Issuu on Google+

Academic Resources Center Wowerasf

2 0 1 2

MASH Training Manual Learn

Prepare

Collaborate

Worcester Polytechnic Institute

~ 2 0 1 3 Evaluate Academic Resources Center Daniels Hall, First Floor 508-831-5381


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

2

Table of Contents Welcome Letter……………………………………………………………………………………………………3 Contact Information……………………………………………………………………………………………..5 Job Description……………………….……………………………………………………………………………6 The Role of a MASH Leader………………………………………………………………………………….7 The Tutoring Cycle………………………………………………………………………………………………..9 Beginning a MASH Session…………………………….……………………………………………………10 Managing a MASH Session………….………………………………………………………………………12 Ending a MASH Session……….……………………………………………………………………………..12 MASH Do’s & Don’ts………….……………………………………………………………………………….13 Active Listening & Verbal Communication………………………………………………………….14 Learning Styles…………………………………………………………………………………………………..15 Diversity……………………………………………………………………………………………………………..15 Time Management……………………………………………………………………………………………..16 Policies & Procedures…………………………………………………………………………………………17 FERPA…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………18 References………………………………………………………………………………………………………….19


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

3

To the fall 2012 MASH Team Thank you for your interest in our MASH program, and congratulations on being selected to the fall 2012 MASH team! After sorting through applications, interviewing, and reading over your recommendations, you have not only proven to us your interest in the world of academic tutoring, but have shown us your ability to become a great leader. With the combination of our unique personalities, strong work ethics, and interests in academia, we make up an invaluable team. Together we have the ability to help students become independent learners, assist in the understanding of course material, and provide stronger academic skills. Every day we are making a difference to the students who meet with us, and THAT is why we believe so strongly in the work we do here in the Academic Resources Center. Each of us has different expectations coming into this experience, and I look forward to helping you find excitement, fulfillment, and a sense of purpose in your role as a tutor. I want to create a cohesive group that relies on each other— the best way to learn is from each other, and by sharing our experiences with one another. Please feel free to ask us any questions, or talk with me about any concerns you may have along the way. I am SO excited to have you here as part of the MASH team. Cheers to a great year! -Kim


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

4

You Make a Difference!

Once upon a time there was a wise man that used to go to the ocean to do his writing. He had a habit of walking on the beach before he began his work. One day he was walking along the shore. As he looked down the beach, he saw a human figure moving like a dancer. He smiled to himself to think of someone who would dance the day away. He began to walk faster to catch up, and as he got closer, he saw that this was a young man, and the young man wasn’t dancing; he was reaching down to the shore, picking up something and very gently throwing it into the ocean. As he got closer he called out, “Good morning! What are you doing?” The young man paused, looked up and replied, “Throwing starfish in the ocean.” “I guess I should have said why are you throwing starfish in the ocean?” “The sun is up and the tide is going out. If I don’t throw them in they’ll die.” “But, young man, don’t you realize that there are miles and miles of beach and starfish all along. You can’t possibly make a difference!” The young man listened politely. He bent down, picked up another starfish and threw it into the ocean, past the breaking waves and said, “It made a difference for that one.”


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

5

Contact Information The Office of Academic Advising 508-831-5381 Academic-advising@wpi.edu Office Hours: Monday – Friday, 8:00 am - 4:30 pm Staff: Paul Reilly Director of Academic Advising

preilly@wpi.edu

Connie Aramento

cpeppes@wpi.edu

Associate Director of Academic Advising

Aleshia Carlsen-Bryan

acarlsen@wpi.edu

Assistant Director or Academic Advising & Pre-Professional Programs

Lindsey Weber Advisor for Academic Support & Technology

lweber@wpi.edu

Kim Yeomans Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources (Office in the Academic Resources Center)

kyeomans@wpi.edu

Teresa Geddis

tgeddis@wpi.edu

Administrative Assistant

Academic Resources Center 508-831-5381 arc@wpi.edu Hours: Monday – Thursday: 8:00 am – 10:00 pm Friday: 8:00 am – 4:30 pm Sunday: 3:00 am - 10:00 pm


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

6

JOB DESCRIPTION Title: MASH Leader Basic Function & Responsibility: To provide academic assistance to students enrolled in selected courses by offering regularly scheduled out-of-class study sessions throughout the term. Duties: 

      

Attends training sessions prior to the beginning of the term, as well as any scheduled continuous trainings and conferences/meetings with the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources Ascertain course requirements and maintain contact throughout the term with the course professor or designated representative Refers students to the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources for additional assistance with study skills as deemed appropriate Attends two classes per week, takes notes, and reads all assigned course materials including text(s) and supplementary readings Schedules and conducts three 50 minute sessions per week throughout the term Collects attendance data for every study session, including student names, course title, date, and time of session and enters into TutorTrac Maintains regular working hours and notifies Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources in advance if session cannot be conducted as scheduled Accepts feedback from Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources, and participates in program/personal evaluations

Qualities:     

Keep a positive attitude, always remain friendly and willing to help Create a comfortable learning environment, free of distractions Foster independent learners Be knowledgeable and patient Remain up-to-date with material, and involve activities surrounding various learning styles

Minimum Qualifications:   

Overall good academic performance; with exceptional performance in selected course(s) Content-competency (to be determined by the department) Effective communication and interpersonal skills (to be determined by the supervisor)


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

7

The Role of a MASH Leader The goal of tutoring is to empower students to become independent learners. This way, students will gain self-confidence through their successes, and they will be able to apply the learning skills they have been taught to their other courses. A tutor’s role is to help students discover the answers by guiding them through the learning process. In tutoring sessions, students learn how to critically analyze problems and develop their own solutions, rather than being told the answers. At the beginning of your relationship with the student, it is important to begin helping them to become independent learners. In order to do this, it is crucial that you facilitate your sessions structurally and effectively based on the student’s needs, ask probing questions rather than just answering all of their questions, be a model student, and listen to their concerns, but not counsel their problems. Examples of these situations can be found below. Facilitating a Structural and Effective MASH Session It is important for you to come to each session with some sort of an agenda of what you will be doing with the student that day, even if you don’t anticipate any students attending the session By creating a session plan of how you will regularly facilitate sessions, students will know how to accurately prepare, and will feel more comfortable in the learning environment. Asking Probing Questions – NOT Always Providing Answers Students come to MASH to get their questions answered…but who says they can’t answer their own questions?! Your job as a tutor is to get them to become independent learners, and to guide them through the problems you’re reviewing by asking them questions to get them to the answers they are looking for. If a student asks you, “Is this math formula correct?” or “Is this equation balanced correctly?” you should prompt yourself to respond to them by saying, “Can you explain to me the process you went through when trying to balance this equation?” or “What was the formula you went over in class?” Not only does this give the student extra practice, but it helps them answer their own questions. Being a Model Student Being a model student goes beyond just being successful academically and receiving high grades. Being a model student encompasses many areas of academic success, including having strong time management skills, successful test-taking and note-taking skills, being organized, and being aware of how you act around others in class. Remember that you will see your tutees around campus, and may even have classes with them outside of the ARC, so it is important that you model behavior that you teach. Being a Good Listener – but NOT a Counselor

1

*Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

8

Sometimes students may get upset or angry during your sessions and may begin to share information about their personal life outside of classes, or their academic life at WPI. While you may certainly provide a listening ear, it is important for you to not become involved in their life in any way outside of tutoring. Do NOT engage in inappropriate conversations about their personal life, or academic life while in tutoring, and do your best to maintain an appropriate and mature relationship outside of the ARC. If they being to discuss matters with you that make you feel uncomfortable, please speak personally with, or refer the student to, the Advisor for Academic Support and Learning Resources as soon as possible. Every MASH Leader Has a Right To:          

Learn effective tutoring techniques: learning strategies, communication skill, and ways to reinforce learning Be treated with respect by the tutee and tutoring staff and to appreciate differences of ethnicity, race, gender, and age Be treated as a tutor, not as an instructor, professor, or teaching assistant Expect the tutee to come prepared to work and to focus on the subject matter during the tutoring session: dismiss the tutee for being habitually unprepared Be comfortable telling the tutee, “I don’t know.” Confer with a professor regarding coursework and/or expectations Refer problems to the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources and be informed of the results Refuse to do a tutee’s work, but always encourage the tutee to become an independent learner Expect the Academic Resources Center to maintain appropriate rules to promote effective tutoring, such as scheduling, cancellations, space, noise, and conduct Ask the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources for feedback regarding sessions


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

9

THE TUTORING CYCLE

2

Greeting & Establishing a Positive Climate Closing & Goodbye

Identification of Tasks

Arranging & Planning Next Session

Set an Agenda for the Session

Tutor Summery: Acknowledging Work Done & Referral if Necessary

Breaking the Task into Smaller Parts

Tutee Summary of Content & Underlying Processes

*

Adapted from SWTJC Student Support Services Tutor Manual

Addressing the Task & Summarizing often during the session


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

10

BEGINNING A MASH SESSION

3

The First Meeting: As a MASH leader, it is important for you to establish a trusting relationship with your students, as well as to provide them with a comfortable learning environment. To create this atmosphere, it is crucial for you to ask questions to get to know your tutees in their first session in order for them to feel comfortable around you, and confident that they are in a judgment-free zone. Below is a sample “script” you can use during your first session to get to know one another: Getting to know you questions:       

How has your day been? Did you do anything fun this past weekend/have any plans for this upcoming weekend? What year are you? What’s your major? Where are you from? Do you live on campus? Where? Are you involved in any activities on campus? If so, what? What are your hobbies/what do you do for fun?

Class related questions:       

Who is your professor for this course? How has the class been going so far? What’s working for you in the class and what could be better (i.e. teaching style, use of examples, PowerPoint/other visuals, testing, grading structure, etc.)? What do you find the most difficult part of this course? Are there specific aspects of the course that you are concerned about? Are there specific areas/topics of the course that we should focus our sessions on? Would it be possible for me to make a copy of the syllabus so that I can see where the class is right now, and what assignments will be due throughout the semester so I can best help you? We should map out a plan to help you meet those deadlines/get ready for your exam.

Tutoring Logistics/Communication questions:   

Where do you usually study? What is your long-term goal for this course? When do you think would be a good time to meet on a consistent basis? In thinking about when you are at your most/least energetic, when do you think would be a good time to meet?

*Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012 Regularly Scheduled Meetings:

11

4

At the beginning of the session it is incredibly important to assess the student’s learning, and find out a better sense of what the students know, what they don’t know, and what material they may be unclear about. It is also important to recognize the student’s preparation level in order to help them recognize ways to better prepare for class. By completing an assessment at the beginning of each session, you will be able to gather this information and effectively prep for following sessions. Creative ways to assess student’s learning: 

Ask questions! Ask the students what material is giving them difficulties – the more specific your questions are, the more help you will be able to provide the student. Ask students what they did to prepare for your session, what problems they may have missed on their last homework assignment, last quiz or test, and how long it takes them on average to complete homework assignments. Give students a quiz. By providing students sample problems, or asking them to summarize the content they are current learning, you will be able to gain a better sense of the material they have mastered, as well as the material they need further help with. Provide focus questions. Giving students pre-written questions that you have prepared will help them draw attention to the topics that you are expecting to cover during your session, as well as questions that you should be addressing based on their knowledge of the content. Doing this will allow students to gain a better sense of the material they should possibly be paying more attention to in class.

Example questions you can ask when asking students about their preparation techniques:     

How well have you been concentrating on your reading thus far? Do you often get distracted while reading material for this course? If so, how do you get your focus back to the reading? What are you doing to help yourself understand and remember the information you gain while reading for this course? What do you expect to come next in the chapter you are currently learning? How much do you concentrate on the class lecture? Do you get distracted? If so, how do you gain your attention back?

*Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

12

MANAGING A MASH SESSION

5

Checking in with the student periodically throughout the session is an effective way to ensure the student understands the material, and that you are making progress towards the student’s independent learning. This assessment is typically and most effectively done when you are moving in between topics, or procedures within the material. Creative ways to check in with the student:       

Have the student repeat their learning to you by teaching you the equation, or reciting the process aloud Have the student complete another, similar problem independently, or teach another student in the room Provide additional examples Paraphrase or summarize the information into their own words Draw conclusions, based on the information that was reviewed, independently Provide the student with a problem or procedure that includes errors, and have the students point them out Give the student a practice test

ENDING A MASH SESSION At the conclusion of your session, it is important to review the information that was addressed to ensure the student has a good grasp on the knowledge, and to make note of information that should be reviewed again at the next session. To do this, it is crucial that you assess the student’s knowledge of the material. Creative ways to review at the end of a session:     

Have the student complete sample tests Have the student summarize key information Have the student create test questions for each other Have the student apply the concept Have the student complete a procedure independently

Be sure to remind the student of any other scheduled tutoring sessions, or to let them know when you are available for additional sessions. **Make sure you enter attendance into TutorTrac within 12 hours of your session *Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

13

MASH Do’s & Don’ts Do be considerate of time and make the student comfortable upon entering the session. Don’t allow a student to wait for a long period of time before being addressed by a tutor. Do ask the student what the assignment is. Don’t tell the student how to do the assignment. Do allow the student to ask questions throughout the session, allowing you to become an active listener. Don’t cut off all communication with the student and take the role of “expert.” Do ask open-ended. Don’t tell the student what the correction should be. Do give positive reinforcement to the student. Don’t simply hear the student’s faults and mistakes. Do thank the student and encourage him/her to return to the Academic Resources Center after the session. Don’t simply let the student walk away from the session. Do establish and maintain rapport with students. Don’t act like you are disinterested in students and attempt to assist them with an attitude.

Do keep your concentration on the student(s) you are working with. Don’t criticize instructors or other students.

Do try to help all students to the best of your ability. Don’t discriminate based on personal preference.

Do have fun and learn while you are a tutor in the Academic Resources Center! Don’t look at this chance as simply another “job.” It can be much more exciting if you allow it to be!


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

14

ACTIVE LISTENING & VERBAL COMMUNICATION

6

Active Listening:       

Review notes from a previous session Have supplies ready to use in order to take notes and facilitate discussion Position yourself to see and hear the tutee Pay close attention, and be mindful to details Be aware of verbal and nonverbal cues (both yours and the tutees) Participate in both asking and answering questions Follow up with questions to ensure understanding

Verbal Communication:       

Provide a purpose, overview, or ending point : start by providing students with the bigger picture of what you’ll be discussing, and then work on breaking it down. Be precise: Give exact direction. Ex. “Flip to page 46 in your book.” Procede one step at a time: Check for understanding. Have them explain what they are going to do next, and be prepared to repeat information you may have already discussed. Seek feedback from the student: Ask them to tell you specifically what information doesn’t make sense or is unclear to them. Encourage give-and- take between tutor and student: Create an atmosphere where students are not afraid to ask questions, and try new ways to find a solution. Be patient: Remember that just because you understand it, doesn’t mean that they will be right away. Express your limits: It’s okay to not always know the answers – it is not okay to give out wrong information. Always direct them to their instructor if you do not know the information.

*Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

15

DIVERSITY

7

Diversity comes in many forms- culture, race, sexual orientation, religion, ethnicity, nationality, age, gender, physical and learning disabilities, etc. Learning styles can also be very diverse in terms of skill level, experiences, personal values, and goals. As a peer educator who will come in contact will a very diverse, and consistently changing, group of students, it is important for you to build a comfortable and accepting atmosphere, while still recognizing student’s individuality. Ultimately you want to create a cohesive learning environment, which includes all types of students. If you are in a situation where the environment becomes uncomfortable, or potentially harmful, it is important for you to respond and react in an appropriate behavior in order to maintain your integrity as a student leader, as well as to keep the positive reputation of the tutoring program. Should there be any additional concerns, please contact the Advisor for Academic Support and Learning Resources as soon as possible.

LEARNING STYLES Students learn in a variety of ways, which makes it incredibly important to incorporate many different types of activities and ways to facilitate discussion in your tutoring sessions. While students may identify more closely with one of the following learning styles, it is crucial for you to include activities and parts of your discussion that allow the students to speak aloud, write, and manipulate the problem to ensure that the student is learning and retaining the information. Visual Learners:  

Favor mind maps, flowcharts, graphs, and other visual materials Tend to use color and design when learning

Auditory Learners:  

Repetition of information, discussion, debate, talking aloud to themselves, reciting rhymes/pneumonic devices (PEMDAS – Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally) Use tapes, MP3 players, and other recorded material

Kinesthetic Learners:   

Favor experiential learning, hands-on tasks, lap work, field trips, role playing, dramatizing, and demonstration of subject matter Prefer media such as videos, podcasts, and computer simulations. Use case studies, examples, and personal analogies

Perhaps giving your students a Learning Styles Inventory at your initial meeting would be beneficial in your collaboration. These are available in the ARC. *Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

16

TIME MANAGEMENT

8

As a peer educator you will often run into students who have poor time management skills, which is hindering their academic performance. They may be missing assignments, producing sloppy work, rushing through homework because they have procrastinated too long, and ultimately are left feeling stressed due to their lack of organization. While you may feel as if you know how to effectively manage your time, it is important for you to recognize the added time commitment of being a tutor, and the scheduling and preparation involved with this responsibility. Be sure to take the time to educate both yourself and your students on time management. Ways to organize your time:    

To-Do Lists – Make one every day to ensure you are completing everything that you need to. Be sure to prioritize and cross items off as completed. Weekly Block Schedules- Fill in classes, lab hours, work, and any other commitments to give yourself a visual look at your scheduled time for the week. Semester Calendars- Keep track of deadlines for all courses throughout the semester to give yourself a “big picture.” Using a planner (electronic or paper) – Prioritize and include academic, personal, and social responsibilities.

All of these resources are available, to both you and your tutees, in the ARC. Please ask the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources if you, or your students, need any additional guidance.

*Adapted from Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

17

POLICIES & PROCEDURES General Procedure: You are expected to be in the ARC for the entire duration of your MASH shift; and should always be working on materials related to tutoring or other academic resources. You are expected to attend all training and meetings, unless excused by the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources. All tutoring materials are to remain in the Academic Resources Center, or are to be signed out with the desk assistant and returned within 24 hours. MASH leaders are not permitted, under any circumstance, to lend materials to students to take out of the ARC. Please be sure to clean the dry-erase boards, push in the chairs, and return any materials prior to leaving the center.

Record Keeping: All MASH leaders are required to enter session attendance into TutorTrac within 12 hours of their session. Not recording attendance may result in receiving a written warning, at the discretion of the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources.

Time Keeping/Getting Paid: It is the MASH leader’s responsibility to keep track of time spent tutoring and/or in training. While this does require the integrity of the individual MASH leader, the hours will need to be approved by the Academic Advising Office. All hours will be submitted on Banner, and it is the tutor’s responsibility to keep up with the submission of these hours.

Getting paid! MASH leaders who have not already done so, will submit the Payroll Authorization form, Federal & State Tax forms, and the I-9 form, all of which are available at Human Resources, located in Boynton Hall. MASH leaders will need to bring a picture ID, and information regarding the checking accounts you want the checks deposited to, as well as a blank check (all employees of WPI are required to have direct deposit). If you have not previously held a paid position on campus, your first paycheck will be available in the Human Resources Office, and after that they will be deposited into your account. All future checks are deposited on the Thursday of the bi-weekly pay schedule. If you have questions regarding time keeping or getting paid, please call the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources at 508-831-5381.


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

18

Dress Code: Tutors are expected to dress in an appropriate and professional manner. Inappropriate clothing would consist of “short shorts,” spaghetti straps, baggy clothes, clothing displaying offensive language, slippers, etc., unless otherwise permitted. Personal hygiene and dress should not distract students from the learning process.

Attendance: All MASH leaders are required to read and sign an Attendance Policy at the beginning of each semester, and will be provided with a copy of their policy. Any questions or concerns should be directed to the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources.

Plagiarism:

9

Plagiarism as defined by The New American Webster Dictionary is, “the offering of another’s artistic or literary work, ideas, research etc. as one’s own.” Plagiarism is wrong and has serious consequences for those who neglect to follow the laws set to define plagiarism. Tutors should not be involved with plagiarism at any time either with a student or personally. Should the incident occur with student-tutor plagiarism involvement, the Advisor for Academic Support & Learning Resources should be notified as soon as possible (A. Morehead, 514).

Personal Conduct: MASH leaders should avoid loud conversations and/or other activities while in the office, as well as talking on their cell phones, as it may be distracting to other students. Please do not use obscene or offensive language, dress inappropriately or sit on the tables while in the Academic Resources Center. MASH leaders are not permitted to have visitors during their scheduled work hours.

FERPA/CONFIDENTIALITY As an employee of the Academic Advising Office/Academic Resources Center, you may have access to confidential information such as grades, student records, tests results, student progress in class, and similar data. You may also have verbal or written communication with professors, which should be kept confidential. To accept employment is to accept the responsibility to preserve the confidentiality of this information. Failure to adhere to these guidelines may result in termination of employment. All signed copies of the Employee Confidentiality Statement will stay on record in the Academic Resources Center. Should you ever have any questions or concerns, do not hesitate to ask the Advisor for Academic Support and Learning Resources.

*

Adapted from SWTJC Student Support Services Tutor Manual


WPI MASH Manual – Fall 2012

19

REFERENCES Lipsky, S. (2010). A training guide for college tutors and peer educators. Indiana: Prentice Hall. New American Webster Dictionary, The. Ed. Albert Morehead and Loy Morehead. New York: Penguin Group, 1995. 514. Student Support Services Tutor Manual. Southwest Texas Junior College, 2011.


MASH Training Manual