows

Homecoming Football • October 23 at 1:30 p.m. • WSSU vs. UNC Pembroke

W

2010 WSSU Return to Glory Homecoming Golf Tournament October 22, 9:00 a.m. • Winston Lake Golf Course Come enjoy the chance to win great prizes with the Captain’s Choice “3 Flight Format”! Please call Robert Bethea at 336-750-8745 or the WSSU Department of Athletics if there are questions or if special arrangements are needed: 336-750-2141 For hotel information, log onto the WSSU Athletics Department Travel Center at wssurams.com. For information on sponsorship opportunities, call WSSU Department of Athletics at 336-750-2141.

Note: WSSU has determined that $25 of your entry fee is tax deductible. Consult with your tax advisor.

16

FAL L 2 0 1 0

hile some students took a needed break during the summer, Morgan Hinton traveled halfway around the world and back on a mission trip ... spent time in Washington, D.C. as part of an internationally focused fellowship … then prepared to head overseas again for the fall semester. She loved every minute of it. “I’ve always loved the idea of being able to travel,” says Hinton, a junior Political Science major from Raleigh, N.C. “When I came to WSSU as a freshman, the very first day or two a friend told me I should go by the Office of International Programs. I followed her advice and spent time talking with Ms. Deana Brim, and that quickly became one of my favorite spots on campus.” With encouragement from Brim and others, Hinton joined the Ralph Bunche Society and found herself increasingly focused on the prospect of international travel. She also found herself surrounded by support as she began seeking out opportunities to go abroad. “It’s easy to think, why even dream about something like international travel when you know you can’t afford it,” she points out. “But there are so many sources of funding through grants, scholarships and fellowships. We’re fortunate at WSSU to have caring faculty and staff, who will help you find those sources and apply for them. Yes, applications take

no boundaries

work—and nobody loves all that paperwork— but the results can be amazing.” Hinton, a Chancellor’s Scholar with a 3.9 GPA, speaks from experience. Along with fellow WSSU student Yolanda Paylor, she began her summer in South Africa for the Mission of Good Hope through Wake Forest University. “It was a great time to be there, right before the World Cup, when there was such a spirit of national pride. We worked at an elementary school in a small town about an hour and a half from Durban. The children were so polite and bright and appreciative. I loved working with them, and we also painted the school while we were there.” Once she returned to the U.S., Hinton headed to Washington, D.C. to participate in the United Negro College Fund Institute for International Public Policy (IIPP) as part of a six-year fellowship she was awarded with a recommendation from Chancellor Donald J. Reaves. The IIPP fellowship is designed to groom minority students for international careers. Graduate school is a requirement, with funding assistance provided; one summer will be spent at Middlebury Language Institute in Vermont. In September Hinton left for a semester of study in Istanbul, Turkey. “Typically students

choose a location in Western Europe or Africa. I wanted to do something different. Dr. Joti Sekhon, director of WSSU’s Office of International Programs, has been working to establish a relationship with a university in Turkey, and that appealed to me. Again, I was able to get the funding I needed, including a $4,500 federal Gilman Scholarship. “Part of the requirements of the scholarship is a follow-on project—I had to promise to come back and encourage other students to travel, and make them aware of the Gilman Scholarship. That part will be easy—I’ve been able to do what I’m doing because of great support from WSSU, my family and others, and I love being a source of support and encouragement to others.” Phelps Stokes Ralph Bunche Societies are extracurricular undergraduate student-led associations dedicated to developing global citizens, regardless of their field of study, through an emphasis on scholarly excellence, language proficiency and cultural awareness, community service and activism, leadership and professional development, and the life work, legacy, and values of Dr. Ralph J. Bunche.

ARCHWAY

17


class notes

alumni class notes

’60s ’63 Dr. Larry Womble received a high honor of Doctorate of Humane Letters from WinstonSalem State University and a second Doctorate of Humane Letters from Kenya’s Great Lake University this year.

’70s ’73 Mrs. Charlotte Staley Feaster retired from the Randolph County School System after 37 years of service. Feaster retired as an Assistant Principal in Elementary Education.

’80s ’80 Ms. Annetter Sipe, during her career, has been voted Teacher of the Year by her colleagues at Eastern Elementary School, Beaufort County Schools Teacher of the Year for the 2009-2010 school year, was named the runner-up for Northeast Region Teacher of the Year, and was honored at Elizabeth City State University’s Teachers of the Year at an American Education Week program and luncheon.

’00s ’87 Mr. Kevin Walton, as the Chief Procurement Officer, has once again led DeKalb County Purchasing and Contracting to its fifth Achievement of Excellence in Procurement Award. The award is earned by those organizations that demonstrate excellence by obtaining a high score based on standardized criteria.The criteria are designed to measure innovation, professionalism, productivity, e-procurement, and leadership attributes of the procurement organization.

’90s ’91 Mrs. Terri Erickson’s new poetry collection, Telling Tales of Dusk, was #8 in the country in Amazon sales for poetry books. Erickson holds a double major in English and Mass Communications from WSSU.

’06 Mr. Tim Pulliam has been selected to be a News Reporter at WIS News 10 in Columbia, S.C. Pulliam was previously a Reporter/Producer for WECT News in Wilmington, N.C.

Personal:

Please return this form and a photograph to:

Name: __________________________________________________________ Occupation: _____________________________________________________

Winston-Salem State University Alumni Relations Alumni House Fax: 336-750-3134 Winston-Salem, NC 27110 Email: alumnirelations@wssu.edu Yes, I allow WSSU to use my profile and my image.

Marital Status: ________________________ Children: __________________

Graduation Class: ________________

Name at Graduation: ______________________________________________

This is a new address.

Degree(s):

Current Place of Residence: ________________________________________

BA

BS

Master

Major: ________________________________________

City: ____________________________ State: _________ Zip: ____________

Yes, I have been receiving alumni correspondence.

Home Phone: __________________ Business Phone: __________________

No, I do not now receive alumni correspondence.

Email Address: ___________________________________________________

I made a contribution to the WSSU Annual Fund in the past year. Community Service / Charitable Activities / Hobbies: __________________________________________________________________________________________

Professional: 1. Please give us a brief summary of your work from graduation to the present. ______________________________________________________________

Tell Us About It

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

We want to know what’s new in your life. Have you recently gotten married, had children, accepted a new job, published a book, won an award? Tell us—we love hearing from our alumni family and we want to share the news with your peers. Write to alumnirelations@wssu.edu or snipesc@wssu.edu or use the form on page 19.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. What is your current position (title and name of company)? ____________________________________________________________________________ 3. What are your responsibilities/day-to-day activities in this position? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. What do you like most about your current job? _______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. Please list any professional organizations and associations of which you are a member: ____________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 6. Please list any honors or recognition you have received in your career: __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. What has been the proudest moment in your career so far? _____________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

In Memoriam Mrs. Hattie Scales Brown, ’37 Mrs. Brenda Stokes Rogers Jennings Ms. Linda Faye Allen Mrs. Arlethia Harris Thompson, ’54 Mr. Quinton Tyrone Drummond Ms. Edith P. Parish Mrs. Willie Mae Gray Ms. Deborah B. Singletary Mr. Turner A. Douthit, Sr., ’68 Mr. George E. Lyne, Jr. Ms. Donna L. McCullough, ’08 Mrs. Zenaida Enal Reavis, ’09 Mrs. Eulalia Hall Peterson, ’50 Mrs. Sophronia Graves Southerland, ’36 Mr. James Dixon Williams, ’43 Ms. Marian LaDennia Smith

18

FA L L 2 0 1 0

WSSU: August 30, March 13, April 26, May 1, May 10, May 10, May 17, May 17, May 23, May 25, June 14, June 22, July 1, July 1, July 4, July 14,

2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

Captain Kerry L. Hathcock Mrs. Margaret H. Smith Mr. Bennie Monroe McBride, ’10 Sandra Hagans Butler Miss Johnnea LaCole Coleman Ms. Connie Sue Taylor, ’80 Mrs. Martha Grimes Holland, ’48 Mr. Franklin W. Torrence Ms. Evelyn L. Wagner Ms. Cora Rhodes Brown Mr. Tony C. Davis Mrs. Lorrain Rousseau Rorie Ms. Jessie Maye Herron, ’57 Mrs. Mildred Thornton Payne, ’54 Mr. Willis Johnson, ’53

July 15, July 15, July 17, July 23, July 24, July 25, July 28, August 3, August 10, August 11, August 16, August 16, August 20, August 21, August 22,

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

1. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities (athletics, fraternities, sororities, clubs, etc.) while you were at WSSU? (Please list) _____________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. What advantages did WSSU give you that have helped advance your career? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. Would you sum up in two or three sentences what your time at WSSU meant to you? ________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Do you have a philosophy by which you live your life? ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. My news for Class Notes: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ To access this form online, g o to w w w.w ssu. edu/c la ssnotes Return this form and y ou w ill be entered into a dr a wing for a free i- pod. ARCHWAY

19


class notes

alumni class notes

’60s ’63 Dr. Larry Womble received a high honor of Doctorate of Humane Letters from WinstonSalem State University and a second Doctorate of Humane Letters from Kenya’s Great Lake University this year.

’70s ’73 Mrs. Charlotte Staley Feaster retired from the Randolph County School System after 37 years of service. Feaster retired as an Assistant Principal in Elementary Education.

’80s ’80 Ms. Annetter Sipe, during her career, has been voted Teacher of the Year by her colleagues at Eastern Elementary School, Beaufort County Schools Teacher of the Year for the 2009-2010 school year, was named the runner-up for Northeast Region Teacher of the Year, and was honored at Elizabeth City State University’s Teachers of the Year at an American Education Week program and luncheon.

’00s ’87 Mr. Kevin Walton, as the Chief Procurement Officer, has once again led DeKalb County Purchasing and Contracting to its fifth Achievement of Excellence in Procurement Award. The award is earned by those organizations that demonstrate excellence by obtaining a high score based on standardized criteria.The criteria are designed to measure innovation, professionalism, productivity, e-procurement, and leadership attributes of the procurement organization.

’90s ’91 Mrs. Terri Erickson’s new poetry collection, Telling Tales of Dusk, was #8 in the country in Amazon sales for poetry books. Erickson holds a double major in English and Mass Communications from WSSU.

’06 Mr. Tim Pulliam has been selected to be a News Reporter at WIS News 10 in Columbia, S.C. Pulliam was previously a Reporter/Producer for WECT News in Wilmington, N.C.

Personal:

Please return this form and a photograph to:

Name: __________________________________________________________ Occupation: _____________________________________________________

Winston-Salem State University Alumni Relations Alumni House Fax: 336-750-3134 Winston-Salem, NC 27110 Email: alumnirelations@wssu.edu Yes, I allow WSSU to use my profile and my image.

Marital Status: ________________________ Children: __________________

Graduation Class: ________________

Name at Graduation: ______________________________________________

This is a new address.

Degree(s):

Current Place of Residence: ________________________________________

BA

BS

Master

Major: ________________________________________

City: ____________________________ State: _________ Zip: ____________

Yes, I have been receiving alumni correspondence.

Home Phone: __________________ Business Phone: __________________

No, I do not now receive alumni correspondence.

Email Address: ___________________________________________________

I made a contribution to the WSSU Annual Fund in the past year. Community Service / Charitable Activities / Hobbies: __________________________________________________________________________________________

Professional: 1. Please give us a brief summary of your work from graduation to the present. ______________________________________________________________

Tell Us About It

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

We want to know what’s new in your life. Have you recently gotten married, had children, accepted a new job, published a book, won an award? Tell us—we love hearing from our alumni family and we want to share the news with your peers. Write to alumnirelations@wssu.edu or snipesc@wssu.edu or use the form on page 19.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

2. What is your current position (title and name of company)? ____________________________________________________________________________ 3. What are your responsibilities/day-to-day activities in this position? ______________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. What do you like most about your current job? _______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. Please list any professional organizations and associations of which you are a member: ____________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 6. Please list any honors or recognition you have received in your career: __________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 7. What has been the proudest moment in your career so far? _____________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

In Memoriam Mrs. Hattie Scales Brown, ’37 Mrs. Brenda Stokes Rogers Jennings Ms. Linda Faye Allen Mrs. Arlethia Harris Thompson, ’54 Mr. Quinton Tyrone Drummond Ms. Edith P. Parish Mrs. Willie Mae Gray Ms. Deborah B. Singletary Mr. Turner A. Douthit, Sr., ’68 Mr. George E. Lyne, Jr. Ms. Donna L. McCullough, ’08 Mrs. Zenaida Enal Reavis, ’09 Mrs. Eulalia Hall Peterson, ’50 Mrs. Sophronia Graves Southerland, ’36 Mr. James Dixon Williams, ’43 Ms. Marian LaDennia Smith

18

FA L L 2 0 1 0

WSSU: August 30, March 13, April 26, May 1, May 10, May 10, May 17, May 17, May 23, May 25, June 14, June 22, July 1, July 1, July 4, July 14,

2009 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

Captain Kerry L. Hathcock Mrs. Margaret H. Smith Mr. Bennie Monroe McBride, ’10 Sandra Hagans Butler Miss Johnnea LaCole Coleman Ms. Connie Sue Taylor, ’80 Mrs. Martha Grimes Holland, ’48 Mr. Franklin W. Torrence Ms. Evelyn L. Wagner Ms. Cora Rhodes Brown Mr. Tony C. Davis Mrs. Lorrain Rousseau Rorie Ms. Jessie Maye Herron, ’57 Mrs. Mildred Thornton Payne, ’54 Mr. Willis Johnson, ’53

July 15, July 15, July 17, July 23, July 24, July 25, July 28, August 3, August 10, August 11, August 16, August 16, August 20, August 21, August 22,

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010

1. Were you involved in any extracurricular activities (athletics, fraternities, sororities, clubs, etc.) while you were at WSSU? (Please list) _____________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. What advantages did WSSU give you that have helped advance your career? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 3. Would you sum up in two or three sentences what your time at WSSU meant to you? ________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 4. Do you have a philosophy by which you live your life? ________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ 5. My news for Class Notes: _________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________ To access this form online, g o to w w w.w ssu. edu/c la ssnotes Return this form and y ou w ill be entered into a dr a wing for a free i- pod. ARCHWAY

19


alumni news

came to WSSU as a freshman in 1956,” says Cleveland, “and played football my first year. Got cut from the team as a sophomore. Turns out that “I was one of the best things that could have happened to me. I focused on aca-

Message from the President, WSSU National Alumni Association Dear Fellow Alumni, Thank you for electing me to serve as your President of the National Alumni Association. The legacy we inherited from our beloved founder Simon Green Atkins is alive and well. WSSU remains one of the top comprehensive public universities in America. Our students remain competitive as they continue to matriculate at the finest graduate and professional schools in America, and WSSU graduates continue to work in all facets of the private, public and non-governmental sector. Most importantly, I am proud the “Rams” carry on the legacy of our visionary founder by opening doors for those less fortunate and becoming pillars in our respective communities. Each of us is proud to be a “Ram,” and our days at WSSU remain the most influential period in our lives. As the alumni, we have an obligation to support WSSU. The 2010-2015 strategic plan contains five goals. They are: Academic Excellence; Student Success; Community Engagement; Efficiency, Effectiveness and Resources; and University Culture and Pride. I encourage all alumni to read the WSSU Strategic Plan and determine how you can best support the Strategic Plan. Homecoming 2010 (October 17-24) will be here soon. I look forward to welcoming you home to “A Ramatizing Experience.” Our Special Events Committee has planned a great 2010 Homecoming. A highlight takes place Thursday morning as the alumni “Return to Serve” by visiting with hundreds of students and faculty in their classrooms and lecture halls. The Mr. & Miss Alumni Crowning and Scholarship Gala are scheduled for Friday, October 22, at the Millennium Center in downtown WinstonSalem. The evening will commence at 7:00 p.m. with the Hall of Distinction Induction and Reception. This event will be held in the Courtroom of the Millennium Center. The Mr. & Miss Alumni crowning ceremony will begin at 8:00 p.m. sharp. It will be held in the Ballroom of the Millennium Center. Following the crowning will be the Gala; you will be royally entertained by “Envision.” The evening will climax and the morning will begin with a bountiful buffet breakfast. On Saturday evening the Alumni Victory Extravaganza will take place at the Millennium Center at 9:00 p.m. There will be four different venues to choose from under one roof: R&B, Jazz, Hip Hop, and Vegas Night. I am sure many old friendships will be renewed and new ones created on this night. On Sunday morning, grab a classmate and return to your favorite house of worship that you attended while at WSSU. I look forward to seeing you receive your “Ramatizing Experience.”

Gordon G. Everett

Gordon

National President Class of 1978

2010 Class Reunions Class Year

20

Contacts

Class Year

1950 60

Mr. Nathaniel Hayes 336-475-2896

1975 35

Catherine Lowe clowe@wsfcs.k12.nc.us

1955

55

Mrs. Alice Dalton-McNeill adhmcneil@aol.com

Trudy Smart 336-682-8111, trudysta@att.net

1958 52

Mrs. Theresa Snuggs 301-773-9127

1980 30

Craig Umsted craigumst1@yahoo.com

1960

50

Ms. Barbara Manning 336-750-2122, rams75737@triad.rr.com

1985

1970 40

Tonya Talley-Smith tebunnie15@aol.com

25

Jacqueline Gary, Regina McQuaig Huntley, Denis Wilson (President) sweetoumy@yahoo.com

1990 20

Daphne E. Huntley daphne.huntley@wachovia.com duckhuntley@yahoo.com

Melanie Ford my_ford@verizon.net

FAL L 2 0 1 0

Anniversary

Anniversary

Contacts

demics and graduated after 3½ years with a degree in elementary education.” In the classroom he found his calling: helping young people benefit from education. Bit by bit, he added to his own education, earning advanced degrees in education and school administration, advancing from teacher to principal to assistant superintendent to superintendent. Always hard-working, for a period of years he added to his income by operating a newspaper delivery business with 35 paper boys who saw him as a mentor and teacher of money management as much as a boss. At every stage in his career, his high standards and his commitment to his students earned the respect of his peers, even during the precedent-setting era of school integration. “In 1971, I was appointed principal of an elementary school in Eden, and this was my first experience working in an integrated educational setting,” he notes. “Instead of expecting negative reaction, I decided to be positive and proactive. I told the parents—white and black alike—to give me until Christmas to work with the students and then if they had any questions or concerns, come to me.” The semester—and the year—went by smoothly. Cleveland retired in 1995 to take care of his wife, who died later that year. After her death he focused on an assortment of long-delayed hobbies and interests, ranging from fresh-water fishing to traveling to faithfully following WSSU athletics. He and Marlene married in 2000 and, in her, he found a fellow traveler and fellow believer in the importance of education. “I was only able to go to community college a couple of years,” she points out. “I started out as a school secretary and advanced over the years to bookkeeping responsibilities and ultimately was promoted to secretary to the superintendent of Eden City Schools—one of only four blacks in North Carolina to hold that position at the time.” Widowed at an early age, she was a personnel specialist in the Rockingham County Schools when she retired in 1997. “We’re blessed,” she says of the blended family she and Cleveland share, each with two children and a total of six grandchildren. “Neither of us ever made a big salary. We’re just hard-working folks who lived within our budget and built up our savings over the years. Our children have been able to go to college—Cleveland’s daughter has her M.D. in psychiatry and his son has an MBA and works in New York; my daughters are both WSSU graduates. I’m really pleased that we made the decision to set up this endowment. Through it, we’ll be helping students who don’t have the resources or family support we had.” “WSSU equipped me to go out and make a living and be successful,” says Cleveland. “And now they’ve made it easy to give back, since they have the legal staff and provide professional management and investment of the funds. We set our endowment up so we can contribute to it annually. It means a lot to know we’ll be helping young people from our part of the state get an education—and hopefully become educators themselves—even after we’re gone.”

The Cleveland and Marlene Ellison Endowed Scholarship

S

ome people let the circumstances of life control them. Others find ways to turn obstacles into opportunities and quietly proceed to achieve solid success. Cleveland and Marlene Ellison fit squarely into that second category. And WSSU is the beneficiary of their upbeat, can-do approach to life.

SUPPORT FUTURE RAMS... ENDOW A SCHOLARSHIP

Has being a WSSU Ram helped prepare you for success? Now you can pave the way for promising young people who simply can’t afford to attend without financial support. WSSU will work with you to set up a scholarship that meets your goals and impacts lives for years to come.

For more information contact Michelle Cook, cookm@wssu.edu, 336-750-2184 ARCHWAY

21


alumni news

came to WSSU as a freshman in 1956,” says Cleveland, “and played football my first year. Got cut from the team as a sophomore. Turns out that “I was one of the best things that could have happened to me. I focused on aca-

Message from the President, WSSU National Alumni Association Dear Fellow Alumni, Thank you for electing me to serve as your President of the National Alumni Association. The legacy we inherited from our beloved founder Simon Green Atkins is alive and well. WSSU remains one of the top comprehensive public universities in America. Our students remain competitive as they continue to matriculate at the finest graduate and professional schools in America, and WSSU graduates continue to work in all facets of the private, public and non-governmental sector. Most importantly, I am proud the “Rams” carry on the legacy of our visionary founder by opening doors for those less fortunate and becoming pillars in our respective communities. Each of us is proud to be a “Ram,” and our days at WSSU remain the most influential period in our lives. As the alumni, we have an obligation to support WSSU. The 2010-2015 strategic plan contains five goals. They are: Academic Excellence; Student Success; Community Engagement; Efficiency, Effectiveness and Resources; and University Culture and Pride. I encourage all alumni to read the WSSU Strategic Plan and determine how you can best support the Strategic Plan. Homecoming 2010 (October 17-24) will be here soon. I look forward to welcoming you home to “A Ramatizing Experience.” Our Special Events Committee has planned a great 2010 Homecoming. A highlight takes place Thursday morning as the alumni “Return to Serve” by visiting with hundreds of students and faculty in their classrooms and lecture halls. The Mr. & Miss Alumni Crowning and Scholarship Gala are scheduled for Friday, October 22, at the Millennium Center in downtown WinstonSalem. The evening will commence at 7:00 p.m. with the Hall of Distinction Induction and Reception. This event will be held in the Courtroom of the Millennium Center. The Mr. & Miss Alumni crowning ceremony will begin at 8:00 p.m. sharp. It will be held in the Ballroom of the Millennium Center. Following the crowning will be the Gala; you will be royally entertained by “Envision.” The evening will climax and the morning will begin with a bountiful buffet breakfast. On Saturday evening the Alumni Victory Extravaganza will take place at the Millennium Center at 9:00 p.m. There will be four different venues to choose from under one roof: R&B, Jazz, Hip Hop, and Vegas Night. I am sure many old friendships will be renewed and new ones created on this night. On Sunday morning, grab a classmate and return to your favorite house of worship that you attended while at WSSU. I look forward to seeing you receive your “Ramatizing Experience.”

Gordon G. Everett

Gordon

National President Class of 1978

2010 Class Reunions Class Year

20

Contacts

Class Year

1950 60

Mr. Nathaniel Hayes 336-475-2896

1975 35

Catherine Lowe clowe@wsfcs.k12.nc.us

1955

55

Mrs. Alice Dalton-McNeill adhmcneil@aol.com

Trudy Smart 336-682-8111, trudysta@att.net

1958 52

Mrs. Theresa Snuggs 301-773-9127

1980 30

Craig Umsted craigumst1@yahoo.com

1960

50

Ms. Barbara Manning 336-750-2122, rams75737@triad.rr.com

1985

1970 40

Tonya Talley-Smith tebunnie15@aol.com

25

Jacqueline Gary, Regina McQuaig Huntley, Denis Wilson (President) sweetoumy@yahoo.com

1990 20

Daphne E. Huntley daphne.huntley@wachovia.com duckhuntley@yahoo.com

Melanie Ford my_ford@verizon.net

FAL L 2 0 1 0

Anniversary

Anniversary

Contacts

demics and graduated after 3½ years with a degree in elementary education.” In the classroom he found his calling: helping young people benefit from education. Bit by bit, he added to his own education, earning advanced degrees in education and school administration, advancing from teacher to principal to assistant superintendent to superintendent. Always hard-working, for a period of years he added to his income by operating a newspaper delivery business with 35 paper boys who saw him as a mentor and teacher of money management as much as a boss. At every stage in his career, his high standards and his commitment to his students earned the respect of his peers, even during the precedent-setting era of school integration. “In 1971, I was appointed principal of an elementary school in Eden, and this was my first experience working in an integrated educational setting,” he notes. “Instead of expecting negative reaction, I decided to be positive and proactive. I told the parents—white and black alike—to give me until Christmas to work with the students and then if they had any questions or concerns, come to me.” The semester—and the year—went by smoothly. Cleveland retired in 1995 to take care of his wife, who died later that year. After her death he focused on an assortment of long-delayed hobbies and interests, ranging from fresh-water fishing to traveling to faithfully following WSSU athletics. He and Marlene married in 2000 and, in her, he found a fellow traveler and fellow believer in the importance of education. “I was only able to go to community college a couple of years,” she points out. “I started out as a school secretary and advanced over the years to bookkeeping responsibilities and ultimately was promoted to secretary to the superintendent of Eden City Schools—one of only four blacks in North Carolina to hold that position at the time.” Widowed at an early age, she was a personnel specialist in the Rockingham County Schools when she retired in 1997. “We’re blessed,” she says of the blended family she and Cleveland share, each with two children and a total of six grandchildren. “Neither of us ever made a big salary. We’re just hard-working folks who lived within our budget and built up our savings over the years. Our children have been able to go to college—Cleveland’s daughter has her M.D. in psychiatry and his son has an MBA and works in New York; my daughters are both WSSU graduates. I’m really pleased that we made the decision to set up this endowment. Through it, we’ll be helping students who don’t have the resources or family support we had.” “WSSU equipped me to go out and make a living and be successful,” says Cleveland. “And now they’ve made it easy to give back, since they have the legal staff and provide professional management and investment of the funds. We set our endowment up so we can contribute to it annually. It means a lot to know we’ll be helping young people from our part of the state get an education—and hopefully become educators themselves—even after we’re gone.”

The Cleveland and Marlene Ellison Endowed Scholarship

S

ome people let the circumstances of life control them. Others find ways to turn obstacles into opportunities and quietly proceed to achieve solid success. Cleveland and Marlene Ellison fit squarely into that second category. And WSSU is the beneficiary of their upbeat, can-do approach to life.

SUPPORT FUTURE RAMS... ENDOW A SCHOLARSHIP

Has being a WSSU Ram helped prepare you for success? Now you can pave the way for promising young people who simply can’t afford to attend without financial support. WSSU will work with you to set up a scholarship that meets your goals and impacts lives for years to come.

For more information contact Michelle Cook, cookm@wssu.edu, 336-750-2184 ARCHWAY

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Now you can show your WSSU school pride 24/7 by purchasing a collegiate insignia license plate from your local DMV. For North Carolina residents, simply go to www.wssu.edu, scroll over Alumni and Friends, click on Alumni Information, then Collegiate License Plate. The link will take you straight to the DMV site where you can click on Specialized License Plates. Just follow the instructions from that point. Go, Rams!


Archway Fall 2010