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Fall 2018 Guide

WW

About the Writing Center

2

Locations & Hours

3

Undergraduate Students Academic Writing Writing Support Advanced Writing Opportunities

4-5 6 7

For Undergrads, Grad Students, Instructors & Staff Writing Retreats & Community-Building

8

New Media & Writing

9

Style, Grammar, & Punctuation

10

Documentation & The Writer’s Handbook

11

Letters, Résumés, & Applications

12

Graduate & Professional Students On the Academic Job Market Academic Writing Presentation Skills Dissertations & Long Projects

13 14 15 16-17

Instructors, Academic Staff & Faculty Approaches to Improve Teaching & Learning

18-19

For more information writing.wisc.edu


WELCOME to the Writing Center OUR GOAL To help UW-Madison undergraduate students and graduate/professional students across ALL disciplines and at ALL levels to become more effective and confident writers.

SUPPORT FOR THESE FREE SERVICES Writing Center services are offered free of charge to all UW-Madison undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, staff, and faculty through the support of the College of Letters and Science.

OUR SERVICES Individual Instruction Individual instruction is the heart of the Writing Center. These one-on-one meetings are with trained doctoral-level writing instructors who provide a helpful audience for students, pointing out possible problems in their drafts and offering advice for revisions.

Workshops We also offer free, non-credit workshops for undergraduate students, graduate and professional students, instructors, faculty, and academic staff on a variety of writing situations.

Outreach, Writing Fellows, and WAC Instructors, faculty, and academic staff should refer to our website and information on page 18-19 regarding our Outreach program, the Writing Fellows Program, and the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program.

ALL TYPES OF WRITING, ALL LEVELS When you browse our catalog, you see all types of writing—from undergraduate lab reports and PhD dissertations to PowerPoint presentations and cover letters. That variety of workshops is reflective of the many types of writing that students are working on in the Writing Center.

FIND OUT MORE Check out our website—writing.wisc.edu. You can also get regular updates on our workshops and other services by following us on Facebook or Twitter @uwwritingcenter.

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Locations & Hours WHERE WE ARE Our main location on the 6th floor of Helen C. White Hall is where the majority of our individual instruction and workshops take place. In addition to our email and skype instruction, we also provide instruction on a first-come, first-served basis in satellite locations throughout campus. See our schedule below.

Main Location Hours: 6171 Helen C. White Hall • • •

September 5-21: M-R 10:00 am-5:30 pm, F 10:00 am-3:00 pm September 24-December 12: M-R 10:00 am-8:30 pm, F 10:00 am-3:00 pm December 13, 14, 17: (R, F, M) 10:00 am-3:00 pm

Satellite Locations and Hours (below) Begin Sunday, September 16

Sun Center for Cultural Enrichment (Witte Hall, Room 125)

Mon

Tues

Wed

2:005:00pm

Multicultural Student Center (Red Gym, 2nd floor, MSC Student Org Suite)

2:005:00pm

5:308:30pm

5:308:30pm

College Library (Student Services)

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

Memorial Library (West Corridor)

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

Chadbourne (Rheta’s)

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

Dejope (Tutor room)

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

Gordon DEC (near Flamingo Run)

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

6:309:30pm

7-10pm

7-10pm

***

***

Skype (writing.wisc.edu/ skype) Email (***allow 3 business days)

Fri

6:009:00pm

Black Cultural Center (Red Gym, 1st floor)

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Thu

7-10pm ***

***

***

6:309:30pm

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writing.wisc.edu


UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Strengthen Your Academic Writing Five Secrets for Writing a Successful Undergraduate Lab Report Wednesday 10/10 Friday 11/16

3:30-4:45 Sec. 1 12:00-1:15 Sec. 2

FY5

This workshop for undergraduate students will focus on the core components of lab reports, including the introduction, methods and materials, results, and discussion sections. As we review sample lab reports, we’ll discuss specific strategies for improving their content, organization, argument, and clarity. Students are encouraged to bring drafts of their own lab reports in progress.

Building Your Argument: Strategies for Writing Stronger Papers Wednesday 10/10 3:00-4:15 Sec. 1 Thursday 11/1 4:30-5:45 Sec. 2 Do you struggle with convincing readers of your position or viewpoint? Learn how an argument is put together. In this workshop, we will examine the classic structure of argument-driven papers and break down the common persuasive moves within those parts. You will gain a sharper understanding of how to navigate the conventions to make your arguments smarter and more effective. This workshop is for undergraduates, especially first- and second-year students who are writing in the humanities or social sciences.

FY5

Writing In-Class Essay Exams That Impress Wednesday 9/26 Tuesday 12/4

4:30-5:45 4:00-5:15

Sec. 1 Sec. 2

FY5

Not sure what professors are looking for on an in-class essay exam? This workshop will answer your questions and prepare you for writing collegelevel essays during exams. We’ll discuss ways to study for these exams, plan your answers, start your essays effectively, and manage your time during the exams—so you’ll be ready to write well-developed, coherent essays!

Writing About Literature: How to Build an Engaging Interpretive Argument Thursday 9/27 4:00-5:15 Sec. 1 Monday 10/29 3:30-4:45 Sec. 2 Not sure how to go about writing an essay for your literature class? This workshop will get you moving in the right direction by addressing some of the biggest challenges undergraduate students experience when writing a literary analysis. With other workshop participants, you’ll practice strategies for close reading a text, learn to revise thesis statements for clarity and originality, and discuss options for organizing paragraphs and analyzing quotations. Whether you’re writing about a play, a poem, or a graphic novel, this workshop will provide you guided practice in the critical thinking skills you need to succeed in academic writing. Page 4

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Taming Your Undergraduate Research Papers—NEW! Wednesday 10/17 3:00-4:15 Sec. 1 Tuesday 11/13 4:30-5:45 Sec. 2 Research papers can be intimidating, but they don’t have to be! This workshop will break the research paper down to three key elements that work together during the research process: finding a research question that is original and compelling, composing a clear and persuasive thesis statement that answers your research question, and engaging and documenting your sources. Make your research papers more manageable and less stressful by learning useful strategies for tackling these tasks and keeping the information overload under control. If you are currently working on a research project, please bring it to the workshop. Undergraduates, especially freshman and sophomores who are new to college-level research projects, are encouraged to attend.

FY5

Read Like a Jedi: Five Effective Ways to Read Sources When Writing Your Research Papers—NEW!

FY5

Wednesday 10/10 4:30-5:45 Sec. 1 Tuesday 11/20 4:00-5:15 Sec. 2 When you’re writing a research paper, do you have to read complex academic articles? When doing that kind of reading, do you highlight almost everything? Do you read every sentence, but not remember what you read? Or do you not know where to start? In this workshop for undergrads, you will learn five strategies to help you read efficiently and with a clearer purpose, in order to write stronger papers.

FY5 FIRST-YEAR FIVE: Workshops to Help You Thrive in College If you’re a first-year student or a transfer student, one of the easiest ways to pick up new skills and prepare for college writing assignments is to attend some of our Writing Center workshops. While all of the workshops on Pages 4-6 are designed to help undergraduate students early in their academic careers, we’ve designated five key workshops as First-Year Five (FY5) workshops. We encourage you to take these five workshops— and even a few more—and you’ll give yourself a great start on many of the types of assignments that you’ll encounter.

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UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Support for Your Writing Think You’re a Bad Writer? Build Your Confidence and Learn How to Grow Your Writing Skills—NEW! Thursday 10/11 4:00-5:15 Sec. 1 Does improving your writing feel impossible? Do you lack confidence in the face of challenging writing assignments? This workshop, designed for undergrads, will provide you with concrete strategies for changing how you think about your potential as a writer. Beginning with common challenges of college writing, we will explore the many ways that you can develop more confidence and resilience as a writer—in college and beyond.

Ways into Writing: Easy (and Fun) Strategies for Unleashing Your Ideas—NEW! Wednesday 10/3 Tuesday 11/6

4:00-5:15 5:00-6:15

Sec. 1 Sec. 2

Do you freeze up when confronting a blank screen? Do you get stuck in the middle of a draft or when trying to revise? You’re not alone! This workshop will teach strategies for moving past writer’s block, generating ideas, organizing your thoughts, and taking your draft to the next level during the revision process. Strategies we will explore include mind mapping, diagramming, freewriting, using speech-to-text tools, envisioning alternate audiences, and even drawing. There is no right or wrong way to engage with writing—our emphasis will be on finding strategies that work for your own learning needs! If you are currently working on or about to start a writing project, please bring your materials to the workshop.

Communicating Your Writing Accessibility Needs with Course Instructors—NEW! Monday 9/17 Thursday 10/25

3:30-5:00 4:00-5:30

Sec. 1 Sec. 2

In this workshop, we’ll learn how to communicate your individual accessibility needs for academic writing assignments. Participants will explore what kinds of accommodations they may need and learn how to communicate thoughtfully and strategically at the beginning, middle, and end of their writing assignments. This workshop is primarily intended for students with disabilities but is open to all.

Register online at writing.wisc.edu Click “workshops” Page 6

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UNDERGRADUATE STUDENTS

Advanced Writing Opportunities Undergraduate Writing Groups—NEW! every Tuesday starting 9/25 from 4:00-5:30 Are you an undergraduate who is working—or just getting started—on a semester- or year-long writing project? Would you like encouragement and a supportive space as you navigate the writing process? Join a small group of other students from across the university at relaxed meetings where you’ll have the opportunity to log dedicated writing time each week and work through challenges with a community of your peers! A Writing Center instructor will attend meetings to help you set goals, structure your work time, and check in about your progress each week. This group is especially useful for those working on senior theses, senior projects, capstones, semester-long term papers, and articles for publication, but all undergraduates working on a longterm writing project are encouraged to apply! If you would like to join the group, please fill out a survey by September 19 at the following link: https:// go.wisc.edu/fhkorv. For questions, email Mia at alafaireet@wisc.edu If you are interested in starting your own writing group, see Starting and Sustaining a Writing Group on Page 17 for more information. The workshop is open to all students.

Writing Proposals for Hilldale and Holstrom Research Thursday 11/29 4:00-5:30 Sec. 1 If you’re applying for one of the University’s prestigious Hilldale or Holstrom research fellowships, don’t miss this workshop! You’ll have the chance to review successful applications from past years in a variety of fields and learn strategies that will help you stand out as a strong applicant. The application deadline for these awards will be in February 2019. Visit this link for more information about undergraduate Hilldale awards: http://awards.advising. wisc.edu/hilldale-undergraduatefaculty-research-fellowship/.

Thinking of Graduate School? Since writing plays a large part in all graduate programs, we highly suggest taking on a large writing project in your junior and/or senior year. One of the best ways to work on large projects is with help—and that’s where our writing groups (see above) come in. There are also research opportunities, such as the Hilldale and Holstrom Research Fellowships, which the Writing Center would love to help you apply for. See our workshop above. Finally, there’s are helpful workshops on applying for graduate school and professional programs. See Page 12 for more information.

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UNDERGRADS, GRAD STUDENTS, INSTRUCTORS & STAFF

Writing Retreats & Community-Building An Outdoor Writer’s Retreat: Walking, Thinking, and Writing—NEW! Friday 9/28 Saturday 10/13

1:30-4:30 Sec. 1 10:00-1:00 Sec. 2

Does relaxing between drafts seem impossible, or even counter-productive? Do you find you think better when moving instead of sitting at your computer? Are you interested in new ways to promote creativity in your writing process? Come to this workshop—designed for writers of all levels—to reflect on your current writing process, engage in a relaxing 45-minute group walk along the Lakeshore Path, and then buckle down to write with a refreshed body and mind. You’ll gain first-hand experience in learning why some of the greatest writers of all time, literary and science-based, attest to walking as a crucial part of their drafting and revision processes. In this alternative-style writer’s retreat, we will explore ways that walking can help focus your attention, build new connections between ideas, reflect on your writerly process, and take advantage of your surrounding environment to take control of your writing.

A Writer’s Retreat Friday 10/26 Tuesday 10/30 Thursday 11/15 Tuesday 11/27 Saturday 12/1 Wednesday 12/5

12:00-4:00 5:00-9:00 5:00-9:00 6:30-10:30 9:00-1:00 3:00-7:00

Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec. Sec.

1 2 (Ebling) 3 4 (Gordon)*especially for undergrads 5 6 (Ebling)

It’s time to get moving with your term paper, dissertation, thesis, novel, research project, or other major writing project. And time is exactly what a writer’s retreat offers. Retreat participants will engage in brief goal-setting exercises followed by time to write, with Writing Center staff on hand for consultation. Registration is limited to 20 participants for each section.

Writing for Social Justice—NEW! dates TBA (see our website for more details) • What kinds of power do words really have? • What does it mean to be a writer-activist? • How can each of us get involved in writing for social justice? Join us for lively discussion of these questions at this new 3-part workshop series. Featuring a variety of speakers and formats, this inclusive series is designed to engage all members of the UW-Madison community, from undergraduates to faculty. All are welcome, and we hope you will join the conversation!

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UNDERGRADS, GRAD STUDENTS, INSTRUCTORS & STAFF

New Media & Writing Communicating Your Message with PowerPoint: Livening Up Your Presentations Wednesday 9/19 Thursday 11/1

4:30-6:00 3:30-5:00

Sec. 1 Sec. 2

Come to this workshop to explore how well-designed PPT graphics and animations can take you beyond linear presentations, how limiting text avoids information overload, and how creating compelling presentations can effectively engage your audience and emphasize your message rather than your slides.

How to Email Like a Professional Friday 9/28 Thursday 11/15

2:00-3:30 4:00-5:30

Sec. 1 Sec. 2

In this workshop, we’ll talk about how to use email effectively for professional communications, and we’ll have fun looking at examples of what NOT to do. There will be plenty of time for your questions and concerns.

Creating Research Posters Friday 11/2 1:00-2:30 Sec. 1 If you need to create a research poster, this workshop is for you! In this planning workshop, you’ll analyze sample posters and discuss the process for making an effective research poster. DoIT offers additional workshops where you’ll experiment with programs to begin designing your own research poster. Please consult their website for more information about their design courses.

Writing with Scrivener: Software to Keep Your Long Projects Organized Friday 11/9 12:00-2:00 Sec. 1 Are you working on a large writing project? You’re not alone if you struggle to keep your sources, notes, and drafts organized. In this workshop, co-taught by the Writing Center and DoIT, you will get training in Scrivener software and explore ways it can facilitate your thinking and writing.

Connect with us! @uwwritingcenter Page 9

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UNDERGRADS, GRAD STUDENTS, INSTRUCTORS & STAFF

Style, Grammar & Punctuation Grammar I: A Review of English Grammar* Monday 9/24 3:30-5:30 Sec. 1 Friday 10/19 12:30-2:30 Sec. 2 This workshop will refresh and expand your vocabulary for talking about grammar by generating and addressing some common grammar problems together. We’ll briefly review some of the fundamental rules of grammar and the principles behind them and work through errors often related to nouns, pronouns, and verbs.

PUNCTUATION! Punctuation? Punctuation. Tuesday 10/16 3:30-5:30 Sec. 1 Here’s your chance to review the basics of punctuation in a friendly environment. We’ll take a logical and systematic approach to punctuation which you’ll be able to remember and use long after the workshop is over.

Grammar II: Grammar and Editing for Style and Clarity* Thursday 10/4 4:00-6:00 Sec. 1 Tuesday 11/6 3:00-5:00 Sec. 2 In this workshop, we’ll review principles for writing grammatically correct and stylistically clear phrases, clauses, and sentences. We’ll discuss common problems like misplaced modifiers, faulty parallelism, comma splices, and sentence fragments. We’ll also emphasize building a “self-editing” checklist which participants will develop by applying workshop principles to a piece of their own writing. A solid grasp of English grammar or Grammar I is recommended before attending this workshop. *Note: These grammar workshops are a review, rather than an introduction, of English grammar. They provide in-depth explanations of the parts of speech and rules of usage that are most commonly misapplied in academic writing.

Improving Style Friday 10/19-11/9 1:30-3:00 Sec. 1 Tuesday 11/6-11/27 3:30-5:00 Sec. 2 This four-week workshop is for undergraduate and graduate students who want to improve their writing style. We’ll consider the effects of stylistic variations while we review standards for clear and readable prose. This workshop is especially appropriate for students who write about complex ideas, and who want to make these ideas accessible to their readers.

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UNDERGRADS, GRAD STUDENTS, INSTRUCTORS & STAFF

Documentation & The Writer’s Handbook The Basics of APA Documentation Thursday 9/20 4:00-6:00 Sec. 1 Monday 10/22 3:00-5:00 Sec. 2 Do you have to document sources in your paper following APA style, a documentation system commonly used in psychology, nursing, education, and other social sciences? Come to this workshop to learn and practice the basics of citing sources within your paper, compiling a reference list, and using headings—all according to the latest APA guidelines.

Creating Tables and Figures in APA Research Papers—NEW! Wednesday 9/26 4:00-5:30 Sec. 1 Thursday 11/8 3:30-5:00 Sec. 2 Within APA research papers, tables and figures are a crucial part of presenting ideas and theories, distilling previous literature, and reporting your research findings. How do you design effective tables and figures, ones that make data and comparisons easy for readers to grasp? In this introductory workshop, you will learn the basics: when to use tables and figures; how to discuss them within the text of your paper; how to make the layout, titles, and headings of your tables and figures clear, consistent, readable, and concise. Using examples from student papers and from published sources, we will also analyze how effective tables and figures tell stories and make arguments about data.

The Writer’s Handbook Your online source for writing guidance 24/7 • • • • •

Stuck on citation format? Know that you need help writing clear, concise sentences? Want information on writing a resume, cover letter, or personal statement? Want to learn the basics of writing a literature review, grant propossal, annotated bibliography, research poster, or scientific report? Have a research paper looming, and you’re not sure where to start?

The Writing Center’s Writer’s Handbook is an extensive online resource that covers academic and professional writing, the writing process and structure, writing style, grammar and punctuation, and citation format. At any time of the day or night, you can find information, guidance,examples, exercises, and even handouts on these topics and many more.

writing.wisc.edu/handbook Page 11

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UNDERGRADS, GRAD STUDENTS, INSTRUCTORS & STAFF

Letters, Résumés & Applications Writing Résumés and Cover Letters Wednesday 9/19 3:30-5:00 Sec. 1 Thursday 10/18 4:00-5:30 Sec. 2 Monday 12/3 3:00-4:30 Sec. 3 In today’s competitive job market, it’s more important than ever to make your credentials stand out above the crowd. Come to this workshop to consider what employers say they want in résumés and cover letters and how to meet those criteria impressively.

Personal Statements for Health Professions Programs Thursday 12/6 4:00-5:30 Sec. 1 Designed for those applying to professional health programs, this workshop will share insights for writing personal statements—ones that create a compelling portrait of yourself and give a sense of who you are as an individual, a student, and a future health professional. There will be time to review some examples and answer your questions about this important piece of writing.

Writing Personal Statements for Law School Applications Tuesday 9/18 3:30-5:00 Sec. 1 Designed for those applying to law school, this workshop will consider general principles for writing convincing and persuasive personal statements—ones that engage and resonate with their readers, avoid clichés, and earn those acceptance letters! There will be time to discuss some successful, well-written examples, as well.

Peace Corps Application/Reapplication Workshop: Writing the Résumé and Motivation Statement Wednesday 9/26 3:30-5:00 Sec. 1 Co-led by a Writing Center instructor and a returned Peace Corps volunteer, this workshop will walk you through the Peace Corps application process, briefly discuss the expectations of a federal résumé, and help you draw on your experiences to write an effective Peace Corps motivation statement.

Writing Application Essays and Statements of Purpose for Graduate School Tuesday 9/25 3:30-5:00 Sec. 1 Wednesday 10/17 4:00-5:30 Sec. 2 Monday 11/19 3:30-5:00 Sec. 3 For those applying to masters and doctoral programs in the sciences, social sciences, humanities, or the arts, we’ll explore principles for writing convincing application essays, share tips for highlighting your undergraduate work, and inspire you to make the most of this opportunity to shine. Page 12

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GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS

On the Academic Job Market These workshops are intended for advanced graduate students preparing to enter the academic job market.

Writing Statements of Teaching Philosophy Tuesday 9/11 4:00-5:30 Sec. 1 Friday 10/12 1:00-2:30 Sec. 2 This workshop will identify what a statement of teaching philosophy is (or ought to be), what it should encompass, and what it should look like.

Writing Statements of Current and Future Research Monday 9/17 3:30-5:00 Sec. 1 Tuesday 10/30 3:30-5:00 Sec. 2 Come to this workshop to learn how to write an effective statement about your current and future research. We’ll critically analyze some sample statements and consider what experts recommend yours should include.

Composing the All-Important Cover Letter Wednesday 9/19 3:00-4:30 Monday 10/1 2:00-3:30 Tuesday 10/30 1:00-2:30 This workshop is an introduction to demonstrate how you are the most

Sec. 1 Sec. 2 Sec. 3 using your cover letter effectively to qualified candidate for an academic position.

Writing an Effective Academic CV Friday 9/14 2:00-3:30 Sec. 1 Wednesday 10/17 4:30-6:00 Sec. 2 In this workshop, we’ll discuss how audience, purpose, and discipline-specific conventions impact a CV’s effectiveness. In the process, we’ll share strategies for drafting and strengthening your own CV.

Writing Diversity Statements for Academic Jobs—NEW! Tuesday 9/18 2:30-4:00 Sec. 1 Friday 10/19 12:30-2:00 Sec. 2 Diversity statements are a new and increasingly common addition to academic job applications. Join us for a workshop on writing a diversity statement that demonstrates to search committees how your teaching, research, and service will enhance diversity and equity efforts on their campus. We’ll discuss what a diversity statement is, study samples from across disciplines to identify effective strategies, and begin crafting rough drafts.

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GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS

Enhance Your Academic Writing Writing Literature Reviews of Published Research Friday 10/5 12:30-2:00 Sec. 1 Wednesday 11/7 12:00-1:30 Sec. 2 This workshop is for those who need to write a review that brings together many different texts. Join us as we practice developing and organizing themes from your research, discuss strategies for showing the argument of your lit review, and peruse samples from various disciplines.

Researching and Writing Literature Reviews in the Sciences Wednesday 10/31 12:00-1:30 Sec. 1 Join instructors from the Writing Center and Steenbock Library to analyze lit reviews in the sciences that bring together many different research publications. You’ll consider approaches for focusing your topic, searching for papers and publications, reading critically, developing themes, and organizing your material. Workshop will be held at Steenbock Library.

Writing Book Reviews for Publication Friday 10/12 12:30-2:00 Sec. 1 If writing a critical book review for publication or coursework is in your plans, don’t miss this workshop! We’ll discuss how to read a text critically, develop evaluation criteria, structure the review, and ensure appropriate tone and style. For reviews that bring together many different texts, please see “Writing Literature Reviews of Published Research.”

Writing Graduate Research Proposals Friday 9/28 12:00-1:30 Sec. 1 Thursday 11/8 12:00-1:30 Sec. 2 Roll up your sleeves for this hands-on workshop! We’ll explore ways to get a thesis or dissertation started; to organize your introduction, literature review, and methods sections; and to obtain useful feedback.

Communicating Your Writing Accessibility Needs with Course Instructors—NEW! Monday 9/17 Thursday 10/25

3:30-5:00 4:00-5:30

Sec. 1 Sec. 2

In this workshop, we’ll learn how to communicate your individual accessibility needs for academic writing assignments. Participants will explore what kinds of accommodations they may need and learn how to communicate thoughtfully and strategically at the beginning, middle, and end of their writing assignments. This workshop is primarily intended for students with disabilities but is open to all. Page 14

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GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS

Refine Your Presentation Skills You’re Researching What? Crafting a 3-Minute Talk That Appeals to the Public Tuesday 10/16

4:30-5:45

Sec. 1

Are you participating in the 3-Minute Thesis competition, or are you generally interested in learning how to craft a concise, general explanation of your research? This workshop will help you prepare an accessible, intriguing threeminute talk. Open to all disciplines. Sponsored by the Writing Center and the Graduate School Office of Professional Development.

Developing and Delivering Conference Presentations Monday 10/15 1:00-2:30 Sec. 1 Thursday 11/29 4:00-5:30 Sec. 2 This workshop will hone your skills for planning, organizing, and delivering presentations for scholarly audiences, including incorporating visual aids and preparing for the Q&A.

Communicating Your Message with PowerPoint: Livening Up Your Presentations Wednesday 9/19 4:30-6:00 Sec. 1 Thursday 11/1 3:30-5:00 Sec. 2 Come to this workshop to explore how well-designed PPT graphics and animations can take you beyond linear presentations, how limiting text avoids information overload, and how creating compelling presentations can effectively engage your audience and emphasize your message rather than your slides.

Creating Research Posters Friday 11/2 1:00-2:30 Sec. 1 If you need to create a research poster, this workshop is for you! In this planning workshop, you’ll analyze sample posters and discuss a sevenstep process for making an effective research poster. DoIT offers additional workshops where you’ll experiment with Adobe Illustrator (or other programs) to begin designing your own research poster. Please consult the Writing Center website for more information about DoIT’s design courses.

Connect with us! @uwwritingcenter Page 15

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GRADUATE & PROFESSIONAL STUDENTS

Support for Dissertations & Long Projects Graduate Writing Groups: Structured Writing Time for Large Projects At the Writing Center, we believe that community and accountability, along with setting achievable goals, play a significant role in completing major writing projects. Past participants in our weekly writer’s groups have finished chapters, articles, and have even defended their dissertations! Since the Writing Center wants to help you achieve these milestones, we offer graduate students space and time each week to maximize their productivity. Each three-hour meeting begins with goal setting and ends with brief discussions about writing strategies. The bulk of each meeting, however, will be devoted to structured writing time so that you can make substantial progress on your writing projects. Please sign up by September 11. See the Writing Center’s website for details. Questions? Email Mari at mclewis2@wisc.edu.

Getting Your Dissertation off the Ground—Parts 1 and 2 These workshops are aimed at helping dissertators stay on track, from proposal to completion.

Part 1: Writing the Proposal Wednesday 10/3 12:00-1:30 Sec. 1 This workshop focuses on choosing a topic, selecting a committee, and writing the dissertation proposal.

Part 2: Writing the First Chapter Tuesday 10/23 3:00-4:30 Sec. 1 This workshop focuses on managing the dissertation and employing key action plans for drafting chapters, seeking feedback, creating a supportive writing group, and staying motivated to cross the finish line.

Writing with Scrivener: Software to Keep Your Long Projects Organized Friday 11/9

12:00-2:00 Sec. 1

Are you working on a thesis, dissertation, book, or other large writing project? You’re not alone if you struggle to keep your sources, notes, and drafts organized. Scrivener can help you organize your long writing project into one clean work-space. In this workshop, co-taught by the Writing Center and DoIT, you will get training in the software and explore ways it can facilitate your thinking and writing.

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Starting and Sustaining a Writing Group—NEW! Monday 10/1 4:00-5:30 Sec. 1 Have you always wanted to create or join a writing group, but were nervous about getting started? Have you been part of writing groups in the past, but struggled with mismatched goals or commitment levels among group members? In this discussion-based workshop we consider how to design, organize, and maintain an effective and supportive writing group—one that helps encourage progress and accountability among its members. Open to creative and/or academic writers at all levels, this workshop will rely on conversation and activities to help you develop a toolkit for making a writing group work for you.

An Outdoor Writer’s Retreat: Walking, Thinking, and Writing—NEW! Friday 9/28 Saturday 10/13

1:30-4:30 Sec. 1 10:00-1:00 Sec. 2

Does relaxing between drafts seem impossible, or even counter-productive? Do you find you think better when moving instead of sitting at your computer? Are you interested in new ways to promote creativity in your writing process? Come to this workshop—designed for writers of all levels—to reflect on your current writing process, engage in a relaxing 45-minute group walk along the Lakeshore Path, and then buckle down to write with a refreshed body and mind. You’ll gain first-hand experience in learning why some of the greatest writers of all time, literary and science-based, attest to walking as a crucial part of their drafting and revision processes. In this alternative-style writer’s retreat, we will explore ways that walking can help focus your attention, build new connections between ideas, reflect on your writerly process, and take advantage of your surrounding environment to take control of your writing.

**Our regular Writer’s Retreats will be offered this semester as well. See Page 8 for more information.** Mellon-Wisconsin Dissertation Writing Camps Facilitated by senior Writing Center staff, these week-long camps provide participants with intensive, focused time to write and revise their dissertation chapters in a supportive atmosphere alongside other writers. Those selected to participate will have multiple opportunities to share writing goals, experiment with various writing strategies, and receive feedback on their work. For information on the next dissertation writing camps to be offered in January, please visit grad.wisc.edu/pd/dissertation.

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writing.wisc.edu


INSTRUCTORS, ACADEMIC STAFF & FACULTY

Approaches to Improve Teaching & Learning Creating and Sequencing Effective Writing Assignments Thursday 9/13 1:00-2:30 Sec. 1 What can you do to get great work from your students? Design great assignments! In this workshop, we’ll share five proven strategies for designing writing assignments in any discipline and for sequencing those assignments to accomplish course goals and outcomes. We’ll also discuss samples of effective writing assignments, consider how assignment design can help you respond to students’ work more efficiently, and draft a writing assignment for your classes.

Responding to and Evaluating Student Writing...Without Getting Buried Under the Paper Load Tuesday 9/25 3:00-4:30 Sec. 1 Friday 11/16 1:00-2:30 Sec. 2 Want to motivate your students to revise and improve their writing in any discipline? This workshop focuses on giving feedback that challenges and supports students in the writing process. We’ll look at current research about feedback, try out different forms of responding effectively and efficiently to student papers, and share advice for getting students engaged in their writing.

Motivating Students and Coaching Revision through Writing Conferences Monday 10/8 3:00-4:30 Sec. 1 In this interactive workshop, we’ll examine the valuable practice of talking oneon-one with students about their writing. We’ll discuss research that shows the usefulness of these conversations, watch videotaped conferences to generate best practices for getting students involved in the discussion, and explore ways to make the most of your limited time with your students.

Designing Brief Low-Stakes Writing Assignments That Help Students Learn—NEW! Thursday 10/18 1:00-2:30 Sec. 1 Want to improve students’ critical thinking and learning? Research shows that low-stakes, or informal, writing assignments can help students generate ideas for formal assignments, read difficult texts, connect new knowledge to prior knowledge, and deepen their thinking about complex concepts. In this interactive workshop, we’ll explore a variety of informal writing assignments and activities that you can adapt for your own courses.

Register online at writing.wisc.edu Click “workshops” Page 18

writing.wisc.edu


Using Online Tools in Canvas to Evaluate and Respond to Student Writing—NEW! Wednesday 10/24 1:00-2:30 Sec. 1 In this hands-on workshop, we’ll explore various tools for evaluating student writing in Canvas, UW-Madison’s new learning management system. We will try out Canvas’ SpeedGrader tool, which can be used to annotate student drafts, create rubrics for writing assignments, and respond efficiently and effectively to short writing assignments, even in large lecture classes. We will also think critically about the strengths and limitations of Speedgrader and look at examples of how instructors across campus utilize Canvas to incorporate and teach writing in their classes. Before the workshop wraps up, there will be time for you to plan ways to use Canvas for your own classes.

Writing Recommendation Letters Monday 11/5 3:00-4:30 Sec. 1 Do you feel unprepared when asked to write letters of recommendation for your students? Are you uncertain about how much to say, how many details to include, or what tone to take? In this workshop, we’ll look at a sample of letters and we’ll offer advice about writing letters that are honest and effective.

Faculty, Instructional Staff, and TAs: Your Influence Matters At the Writing Center, we often hear that an instructor’s recommendation encouraged students to use our services. Here are a few ways that you can help us reach your students: 1.

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Encourage your students to make an appointment at the Writing Center, its satellite locations, or via email/skype (if students are off-campus or have circumstances that make traveling to campus difficult). Recommend workshops to your undergraduate and graduate/ professional students. We offer workshops in academic writing, writing with new media, grammar and style, letters and applications—and much more. Invite the Writing Center to visit your class. We offer outreach services and a thriving undergraduate Writing Fellows program. See our website for more information. Add links to our Writer’s Handbook in your assignments. There you’ll find guidance and examples in areas such as academic writing, documentation, thesis statements, writing professional letters, etc. Many of the pages have downloadable pdfs of the materials. And if you need instructional support, please reach out to our Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program, which runs the instructor workshops on these pages and offers additional training, help, and advice. You can find more information online at writing.wisc.edu/wac.

writing.wisc.edu


Register online for all workshops at writing.wisc.edu

Writing Center services are offered free of charge to all UW-Madison undergraduate and graduate students, post-docs, staff, and faculty through the support of the College of Letters and Science. More detailed workshop descriptions, updates, and online registration can be found at writing.wisc.edu. Unless noted, workshops are held in or near the Writing Center: 6171 Helen C. White Hall 600 North Park Street 608.263.1992

Connect with us! @uwwritingcenter

Fall 2018 Writing Center Guide  

The Fall 2018 Writing Center Guide focuses on the writing workshops that we offer for undergraduates, graduate and professional students, an...

Fall 2018 Writing Center Guide  

The Fall 2018 Writing Center Guide focuses on the writing workshops that we offer for undergraduates, graduate and professional students, an...

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