Page 1

NEWINGTON

Town Crier

JUST A SAMPLE OF THE GREAT DEALS IN OUR AD IN TODAY’S PAPER CHECK US OUT!

Open Mon.- Sat. 8 Am-6 Pm • Open Sun. 8 - 1

437 New Britain Ave., Newington 860-667-1454

MEAT DEALS!

1.89 $ 6.99 $ 3.49 $ 2.99

BONELESS PORK BUTT $ ROAST SUPER! RIB EYE STEAK OR WOW! STRIP STEAK

BEEF CUTLETS OR EASY! STEW BEEF GROUND SIRLOIN OR MEAT LOAF DEAL! MIX

LB

LB

LB

LB

Go to page 04 for more super deals!

local

sports

Newington woman turns 102 years old

SAVE CEDAR MOUNTAIN !

Newington swims away with a win

Page 8

Page 4

Page 11

Hometown flavor By Alex Syphers Staff Writer

It is hard as a Newington resident to not have heard of Steve’s Place on 84 Market Square. Steve’s Place has been a staple of good eats in Newington since 1969, when Steve Kuzoian opened the restaurant doors for the first time, starting what would become one of Newington’s most popular restaurants. During a recent morning, Doug Kuzoian, Steve’s son and now owner of the restaurant, reflected upon the 42 years they’ve been open in the town. Walking into Steve’s Place, one is struck by a good, homey feeling. The sounds of classic rock mingle with the smells of grilled burgers and grinders that float through the air. Passing the aisles of dark green booths and stepping up to the counter you will find Doug, always hard at work preparing meals for his patrons, most of whom he knows by name. See Steve’s, Page 6

Volume 51, No. 52

local

Friday, January 21, 2011

Douglas Kuzoian,left, owner of Steve’s Place on 84 Market Square, and his staff stop their busy day making grinders and hot dishes to pose for a photo. Free

Alex Syphers

After 42 years of service, Steve’s Place is still a favorite spot for Newington to grab a bite to eat.


Local News

2 | Friday, January 21, 2011

Local Students Named to President’s List at Western New England College

S P RI N G F I ELD, MA — The following students have been named to the President ’s List at Western New England College for the fall semester of 2010. Students are named to the President ’s List for achieving a semester grade point average of 3.80 or higher. Kathleen A. Ciesnik, a senior majoring in electrical engineering. Jack P. Germano, a junior

major ing in i n d us t r i al engineering. Michael J. Valentine, a junior majoring in mechanical engineering. Ryan J. Dalidowitz, a senior majoring in electrical engineering. John F. Kilpatrick, a f reshman majoring in mechanical engineering. Western New England College is a private, independent, coeducational

institution founded in 1919. L ocated on an attractive 215-acre suburban campus in Springfield, Massachusetts, the College ser ves 3,700 students, inc luding 2,500 full-time u n d e r g r ad u a t e students. Undergraduate, graduate, and professional programs are offered through the College’s Schools of Arts and S ciences, Business, Engineering, and Law.

Application Ap pplication Deadline: February y 4,, 2011

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER P.O. Box 2158 188 Main St. Bristol, CT 06010

(860) 584-0501 • Fax: (860) 585-9283 e-mail: newingtontowncrier@ centralctcommunications.com

A Central Connecticut Communications LLC publication Michael E. Schroeder — Publisher Gary Curran — Classified Advertising Manager Brenda Kelley — Circulation Director

At Your Service

We welcome your phone calls — and your visits.

News Coverage If you have a story idea or questions call (860) 225-4601 ext. 359.

Sports Coverage If you have a story idea or question, call sports rporter Andy Ragali (860) 225-4601 ext. 210

To Subscribe

Preparing Your Child for a Lifetime of Learning NEW Pre K – Grade 5 Opportunity!

CREC Discovery Academy At the new CREC Discovery Academy (Pre K – Grade 5) children will discover a love of learning that will serve them the rest of their lives. Certified teachers will provide children with strong foundational knowledge in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathametics (the STEM domains). Through hands-on exploration, the curriculum will nurture scientific thinking and technology aptitude for elementary school readiness. s No tuition cost to parents s The Academy will open in a location Southwest of Hartford s Full day programs for Pre K 3 & 4 year olds and full day Kindergarten s Before Care and After Care available s Learning partnerships with Connecticut science centers and museums For more information: call CREC Magnet School Office at (860) 524-4096 or visit www.crecschools.org. Open House: To be held at the University of Hartford Magnet School, 196 Bloomfield Avenue, West Hartford, January 26, 2011, 6 p.m. To obtain an application, go to www.choiceeducation.org and click on APPLY NOW, or visit the Regional School Choice Office (RSCO) at 43 Vernon Street in Hartford between 8 a.m. and 4 p.m. The RSCO office phone number is 860-757-6188.

To subscribe or for questions about a subscription, call (860) 225-4608.

Advertising CLASSIFIED & LEGAL

To place a classified ad, call (860) 231-2444. For legal advertisements, call (860) 231-2444.

DISPLAY

If you have questions about placing a display advertisement, call Brenda Vumback, (860) 225-4601 ext. 240. Copyright 2010, Central Connecticut Communications LLC. No reproduction or reuse of material without the express written consent of the Newington Town Crier. All rights reserved. To request permission to reprint any material from this publication, write to: P.O. Box 2158, 188 Main St., Bristol, CT 06010.

The Newington Town Crier (USPS 618-380 and ISSN 07450796) is published weekly on Friday for $31 per year and $52 for out-of-state deliveries, by Central Connecticut Communications LLC, P.O. Box 2158, 188 Main St., Bristol, CT 06010. Periodical postage paid at Bristol, CT and additional mailing offices. Postmaster: Send address changes to The Newington Town Crier, P.O. Box 2158, 188 Main St., Bristol, CT, 06010-6258. Publisher’s liability for errors or omissions in advertising copy shall not exceed the cost of the space in which the error/omission occurs on the first insertion. Errors/omissions will be rectified by republication or by a credit applied to advertiser’s account; only one incorrect insertion of the same ad will be subject to republication or credit. No allowance shall be made in cases where the advertiser is at fault. Errors, typographic or otherwise, which do not materially affect the advertisement will not be adjusted. In no event shall Imprint be liable for consequential damages of any kind.


NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Friday, January 21, 2011 | 3

These doctors are on hand 24/7. Because newborns don’t make appointments.

Sometimes, a newborn baby will need expert attention, immediately. That’s why The Hospital of Central Connecticut has specialists on hand, round the clock. We know that babies come when they’re good and ready. And we’re ready, too. For a referral to one of our ob-gyns, please call 1-800-321-6244. For a free baby bib, visit www.thocc.org

Expert care. Right here. www.thocc.org/services/birthplace Our neonatologists, from left: Scott A. Weiner, M.D., and Arpana Mohnani, M.D. Missing from photo Daniel Langford, M.D.


Local News

4 | Friday, January 21, 2011

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

The destruction of Cedar Mountain town could do if the Toll Brothers decided to buy the land or develop it. The 96-acre parcel is designated as an R-20 zone, which allows for residential building on half acre plots. “There has been some activity up there — nothing official,” said Wright. “But they have not submitted any applications for that. But that property is zoned for residential halfacre lots, so if Balf decides to develop that or sell it to someone else to build houses, they are within their rights.” According to Meehan there are development limitations in the area due to the steep slopes and wetlands on the top of the mountain. The construction crews are most likely conducting preliminary testing of the area, he said. “They are probably working on some sort of concept plan — they being the Toll Brothers,” said Meehan. “They would take that concept plan and make sure that it meets the land use regulations in planning and zoning, but they haven’t shared that with us yet.” “Spring is coming,” he added, “and if they plan on doing anything it will probably be in the next couple of months.” Wright said his major concern was the preservation and extension of a 1.8-mile walking trail that runs the length of the mountain. To stop the development of the land, he said, the town would have to buy the land. “Long-term, if you look at it, there is

By Alex Syphers Staff Writer

Even though it is nestled under blankets of white and lies quiet during the long winter chill, talk about the Cedar Mountain range is starting to heat up among citizens in the towns of Newington and Wethersfield. Residents have noticed construction equipment lumbering through the woods in recent months. Gayle Raducha, one of the founders of Save Cedar Mountain, a group looking to preserve Cedar Mountain as a wildlife friendly area for all to enjoy, is one such resident. “Because I am always on Russell Road, I was noticing that there were a lot of trees being marked and then one day I went up there and there were a lot of bulldozers and backhoes,” said Raducha. Cedar Mountain became an area of hot dispute during the latter half of 2009 when the Toll Brothers, a luxury home and condominium builder, went before the Newington Town Planning and Zoning Commission to request the rezoning of 28 acres of industrial land, owned by Marcap Co., be re-designated as a residential zone for potential development. The supporters of Save Cedar Mountain were able to effectively band together to stop the re-designation of the parcel of land and put a hiatus on the development of the mountain. Yet, in recent months Raducha says she has encountered construction crews working in the woods between the Connecticut Humane Society and Cedar Crest Hospital. The 96-acre lot is owned by Balf Co., which also owns the former Tilcon quarry at the northern end of the mountain range. Both Newington Town Mayor Jeff Wright and Town Planner Ed Meehan acknowledged the activity taking place on the mountain, but said there is little the

GREAT PRICES, DELICIOUS FOOD AND QUALITY... ALL CLOSE TO HOME 011177 Italian-American Deli & Catering Mangia! "Italian Style!"

BOAR’S HEAD

MAPLE TURKEY

QUICK IN & OUT SERVICE, GREAT, FRESH FOOD!

OPEN MON.-SAT. 8 AM-6 PM OPEN SUN. 8AM - 1 PM

3.49 $ 3.99

PROVOLONE $ CHEESE MARTIN ROSOL

VEAL LOAF OR KIELBASA

LB

LB

2.99 CHOCOLATE $ CROISSANTS 2.99 HOT

HAM

$

WOW!

YUM!

LB

PKG

Jan. 12

Szymon Dola, 22, of 24 Woodbury Circle, Middletown, was charged Jan. 12 with failure to pay or plea. Joshua Costa, 18, of 801 Four Rod Road, Berlin, was charged Jan. 12 with larceny in the fifth degree and larceny in the sixth degree.

Jan. 13

Joseph D’Agostino, 51, of 415 George Washington Turnpike, Burlington, was charged Jan. 13 with breach of peace (two counts).

a significant amount of acreage up there; that is too much property for the taxpayers to buy. It would cost us a fortune,” said Wright. “I wouldn’t be surprised if we see applications for things to be developed up there. To me, to keep the trail line is the most important issue of the whole thing.” For Raducha the goal is still the same as last winter, the preservation of one of the few open spaces left in the surrounding area. “They would be destroying the one natural place in miles. It’s just a wonderful place. The wildlife is spectacular,” said Raducha, “My concern is the wildlife. It bothers me to know that these people are not going to be happy until all of Connecticut is concreted or paved over and there is not going to be anything natural left in the area.”

5.49 $ 3.49

BOAR’S HEAD CLASSIC EVER ROASTED

$

LB

CHICKEN

LB

BOAR’S HEAD ASIAGO OR HORSERADISH

CHEESE

Jan. 14

Susan Pencz, 45, of 66 Lancaster Road, West Hartford, was charged Jan. 14 with DUI, operating an unregistered motor vehicle and failure to maintain lane. Rachel Groll, 21, of 178 Buena Vista Ave., Newington, was charged Jan. 14 with forgery in the third degree and larceny in the third degree. Norberto Natal, 29, of 83 Tremont St., Hartford, was charged Jan. 14 with burglary in the third degree, larceny in the third degree and criminal mischief in the third degree. Gabriel Gonzalez, 22, of 180 Johnson St., Waterbury, was charged Jan. 14 with criminal mischief in the first degree and criminal trespass in the third degree. Jose Perez, 55, of 18 Reservoir Road, Newington, was charged with assault in the third degree.

5.49 $ 4.99 $

LB

TRY MAMA LEARES Extra Virgin Olive Oil and Balsamic Vinegar

3.49

REG. $2.49

NAPOLI CRUSHED TOMATOES 28 oz. W OW!! WOW NAPOLI PANETTONE 2 LBS.

MEAT DEALS! BONELESS PORK BUTT $ ROAST

LB

1.29 MOTHER 3.99 $ GOOSE SCLAFANI RED CAN $ OLIVE OIL - 3 LITERS WOW! 11.99 LIVERWURST SCLAFANI $ BUY ONE NAPOLI WINE VINEGAR - 32 oz. 1.49 GET ONE FETTUCCINE BICECCIO EGG $ NEST NOODLES FREE NOODLES - FETTUCCINE 2.49

437 NEW BRITAIN AVE., NEWINGTON 860-667-1454 CARANDO

Maria Pryzmont, 59, of 107 Martin Luther King Drive, New Britain, was charged Jan. 11 with larceny in the sixth degree. Jesse Cohen, 34, of 48 Plum Tree Lane, Plainville, was charged Jan. 11 with larceny in the sixth degree. Richard Langer, 39, 481 Windham Road, Willimantic, was charged Jan. 11 with improper number of headlights. Omayra Curet, 32, of 60 Springdale Ave., Meriden, was charged Jan. 11 with possession of narcotics. and violation of probation (three counts).

AMERICAN CHEESE WOW!

Joseph A. Lenares • Joseph S. Lenares • David J. Lenares

Newington Police report the following: Jan. 11

BOAR’S HEAD OR LAND O’ LAKES

Sale good to 1/23/11

police blotter

$

$

LB

PKG.

1.89 $ 6.99 $ 3.49 $ 2.99

SUPER!

RIB EYE STEAK OR WOW! STRIP STEAK BEEF CUTLETS OR EASY! STEW BEEF GROUND SIRLOIN OR MEAT LOAF DEAL! MIX

LB

LB

LB

LB


Friday, January 21, 2011 | 5

Local News

Seremet found guilty

Seremet’s arrest. He was charged with first-degree larceny and 40 counts of second-degree forgery. Seremet was required to pay back the $118,711 he had embezzled along with an additional $20,000 for damages done to the Newington Volunteer Ambulance Corps. Since his arrest all the money has been returned. “I think Mr. Seremet just wants people to know that he is genuinely sorry for what he did,” said Seremet’s Attorney Andrew Urbanowicz of Enfield. Seremet was a long-time volunteer of the Newington Ambulance Corps., including serving for over 15 years on the Ambulance Corps Board of Directors. The Newington Volunteer Ambulance Corps is a nonprofit organization; the corps relies on donations and billing the insurance companies of people that require its medical service to fund in its operating budget of $500,000 a year. The organization does not receive any money from the town. Fredrick Seremet could not be reached for comment. The Newington Volunteer Ambulance Corps did not respond to phones calls.

By Alex Syphers Staff Writer

Former Treasurer of the Newington Volunteer Ambulance Corps, Fredrick Seremet, 59, was found guilty of first-degree larceny Thursday, Jan. 13, at the New Britain Superior Court for the embezzlement of $118,711, from the Ambulance Corps over the course of three years. Seremet pled guilty to the larceny charge and was convicted, he was found not guilty on the 40 counts of forgery. He was sentenced to five years probation, including nine months house arrest, in addition to a 20-year suspended jail sentence. If Seremet is convict of another crime during his five-year probationary period, the court reserves the right to revoke the suspended sentence and incarcerate him for up to 20 years. On Feb. 3, 2010, Seremet was accused of embezzling money from the non-profit organization after Ambulance Corps Board Directors noticed irregularities in expense reports. The board hired an auditor to review the budget. After reviewing the audit findings, the board filed a warrant for

pets of the week @ the humane society

Barney is an 8-year-old beagle mix. He enjoys the “simple” things in life, like stopping to smell the flowers and snoozing in the shade. He is very mellow and relaxed. Barney has a great personality. He wants his forever home to be quiet and peaceful with adults. If Barney sounds like a perfect addition to your family, than he would love to meet you at the Connecticut Humane Society in Newington.

S ES T T EN RA D D R SI E C FO RE U N D E O R T G IN W E N

Small classes, more attention – more than a middle school

Please join us at our

Open Morning Tuesday, January 25, 9-11 am Kindly RSVP 860.223.6428 or online at www.mooreland.org

Saturday, February 5 Ask about the

Headmaster’s Award For Young Scholars

A home for your golf...

*New members only or previous members who resigned before 2006

Indian Indian Hill Hill Country Country Club Club

Mooreland Hill School is an independent, co-educational day school serving central Connecticut students in grades 4-9.

111 Golf Street, Newington, CT 860-665-7817 010428

Mooreland Hill admits students of every race, color, creed, ethnic & national origin.

www.mooreland.org

Beautifully Conditioned

NEWINGTON NEWINGTON RESIDENT RATES: NEWINGTONRESIDENT RESIDENT RATES: RATES: Single $2,800 Single $2,800 Single $2,800 Family $3,400 Family Family $3,400 $3,400 Junior (under Junior (under 40) $2,500 40) $2,500 $2,500 Junior (under40) Early EarlyCommitment CommitmentDiscounts Discounts Junior Family (under 40) $2,875 Junior Family (under 40) $2,875 Junior Family (under 40) $2,875 Say SayGoodbye Goodbyeto toCrowds CrowdsForever Forever Weekday Senior (62 and over) Weekday Senior (62 and over) $2050 Weekday Senior (62 and over)$2050 $2050 Private, Private,Yet YetAffordable Affordable Weedkay Weedkay Non-Senior: $2,575 WeedkayNon-Senior: Non-Senior:$2,575 $2,575 Young Young Executive (under 30) $1,675 YoungExecutive Executive(under (under30) 30)$1,675 $1,675

Admission Testing

Easy proximity to I-84, RT 9 and I-91

Montana is a 5-year-old spayed female. She is a black and white Australian shepherd/border collie mix. If exercise is your game, Montana will love you! She will return the favor with love and loyal companionship. Montana lived happily with a dog and a cat in her previous home. She enjoys the company of adult and older children who will provide her with lots of exercise and who will continue her training. Montana aims to please! Visit with Montana at the Humane Society in Newington.

Remember, the Connecticut Humane Society has no time limits. Inquiries for adoption should be made at the Connecticut Humane Society located at 701 Russell Road in Newington or by calling (860) 5944500 or toll free at 1-800-452-0114. The Connecticut Humane Society is a private organization with branch shelters in Waterford and Westport. The Connecticut Humane Society operates a cat adoption center in the PetSMART store in New London. It is not affiliated with any other shelters or agencies.

MOORELAND HILL SCHOOL

166 Lincoln Street, Berlin CT 06037

Teddy is a 13-year-old neutered orange tiger. Teddy is the perfect name for this friendly affectionate guy! He’s not shy about coming up to rub against your leg and say hello. He is a spry and inquisitive senior with a playful spirit, laid back and loving. Teddy would love to find a forever home with his brother Simba. Simba is a 17-year-old black short hair neutered male. Simba is such an affectionate and loving cat. He needs someone who can give a deserving older cat a quiet place to relax and a warm hand to nuzzle against. They love to sleep with each other and rub heads against each other. If you can open your home to a loving older boy and his brother, then Simba and Teddy would love to meet you! Visit with Teddy and Simba at the Connecticut Humane Society in Newington.

www.ihccgolf.com

010427

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER


Local News

6 | Friday, January 21, 2011

2010 ends on high note at Elizabeth Green

Elizabeth Green students celebrated reading as “Super Heroes” through the recent Book Fair titled Reading Saves the Day. The school was decorated with 300 hero drawings by the student and families raised $150 for charity. In addition, the new principal, Jennifer Michno, engaged the students with a hero story in a “Captain Literacy” super hero costume during the Family Night event. The action didn’t stop there. On Thursday, Dec. 16, the fourth-grade chorus entertained the school with a winter concert. All in all, the spirits are high at Elizabeth Green School!

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Steve’s Place remains a much-loved place to grab a bite in Newington

to history of Steve’s Place. “I think when people talk about their Doug started working at Steve’s Place favorite local eating spots, we are always when he was 15 years-old, working with in the conversation,” said Doug, “I think his two brothers and mother to help their it’s neat, because people like to talk about father operate the restaurant. After gradutheir favorite places and ating from college in I think, thankfully, we 1982, Doug took over “I think when have always been part the restaurant. He of the conversation.” never expected to make people talk about Steve’s Place is a it his career, he said. their favorite local family run business, “When I got out run by people who of college my father eating spots, we care for other people, wanted to retire so are always in the said Doug, and it is the I was going to take people who have made over it for a few years conversation.” Steve’s place the gathinstead of having it ering spot it is today. leave the family. That A place like this was 29 years ago. How Doug Kuzoian wasn’t built in a year,” do you like that,” he Owner said Doug looking said with a laugh. toward the timeline of Today Steve’s place faded photographs of still holds its place as high school sports teams of years gone by one of Newington’s staple restaurants. scattered along the walls of the restaurant. “It is easy to come to a place like “It has evolved.” this and become a regular,” said Doug, His father started the collection of “because even if you only have a half hour Newington sports memorabilia years ago lunch you will get most of your lunch hour when Doug and his brothers played town sitting, enjoying, eating.” sports. Today the photos are time capsules The friendly faces behind the display Continued from Page 1

case of pickles and quality cold cuts, contribute to the atmosphere of the restaurant, as they are always eager to take orders or prepare a cup of coffee to exact specifications. “A business like this comes down to people helping people,” said Doug. “You cannot franchise service.” Steve’s Place serves a simple yet quality menu of pastas with homemade sauces, to burgers and paninis, giant hot oven grinders, and of course a classic breakfast selection. “Franchises have ruined the sandwich,” said Doug, saying he keeps the food simple, made fresh and of quality ingredients. “That is what helps us distinguish ourselves away from the pack.” It’s his quality food and great staff, said Doug, which has kept the doors to Steve’s Place open for all these years but most importantly it was the support the residents of Newington have always given him and his father. “As the years go on, places like Steve’s Place have become few and far between,” said Doug. “I hope in the years to come, people will go the extra mile to find places like Steve’s.”

C O N N E C T I C U T

Try feeding the birds our quality wild bird food at a very affordable price. Contains only edible seeds, no fillers, grains, or red seeds birds won’t eat.

3 30 for

HIGH ENERGY SUET MIXED WITH NUTS

- Supplies high amounts of protein & energy - Readily consumed by most wild birds.

12for $12.99 Sale Ends: Feb. 28, 2011

Winter Store Hours Open Mon. - Fri. 10-5 Sat. 10-5 • SUN 10-4

$

Reg. $10.99ea. 20 lb bag

FIREWOOD Stay warm this winter season, dry split seasoned firewood available for pick up or delivery 011591

1616 WILLARD AVE. NEWINGTON, CT (860) 667-1158

www.stonehedgelandscapingco.com

KENPOKARATE � SELF DISCIPLINE � S E LF E STE E M � SELF CONFIDENCE � 4 C LASSES PER W EEK � V I D E O I N ST R U CTI O N � MODERN ARNIS INSTRUCTION � NO CONTRACTS R EQUIRED 64 Market Square Newington, CT

NOT EVERYBODY FLIES SOUTH FOR THE WINTER

665-9822 www. c t k e n p o .com

SERVING NEWINGTON S I N C E 1991


NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Friday, January 21, 2011 | 7

Local News

Newington Town Council meets to face tough issues By ALEX SYPHERS STAFF WRITER

The Newington Town Council met with local state legislators during its last meeting Tuesday, Jan. 11, to discuss future state and local issues as well as how the projected state budget deficit could trickle down and affect the town’s budget process in the coming months. “We are all staring down a $3.5 billion deficit so I don’t envy your position at this point,” said Mayor Jeff Wright, as he welcomed state Rep. Tim O’Brien of the 24th Assembly District, state Rep. Sandy Nafis of the 27th Assembly District, state Rep. Antonio Guerrera of the 29th Assembly District, and Sen. Paul Doyle to the council meeting. In their opening remarks the legislators told the council it was going to be a financially rough year for both the state and the town. In preliminary reviews of the upcoming budget it is predicted that the state could be facing a budget deficit

that is in excess of $3.7 billion in the coming year, a financial sting that is compounded by the fact that federal dollars to the state have also slowed due to the recession. “We can’t count on federal dollars. Those aren’t coming in as they used to and again it is up to all of us to sacrifice a little bit like we do in our own homes,” Guerrea told the council. “I don’t want to sound like doom and gloom, I just want to make sure there is a reality check.” In an effort to soften the financial blow against the state and local municipalities the state is looking at a few options to reduce spending and increase revenue, said the legislators, including reducing the size of government, streamlining systems, and incorporating highway toll booths along the state borders. One major concern expressed by the legislators was the potential reduction of state aid given to local municipalities, such as educational and STEAP grants. “Realistically, there will not be an

increase in state aid. We all certainly know that. The truth of the matter is there’s a lot of [budget] areas we can’t cut because of contractual issues,” explained Doyle, “so it will be a challenge, but I do look forward to fighting again for Newington and getting through the tough times.” Both legislators and councilors feared that as a result of these financial streams being reduced to a trickle, the municipalities would be forced to make up the difference. Yet, the legislators were quick to explain that raising property taxes was not the way to overcome short falls in state funding. “We are in a $4 billion plus hole and how are we going to overcome this, and we can’t do this, folks, by raising taxes. We have to think

outside the box… we have to work together to figure this puzzle out,” said Guererra. “You can’t fix this by raising taxes, you can’t fix this by devastating services either, it is going to be something like a pendulum, we will have to weigh this off. It is going to be a sacrifice for all of us.” O’Brien showed optimism saying that this was a time to creatively assess the state’s budget practices and correct current practices that contributed to the budget deficit over the years. “We really need to think about the totality of the way we do things in the governments of our state and think about the most efficient and effective way of getting things done,” said O’Brien, “There’s a lot of ideas out there. I don’t think we should sweep anything off the

... the state is looking at a few options to reduce spending and increase revenue ...

table. This is a time when we can be truly creative. If we use this moment as an opportunity, we can set things right for the future. “ During the hour-long discussion many councilors expressed concern that state mandates being enacted upon the town could potentially be unfunded, burdening the town with more financial expenditures than would not have been allocated for in this year’s budget. “Governor Malloy, being a former mayor, has always rattled the cages about unfunded mandates,” said Doyle. “This may be an opportunity for us to help the communities by eliminating some mandates. I think that is on the table like it has never been before.” “I just want to thank you for all you do for the district,” said Councilor Maureen Klett, at the close of the meeting, “I know it’s not an easy time out there right now but I just want to let you know everything you do is appreciated.”

The Connecticut River Academy at Goodwin College

Located on the Goodwin College Campus in East Hartford, the Connecticut River Academy magnet high school offers one of the most advanced environmental studies programs in the region and provides free college courses to students as part of our Early College model.

We are accepting applications for next year’s 9th and 10th grade classes.

Open House

Saturday, January 29, 2011 10:00 a.m. - 12 noon Register For The Open House Event Online

Opportunities abound for out-of-the-ordinary learning experiences at The Academy. Above, a group of students aboard the tall ship Half Moon on its annual “Voyage of Discovery” up the Connecticut River.

goodwin.edu/ctra Find Us On:


Local News

8 | Friday, January 21, 2011

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Newington woman celebrates 102nd birthday, shares good advice Benedetta Boccaccio, center, celebrated her 102 birthday Jan. 5. The oldest of 12, Boccaccio was born in Lawrence, Mass., in 1909. She moved to Newington with her family in 1912. On Jan. 8, 2011, she was joined by five generations of family to celebrate her birthday. She has three daughters, Mary, Josephine, and Eva, and two sons, Tom and Paul. To date, Boccaccio has 17 grandchildren, 43 greatgrandchildren, and 22

great-great-grandchildren. During her celebration Boccaccio reminisced about such events as World War I, the Great Depression, and World War II. “She has seen poverty. She has seen hard times. She has seen the death of most of her siblings,” said Benedetta’s son Tom. What keeps her so healthy? “A little bit of spaghetti and vino,” Benedetta said with a laugh. As for advice for future generations, she says, “Don’t try to grow up to early.”

Photo by Alex Syphers

Snowy adventures spread across Connecticut

Alison Mishou,16, follows her friend Zachary Pierson, 15, both of Newington, down a steep hill at the Indian Hill Golf Course.

Photos by Alex Syphers Snow and ice create a picturesque scene at Mill Pond Falls in Newington Saturday afternoon, Jan. 8.

A smile springs across the face of Christopher Doski, 3, as he sleds down a hill at Mill Pond Park.

We get people back on their feet. And back to their lives. People who live with constant joint pain often give up things that are important to them, like playing with their kids or grandkids, or leading a healthy, active life. But help is available. The Center for Joint Care at The Hospital of Central Connecticut offers the latest techniques in knee and hip reconstruction and replacement. So people can get their lives, and limbs, moving again. For more information, call 860-224-5186 or visit www.thocc.org/services/joint.

Become a Facebook fan! www.facebook.com/hospofcentralct


NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Local News

Friday, January 21, 2011 | 9

Newington town calendar Seeking registered Democrats The Newington Democrat Town Committee is seeking registered Democrats interested in running for office in the November municipal election. If interested in being a candidate for Mayor, Town Council, Board of Education or Constable, send a letter of intent by March 1 to: Lyn Connery, 225 Robbins Ave., Newington CT 06111.

House, feel free to call St. Mary School at (860) 666-3844 or visit the Web site at www. stmaryngtn.com.

the Church Office at (860) 666-4689 or churchofchrist@newingtonucc.org so we can plan accordingly.

Recreation office at (860) 665-8666.

Blood glucose screening program offered The Central Connecticut Health District NCTC presents “Beauty And The Beast” Art Exhibit at the Library and the Wethersfield Health Care Center Newington Children’s Theatre Company will From Feb. 1 to Feb. 26, Peter Upton will discontinue to offer a glucose screening program present “Beauty and the Beast” at the complay his artwork at Newington’s Lucy Robbins to residents of Wethersfield, Rocky Hill, pany’s Black Box Theatre, 743 North Moun- Welles Library. A resident of Hartford’s West Newington, and Berlin who are 65 years of tain Road. Shows at this venue will be 7 p.m. End, Upton has a law practice in downtown age and older. Jacki Baranowski, R.N. from Friday, Jan. 28; 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, New Britain. He will host an Artist’s Recepthe Wethersfield Health Care Center, conJan. 29; 2 p.m. Sunday, Jan. 30; 7 p.m. Friday, tion from 2 to 4 p.m. at the library Saturday, ducts free blood glucose screenings monthly Prudence Crandall Center fundraiser in the Health District member towns of Feb. 4; 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 5 Feb. 5, which is free and open to the public. Grace Church, 124 Maple Hill Ave., will and 2 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 6. Call the theatre for Refreshments will be served. His exhibit may Rocky Hill and Wethersfield. The blood sugar be selling meat and veggie grinders to raise test takes only minutes, and time is permittickets at (860) 666-6282 to purchase. Ticket be viewed during regular library hours when money for the Prudence Crandall Center in ted to allow participants an opportunity to New Britain. The Prudence Crandall Center prices are $12 for adults and $10 for children, there is not another regularly scheduled prostudents, and seniors. These shows do sell gram: Monday through Thursday, 10 a.m. to discuss the meaning of the resulting numbers provides services to victims of domestic 9 p.m.; Friday and Saturday, 10 a.m to 5 p.m. and what to do if the sugar level is too high. violence. Grinders are ham, roast beef, turkey, out, so call ahead. Special group rates and Screenings are conducted on the secondnd party packages are available. After debuting in and Sunday, 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. veggie or combo. Each grinder is $7.95 each. Tuesday of each month in Wethersfield and Newington, “Beauty and the Beast” goes on to (860) 665-8700. You can place your order after the 8 or 10 the fourth Tuesday of each month in Rocky a three-month tour. Ticket prices for the tour o’clock services Jan. 23 and 30 or by calling Hill. Residents of all four health district towns locations vary by venue. Visit the Website, Mitch Page at (860) 667-1835. Pick up your Seventh and Eighth-Grade Dance are invited to participate at the location of newingtonchildrenstheatre.org, for the latest grinder Feb. 6 between 9 a.m. and noon. The The Newington Parks & Recreation Depart- their choice. The February glucose screenings venues, schedules and ticket information. church phone number is (860) 666-3331. ment will sponsor a dance for Newington will be Feb. 8, from 10 a.m. to noon at the seventh and eighth-grade students from 7 Pitkin Community Center, 30 Greenfield St. NHS PSAT Parent Program to 10 p.m. Friday, Feb. 4 at the Mortensen Guest pastor in Wethersfield and Feb. 22, from 10 a.m. to Community Center located in the Town Hall, noon at the Rocky Hill Community Center, Verline Eldridge, will serve the Church of the The Newington High School Counseling Department will host a PSAT night for 131 Cedar St. The fee is $5 per student plus Infinite Spirit located in The Masonic Hall, 55 Church St., Rocky Hill Appointments are a non-perishable food donation. Refresh80 Walsh Ave., at 10:30 a.m. Sunday, Jan. 23. parents and students in grades 10 and 11 at required. For further information, directions, Eldridge, CM, is a member of National Spiri- 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Jan. 27. in the NHS audi- ments will be available for sale. Dance will be and to schedule an appointment, contact tualist Church of Norwich, CT (NSAC). For torium. School counselors discuss how to use well supervised; no re-entry once admitted. the Central Connecticut Health District at the feedback provided in the score report and Students must show their school ID at the more information, call (860) 646-5976. 721-2818. other resources to improve student academic door. For more information, call the Parks and skills and plan for college Mooreland Hill Winter Open Morning and beyond. Parents in atMooreland Hill School’s Open Winter tendance will receive their Morning will begin at 9 a.m. Tuesday, Jan. 25. student(s) PSAT scores The Winter Open Morning is a great opfrom the October 2010 portunity to have a guided tour of the campus, test administration. see classes in action, and have ample time to visit with us about anything that is on your ‘Everything You Wanted mind. Kindly let us know you are coming by calling the school at (860) 223-6428. Register to Know About Social Security’ online at mooreland.org. Mooreland Hill is The Church of Christ in an independent, co-educational day school serving central Connecticut students in grades Newington, 1075 Main St., will host a discussion, 4 to 9. Est. 1930. 166 Lincoln St., Berlin. “Everything You Wanted To Know About Social • Academic Excellence St. Mary School Enrollment Open House Security,” from 7:30 to On Wednesday, Jan. 26, St. Mary School, 9 p.m. Tuesday, Feb. 1. • High Standards 652 Willard Ave., will host an Enrollment Robert Rodriguez of the Open House. The building will be open • Supportive Environment Social Security Administo visitors with our presentation starting at 581 Silas Deane Highway tration will cover many ar• Strong Fine Arts Program 6:30 p..m followed by a school tour. Families eas. There will be time for Wethersfield, CT 06109 wishing to explore what a Catholic Educa• Advanced Technology with a Rodriguez to answer all of tion can do for their children may come in 860-529-5487 your questions. Whether Wireless Facility and State-of-theArt and meet the administration and teachers. you are trying to help a www.corpuschristischoolct.com Equipment for Students and Faculty A complete listing of Pre-Kindergarten parent or have questions Easily accessible through Grade 8 programs will be available • After School Program Offered about your own benefits, from I-91 and Rte. 2 including our before- and after-school care this presentation will be programs. Faculty and staff will be on hand helpful to you. The church to answer any questions regarding curriculum is handicap accessible and and extra-curricular activities. Visitors will be parking is free. This is a Educating students from approximately 20 towns since 1958. able to tour facility including the classrooms, free event and the public If unable to attend the Open House, please call for a visit and tour. lunchroom, gymnasium, library and computer is welcome. Registration lab. Children are welcome and encouraged is not necessary, but if you Corpus Christi School accepts students from different religious backgrounds. to attend. For information prior to the Open plan on attending contact

Open House Grades Pre~K _ 8

Thursday, January 27 at 8:30 am

007775

Corpus Christi School


Local News

10 | Friday, January 21, 2011

Newington town calendar cont... St. Mary Women’s Club Pot Luck St. Mary Women’s Club will hold its annual Pot Luck Supper at 6 p.m. Monday, Feb. 14 in the Parish Hall. Bring your favorite pot luck dish and enjoy a night with your fellow parishioners. All parishioners are welcome. Call Madeline by Feb. 11 at (860) 666-9329 to sign-up. Trip to see ‘Grease’ St. Mary Women’s Club will sponsor a trip to City Stage Symphony Hall in Springfield, Mass., Wednesday, Feb. 16 to see the musical “Grease.” The $76 package includes round trip Dattco motorcoach, free time at the Holyoke Mall, and the 7:30 p.m. performance of the show. The bus will leave St. Mary School, 652 Willard Ave. at 2 p.m. For reservations, contact Kim Breton: Breton2@cox.net or (860) 666-8873 (after 5 p.m.)

004633

AARP Chapter No. 697 meeting The Newington Area AARP Chapter No. 697 will hold its next meeting at 1:30 p.m. Wednesday, Feb. 16 at the Joseph P. Doyle Senior and Disabled

Center, 120 Cedar St. Members are asked to make donations of nonperishable food items, health care items and paper goods for the Newington Food Pantry. Scholarship donations are always welcome. James Harkins, guitar/vocalist, will provide musical entertainment after the meeting. Members may call Angela Sinnott at (860) 667-0575 regarding trips offered by the Chapter. 13th Annual Parks & Rec Golf Tourney Save the Date: Join the Newington Parks and Recreation Department’s 13th Annual Golf Tournament at Indian Hill Country Club to be held Monday, May 9, beginning at 12:30 p.m. The “Shotgun” format tournament is open to all ability levels, and all proceeds support recreation programs in the town of Newington. The registration fee is $125 per person and includes the golf tournament, cart, lunch, dinner and prizes! Call the Parks and Recreation office at (860) 665-8666 if interested in making a donation (cash or raffle prizes accepted), becoming a sponsor for a $100 Tee Sign, or playing in the tournament.

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Sen. Doyle to give 50 percent of CEF funds back to taxpayers

State Senator Paul Doyle (D-9th District), recently elected to his third term in the Connecticut State Senate, is doing something that very few politicians in competitive election races have done — after running a lean election campaign, Doyle is returning more than 50 percent of his taxpayer grant money back to the taxpayers of the state of Connecticut. “In these very difficult economic times when Connecticut’s families are reducing their spending and watching every dollar, the least I can do is be prudent with their money and return much of it back to them,” explained Doyle. Earlier this week, Doyle dropped off a check for $45,488.92 at the office of the State Elections Enforcement Commission in Hartford. That amount represents over 50 percent of the taxpayer’s money that Doyle’s campaign committee received from the state public financing system. While grateful for the many contributions he received in qualifying for the Connecticut Citizens Elections Program, Doyle made it a priority to run an efficient campaign that

limited his use of the taxpayer’s money. “My opponent last fall was very experienced, in fact, I served with him in the State House of Representatives for several terms. We had a tough, fair, and competitive race,” said Doyle. “He and I ran an issues-based race both focused on talking directly to the voters.” “Ultimately, the Citizens Elections Program is funded by the hard-working taxpaying citizens of the state and we are all wise to remember this as we run our campaigns,” he pointed out. “I made a commitment when I ran to run a lean and efficient campaign operation and that’s what we did. I’ve always run my campaigns this way, but given the fiscal crisis that the state is currently in, it became even more important to ensure that state taxpayer money was being used efficiently.” “I’m proud to be able to return this money to the state coffers, on behalf of the citizens of my district,” Doyle stated. “I serve in public office to focus on issues that are important to my constituents and represent them at the Capitol, and I know they are very concerned about the budget crisis we currently face.”


Sports www.newingtontowncrier.com

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Friday, January 21, 2011 | 11

Newington tops New Britain Indians topple New Britain 64-55 at Connecticut Hoops Challenge By Andy Ragali MATT STraub contributed to this article Staff Writer

Newington took care of New Britain 64-55 on Monday in the second game of the day at the Connecticut Hoops Challenge at Central Connecticut State’s Detrick Gym. Sophomore Timmy Blair led the Indians with 23 points and Junior Matt Dean was a scoring threat as well, putting in 13 points to help hold off the Hurricanes

after building a lead early on. It was the eighth win of the season for Newington (8-2), qualifying the team for the Class LL state tournament with still a half season to play. New Britain (1-9) came back from a nine-point deficit to even the game at 21 midway through the second quarter, but the Indians scored the last 10 points of the half to take control of the game. They wouldn’t give away the lead again for the rest of the match up.

“That was huge, and it all startThe Hurricanes were led by ed from our defense,” Newington freshman Craven Johnson’s 18 coach Scot Wenzel said. “We were able to get some stops. Defensively we went to a manto-man. Give New Britain credit, they knocked down some shots against our zone, but once Scot Wenzel we went man- Newington coach to-man, that’s our bread-and-butter. points and 20 by sophomore Once we went to that we got Deaquone Clark. some stops and fed off of it.” Clark kept New Britain in the

game in the first and third quarter, getting to the foul line and keeping his team within striking distance. The Indians were too much though, and escaped with a huge win. “Blair had an unbelievable night, he was shooting the lights out for us,” Wenzel said. “He was shooting the lights out. And the good news is he’s only a sophomore.”

“That was huge, and it all started from our defense. Defensively we went to a man-to-man. Give New Britain credit, they knocked down some shots against our zone, but once we went man-toman, that’s our bread-and-butter.”

Southington swimmers fall to Newington Teams trade leads but Newington comes out on top By Joe Fortunato staff writer

NEWINGTON — It was a day of special performances in Newington’s 97-86 victory over Southington Friday night. The meet was close and exciting, with both teams stealing the lead from the other, until Newington finally pulled away at the end. Southington coach Evan Tutto was pleased with the effort from his team, but also tipped his hat to a stronger Newington side. “Obviously it’s our toughest meet all year and Newington swam fantastically,” he said. “All their guys stepped up, and they did what they had to do. Our guys swam great too, it was just a matter of battling numbers and battling bodies. We just couldn’t pull it out.” For the Indians, the win camewith several gems. Newington’s Andre Profitt was a

dual winner, taking first in both the 200 free and the 500 free. Profitt had the most impressive finish of the night, destroying the rest of the competitors in his 500 free finish. He took first place in the event with a 5:34.14 time, the next closes competitor came in at 6:08.77. Newington coach John DipaolaTromba was happy with Proffitt’s effort today. “He’s pretty much a rising star on the team the past couple of years,” Dipaola-Tromba said. “He has a ton of potential, but he doesn’t know it yet. He holds himself back, but when he’s on he’s even better than what he did today. But he swam great today.” As a team Newington dominated the 50 free. Chris Seguro took first, Steven Falkner took second and Andrew McCarther took third, giving the Indians 13 points and putting them ahead 35-27. That would be

the decisive swing of momentum, as Indians wouldn’t relinquish the lead from that point forward. Dipaola-Tromba praised his team’s effort. “I’m actually pretty happy. We’ve always had Southington as one of out bigger rivals over the years. This year it’s been pretty close between us, and it’s great to see a meet where it was close all the way to the final heat,” he said. The Blue Knights had a wellrounded effort from all of their swimmers, despite the loss. Ryan Connors took first place for Southington in diving, with a score of 152.45. Michael Smigelski took first in the 100 fly and the 100 breast, and also swam on the 200 medley relay and the 200 relay teams (both of which also took first for Southington. Tutto expected that kind of performance from his star swimmer. “I don’t have to worry about him. The biggest challenge for me is finding the best spot to put him in,” he said. “You know he’s going to perform well and you just try to maximize the points from him.”

Tutto made a few strategic moves before the match began to try and maximize points, something that both did and did not work for the Blue Knights. “I took some gambles today,” he said. “I took a few guys out of sprint events to try and get us some points. And I picked us up some points, but I also got hurt in the sprints. It was win one lose one today unfortunately.” Southington’s biggest score was posted by Colin Magaro who finished the 100 free in 53.15 seconds. “His previous best was a low 54, so it was a great time and he should be pleased,” Tutto said. Jesse Cooney also had a great fin-

ish for the Blue Knights clocking in a 1:02.47 in the 100 back. Although the time was impressive, he missed automatically qualifying for states by half a second. Still, Tutto wasn’t worried. “That time will get him in,” he said. The Indians swimmers were competitive all meet, and their mentality was something that DipaolaTromba liked to see from his swimmers. “The kids were really enthusiastic, they went after every event with heart,” he said. The meet might have gone in Newington’s favor, but both sides swam with purpose and heart and set the stage for some matchups down the road in states.

As a team Newington dominated the 50 free. Chris Seguro took first, Steven Falkner took second and Andrew McCarther took third, giving the Indians 13 points and putting them ahead 35-27.


12 | Friday, January 21, 2011

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

Take your first step toward healthier legs The first step in the treatment of varicose veins is scheduling your screening. Join us for a night of refreshments and fun, and get ready to say good-bye to the pain, swelling and health risks caused by varicose veins.

FREE

VEIN SCREENING EVENTS Kick up your heels and enjoy light refreshments as you learn what you can do to improve your leg health. 6 Northwestern Drive Bloomfield, CT 06002 Wednesday, January 26 5:30 – 8 p.m. 1260 Silas Deane Highway, Suite 104 Wethersfield, CT 06109 Wednesday, February 2 5:30 – 8 p.m. Space is limited. Please call to RSVP. 860-291-6508

Jefferson Radiology has been helping patients with venous disease for over 40 years. Our team of specialty-trained physicians provides the latest treatments right in the comfort of our office. The pain-free procedure takes less than an hour — no surgery, no anesthesia, no scarring — and you’ll be back to your normal routine in a day or two. Take a step in the right direction: Schedule your appointment with the most trusted name in vein care. For more information, visit our website or call.

860.676.0110 | jeffersonradiology.com


Friday, January 21, 2011 | 13

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

NEW BRITAIN: Move-in Special. $600 mo. 1 mo. free rent, ask for details. Includes heat and hot water! 1 br unit. Off street parking, laundry facility, close to ma230 APARTMENTS jor hwys and bus line. Sec. UNFURNISHED dep. req’d. Sorry No Dogs, cats with deposit. For info; 203-639-8271. BRISTOL Beatiful 1 & 2 BR, appl, on-site laundry, clean. NEW BRITAIN: Spacious 3 br, Starting at $550. 2nd flr, sunporch, priv. prkg, 860-584-1654. $895/mo. Utils not included. No pets. 203-982-3042. BRISTOL Beatiful 1 & 2 BR, appl, on-site laundry, clean. PLAINVILLE-2 BR, 2nd FL inc Starting at $550. ht/hw. Appl, w/d hkp. Gar. No 860-584-1654. pets. $900. 860-747-0868. NEW BRITAIN - 1 BR, w/office, $625. Pkg, laundry, super. 819 FURNITURE (860) 348-9534. NEW apts., quet, $625.

BRITAIN: 1 & BR newly renov. Clean, parking. Starting at 860-614-9564.

NEW BRITAIN: 1 br & studio apts. Downtown. Starting at $499/mo. Utils not included. No pets. 203-982-3042. NEW BRITAIN: 1 BR apts., $590 & $670. 860-985-5760. NEW BRITAIN - 2 BR, 3rd FL, $800 + util. 1 mo sec dep & 1 mo rent. 860-770-4906.

*NEW BRITAIN: 2 BR w/ht & hw, appl. No pets/NS. $775. Gustin Co. (860) 225-4613.

NEW BRITAIN – Downtown. ANVIL PLACE APTS. Senior 55+. 1 & 2 Bedroom market rate & affordable apts. Ht/ HW & pkg included 860-257-1330 NEW BRITAIN - Large 2 BR apt., 2nd FL, $750. Call 860-738-8803 NEW BRITAIN Remodeled 2 & 3 BR townhomes. Private entry, hdwd flrs, laundry. On busline. Ht & hw inc. $750 & up. 860-223-8866. NEW BRITAIN: Studio $525 & 2 BR, $675. Upper High St. No utils. Available now. No pets. Sol 203-816-7790.

BED: All new, still in plastic. Extra, extra thick queen pillow-top mattress set & frame. Can deliver. $400. (860) 298-9732.

881 WANTED TO BUY BUYING 1900s-1960s: Toys, jewelry, bar signs, antiques, household, political, Sporting. Christine 561-1817.

Old Tools Wanted

Always Buying old, used and antique woodworking, machinist, other hand tools & tool chests. Honest offers made at your home. Please write this number down. Call Cory

860 - 613 - 1108

Every week, we bring buyers and sellers, employers and employees, landlords and tenants together. You can rely on Classified Ads to get results.

Do want ads work? Do mice like cheese? Call 231-2444.

645 GENERAL HELP WANTED

Do want ads work? Do mice like cheese? Call 231-2444.

645 GENERAL HELP WANTED

Do want ads work? Do mice like cheese? Call 231-2444.

645 GENERAL HELP WANTED

Sell Advertising At Central Connecticut’s Fastest Growing Newspapers Do you like to have fun while working in a fast paced environment? We are looking for a motivated, outgoing individual to join our sales team. Sell newspaper print and online advertising on a part-time, straight commission basis. Prior media sales a plus. Interested applicants may e-mail a resume and cover letter to gcurran@centralctcommunications.com or mail to: The New Britain Herald 1 Court Street, 4th floor New Britain, CT 06051 Attn: Gary Curran

231-2444

Having a tag sale? Don’t forget to advertise it with a fast-acting Classified to let everyone know! Call 231-2444

an Equal Opportunity Employer

nce upon a time, there was a big pile of laundry.

The pile was made up of all different colors. A mommy decided she would play a game. Red! she said to her child, holding up a red ©2005 United Way of America. Registered trademark of United Way of America.

230 APARTMENTS UNFURNISHED

2395800

Real Estate

shirt. Red! the child said. Mommy put it in the colors pile. Whites went in another pile. Green like a frog! White like ice cream! And so it went. Colors, whites. Colors, whites. And on the very last thing – a bib of blue – the child pointed to the colors pile. You should’ve seen the smile on mommy’s face. Everyday moments can become learning moments. Because learning starts long before school does. So tell stories. Play with the laundry. And even a chore with your child will become much more. Find out more at bornlearning.org.


14 | Friday, January 21, 2011

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

HANDYPERSON

GUITAR LESSONS

Be A Guitar Star

 011311

Enjoyable, Successful Instruction Individual Programs, Rapid Progress Learn Your Favorite Songs

rs 29 yea e enc experi

6LPSOH6ROXWLRQVWR(YHU\GD\3UREOHPV 

6SHFLDOL]LQJLQVPDOOMREVZKHQ\RXDUHDYDLODEOH 

/LFHQVHG³³³³³

+$1'<0$1³²³³³,QVXUHG

Fully Insured Reg. #HIC0620964

Larry Pericolosi, CLC thetopshelf@cox.net

5HSDLU +RPH,PSURYHPHQW

x %DWKVIDXFHWVWRLOHWVVLQNSLSHVYDQLWLHVFDXONLQJIDQVOLJKWLQJ x .LWFKHQVOLJKWLQJVZLWFKHVGLPPHUVRXWOHWV*)&,FHLOLQJIDQV GULSSLQJIDXFHWVOHDNLQJSLSHVJDUEDJHGLVSRVHUV

x 2XWGRRUVPRWLRQVHQVRUVVLOOFRFNV IDXFHWV GRRUEHOOV ORFNV x 'HEULV6KHHWURFN5HSDLU$OO5HSDLUV³$Q\WKLQJMXVWDVN´ x 6SHFLDO5DWHV6LQJOHV0RPV6HQLRUVDQG$OO7KXPEV

Pete Cocolla, 860-463-2734 Certified Teaching Specialist www.guitarstarinstruction.com

+870$;;3$571(56&7/LF 3KRQH6DPH'D\6HUYLFH

012910

Guitar and Bass Lessons Children & Adults



HOME IMPROVEMENT

www. thetopshelf home.com

PLUMBING & HEATING

JEWELERS

Joseph A. Borselle, Jr.

Lic #â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 204827-P1 5155-SM1 392764-S3 HIC 0625232

REALTORS

Newington, CT

REALTORS

121809

Contractor

(860) 757-3800

The Best Team in Town

Plumbing & Heating â&#x20AC;˘ Repair Service â&#x20AC;˘ Home Improvements & Remodeling â&#x20AC;˘ Heating Systems Hydronic & Steam â&#x20AC;˘ Hot Water Heaters, Sales & Service â&#x20AC;˘ Gas Fireplaces & Piping â&#x20AC;˘ Drain & Sewer Cleaning

HOME IMPROVEMENT LLC

860.948.0510

P.O. Box 311231 Newington, CT 06131

860.666.5656 REALTORS

REALTORS

Denise Lambros, ABR

Cathleen B. Hall

REALTORÂŽ Leading Edge Society

Broker, G.R.I. SRES 860-666-5656 X156 (Office)

Amy Kelleher

EQUAL HOUSING

012111

860-667-1993 (Home) 860-559-6643 (Cell) 860-665-8071 (Fax) chall@prudentialct.com

155 Lowrey Place Newington, Ct 06111 Cell:860-416-5652 Off:860-666-5656 Fax:860-665-1351 Dir:890-594-6948 amykelleher@prudentialct.com

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

OPPORTUNITY

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

012111

Connecticut Realty

Connecticut Realty

012111

Sales Executive

Connecticut Realty

155 Lowrey Place, Newington, Ct 06111 Bus 860-594-6946 Cell 860-666-7175 Fax 860 665-1351 dlambros@prudentialct.com

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

REALTORS

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

REALTORS

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

REALTORS

Jeff Palumbo ÂŽ REALTOR

Donna Savoia

Maria Parker

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

012111

EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

To Advertise call Classified Department

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

Connecticut Realty 155 Lowrey Place Newington, Ct 06111 mobile 860-424-7565 fax 860-665-1351 dsavoia@prudentialct.com www.DonnaSavoia.com EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

860-231-2444

012111

155 Lowrey Place Newington, Ct 06111 Cell: 860-306-6040 Fax:860-665-1351 Direct Line: 860-594-6964 mariaparker@prudentialct.com www.mariaparker.prudentialCT.com

012111

Connecticut Realty 155 Lowrey Place, Newington, Ct 06111 Bus 860-666-5656 Cell 860-305-8839 Fax 860-665-1351 Voicemail 860-594-6965 E-mail jpalumbo@prudentialct.com

Realtor - Staging Professional

Realtor


Friday, January 21, 2011 | 15

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

REALTORS

REMODELING

ROOFING

Roofs â&#x20AC;&#x153;Râ&#x20AC;? Us

Roger Veilleux, ABR Realtor

HOME IMPROVEMENT

012111

and Odd Jobs and Repairs E/glass VINYL REPLACEMENT WINDOWS

155 Lowrey Place, Newington, Ct 06111 "US  s&AX   $IRECT  s#ELL   % -AILROGERVEILLEUX PRUDENTIALCTCOM EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY

An independently owned and operated member of Prudential Real Estate Affilliates, Inc.

(203) 715-8850

SNOW PLOWING/SANDING â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our Family Serving Your Family for over 20 Years Operatingâ&#x20AC;?

SCOTTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CARPENTRY LLC

Call Now For All Your Snow Plowing & Sanding!!! LAST MINUTE, CALL SCOTT We Accept All Major 860-573-7341 DONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;T Cards 110510

Credit

$189.00

FAMILY RUN SINCE 1949

G STUC ET CALL UK S!

SNOW PLOWING QUICK SERVICE Call Scott 860-584-5451

EMERGENCIES Call

@

Nancy

860-539-7938

TREE SERVICE Systemic Micro-Injection Fertilization

GRAVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TREE CARE Tree Removals â&#x20AC;˘ Pruning â&#x20AC;˘ Storm Damage Stump Removals â&#x20AC;˘ Shrub Pruning

Justin

860-563-6581

860-573-7343

Wethersfield

www.scottscarpentry.com

Residential & Commercial CALL NOW! A name you can trust & rely on! Fully Insured â&#x20AC;˘ Lic. #532398

Spraying B-0567

Bruce Graver â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Licensed Tree Surgeon â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Certified Arborist

INSURED CT Lic #573358

(860) 869-3724

TREE SERVICE

Total Tree Service & Landscaping, LLC anup & SPRING Cle ance en nt ai M Lawn al & Commercitia Residen l

FR ESTIMAEE TES

75 foot Bucket Truck

CHIPPER â&#x20AC;˘ FIREWOOD â&#x20AC;˘ LAND CLEARING STUMP GRINDING â&#x20AC;˘ TREE REMOVAL

860-529-8389 â&#x20AC;˘ 860-538-0980 Registration #608808

Fully Insured

HOME IMPROVEMENT DIRECTORY AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING

CLEANING SERVICES

Mull Bros, Inc. - We are a family business thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s been catering to your cooling & heating needs since 1945. We proudly install Lennox, American Standard, Weil McLain & other quality equipment (oil, gas & electric). We also service most makes & models. We are located next to the Wethersfield Post Office (behind the penguins and polar bears) at 61 Beaver Rd., 860- 529-8255

Polish/English speaking woman can clean your house with care. 2nd cleaning 50% off for new clients only. Satisfaction guaranteed. Insurance Bonded. Call Kasia 860-538-4885

BASEMENT WATERPROOFING JP Bachand Basement Waterproofing - Reliable local contractor. Hatchway leaks, foundation cracks, sub-floor drainage systems, sump pumps & yard drainage. Fully insured, free estimates, written guarantee. Our 27th year registered with CT Dept of Consumer Protection (Reg #511842). Call 860-666-9737

CERAMIC TILE Len and Jeff Schaller - Fix leaky showers. Regrouting in tubs. Bath, kitchen tile installed. 37 years experience. Neat, expert workmanship. Repairs a specialty. Call 242-5805

HAULING Dump Runs, Clean Outs, We Load It For You. Honest, Hardwoorking, Affordable. Max 860-916-5525

PLUMBING Positano Plumbing, Inc. - 31 years of serving Bristol and the surrounding areas. Specializing in all repairs. Plumbing & heating. Water heater replacement, boiler replacement. CT Lic #202691, 308931. For the best repair work in the area, please call 860-584-0012, 186 West St., Bristol.

REMODELING Full Service Remodeling - Windows, bathrooms and kitchens. All interior and exterior home or business remodeling and handyman service. You name it Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve done it! Excellent references and competitive

010333

Connecticut Realty

FREE SEAMLESS GUTTERS

WITH A ROOF REPLACEMENT AND SIDING JOB REMODELING FROM A-Z

rates with over 10 years experience. BBB Accredited. Call Mike 860-690-6505 or Kris 860-348-076 today for your free estimate. Fully insured and licensed. Lic #565969.

ROOFING LA Rich, LLC - Master Elite Roofing Contractor with over 500 satisfied customers. Our workmanship is warranteed for 20 years by shingle manufacturer. Best warranty in writing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Quality you can count on for years.â&#x20AC;? We do roof repairs, vinyl siding, windows, seamless gutters. Honest, competitive pricing. No hidden costs. Free estimates. Fully insured. Written warranties. Clean and courteous installers. CT Lic #565709. GAFELK ME #11852. 860-622-9800 or 860-747-4427. www.larichroofing.com

TREE SERVICE Total Tree Service & Landscaping, LLC Fall Cleanup & Lawn Maintenenace. Commerical & Residential. 75 ft. bucket truck. Chipper, firewood, land clearing, stump grinding, tree removal. Registra-tion #608808. Fully insured. 860-529-8389 or 860-538-0980.

to advertise call 860.231.2444


16 | Friday, January 21, 2011

NEWINGTON TOWN CRIER

BIG EVERYDAY EVERYDAY SAVINGS! SAVINGS! LOW LOW EVERYDAY EVERYDAY PRICES! PRICES! BIG

VEGGIE WORLD

5.00

giant grinders $

Starting at....

SPECIALS HOT SELF SERVE

SOUPS TO GO...

1.99 $ 3.49 3.99 4.99 1.99 $

8 OZ.

CHANGES DAILY!

16 OZ.

DELI

3.99 $ 3.99 $ 3.99 PECORINO $ ROMANO 5.99

CITERIO MORTADELLA w/ PISTACHIO’S

$

MOTHER GOOSE LIVERWURST TURKEY PASTRAMI

PRODUCE BEEFSTEAK $ TOMATO

VINE RIPENED TOMATO

.$ 79 .99

lb

lb

lb

lb

FRESH SALADS $ $ $

CHEF TUNA GARDEN

3.99 5.49 5.99 5.99

MARTIN $ ROSOLS VEAL LOAF BOARS HEAD $ ASIAGO CHEESE BOARS HEAD $ DELUXE HAM BOARS HEAD OVEN ROAST $ CHICKEN

lb

lb

lb

.79 $ .99

PLUM pkg TOMATO

lb

lb

4.99 $ 3.99 $ 4.49 $ 3.99 $ 3.99

SELECTION

KOHLER AMERICAN CHEESE LAND O LAKES AMERICAN CHEESE PROVOLONE CHEESE

ONIONS 3 LB

3.99 $ 4.99 $ 2.99

lb .99 $ 1.49

lb

POLISH KIELBASA

$

lb

lb

lb

ASSORTED APPLES

FROM

lb

FINLANDIA IMPORTED SWISS WONDERBAR GERMAN BOLOGNA

lb

3.69 $ 3.99

$

OLIVE AND PP LOAF

ROASTED, MAPLE, PEPPER, lb

lb

SMOKED TURKEY

lb

4.99

$

BAKERY

lb

FINE ASSORTED PASTRIES FROM EDDIE’S BAKERY.... muffins, cookies, turnovers, raisin muffins, babka, danish, fresh bread and rolls. Brooklyn Baking Co. Rye Bread & Armenian Bread $ lb TURKISH BAKLAVA

10.99

lb

1.29

PEARS$

YELLOW MILD CHEDDAR CHEESE

lb

SMOKED HONEY HAM

860-665-8288 010499

Cannot be combined with any other offer.

OLIVE BAR $ HUGE

ONIONS $ 2 LB

$

KUMATO BLACK lb TOMATO

lb

with FREE can of soda

.99 $ 49 3

$

SWEET CHERRIES

IDAHO POTATOES

lb 50 LB BAG

lb

RUSSET OR EASTERN POTATOES

5 LB BAG

20 $ 99 1

$

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK Deli Closes 1/2 Hour Early

Twin City Plaza, Newington

GREEN PEPPERS YELLOW or GREEN SQUASHES

.99

¢

.99

lb

lb

We accept Food Stamp Benefits

NTC flipbook  

local weekly newington newspaper

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you