Page 1

SEPTEMBER 2018

PROMOTING SAFETY IN THE CRANE INDUSTRY Utilising technology to provide safer crane operations Exploring innovation in crane safety


From the Editor September 2018

Welcome to the re-launch edition of Lifting Matters. We are excited to return with our continuing mission to share health and safety information among members of the crane industry. Lifting Matters is a forum for our industry to be open and honest about safety incidents and to share our knowledge for the benefit of others. Each quarter we will share safety developments, major incidents, near-misses, government initiatives, innovations, health and wellbeing stories and more. First published in 2009, Lifting Matters began as a monthly safety newsletter for the crane industry featuring a consolidation of crane incidents and near-misses from around the world. Our vision for Lifting Matters going forward is that it becomes an influential and collaborative communication tool for our industry. Therefore, we welcome content, suggestions, feedback and input from crane companies throughout Australia and internationally. The objective is to have Lifting Matters in every crane cabin in Australia and around the world. Our crane operators, riggers and dogmen, who make many of the critical decisions, spend plenty of time waiting on standby in the field. What better way to use this time than educating ourselves and each other about safety learnings in our industry? Our objective is to have this booklet readily available to stimulate discussion and idea sharing in the field on real work sites. We want every crane operator to know of and learn from each of the incidents reported. There are plenty of horror stories of crane incidents available online.

Often these incident reports focus on the events of the incident, but at Lifting Matters we focus on what is learnt from these events. We hope to serve as a learning tool for both our frontline and support team members to prevent unnecessary reoccurrence of incidents on worksites. This is why we are producing Lifting Matters in different formats, including online at our website, as a downloadable PDF, or in a printed hardcopy. If you prefer printed copies, please send your postal address and the number of copies you require to liftingmatters@writestrategy.com.au. Lifting Matters will be also available for download at www.liftingmatters.com. au or you can subscribe to receive an email copy each quarter. If you have an incident report, ideas about safer and more efficient ways of working, prevalent issues, important reminders or anything safety related, we want to hear from you. Email liftingmatters@writestrategy. com.au for all contributions, questions and subscription information. Read, share and act upon the issues raised in this forum. We look forward to working together to protect our people and save lives in the crane industry. In this issue, we are thrilled to welcome a number of valuable contributors including TRT, Verton Group, CICA, Worksafe Qld and Safe Work Australia.

Thank you FROM THE LIFTING MATTERS TEAM liftingmatters@writestrategy.com.au

Thanks to this edition’s contributors


Contents EDITORIAL

2

FEATURE ARTICLE Utilising technology to provide safer crane operations

4

INDUSTRY SAFETY NEWS CICA CrewSafe

7

INDUSTRY INNOVATION World-First Technology Set to Revolutionise Crane Safety

8

INCIDENT REPORT Auckland, New Zealand Army Bay, New Zealand Gold Coast, Australia Melbourne, Australia

10 11 12 14

WORKING SAFELY National Safe Work Month New Slew Safe - Turning the Corner on Pick and Carry Crane Safety

16 18

HEALTH & WELLBEING How will you show your support of Mental Health Week 2018?

19


Feature Article

Utilising technology to provide safer crane operations By ALBERT SMITH, Lifting Matters Chief Sponsor

After more than 40 years in the crane and construction industry, I still find there’s never a dull moment. Why? The engineering solutions and technological innovations which continue to evolve offer inspiration and endless opportunities to advance as an industry, particularly in keeping our people safe. Through appropriate application of the technology at hand we have an opportunity to drastically reduce human plant interactions, reduce lift cycle times and improve quality outcomes, in turn working toward reducing those 200 serious incidents per year down to zero. So, what are the technologies available to us and how should we be utilising them to provide a safer workplace and better safety outcomes? It was back in 1977 that I recall the first major leap forward in innovative crane technologies, when Robert Way started the Robway Crane Safety systems business in Adelaide, Australia. Bob and his team produced a crane load indicator system which was world leading technology at that time. Bob was a crane owner himself facing challenges such as overloading and other crane accidents due to the nature of the machines of the day, which lacked suitable safety systems. Over the past 40 years,

4

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018


Feature Article

Robway Safety Systems have been fitted to over 10,000 cranes in Australasia and around the world. Robway has also been a specialist supplier of standard load safety systems to several major manufacturers since 1983 and has made a significant contribution to crane safety in Australia and around the world. This technology has been legally mandated equipment in cranes for many years and is now available from several independent suppliers and via every crane manufacturer in their new equipment. After various international ownership and branding changes, Robway has recently again become an Adelaide owned and based company. Today, Robway is well known for their RCI and Load Indicator product range both on-shore and off-shore, dating back several decades. They have also developed capability in hydraulics controls, integrated highway instrument panel data and video camera systems. The next notable progression in crane technologies was from Liebherr, who led the charge in terms of manufacturers to introduce new technology into production model mobile cranes. In 2007, Liebherr released the Liebherr Computer

Control (LICCON2) to the market. This is said to be the most modern computer system in the world for controlling and monitoring mobile cranes. This technology enables crane movements to be controlled safely from outside the cab with greatly improved visibility. With the aid of Bluetooth technology, a crane driver can remotely control the majority of crane setup and operation. Then, in 2013, Liebherr introduced Vario-Ballast and Vario-Base as a feature on many machines. Vario-Ballast features an easily adjustable counterweight radius using standard mechanically adjusted ballasting cylinders. This solution enables flexible use for both constricted conditions and large radius. The Vario-Base enables each individual crane support to be extended to an arbitrary length, which also allows for safe crane operation in construction locations. These technologies provide increased safety and ease of use, thus eliminating strain on the crane driver who can then concentrate fully on the hoist. These features also significantly improve capacity, productivity and safety of mobile cranes and will become standard features of all mobile cranes over time. Monitoring systems have also come a long way in my 40 years in the industry. We now have systems to monitor location, speed, load cycles, loads and configurations, and many of the daily maintenance checks on the cranes in real time using combinations of GPS technology, cellular communications and internet-based data management. These features all improve safety and productivity and are becoming an essential “stay in business� tool for crane owners and operators. The most recent wave of smart technology being developed in Australia is in under-hook devices. The Verton R-Series is a great example. Verton is a Brisbane based technology company who have developed the world’s first remote-controlled electromechanical under-hook load rotation system. This device can be utilised under any free swivelling crane hook. It does not require any cables or oil supply hoses connected to the crane or suspended to the ground. It also does not induce a reverse rotational torque on the hook. The R-Series

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

5


Feature Article

is remotely controlled, which improves safety outcomes by removing riggers from the lift zone. It utilises a similar concept to a gyrocopter, with high speed spinning fly wheels electronically adjusted to rotate the crane load under the hook. This enables precise rotational manoeuvring, including the ability to pre-programme lifts to a specific load orientation relative to the crane boom or to structures or co-ordinates. Verton’s R-Series innovation negates the need for human held tag lines, and further eliminates the need for workers to stand under loads. It is particularly effective for use on extremely high lifts when tag lines to personnel on the ground are not possible, and where reconnection of tag lines to personnel on the top of the structures near the landing point is unsafe and impractical. The Verton rotational device also provides huge benefits in single hook ship loading applications where fast and safe rotation of the load to the correct orientation for stowage position is critical. Verton estimates this technology will deliver a 50% reduction in hook time for repetitive lifting such as ship loading or precast panel placement. Another Brisbane company continuing with the development of under-hook technologies is Buildvation. They have created a hook verticality device known as “Rigger Assist". This newly-patented electronic device is attached to the hook of the crane and accurately measures in real time the angle deviation from vertical of the hook. This is used to assist the crane operator in ensuring the deflected loaded boom tip is directly over the centre of gravity of the load at the point of lifting to eliminate load swing on lift off. This information is transmitted to an output screen in the crane cabin and to a smart glasses view screen which can be used by the rigger while in the field working. Rigger Assist is intended to reduce load swing and increase the speed of rigging and lifting loads. Smart glasses open up an entirely new area of technological innovation in the crane and construction industry which I won’t cover here, but no doubt we will further explore in the future.

"We have to approach smart technology and automation capabilities as an opportunity to improve the way we do things, including our safety outcomes."

We can’t really talk about technology in the crane industry without facing the conversation around automation. There are some fearmongers in the industry who claim automation will do humans out of jobs – but I believe companies and contractors who think that way are about to get left behind. We have to approach smart technology and automation capabilities as an opportunity to improve the way we do things, including our safety outcomes. Automation is on the rise. The job description of a crane operator has already changed and

6

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018

will continue to change as the technology advances. I believe automated technologies will release significant pressure and energy off our field workers, enabling them to instead focus on more critical lift decisions. For example, CAT has designed a hydraulic excavator with ‘E-Fence Technology’. The E-Fence automatically stops the machine’s movements within defined boundaries in front, beside, above and below the machine. In the event of an operator’s lapse of concentration, the machine can automatically freeze before hitting an underground service for example. It also reduces operator fatigue by reducing over swinging and digging. This technology can also be used for cranes to prevent boom collisions on multi crane sites, and to protect against accidental slew into power lines and other obstacles. Manufacturing industries have led the charge in terms of automation. Both fully- and semi-automated cranes are now integral to automotive manufacturing, food and consumer goods production, shipbuilding, metals processing and the like. Fully automated gantry cranes are revolutionising the maritime industry and container handling practices. This has improved safety outcomes for the personnel involved in these works and allows for the elimination of manual handling. These industries involve standardised and repetitive processes. When it comes to more diverse and complex construction activities, we are yet to fully harness the remote operation or automation capabilities. There is a huge opportunity for the crane industry to partner with and support constructors. Within the building sector, erection of structural frames is one of the highest risk activities on a construction site and for the majority of highrise developments there is still a large requirement for human effort. This human effort puts our people in close proximity to the lifted load, and at risk of injury due to falls from heights and collision with the loads. Lendlease are working tirelessly to improve safety, sustainability and efficiency within the construction sector. They are leading the Australian market in engineered timber buildings, maximising pre-fabrication and designing for efficient onsite assembly. Crane companies have a role to play here in collaborating with companies such as Lendlease to design for construction and design for safety. I believe the next steps for us as an industry will involve looking beyond our own backyards to other industries and other applications to uncover the best ways to combine and integrate these technologies. Integrating technology across the entire project lifecycle will be key to maximising safety and productivity outcomes. What excites me are the engineering challenges the latest technology presents. Those who can leverage the technology on offer for maximum benefit will win. Jobs abound for the technology-savvy engineers ready to adopt and integrate the tools at their disposal. Engineering of complex lift plans both now and into the future is a moving beast. Through this renewed and refreshed Lifting Matters my sincere hope is to see many more innovations and safety initiatives shared across the industry. Together we can improve safety for all workers. By simultaneously improving productivity we will not only thrive as an industry, but prepare ourselves for the imminent construction boom.


Working Safely

CICA CrewSafe This article was contributed by CICA

Each operator is assessed using the same criteria and by demonstrating those criteria on a specific make and model of crane. A High-Risk Work Licence (HRWL) is currently the only requirement for crane operators to commence operating cranes, irrespective of experience. High-Risk Work Licences (HRWL) are issued by state regulators but recognised nationally. Public and private Registered Training Organisations (RTOs) offer HRWL courses and testing, and the quality of the training varies. The health and safety issue is that currently, a HRWL is only an entry requirement into industry and experience in the industry or with crane operation is not a mandated requirement. To combat this, construction sites often require a HRWL to be supplemented with a Verification of Competency (VOC). Content for VOCs is currently undefined and unregulated. However, the goal of VOCs is to assess crane operators on specific equipment types, i.e. All Terrain Cranes, Crawler Cranes and Rough Terrain Cranes. Most construction sites have a preferred VOC provider which results in numerous VOCs being completed for the same operator on the same crane for different job sites.

CICA, as the peak crane industry body, has worked with crane owners, equipment manufacturers, rigging equipment retailers, CraneSafe Assessors, tier one construction companies, regulators and qualified training assessors both nationally and internationally to develop a standardised assessment program that is machine-specific, impartial and peer-assessed. The consensus was that the solution for the crane industry is CrewSafe. This assessment module uses an app for documenting evidence of competency. Each operator is assessed using the same criteria, and by demonstrating those criteria on a specific make and model of crane, the operator’s familiarity with unique functions are confirmed. Operators are assessed by peer operator assessors who are experts in handling a specific crane. Photo and video evidence of the assessments being successfully completed ensures impartiality and provides a frame of reference that is universally accessible by site supervisors.

For more information visit the CrewSafe website www.crewsafe.com.au

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

7


Industry Innovation

World-First Technology Set to Revolutionise Crane Safety The vocation of crane operation and rigging has existed since 600BC when the Greeks invented the first crane. While we have seen significant advancement in heavy machinery and cranes which has eliminated many high-risk manual duties, we have seen very little change in the role of riggers. To this day, riggers and dogmen must still collect and guide the taglines, which increases the risk of serious or fatal workplace incidents. Now, with the introduction of remote operation technology we are finally seeing significant improvement in safety outcomes for riggers and dogmen. Verton Technologies is at the forefront of this progress, having launched a world-first technology which will revolutionise crane operations globally by improving safety and productivity. Verton has developed the R-series, the world’s first remote load-management system, to eliminate

8

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018

“With the introduction of remote operation technology we are finally seeing significant improvement in safety outcomes for riggers and dogmen." the need for human held taglines to control suspended loads. The solution is designed to dramatically boost productivity and safety in industries which use cranes and hoists. Many industries continue to rely on outdated and dangerous tagline methods. Moving heavy loads using cranes or hoists


Industry Innovation

A condenser unit required removal and replacement in the roof cavity of a hotel complex on a prominent and busy intersection in the Brisbane CBD.

is dangerous with industry research showing proximity to a load, let alone actual contact, accounts for 80 per cent of crane-related fatalities. The R-series reduces the risk of these accidents occurring by ensuring no human contact is required for managing suspended loads. “This world-first technology will revolutionise suspended load-management for the transport and construction industries,” Verton CEO Trevor Bourne said. Mr Bourne said Verton had begun manufacturing the R-series and is ready to take orders from interested industries. In its simplest form, the R-series is the world’s first remotecontrolled electromechanical load-management system. The R-series features a single pair of gyroscopic modules and one handheld remote controller. The unit is attached to the load and its orientation is controlled using the remote. The R-series can be applied to suspended loads of all sizes and across numerous industries, such as engineering construction, general cargo shipping and resource development, defence and mining. The R-Series was recently utilised on a high-risk project in Queensland. A condenser unit required removal and replacement in the roof cavity of a hotel complex on a prominent and busy intersection in the Brisbane CBD. The removal and installation works had to be executed at a height of 90m, with precise manoeuvring of the load into a narrow access point, and within a strict timeframe to minimise traffic disruption. The R-Series was the ideal solution to address the risks associated with this lift, overcoming the problematic need for human held taglines to control free-swinging or suspended loads. At approximately 90m from ground, controlling the rotation of the load would have been extremely difficult using

traditional rigging methodologies. With the user-friendly interface of the R-Series on a tablet, the loads were able to be lifted from and delivered to precise GPS coordinates. The R-Series significantly improved lift outcomes through:

Increased safety on site: prevented workers from being under loads and leaning out of the open space 90m in the air.

Addressed risks in site conditions: eliminated building damage and closed less roads by eliminating the required perimeter for tag lines.

Verton Founder and Chief Technology Officer Stanley Thomson said the R-series would also increase productivity and profitability of businesses operating or relying on cranes and hoists for orientating heavy loads. The R-series will reduce hook time (the time each load needs to be suspended in the air) by 50% or more and the overall cycle time by 25%, the biggest improvement in productivity since the crane was invented. This was demonstrated on the condenser unit removal and replacement project, saving around an hour on the day due to shorter cycle times. This further improved the safety performance of the project, reducing time on site for the lift team and eliminating risks associated with fatigue and prolonged intense concentration. The R-Series is an exciting application of remotely operated crane technologies and will achieve safer and more productive work places for the crane industry. You can see the R-series in action at www.vimeo.com/274602115.

For more information contact Stan Thomson 0427 690 243 or visit www.verton.com.au. For media enquiries contact Esna Louwrens (Verton Marketing and Business Development Manager) on 0406 586 160.

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

9


Incident Report

May, 2018

Auckland, New Zealand slightly loose and the vibration caused the wheel nuts to come off completely. The root cause of the incident was found to be the lack of a documented process relating to torqueing of wheel nuts and retorquing of wheel nuts post-100km. Auckland Cranes has a tyre contractor visit site almost daily to carry out retorquing on the entire fleet, but this particular trailer missed retorquing as it arrived and left the Auckland yard again before the contractor arrived on site. Several lessons learned were identified and remedial actions put in place to ensure the prevention of any future incidents of this nature:

In May 2018, Auckland Cranes experienced a near miss when the wheel nuts of two tyres on a trailer became loose while on route to site. This caused the two front left wheels to become displaced from the trailer, rolling into an embankment on the highway shoulder. The trailer’s axle consequently dragged along the motorway for an unknown duration. This caused damage to both the trailer hub and brakes but thankfully did not result in an injury or fatality. The driver reported that while travelling to site he initially noticed a vibration in the truck, then later noticed sparks coming from the trailer. His initial suspicion was the sparks were being caused by a tie-down chain dragging on the road. As he was travelling on a motorway, he could not identify a safe position to pull over. When he was able to exit the motorway, upon inspection, he identified two wheels had been lost from the trailer and that the sparks were actually being caused by the trailer dragging along the motorway. He was unable to identify at what point the wheels had dislodged from the trailer during the journey. After an incident investigation, it was identified the trailer had been recently refurbished including being fully stripped and repainted in the company's Auckland workshop. The trailer brakes and bearings were changed and the rims sanded and repainted. It was reassembled in Auckland and awaiting guards for installation when it was relocated to their Hamilton workshop to have this work completed. It was on route to the first job following the refurbishment that the incident occurred. The trailer had travelled no more than 300km since the wheels were fitted. The wheels had been torqued up following reassembly, but the trailer had failed to be retorqued since then. Due to the newly painted rims, it is possible the paint had compressed allowing the rims to become

10

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018

A mobile tyre fitter was immediately engaged to re-torque all trucks, trailers and cranes in the fleet.

Documents and processes for torquing of wheel nuts and retorqueing post-100km have been developed and implemented.

A line has been added to all service records to carry out the wheel nut torque process with every service.

The branch manager has contacted all other branches to remind them to be vigilant about identifying this issue and encourage the improvement of documentation processes.

In addition, wheel nut plastic indicators were installed on all the Auckland Cranes fleet. Wheel nut plastic indicators can be placed on the wheel nut, with the arrowhead indicators pointing toward each other providing a visual indicator of any movement in the wheel nut. Some trailer owners opt to place wheel nut plastic indicators on all wheel nuts, but it was identified the more efficient option of placing the indicator on just four wheel nuts per wheel would achieve the same safety outcome. Checking of the wheel nut plastic indicator has been integrated into the operator’s daily prestart. There has been an ongoing conversation in the industry around the merit of the wheel nut plastic indicators, with some viewing them as unnecessary due to the unlikeliness of an incident such as this occurring, where the wheels have become completely displaced from the trailer. This is a stern reminder that just because an incident ‘has never occurred before’ or ‘very rarely occurs’, does not mean we should not take the risks seriously and treat them accordingly. 


Incident Report

May, 2018

Army Bay, New Zealand In May 2018, a crew from Smith Cranes’ Auckland branch were undertaking a job at the Army Bay sewer outfall project. Smith Cranes was engaged to dismantle a steel structure at the bottom of a 45m mine shaft. The crane operator had successfully winched two workers down the shaft in a man cage, then had lowered the man cage a second time to deliver tools to the team at the bottom of the shaft. While the workers were dismantling the structure at the bottom of the shaft, the crane operator was engaged to remove a steel beam, which required him to reconfigure the crane by removing some chains. The workers at the bottom of the shaft took less time than the operator anticipated, and they notified him they were ready to be extracted from the shaft. The operator then proceeded to lower the man cage to collect the workers and tools without reinstalling the chains. This meant the man cage stopped 10m short of the shaft flooring, as the winch ran out of line. The operator had run the winch drum to the end, causing the drum to trip and automatically begin ascending back out of the mine shaft. This meant the operator’s controls had effectively reversed, causing him confusion as the up control resulted in the winch descending, and the down control resulted in it ascending. The operator then ascended the man cage to the top of the shaft and proceeded to reinstall the chains to enable the man cage to reach the shaft flooring. He contacted the workshop to discuss the error with the controls, suspecting a breakdown in the machine’s hydraulics. By this time, the workers had been waiting at the bottom of the shaft for well over an hour and were becoming distressed. The operator was also experiencing panic in response to the workers’ distress and confusion in dealing with the reversed controls. He managed to lower the man cage to the shaft flooring, so the workers could board the man cage and ascend out of the shaft. However, the rope started jumping on the drum during the ascent, bunching up on one side so that when the motion of winching stopped, the lays of rope then dropped into a smaller circumference creating the slack in the line and giving a freefall effect. This obviously caused extreme distress to the workers in the man cage. They were ultimately winched up using the emergency davit arm connected to their harnesses. A comprehensive incident investigation was undertaken immediately following the incident, including engagement of a third-party incident investigator. The key findings of the incident revealed a major contributing factor being the failure to carry out comprehensive lift planning prior to commencing the job, including assessment of the shaft depth and the crane’s reach. Furthermore, changes to the site environment and lift sequence resulted in an unanticipated change of crane

The key findings of the incident revealed a major contributing factor being the failure to carry out comprehensive lift planning prior to commencing the job, including assessment of the shaft depth and the crane’s reach. configuration, which, compounded with the stress of the situation, caused the operator to make critical errors of judgement. In the panic caused by the workers feeling they were trapped in a deep shaft, the operator did not step back and Take 5 to thoroughly assess the situation and make a calculated rectification plan. Unfortunately, the operator failed to recognise why the levers went into reverse. No workers were injured in this incident, but critical lessons were learned and shared across the organisation. As a result, several actions were undertaken internally, and lessons learned to ensure there are no reoccurrences of this nature:

The ropes were removed and inspected for damage and replaced where necessary.

The auxiliary hook was removed and wound back to drum and the drum disconnected.

The Rooster and auxiliary anti two-block were removed.

The main hook was removed, and a two-part line installed.

A critical emphasis placed on the importance of comprehensive lift planning.

A reminder of the importance of remaining calm and taking the opportunity to step back and Take 5 when necessary. 

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

11


Incident Report

December, 2017

Gold Coast, Australia In the early hours of 9 December 2017, a Liebherr LTM1350-6.2 experienced an outrigger failure on the Gold Coast in Australia. The crane was being set up to complete a dual lift. During set up, the operator slewed to the front of the crane cab to configure the hook block with the correct reeving required when the rear left outrigger failed. This caused the outrigger to collapse. Directly following the incident, a quarantine area was established around the machine to ensure the safety of all personnel working in the area. Universal Cranes immediately mobilised additional operatives and transport to site to assist with making the crane safe to de-rig. Upon investigation of the site, the initial cause of the collapse was suspected as failure to install the outrigger pin

12

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018

on the left rear outrigger, causing the inner jack box to be incorrectly positioned over the internal shear keys. This caused the outrigger box to collapse with the upper structure of the crane sitting down over the rear left outrigger. The crane was transported back to Universal Cranes’ Brisbane depot where a visual inspection of the crane was carried out by the manufacturer and Universal Cranes’ mechanics. The damaged outrigger box was removed and stripped to enable confirmation of the cause of the incident. This inspection confirmed the conclusion of the onsite assessment that the missing locating pin in the outrigger had allowed the inner box to load the area of the outer box which did not have shear keys available for the required load spread.


A new policy states that outrigger pins must be installed regardless of whether they are structural or not. Stickers have been added to the outrigger beams and in the top cab of this crane to remind the operator.

Furthermore, the factors that contributed to this incident were:

1.

The mat under the left rear outrigger needed to be repositioned as it was not in the correct position.

2.

The pins in the left rear outrigger were not inserted.

3.

The left rear outrigger was not fully extended.

There have been several measures put in place to prevent the reoccurrence of incidents of this nature: • A sensor system was installed onto the outriggers after the incident. This system displays the percentage each outrigger is extended on the computer in the top cab. • The Job Safety Analysis on the docket book has been modified with an additional check box ensuring the crane is set up as per manufacturer specifications, to be completed before work commences. • The commissioning and testing step in an internal SWMS document has been updated to include minimum checks that are specific to this crane and as per the manufacturer’s specifications in the operations manual: ɑɑ The axle suspension is blocked ɑɑ Outrigger beams and support cylinders have been extended according to the load chart

ɑɑ All safety functions to be checked, including operation of anti-two blocks, boom limitations and anemometer

ɑɑ Prior to telescoping/extending boom test all outrigger pads with maximum counterweight load with the boom at the lowest possible angle; do this by slewing the counterweight over all 4 outrigger beams. A new policy states that outrigger pins must be installed regardless of whether they are structural or not. Stickers have been added to the outrigger beams and in the top cab of this crane to remind the operator. 

ɑɑ The outrigger beams are pinned and locked (2 pins per outrigger beam) ɑɑ Outrigger cylinder pads are pinned and secured in the operating position ɑɑ Adequate support underneath outriggers ɑɑ The axles are relieved, which means the tyres do not touch the ground ɑɑ The counterweight is attached and secured according to the data in the load chart ɑɑ The hook block is correctly reeved as shown in the reeving plan ɑɑ The correct function on LMI has been selected

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

13


Incident Report

July, 2018

Melbourne, Australia In late July, there was an incident in Melbourne where a luffing tower crane was damaged during high wind, leaving the boom in an unstable and unsecured position posing a risk to a large number of residences and businesses. There were evacuations and business shutdowns for over 24 hours, but fortunately no injuries or loss of life. It’s important that while WorkSafe conducts their investigation, we as an industry focus on the facts and lessons learned so we can improve on our safety standards and reduce the risk of this or similar incidents happening again. Hence this article is not here to focus on liability and fault, but rather prevention. High wind speed affects crane safety, and there are mechanisms that exist in cranes to deal with high wind speed.

Image: Lynda Eckhart (Twitter)

This graphic explains the effect of high wind speed and the mechanisms that exist in cranes to deal with high wind speed.

14

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018


Image: Lynda Eckhart (Twitter)

For the boom to be blown backwards, the crane needed to be in a position with either the boom too high and/or the machinery deck unable to slew (weathervane). Worksafe will investigate whether:

1.

The crane was improperly parked for out-of-service.

2.

The crane was properly parked but malfunctioned.

3.

The crane was properly parked but there is an inherent design flaw with the particular model of crane.

As an industry collective, we must be two steps ahead of all three scenarios above. This starts firstly with conducting an assessment on the crane installation and the crane itself, to ensure its condition and working order. CraneSafe is one programme widely used and NATA-endorsed. Secondly, operators and riggers need to be adequately licensed, trained and verified to operate the specific machine. This is an ongoing challenge with the current high demand for labour.

Thirdly, faults or issues detected on cranes need to be documented and rectified immediately to ensure all aspects of the crane’s function are working 100%. The owner’s manual is gospel when operating any crane. It needs to be accessible to the operator at all times and should include instructions such as positioning of cranes while out-ofservice. If such instructions are not readily available, they should be obtained, or further engineering advice sought. Correct permits and approvals are required for setting up cranes that slew over private property adjacent to worksites. Sometimes to leave the boom in the correct position stipulated by the manufacturer may conflict with the approved operating area. If this occurs, then manufacturer guidelines should not be deviated from; and further clarification with asset owner/ principal contractor should be sought. Point 3 is rare but not impossible. Generally, manufacturers conduct rigorous validation programmes that factor in all operating conditions. So, if a crane does not perform or respond in the intended way, the operator needs to highlight this and escalate the issue immediately. With no fatalities or injuries from the incident, as an industry, we were fortunate. So, let’s all learn from the incident and pull together and do what we can to ensure we have a safe crane industry today, and in years to come. This article was originally published in CICA - Vic/Tas Branch’s Crane Safety Bulletin #237.

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

15


Working Safely

National Safe Work Month This article was contributed by SAFE WORK AUSTRALIA

Every year throughout October, Australians observe National Safe Work Month, which is a time for workers and employers to commit to building a safe and healthy workplace. Last year in Australia, 191 people died while doing their job and over 106,000 people made a claim for a serious injury. No industry should be unsafe to work in, and no death or injury is acceptable. The theme for this year’s National Safe Work Month campaign – ‘A moment is all it takes’ – calls on all of us to spend a moment each day considering safety in the workplace.

Safe Work Australia CEO Michelle Baxter said that while a safety incident can happen in a moment and in any workplace, a moment’s forethought can prevent harm. “Taking a safety moment can be as simple as spending five minutes every morning talking with your team about the hazards and risks in your workplace, and how to prevent harm." Safe Work Australia has published a range of resources on the National Safe Work Month website, including posters and graphics specific to a range of industries. Employers and workers can use these resources to raise awareness of work health and safety in their workplace. “Injury or death in the workplace changes lives forever. This October, take a moment to consider what workplace safety means to you,” Ms Baxter said. At a state level, there are many events being staged that employers and employees can attend together including conferences, breakfast forums and masterclasses. Some of these are ticketed events, so please check with your relevant state government department and register early if you’re interested.

“Taking a safety moment can be as simple as spending five minutes every morning talking with your team about the hazards and risks in your workplace, and how to prevent harm.”

16

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018


in the h t a e es or d ges liv Injury n a h c lace workp r foreve

Take a safety moment in your workplace this October Share what workplace safety means to you


Working Safely

New Slew Safe - Turning the Corner on Pick and Carry Crane Safety

After extensive testing, TRT have retrofitted the first Slew Safe to an existing TIDD crane for Universal Cranes. Slew Safe is an innovative development for pick and carry cranes and does exactly as the name says. It allows the operator of the TIDD crane to keep loads within the chart. This minimises the risk of overloads and the risk of an accident or something more serious. Since the inception of articulating pick and carry cranes, there hasn’t been anything to stop the operator from picking up a load safely over the front on firm level ground and then driving around a corner with a slope, inadvertently moving into the “red zone” (i.e. outside 100% load chart). Articulation combined with side slope dramatically affects stability and can sometimes cause a unit to tip over. This is a serious issue for the construction industry and results in several rollovers annually. The overwhelming call from industry has been a demand to improve operator safety with this class of crane. Many construction site management organisations are restricting the access of pick and carry cranes, and in some cases removing them from site, because of the serious nature of the risk posed by load instability when operating on slopes. Albert Smith, managing director at Universal Cranes, agrees. “This is a long overdue and welcome safety feature we will be fitting to the rest of our TIDD fleet”. Slew Safe delivers confidence for drivers, dogmen, crane owners and site owners, with improved safety, better risk management and duty of care. “Finally, operators of pick and carry cranes can operate with the same relative safety as slew cranes, whether they be on outriggers or crawlers. This is a massive step forward in safety and has been embraced by our

18

LIFTING MATTERS

SEPTEMBER 2018

customers,” Phil Chadwick, General Manager, Crane Sales at TRT. Slew Safe simply and effectively allows the TIDD crane operator to pick and carry a load knowing they will be warned and their steering restricted if they get into a situation that triggers an overload. “The feedback from the operators is only positive and that gives us real peace of mind that this is a step in the right direction,” says Craig Welch, Maintenance Manager at Universal Cranes. It works very simply and is displayed clearly on the crane ECU in the cab. When the crane is operating in the green and amber areas of the lifting chart, Slew Safe will remain inactive. Slew Safe will activate when the crane in operation moves outside of the lifting chart and moves from green and amber to red. A warning is sounded at 90% of the lift chart to enable the operator to make the required adjustments to remain within the chart and avoid the risk of load swing. At 100% Slew Safe is activated. There is a constant alarm inside and outside the cabin to warn the operator and dogman of overload and there is an audible change in the engine output. It will reduce steering to 15%, enough to park the crane safely, but not enough to continue working off the chart. “As with every other innovative safety feature developed, TRT has consulted with industry and developed a solution that truly makes the TIDD pick and carry crane the safest on the market,” says Robert Carden, TRT’s Engineering Director. TIDD PC25 is the only pick and carry crane system with this level of safety. Other features of the system include:

Auto side slope and articulation de-rating via Robway LMI eliminating the need for calculations by the operator on the job.

ROPS Cabin with FOPS option including full lap and diagonal seat belts, to ensure operator and dogman safety.

• •

Speed variable electrohydraulic steering and speed limiting to prevent “speed wobbles” at top operation speed. ABS brakes replacing the conventional drum brakes for safer road ability.

For more information on Slew Safe or how the TIDD 25t Crane will work for your operation call TRT on 07 3890 8800 or visit www.trtaustralia.com.au


Health & Wellbeing

How will you show your support of Mental Health Week 2018? This article was contributed by WORK SAFE QUEENSLAND

While building a mentally healthy workplace makes good business sense, controlling psychological health and safety risks is also a legislative requirement. A new toolkit developed by Workplace Health and Safety Queensland is helping Queensland businesses take positive steps towards creating mentally healthy workplaces. Download the toolkit and show your support for Mental Health Week (6-14 October) by promoting mental health and wellbeing and help reduce the stigma associated with mental illness. The toolkit aims to help employers, managers and leaders eliminate and minimise risks to psychological health and provides a comprehensive approach to creating and maintaining a mentally healthy workplace. It targets key areas such as systems, policies, processes, culture and leadership. When someone suffers from a physical condition, like a broken leg, most managers know exactly what to do and what to say. However, with distress or psychological injury, managers and workers aren’t sure about how to broach the subject (let alone talk about it) or what action needs to be taken. There are simple steps you can take to start a conversation with someone in the workplace. This includes getting organised beforehand – are you ready to listen and give your time if needed? Be prepared, open-minded and understanding, and pick the right moment – where and when you will approach them? You can start a conversation by asking ‘R U OK?’ It also helps to listen without judgement, encourage action, and check in. Containing a range of practical tools, checklists, activities, videos and case studies, the interactive toolkit can be downloaded from worksafe.qld.gov.au/mentally-healthy-workplaces.

A mentally healthy workplace is one that:

• • • • •

Promotes workplace practices that support positive mental health. Eliminates and minimises psychological health and safety risks through the identification and assessment of psychosocial hazards. Builds the knowledge, skills and capabilities of workers to be resilient and thrive at work. Is free of stigma and discrimination. Supports the recovery of workers returning after a physical or psychological injury.

Looking for other ways to show your support for Mental Health Week? Visit www.worksafe. qld.gov.au/mentally-healthy-workplaces/ qld-mental-health-week-2018 for event details.

SEPTEMBER 2018

LIFTING MATTERS

19


Any questions? Want to support? Contact us! liftingmatters@writestrategy.com.au www.liftingmatters.com.au

Disclaimer – This newsletter is not an exhaustive list of all safety matters that need to be considered. Whilst care is taken in the preparation of this material, Lifting Matters does not guarantee the accuracy and completeness of this information and how it applies to your situation. Lifting Matters will not be responsible for any loss, damage or costs incurred as a result of errors or omissions in relation to the material in our publication or for any possible actions ensuing from information contained in our publication. Any views or opinions represented in this publication are personal and belong solely to the author and do not represent those of people, institutions or organisations that the publisher may or may not be associated with in a professional or personal capacity unless explicitly stated.

Profile for writestrategy

Lifting Matters September 2018 Issue  

Lifting Matters September 2018 Issue  

Advertisement